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Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley in the Great War - The Wartime Memories Project -

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Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley



If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.





Those known to have worked or been treated at

Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley

during the Great War 1914-1918.

  • Adams Frederick. Pte. (d.10th Nov 1917)
  • Allsop Norman John. Pte.
  • Applebee Joseph Harold Alfred. Pte.
  • Archibald Hixon. Cpl.
  • Atkinson John. Sgt.
  • Atkinson John. Field Sgt.
  • Atkinson Samuel. Pte.
  • Bailey Cecile. V.A.D.
  • Baynes William Henry. 2nd Lt. (d.12th October 1918)
  • Bunting James Thomas. Able Seaman.
  • Caldwell William. Sgt.
  • Carpenter Sidney. Rflmn. (d.1st October 1917)
  • Clarke Tom. Pte. (d.19th Mar 1915)
  • Davies Alexander Rees. Pte. (d.25th Feb 1917)
  • Davies William George. QMS.
  • Ellis Charles. Pte
  • Evenden Ernest. Pte. (d.1st Sep 1916)
  • Foggerty . Sister
  • Hitchings . Pte.
  • Holmes William Henry. Pte. (d.1st Mar 1915)
  • House Robert Henry. L/Cpl.
  • Hudson . Sjt Mjr
  • Lawton James. WO2. (d.19th July 1916)
  • Martin . Capt.
  • Mayrick Thomas. Pte. (d.28th Sep 1916)
  • McMahon John. Pte. (d.2nd Sep 1916)
  • Owen Wilfred. (d.4th Nov 1918)
  • Phillips George A.. Dvr. (d.10th Oct 1914)
  • Qualtrough Henry James. Pte.
  • Read Stanford. Mjr.
  • Revely Joseph. L/Cpl. (d.6th Nov 1914)
  • Smyth Paul.
  • White James Alban Charles. L/Cpl.

All names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List



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Sep 2017

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Did you know? We also have a section on World War Two. and a Timecapsule to preserve stories from other conflicts for future generations.




Want to know more about Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley?


There are: articles tagged Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley available in our Library

What additional information is available on Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley?







233660

2nd Lt. William Henry Baynes 1st Btn. Queens Royal West Surrey Rgt. (d.12th October 1918)

William Henry Baynes is my great uncle. He lost his mother when he was only 11 years old and was one of six children. His father Henry went on to look after the children who had not left home, one of whom was my grandad. I found William while reserching my family history. Although my mother knew of him and told me the family did not want him to sign up, he did and was in France by October 1914.

William is mentioned twice in the WW1 war diaries of the Queen's Royal (West Surrey) Regiment. He was a bomber trying to take enemy trenches at Lump Lane (Somme). These trenches were in places nearly knee deep in mud and water from the heavy rain of the previous evening and the going was very heavy. This was not a successful attack and William and four men became isolated in a shell hole having run out of bombs or grenades, but luckily they were covered by a small party sent to help and made a withdrawal. He was later wounded at Menin and sent to the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, Southampton where he died on the 12th October 1918.

He received the 1914 star and British War Medal and Victory Medal. William is named on the Great War Memorial outside Canterbury Cathedral.

Heather Gittings




232294

Sgt. William Caldwell 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

William Caldwell was evacuated to the Victoria Hospital, Netley on the 11th of July 1916

Lynne




231277

L/Cpl. James Alban Charles "Jimmy" White 15th (2nd Portsmouth Pals) Btn. Hampshire Regiment

James White enlisted in the 15th (2nd Portsmouth Pals) Btn, Hampshire Regiment at Winchester on 9th Feb 1915. After training the Bn moved to France on 2nd May 1916 as part of 122nd Brigade in 41st Division and moved to the La Creche area where they started instruction in the trenches in parties of about 100 with other units on the 10th May. The Bn continued to operate in the area between Hazebrouck and Bailleul until Sep 1916 when it moved to the Somme area.

On 15th Sep 1916 the Battalion took part in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, which was the first attack using tanks. A major advance (in WW1 terms) was achieved and the village of Flers was captured by 122nd Brigade with the support of the tanks. However casualties were high, mainly due to the German artillery barrage, but also to three machine guns on the Battalions left. 8 officers and 31 men were killed, 5 officers and 188 men wounded and 60 men were missing.

James White was one of those wounded, and left some notes and a map of the action. It shows he reached the 3rd German line at the edge of the village, where he says the line was consolidated, and he may have gone further on with a party under Lt Smith. His map shows he was wounded in the second German line, but does not indicate if this was on the way forward or later. However the Battalion War Diary records that the German barrage was very heavy and many messengers were killed or wounded trying to get messages to or from Battalion HQ to the men in Flers. It may be that James White was one of these. He suffered severe wounds to his legs from a shell.

He records that he manged to get to a Field Ambulance in a sunken road running from Longueval to Flers and was then evacuated back. He spent a long time in Whitchurch Military Hospital (Cardiff), Netley Hospital and the Royal South Hants Hospital and was discharged as unfit for military service on 22nd Nov 1917.

James Alban Charles White died in 1926, ten years after he was wounded, from septicemia caused by his wounds.

James White in 1917 in Hospital Blues

James White with his daughter in approximately 1924

Alan Evans




230981

L/Cpl. Robert Henry House 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Robert House was born in August 1894 in the Curragh Amy Camp, County Kildare in Ireland. His father was Robert Charles House, a sergeant based at the camp in the Army Service Corps.

Robert enlisted with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers on the 2nd of July 1914. He married his sweetheart, Sarah Jane McCord, at the Pro Cathedral in Dublin on the 7th of December 1914. He landed in France as part of the British Expedition Force on the 3rd of January 1915. On the 29th Lance Corporal Robert Henry House while on active service at St.Yves in Belgium was wounded. He received gun shot wounds to his chest, upper left arm and his two feet. The wounds to his feet fractured his first, second and third metatarsals bones. While at General Hospital Boulogne he is diagnosed with rheumatism and bronchitis. He was transferred to H.S. Carrisbrook Castle on the 10th of February and sent back to England arriving at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley. At the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Depot, Robert Henry House is discharged from the British Army deemed No Longer Physically Fit for War Service on the 6th of August 1915.

This brave young 19 year old man's army career was short, only lasting 13 months. He was unlucky to be badly wounded but very lucky to survive them. He went on to have a large family, marrying twice and lived in Dublin, Ireland until 1971. Robert Henry House late of 63 Kildare road, Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland died at St. Jame`s Hospital Dublin. Having survived his serious War Wounds in January 1915, it was Cancer of the Stomach and Lungs which was the cause of his Death. This man was a True Hero to his generation.

John




229253

WO2. James Lawton Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (d.19th July 1916)

My Grandfather James Lawton was born in Marylebone Middlesex in 1880 son of Joseph Lawton and husband of Annie Lawton (Nye) of 2 Weiss Passage,Ossington Street Euston Road London. Between 29th December 1896 and 28th December 1908 he served with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, service no.5049 Prior to enlisting he had been working as a bottle washer, he was 18 years old. James was posted into the 2nd battalion, then to the 1st on the 8th June 1901. He was promoted to Corporal for an act of gallant conduct in the field ( I have no other information). On 18th September 1902 he was posted back to the 2nd battalion between Dec. 1902 & June 1904 he was acting Lance Serjeant. At the time of his discharge, after 12 years service in 1908 he was rank Corporal For his time in South Africa he was fighting the Boers,on the Orange Free State, Cape Colony 1901 to 1902 clasps.

He re-enlisted at Fulham in on the 5th of September 1914 he was 34 he entered as a private but was promoted to Corporal, then on the 11th March to Warrent officer. On the 31st July 1915 he sailed to France with the 10th Battalion N.L.R, he was wounded on the 29th of June 1916 by a gunshot to right leg he was evacuated to the Royal Victoria (Netley) Hospital on the 4th July 1916 but succumbed to his wound on the 19th July 1916. He is remembered in Paddington Cemetery screen Wall 3W.9814 age 39. May we remember.

Mary Lawton




222955

Rflmn. Sidney Carpenter 1st Btn Rifle Brigade (d.1st October 1917)

My Uncle Syd Carpenter became employed in the Y M C A and met many of the trainee soldiers. Sid was only aged 17 but lied about his age and enlisted into the 3rd/8th Battalion Post Office Rifles. His contracted trench foot and was sent to Netley Hospital for treatment. He was sent home for a short leave back to his home at Fovant and my mother Dorothy told me Sid was a changed man , he was terrified of going back to the front. He went back and was assigned to the Rifle Brigade who were fighting at Passcendaele. On a day of no great action Sid died of shell fire, he is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Donald Ekless




220057

QMS. William George Davies Army Service Corps

My great grandfather, William George Davies, was born in Shoreditch, East London in 1882. His father was a baker and had a shop at 509 Seven Sisters Road, Tottenham where William worked as a baker alongside his father and brother. He married my great grandmother in 1910 and they were running a bakers in Green Street, Bethnal Green in 1911. On 8th April 1915 he joined the army, leaving his wife in Bethnal Green with their 3 small daughters aged between 4 years and 5 months old. By the time of his death he would also have 2 sons born in 1918 and 1920, the youngest just 5 months old when he died.

He joined the Army Service Corps at Aldershot and by June 1915 they were in France. His discharge records say he was of very good character but on 8 November 1916 he was reprimanded for being drunk in town without a pass. In May 1917 he was transferred to the Labour Corps where he was a Quarter Master Sergeant but by August 1918 he was already being treated for shell shock and was formerly discharged as being unfit for service on 11 Sept 1918 ('melancholia due to AS'). He was sent to the Belfast War Hospital which was a specialist mental health unit set up in 1917. Across the top of his discharge papers is written by hand 'Mental case'. He was discharged with a new suit, £1 and his Silver Badge.

At some point after August 1918 he arrived at the Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley where his treatment for shell shock continued. He died there on 27 June 1920. My grandmother, Florence Ada Davies, told me a story that he died from blood poisoning after being bitten by a goat - my dad and I used to laugh at this, dismissing it as another of her funny stories. His service records show that his wife gave his cause of death as 'blood poisoning' and also mentioned Army Farms 2067 and 2079 so perhaps there was some truth in it after all....

William George Davies is buried in the Netley Military Cemetery. He was 39 years old when he died and was survived by his wife Annie; daughters Edith, Mary and Florence; sons Billy and Bert. He is remembered by his grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Claire




216472

Pte. John McMahon Royal Munster Fusiliers (d.2nd Sep 1916)

John McMahon enlisted in Clydebank in the Connaught Rangers and later served with the Royal Munster Fusiliers. He died from wounds age 20 on the 2nd September 1916 and is buried in Netley Cemetery. His medal card records the award of the 1915 Star, War and Victory Medals. John was born in Jarrow in 1896, son of James and Frances McMahon nee Burke of 48 John Knox Street, Clydebank, Glasgow.

Vin Mullen




215450

L/Cpl. Joseph Revely 2nd Btn. Durham Light Infantry (d.6th Nov 1914)

Joseph Revely enlisted at Jarrow and served in the 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He died on the 6th November 1914 and is remembered at Monkton Memorial, he is buried in Netley Military Cemetery. Netley Military Cemetery is in Hampshire on the site of the old Military Hospital so he must have died there. His medal card records the award of the 1914 Star, War and Victory medals and noted that he died presumably from wounds or illness.

Joseph born in Jarrow 1894 son of Edmund Revely and the late Elizabeth Revely nee Skime). In the 1911 census the family lived at 17 Frederick Street, Jarrow with Edmund (69) widower, a joiner in the shipyard, his sons, Henry(33) single, a general labourer, William E(23)single, crane driver in steel works and Edmund, age 13, at school. There are two younger daughters, Margaret (10) and Linda (7).

Vin Mullen




214278

Field Sgt. John Atkinson 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

With the outbreak of the First World War John Atkinson enlisted on the 10th August 1914 in the 3rd Training Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Army Number 22546) and the Northern Echo of 1st March 1916 shows him as a Lance-Corp. serving with the 3rd’s in France. On 14th October 1916 he is recorded as a Sergeant suffering from shell shock and on 26th March 1917 he had been wounded and was in a base hospital in France. He retained the scar of the wound in his right forearm and the remnant of the bullet in his shoulder.

He never talked much about his experiences on the Somme in W.W.1 other than to relate the time when he was in the ambulance from the front to field hospital. Alongside him was a Prussian Guard who, seeing the marksman badge on Dad’s sleeve (he was a sniper), Dad relates,”he would have killed him if he could”. He was wounded at St. Eloi, near Ypres, and our former home at Aycliffe, near Darlington, bears that name to this day.

However, whilst searching the 1943 edition of the Darlington & Stockton Times the following article of 10th September 1943 emerged:

Great War Comrades Meet at Durham.

The swearing in of Mr. Roland Jennings, M.P., of Whitburn, Sunderland, as a county magistrate at Durham Quarter Sessions on Wednesday was followed by an informal reunion with one of his Great War comrades in arms.

On the bench was Mr. John Atkinson, of Great Aycliffe, who during the Great War was a platoon sergeant in the 20th Batt. Durham Light Infantry. Recognising his former officer, Mr. Atkinson left the court and had a happy chat with Mr. Jennings. In particular they recalled an episode at St. Eloi in 1917 when Sergt. Atkinson was wounded while attacking with a Lewis gun a German machine-gun nest at a 40 yards range in no man’s land. Mr. Jennings, then a second-lieutenant, came to the rescue, helped Sergt. Atkinson back to the British lines and dressed his wound.

Mr. Jennings, chartered accountant, was M.P. for Sedgefield from 1931 to 1935 and has been M.P. for the Hallam Division of Sheffield since 1939. Mr. Atkinson is Aycliffe representative on the Darlington Rural Council and, as a J.P., sits on the Spennymoor and Darlington County Benches.

(Postscripts) – the 20th (Service) Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Wearside), the “Faithful Durhams”, after training at Barnard Castle were at Aldershot on 7th January 1916 (Northern Echo). They were the only North-country battalion in the 41st Division with a high proportion of miners and it became well known for its digging abilities. They moved to France in May 1916 based around Armentieres (my father talked about the place as a place they relaxed in).

From John Sheen’s book emerges a detailed record of the Battalion and its movements as follows:

The 20th Battalion DLI was part of the 123rd Brigade along with the 11th Queens, 10th Royal West Kent, and 23rd Middlesex. The Brigade was part of the 41st Division, which in turn was part of the 15th Corps.

  • 1/5/1916 Moved to embarkation positions.
  • 4/5/1916 Entrained Farnborough and embarked SS Arundal at Southampton
  • 5/5/1916 Gare des Marchandises – Godewaerswelde (Belgium).Probably John joined the Battalion here??
  • 10/5/1916 Ypres Salient – frontline for instruction in trench warfare.
  • 28/5/1916 Le Bizet/Armentieres.
  • 29/5/1916 22 officers & 696 men into the front line.
  • 23/8/1916 Bailleul to Somme Front (Longpre les Corps Sants) then marched to Yaucourt Bussus.
  • 7/9/1916 Train Longpre to Mericourt then camp near Becorel outside Albert.
  • 12 – 13/9/1916 Into line with the 11th Queens.
  • 14/9/1916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt then back to the Battle at Flers (with tanks). 123rd Brigade in reserve behind 122nd Brigade (no fighting but with casualties from shelling – possible source of John’s shell shock reported in the press on 14/10 1916)
  • 17/9/1916 Moved to the Montauban line then Bercondal for attacktraining.
  • 27/9/1916 Much reconnaiscence into No Man’s Land.
  • 1/101916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt.
  • 3/10/1916 Camp at Memetz Wood – resting.
  • 7/10/1916 800 yards behind Flers.
  • 17/10/1916 Left Somme and entrained at Dernancourt to Oismont (via Amiens). Arrived 18/10/1916.. Battalion strength 1068. From 23/8 to 17/10/1916 casualties 98 dead, 200+ wounded.
  • 20/10/1916 Train from Pont Remy to Godeswaersvelde (Dickebusch Sector)
  • 22/10/1916 Renningshelst.
  • 3/11/1916 Back to trenches – skirmishes.
  • 12/11/1916 Ontario Camp (Dickebusch)
  • 18/11/1916 SNOW – COLD. Fighting dimishes but still casulaties. Battalion strength 29 officers and 828 men.
  • 23/11/1916 Ontario Camp.
  • December 1916 In and out of the line.
  • Christmas Day Trench mortar activity.
  • 29/12/1916 Ontario Camp (Ypres Salient)
  • New Year’s Day 1917. Some had baths – practicing – operating Lewis Guns. Strength 19 officers (-10) and 463 (-365) men.
  • 3/1/1917 In the line – very wet.
  • 8/1/1916 New officers joined the Battalion, including R. Jennings.
  • 17/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • 21/1/1917 SNOW – back to Ontario Camp.
  • 28/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • Early February 1917. Clearing trenches – back and forward to Ontario Camp.
  • 17/2/1917 Routine fighting – in and out through February into March. Battalion football competition – church in Reninghelst.
  • 5/3/1917 Took over from East Surrey’s.. Snow and mist. Things described as quiet – in and out the line.
  • 18/3/1917. Skirmishes and shelling – likely time when John was wounded (Northern Echo report on 26/3/1917.
  • 24/3/1917 Battalion out of the line and on ‘stand-by’.

John used to talk about the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley in Hampshire - an existing pre-war military hospital as the place he received on-going treatment for his wounds prior to him moving to Croydon for a time before ultimately finishing up at Woodside Hospital Darlington where he was Orderly Sergeant. He was finally honourably discharged on 13th December 1917.

Postscript by Lewis Atkinson, John’s son: My son and I are currently tracing family records and we came across the following article by my father dated 11th November 1929 in a Darlington newspaper. He served and was wounded twice in the First World War.

“Once again the Empire today does homage to that vast, immortal army who died that we might live. Again it is vividly brought home to us by the sight of Flanders poppies, religious and other national memorial services, of the terrific sacrifices made by the British Empire during that tragic conflict.

Again, we ex-Servicemen think of those with whom we marched along the roads to the familiar strains of ‘Tipperary’, ‘Who’s your lady friend?’ and the like who are no more. We recall the training, the embarkation, our baptism of fire, the walking wounded wending their way back to the dressing stations, followed by screaming murderous shells; the stretcher cases, the lines of men outside the casualty stations, the on-coming troops, guns, transport, ever moving forward; Ypres, Armentieres, Vimy Ridge, Albert, the mud, aerial torpedoes, whizz-bangs, and Heaven knows what else. And I often ask myself, ‘Was it worthwhile?’ I say most emphatically, never again must the British Empire be plunged into such a catastrophe! Never again. They died that we might live”

Lewis Atkinson




213720

Sgt. John Atkinson 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

With the outbreak of the First World War John Atkinson enlisted on the 10th August 1914 in the 3rd Training Battalion, Durham Light Infantry (Army Number 22546). The Northern Echo of 1st March 1916 shows him as a Lance-Corp. serving with the 3rd’s in France. On 14th October 1916 he is recorded as a Sergeant, suffering from shell shock and on 26th March 1917 he had been wounded and was in a base hospital in France. He retained the scar of the wound in his right forearm and the remnant of the bullet in his shoulder.

He never talked much about his experiences on the Somme, other than to relate the time when he was in the ambulance from the front to field hospital. Alongside him was a Prussian Guard who, seeing the marksman badge on Dad’s sleeve (he was a sniper), Dad related he would have killed him if he could. He was wounded at St. Eloi, near Ypres, and our former home at Aycliffe bears that name to this day.

Whilst searching the 1943 edition of the Darlington & Stockton Times the following article of 10th September 1943 emerged:

Great War Comrades Meet at Durham.

The swearing in of Mr. Roland Jennings, M.P., of Whitburn, Sunderland, as a county magistrate at Durham Quarter Sessions on Wednesday was followed by an informal reunion with one of his Great War comrades in arms.

On the bench was Mr. John Atkinson, of Great Aycliffe, who during the Great War was a platoon sergeant in the 20th Batt. Durham Light Infantry. Recognising his former officer, Mr. Atkinson left the court and had a happy chat with Mr. Jennings. In particular they recalled an episode at St. Eloi in 1917 when Sergt. Atkinson was wounded while attacking with a Lewis gun a German machine-gun nest at a 40 yards range in no man’s land. Mr. Jennings, then a second-lieutenant, came to the rescue, helped Sergt. Atkinson back to the British lines and dressed his wound. Mr. Jennings, chartered accountant, was M.P. for Sedgefield from 1931 to 1935 and has been M.P. for the Hallam Division of Sheffield since 1939. Mr. Atkinson is Aycliffe representative on the Darlington Rural Council and, as a J.P., sits on the Spennymoor and Darlington County Benches.

Postscript- the 20th (Service) Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Wearside), the "Faithful Durhams", after training at Barnard Castle were at Aldershot on 7th January 1916 (Northern Echo). They were the only North-country battalion in the 41st Division with a high proportion of miners and it became well known for its digging abilities. They moved to France in May 1916 based around Armentieres (my father talked about the place as a place they relaxed in).

From John Sheen’s book emerges a detailed record of the Battalion and its movements as follows: The 20th Battalion DLI was part of the 123rd Brigade along with the 11th Queens, 10th Royal West Kent, and 23rd Middlesex. The Brigade was part of the 41st Division, which in turn was part of the 15th Corps.

  • 1/5/1916 Moved to embarkation positions.
  • 4/5/1916 Entrained Farnborough and embarked SS Arundal at Southampton.
  • 5/5/1916 Gare des Marchandises – Godewaerswelde (Belgium). Probably John joined the Battalion here??
  • 10/5/1916 Ypres Salient – frontline for instruction in trench warfare.
  • 28/5/1916 Le Bizet/Armentieres.
  • 29/5/1916 22 officers & 696 men into the front line.
  • 23/8/1916 Bailleul to Somme Front (Longpre les Corps Sants) then marched to Yaucourt Bussus.
  • 7/9/1916 Train Longpre to Mericourt then camp near Becorel outside Albert.
  • 12 – 13/9/1916 Into line with the 11th Queens.
  • 14/9/1916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt then back to the battle at Flers (with tanks). 123rd Brigade in reserve behind 122nd Brigade (no fighting but with casualties from shelling – possible source of John's shell shock reported in the press on 14/10 1916)
  • 17/9/1916 Moved to the Montauban line then Bercondal for attack training.
  • 27/9/1916 Much reconnaiscence into No Man’s Land.
  • 1/101916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt.
  • 3/10/1916 Camp at Memetz Wood – resting.
  • 7.10/1916 800 yards behind Flers.
  • 17/10/1916 Left Somme and entrained at Dernancourt to Oismont (via Amiens). Arrived 18/19/1916. Battalion strength 1068. From 23/8 to 17/10/1916 casualties 98 dead, 200+ wounded.
  • 20/10/1916 Train from Pont Remy to Godeswaersvelde (Dickebusch Sector)
  • 22/10/1916 Renningshelst.
  • 3/11/1916 Back to trenches – skirmishes.
  • 12/11/1916 Ontario Camp (Dickebusch)
  • 18/11/1916 SNOW – COLD. Fighting dimishes but still casulaties. Battalion strength 29 officers and 828 men.
  • 23/11/1916 Ontario Camp.
  • December 1916 In and out of the line.
  • Christmas Day Trench mortar activity.
  • 29/12/1916 Ontario Camp (Ypres Salient)
  • New Year’s Day 1917. Some had baths – practicing – operating Lewis Guns. Strength 19 officers (-10) and 463 (-365) men.
  • 3/1/1917 In the line – very wet.
  • 8/1/1916 New officers joined the Battalion, including R. Jennings.
  • 17/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • 21/1/1917 Snow – back to Ontario Camp.
  • 28/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • Early February 1917. Clearing trenches – back and forward to Ontario Camp.
  • 17/2/1917 Routine fighting – in and out through February into March. Battalion football competition – church in Reninghelst.
  • 5/3/1917 Took over from East Surrey’s.. Snow and mist. Things described as quiet – in and out the line.
  • 18/3/1917. Skirmishes and shelling – likely time when John was wounded (Northern Echo report on 26/3/1917.
  • 24/3/1917 Battalion out of the line and on ‘stand-by’.

      John used to talk about the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley in Hampshire - an existing pre-war military hospital as the place he received on-going treatment for his wounds prior to him moving to Croydon for a time before ultimately finishing up at Woodside Hospital Darlington where he was Orderly Sergeant. He was finally honourably discharged on 13th December 1917.

      Lewis Atkinson




211985

Pte. Samuel Atkinson Lancashire Fusiliers

My Grandfather Samuel Atkinson, Lancashire Fusiliers, enlisted 26th of August 1916. He was wounded on the 14th of Sept 1917 and treated in Royal Victoria Hospital Netley with Gun shot wounds to his right side. Also wounded again 19th April 1918 gun shot wound to his left arm.

Gary Atkinson




207416

Pte. Henry James Qualtrough Royal Army Ordnance Corps

My Father, Henry Qualtrough, served France, Belgium and Dublin between 1917 and 1919. He was invalaided to Netley with Typhoid and also had his foot run over by a gun carriage.

John W. Qualtrough




206860

Pte. Alexander Rees Davies 2nd Battalion The Welch Fusiliers (d.25th Feb 1917)

Alexander Rees Davies was born in Llanychaiarn, Cardiganshire, Wales in 1881. His father was a tailor and he was a plasterer by trade. His first regiment was the Welsh Horse and his service number was 11722. This Regiment then became absorbed in the Welch Regiment, I believe.

His death Certificate shows that he died at the Netley Hospital (the Royal Victoria Hospital) on 25 February 1917, of "multiple G.S. wounds of body and limbs and septicaemia and collapse". He was 36 years old and had been married for just over a year.

He is buried in the Llanychaiarn churchyard. His headstone reads:

In loving Memory

Alex

The beloved husband of Kate Davies of Towyn, Merioneth.

"Duty and honour bid us part 'Til the day breaks and shadows flee away."

Sharon Immelman




142551

Pte Charles Ellis Sherwood Foresters

My Dad, who was born on the 20 September 1899 enlisted when he was 16 years old. He didn't talk much about his time in France and I failed miserably to be interested in what happened, which I very much regret. He always made us eat up out meals as children and told us the story of how luck he was when he had a tin of jam, yes, just a tin of jam - his mate had a tin of golden syrup. Imagine that - a growing boy of 16 and that was your meal! He did mention how scared he was when, one night he was on "Sentry go" and there was an awful banging noise very close to him - he HAD to investigate and it was a rat with its head stuck in a bully beef can. He was badly gassed and spent some time at the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley. After the war he was based an the Cologne Cavalry Barracks where he was friendly with a German family. Being gassed caused enormous abcesses and I remember he could not sit down for three Christmas dinners. He died at the age of 75 and I still miss that very brave man.

Molly Taylor




100150

Pte. Ernest Evenden 9th Btn. The Royal Sussex Rgt. (d.1st Sep 1916)

Ernest died of wounds at the Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley on the 1st of September 1916, aged 19. He was buried in the Military Cemetery in the hospital grounds.





1248

Pte. William Henry Holmes 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers (d.1st Mar 1915)

William Holmes died of wounds whilst he was being treated at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, he was buried at Netley Military Cemetery.

Vin Mullen




1154

Pte. Joseph Harold Alfred Applebee 33rd Btn.

Harold Applebee was a 19 year old Labourer when he enlisted, he was described as being 5'8", having very dark complexion, black hair and brown eyes. He embarked from Australia in May 1916 and after training in England, proceeded to France in January 1917 where he transferred from 33rd Btn to the 9th Machine Gun Company. He saw action at the Battle of Messines and was wounded on the 18th of July, had a short spell in hospital and was again wounded, this time by gassing on the 31st. After a longer spell in hospital he rejoined his unit in September and suffered a 3rd Wound in action on the 2 October, he was invalided back to England with a severe wound which had fractured his skull and treated at the King George Hospital. By mid February 1918 he was fit enough to return to France and rejoined his unit on the front line. He had another spell in hospital in England, this time at the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley in June 1918 suffering from Tonsillitis but again returned to France. He returned to Australia in 1919.





681

Able Seaman. James Thomas Bunting Drake Battlion

This photo was taken at either Netley Hospital or West Cliffe Hotel Hythe, Hants

My father, AB James Thomas Bunting joined the Navy in August 1914. He was assigned to Drake Battalion, Royal Naval Division. They did their training at HMS Victory III. Crystal Palace . The training was brief. The whole division was sent to Antwerp to defend the attempt of the Germans entering Belgium. They were very ill equipped for the task. Many had no greatcoats. Some did not even have rifles. Little hope against the seasoned German Army. There were many losses but my father survived.

In February 1915 The Royal Naval Division left their new headquarters at Blandford Forum bound for Gallipoli in the Dardinelles Conditions were bad and by the end of March the whole division left for Egypt because of illnesses. By the end of April they were back at full strength but on the initial advance Collingwood Battalion was wiped out. July saw the depleted Division retreat to Larnos Island to recouperate. Everyone suffering from Diarrhoea Malaria and fly borne gastric infections. End of July saw them back again but campaign was declared a failure and all troops were withdrawn. Arriving at Marsailles in December 1915.

January 1916 moving up through France. February, The Battle of Verdun. September, The Somme. Then it became the end of the war for dad. He was wounded at Arras near the village of Gavrille. On the 23rd. of April 1917. Shrapnel wound left arm. Entering just behind the left elbow. Leaving an 8 inch cut up the tricep and exiting along the forearm Fracturing the Ulna and taking the end off the humerus. Hospitalised at Wimereux.

Departed on the 26th. of May on the hospital ship “St. Denis” for Victoria hospital Netley, Southampton. After six months in hospital he went on leave in December 1917.

Overdoing his leave by six months he faced a court martial at Perham Down.

“In that at Blandford camp on the 21st. of January 1918 he absented himself. Until surrendering himself to Goole ( his home town) police on the12th. of June 1918. Losing by neglect his equipment and regimental necessities. Sentenced to undergo detention for one year and to be put on stoppage of pay until he has made good the value of the articles valued at £2/6/9

On the 2nd. of August 1918 The Lords Commision of the Admiralty quashed the charge. Returning the good conduct badge which had been confiscated when charged!! What had brought about the turnaround to the serious charges against him? It may have been his contract which he had signed on enlistment 8th. August 1914. Which had clearly stated that, “I undertake and bind myself till the end of the war Or for three years, whichever comes first.

So legally his service had ended whilst he was hospitalised at Netley. Also consider he had served in three fierce campaigns. He was at that time rated as being 50% disabled.It would have being a travesty to have convicted him.

In November 1918 he was declared unfit for service and discharged after 4 years and 82 days. On his discharge he was still rated 50% disabled. But after visiting different hospitals and appeal boards he was finally awarded a final pension assessment of 30% for life on the 25th. of July 1923 The wound, which never healed caused problems all his life Quite often flaring up and needing hot fermentations and poultices. My sister became an expert. When he became fit for work and had regained some of the grip in his hand he went back to his trade as boot repairer. But finally found work on the docks.

Corby Bunting




678

Pte. Thomas Mayrick 14th btn. Royal Warwickshire Regt (d.28th Sep 1916)

Pte Thomas Mayrick died of wounds at Netley on the 28th Sept 1916, he was 22 years old. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church, Bidford-on-Avon.





677

Dvr. George A. Phillips Army Service Corps (d.10th Oct 1914)

George Phillips died at Netley on the 10th October 1914 he was 29 years old.





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