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The Wartime Memories Project - The Great War - Those Who Served

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World War 1 One ww1 wwII greatwar great

Those Who Served






Surname


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205939

Pte. Arthur Abbey

British Army 7th Btn. Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

(d.21st Jul 1917)




208968

Pte. Charles Abbey

British Army 4th Battalion Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment)

from:Ealing, Middlesex

(d.12th Oct 1918)




1477

Pte. Reginald Ernest Abbey

British Army 1st Btn. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:Hertford

(d.15th Nov 1918)




1478

Pte. Albert Fordham Abbott

British Army 1st Btn. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:East End, Bluntisham.

(d.4th Sep 1916)




1479

Pte. Arthur John Abbott

British Army 1st Btn. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:Little Raveley, Huntingdonshire.

(d.28th Aug 1916)




231262

Pte. Broughton Abbott

British Army 1st and 3rd Bt. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Nelson, Lancashire

(d.26th July 1917)

My Great Uncle Broughton Abbott landed at Gallipoli with the 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, he was wounded in the legs and eventually sent back to England for recuperation with the 3rd Battalion.

He later rejoined the 1st Battalion in France/Flanders where he was once again wounded very badly in the legs, after having one leg amputated he finally succumbed to his wounds and died in the hospital in Calais and is buried in the Calais cemetery.




231771

Able Sea. Cecil Charles Henry Abbott

Royal Navy




217872

2nd Lt. Charles Abbott MC.

British Army 1st Btn. Hampshire Regiment

'Cousin Charlie' was actually a first Cousin of my father, Leonard Baker, they were very close, Dad also served in WW1. Cousin Charlie began as a private, Pte. C B M Abbott, 5321 No 1 Company, 2nd Battalion H A. I don't know when he became an officer but I know he received the Military Cross after some appalling carnage in the trenches he was one of some half dozen survivors, a VC and an MC was awarded and the survivors were told to draw lots for who got what. He later moved to South Africa and became an MP in Cape Town for General Smuts party, I have a letter he wrote back home after he had returned to Cape Town just as WW2 began, he tells us he took cine film of the Glorious a day or so before it was sunk and that the Union Castle liner he was on was later torpedoed. He visited us after the war, and retired to Sandwich, Kent where he died around 1969. He had one child, a son Norman who ran a shop in East Anglia, if still alive he would be in his 70s.




235028

Lt. Edward John White Abbott

British Army 4th Btn. attd. 2nd Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

(d.17th May 1915)




1215

L/Sjt. Edwin Abbott

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.21st Feb 1915)




1126

Pte. Francis Arthur Abbott

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Hornseywood, Penrith, New South Wales

(d.31st Aug 1918)




500852

Rfm. Geoffrey Robinson Abbott

British Army 18th Btn. Kings Royal Rifle Corps

from:Southminster, Essex

(d.31st Jul 1917)




100564

Sergeant Gilfred "Gilly" Abbott

British Army 6th Btn. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Shaw, Oldham, Lancashire

My Grandfather Gilfred Abbott served with the 6th Lancashire Fusiliers and we would welcome any information on any known activities during the war. His son Geoffrey Abbott joined the same battalion, the same regiment during World War Two. Any information on either my grandfather or my father would would be appreciated. Hoping for a response




1480

Pte. Harold Campbell Abbott

British Army 1st Btn. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:96 Oak Rd, Luton.

(d.17th Apr 1915)




500837

Spr. Horace Abbott

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




500853

Pte. John Abbott

British Army 8th Btn. Gloucestershire Rgt

(d.7th Jun 1917)




1127

Pte. Norman Abbott

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:6 Stream Street, East Sidney, New South Wales

(d.3rd Aug 1918)

Norman Abbott left Australia in July 1917 and joined the 33rd Battalion in France in March 1918. He was wounded in action twice, in April 1918 he was admitted to 3rd General Hospital at Le Treport, he returned to his unit after treatment and suffered a gun shot wound which fractured a finger on the 25th July 1918. After treatment at the 3rd General Hospital it was decided that he needed further treatment in England. Norman embarked on the hospital ship HMAT Warilda on 2nd August. During the crossing from Le Havre to Southampton the ship was torpedoed by the enemy. Norman was listed as missing believed drowned and is commemorated on the Hollybrook Memorial in Southampton. He left a wife, Ida




221171

Pte. Robert Abbott

British Army 5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:4 Ribbleston Place, Preston, Lancashire

Robert Abbott was born in 1897, and enlisted, at the age of 18yrs, on 11th December 1915. He gave his trade, on enlistment, as a Cotton Spinner. His father's name was Thomas Abbott and the family home was 4, Ribbleston Place, Preston.

He went to France in March 1917 and was wounded, in the forearm, in September 1918 as a result of which, he spent a period of time in Leeds Hospital.




214004

W. Abbott

W. Abbott is commemorated on the Triptych for WW1 (1914-1918) in St. Paul's Church in Jarrow.




1128

Pte. William Charles Abbott

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Narromine, New South Wales




500771

Pte. William Frederick Abbott

British Army 1st/22nd Btn. London Regiment

from:London. England.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500854

Pte. William Townsend Abbott

Australian Imperial Forces 43rd Btn.

from:Moonta, South Australia.

(d.31st Jul 1917)




216595

Dnkymn. David Abby

Mercantile Marine SS Saint Ninian

from:10 O'Brien's Place, Haddington Road, Dublin

(d.7th Feb 1917)

David Abby was the son of William and Elizabeth Abby, of 10 O'Brien's Place, Haddington Road, Dublin. He was one of the fifteen men who were killed when the SS Saint Ninian was sunk by torpedo-fire from the UB-48 off the coast of Whitby. He was 23 years old, and is commemorated at Tower Hill Memorial in London.




235301

L/Cpl. E. Abela

British Army 1st Btn. King's Own Malta Regiment

(d.7th July 1915)

Lance Corporal Abela was buried in the Limassol Roman Catholic Cemetery in Cyprus.




1865

Capt. John Lloyd William Howard Abell

British Army 11th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:Marlborough House, Witcombe, Glos

(d.3rd Jul 1916)




219310

Capt. John LLoyd William Howard Abell

British Army 11th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:Wallasey

(d.3rd Jul 1916)

John Abell was a schoolmaster at Wallasey Grammar School. He and fellow Captain, Thomas Murray were the two form masters of the Second Form. There are staff photographs taken in 1912, which show both of them. In addition the archive for Wallasey Grammar School has form photographs for summer 1912, which show John Abell and Thomas Murray with their respective forms. Both left Wallasey Grammar School in the late summer of 1914 to serve with the 11th Battalion, Cheshire Regiment.




500766

Pte. Maurice Abell

British Army 9th Btn. Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards)

(d.7th Jun 1917)




212628

Pte. Alexander Abercrombie

Australian Imperial Force 4th Machine Gun Battalion

from:Wooler, Northumberland

I have no known details about my Grandfather's WW1 efforts except that he had injuries to his right shoulder and chest, due to gas burns sustained in France. His name was Alexander Abercrombie, he only had two war medals, plus a little medal from his home town of Wooler, Northumberland, so I was told he only joined WW1 in 1916 thereabouts.

His birth date was May 1899. He then emigrated to Western Australia in 1921 and joined the Australian Army in 1939 for WW2, as a trainer to soldiers, mostly on Rottnest Island, Western Australia, till the end of the war. He lived the rest of his life in Western Australia, marrying and having 6 children. He passed away on November 11, 1982.




500838

Spr. George Malcolm Abercrombie MM.

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




217953

Pte. John Henry Abigail

British Army 8th Btn. Norfolk Regiment

from:Norwich, England

(d.12th Sep 1917)

John Henry Abigail served with the Norfolk Regiment 8th Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 12th September 1917, aged 20 and is buried in Esquelbecq Communal Cemetery, Nord, France.

It's a long story, a very sad one. In brief he came from a very poor family, with more than it's share of troubles. John's parents exhibited what I think now would be termed a "chaotic lifestyle" often leaving their children to go without food. His father may well have been an alcoholic, more inclined to spend his hard earned cash; (he was a drayman) on beer in the local pubs and beer houses around Oak Street, than to spend it on his family.

John went to war being called up in March 1916 he left Distillery Square down near the Anchor Brewery. He fought through some fairly hideous experiences in the 8th Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, finding himself in the charnel house that was the Somme including actions at Delville Wood (aka Devil's Wood) where he was wounded.

On return to Britain he went AWOL twice from a camp near Felixstowe, extenuating circumstances, relating to his family, may have led to him not feeling the full impact of the law, but still being given everything from detention, and pay cuts to field punishment, On at least one of these instances his father was imprisoned leaving his younger siblings without any care other than those which the corporation and the early NSPCC could give, so he ran home. The battalion were eventually sent back out, this time to fight at Arras, he deserted again and was found near 'Eat Apples' or Etaple, a training camp, also known as The Bullring, on the coast. He was sent back again this time to Comines. Under the mud, blood and bombardment of Passchedaele he deserted again, this time was the last time, he was found wandering behind the lines.

I think it's reasonable to believe that he was suffering from shellshock/PTSD. This time they didn't let him off. So far as I'm aware he is the only soldier who was shot at dawn who is remembered on his local memorial. Poor lads.




1129

Pte. R. J. C. Abolan

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




500855

Pte. M. Abolin

Australian Imperial Forces 44th Btn.

(d.8th Jun 1917)




213949

L/Sgt. Albert Abraham

British Army 3rd Btn. Coldstream Guards

from:London

Albert Abraham was my maternal Grand Father. I am still trying to fill in some blanks but so far have discovered these facts which really seems to be a sad story. Albert joined the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards in August 1902. He served in Egypt from 1908 - 1911. He then left the army and became a policeman. On 12th August 1914 he was recalled to the B.E.F and sent to Belgium on the 13th August. On the 11th of September 1914 he was shot and wounded then taken prisoner. He was freed 6th September 1918. He never fully recovered from his wounds and died in 1921. Sad to think, he married in 1912 and had a son the following year and my mother was born 9th August 1914, 3 days before he was sent off to war. His son died in 1916 from flu. Albert was not aware that his son had died until he was repatriated. He had never seen his daughter until his return. After all he had endured he was still put on a charge in 1920 for obtaining leave in an unconventional manner(whatever that means).




237152

Sgt. James Henry Abraham

British Army 2nd btn. Dorsetshire Regiment

from:United Kingdom

(d.5th July 1918)

Serjeant Abraham was 29 when he died and is buried in the Purandhar Cemetery in India, Plot D. Grave 33.




1481

Pte. Sidney Abraham

British Army 1st Btn. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:Walham Green, Middlesex.

(d.21st Apr 1915)




500761

Pte. Isidor Abrahams

British Army 10th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle-on-Tyne

(d.9th Jun 1917)




1825

2nd Lt. Robert Abram

British Army 3rd Btn. Border Regiment

from:34 Grasmere St. Carlisle

(d.26th Oct 1917)




1206652

Ord.Sea. Ambrose Abrey

Royal Navy HMS Invincible

from:Lydd, Kent

(d.31st May 1916)

Ambrose Abrey was lost at sea during the Battle of Jutland, he was aged 18, the son of Emma Abrey.




205974

2nd Lt Joseph Acheson

British Army 2nd Btn. South Lancashire Regiment

from:Liverpool

(d.7th Jun 1918)

Gravestone of John and Maria Acheson commmorating also their sons 2Lt Joseph Acheson and William John Acheson.

Gravestone of John and Maria Acheson commmorating also their sons 2Lt Joseph Acheson and William John Acheson.

I can find no war memorial to his man - my Great Great Uncle so I wish him to be remembered here - I hope.

Second Leiutenant (Temporary) Joseph Acheson. Born 09 Nov 1889 in Drumadillar, Co Fermanagh, Ireland. Death 7 Jun 1918 DOW No 34 French Canadian Hospital, Troys, France.

Notes from his Army Service Record...

Former No 202636 or 5700 LSgt, 5th Battalion, Kings Liverpool Regiment, Territorial Force.

Temp Commission 27 Jun 17 2Lt., 8th (Service Battalion), attached 2nd Battalion, Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment). Wounded 29 May 1918. Died 17 Jun 1918.

Attended Derrygonely National School. Character Ref by Rev W B Steel, Levally, Enniskillen. Next of Kin - Mrs J Acheson, 62 Windsor Road, Truebrook, Liverpool. Effects form signed by Mary Evelyn Acheson, 39 Windsor Road, Truebrook, Liverpool.

Letter from James Roberts, Solicitor, 5 Castle Street, Liverpool enquiring if wife and child are entitled to any pension (child = Violet Josephine). Copy of Death certificate stating he died in No34 French Canadian Hospital, Troyes, France.

Letter from Mrs E Acheson requesting a copy of the Death Certificate. A copy of his Will... "I Joseph Acheson of the 6th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment, 2Lt in the event of my death do hereby request that my wife Mary Evelyn shall have all I possess in money or articles etc. And that she draw any allowance which is her due. I also specifically request that she shall under all circumstances be as cheery as possible and fully realise that my death has resulted whilst doing my duty and I die with one last wish that we both meet in a better land." Signed, Joseph Acheson 2Lt on the field 7th Sep 1917. Total of estate £68-08-10p.

Letter from his mother to the War Office requesting information on his death. Letter from his wife also asking for details.

The following is the insertion about his death in the Impartial Reporter (Newspaper) at the time of his death...

2nd Lieutenant Joe Acheson, South Lancashire Regiment, whose house is at 39 Windsor Road Truebrook, Liverpool, died of wounds received in France on 07 Jun 18, was 28 years of age. He was the youngest son of Mrs Acheson, Drumadillar, Enniskillen. He had been wounded by a bullet in the arm and despite all medical attention he succumbed. He was buried with full military honours at Troyes, the French Commandant and his staff attending the ceremony.

The commanding Officer wrote to say that the Battalion had lost a valuable Officer and one that was admired by all, being of a cheerful disposition. He gained popularity wherever he went. The deceased Officer had seen a good deal of service from 1914, this being his third time out to the French front. He took part in several engagements including those of the Somme of July 1916, escaping without even a scratch. He was recommended on the field for a commission and was gazetted to the South Lancashire Regiment and sent to France. He was a keen territorial and originally belonged to the 7th Kings Liverpools before the war. Deceased Officer was in business with his brother, W J Acheson at 35 West Derby Road and 86 Kensington, Liverpool; he was also in the employment of the Tramways Committee for many years. In his last letter to his wife he asked the following request, that a small Union Jack be placed above his photo for the honour of old England. His wife who mourns his loss is the second daughter of Edward Morrison, Kinmore, Lisnaskea.




239510

2nd Lt. H. M. Achilles

British Army 173rd Brigade, C Bty. Royal Field Artillery

Second Lieutenant Archilles was wounded on 28th April 1918.




233654

Pte/Cpl Albert Ackerman

British Army 11th Btn. Manchester Rgt.

from:Manchester

Albert Ackerman, my grandfather, joined the 11th Manchester Regiment in August 1914. He received the Military Medal - Three Blue Chevrons, the Victory Medal, the British Medal and the 15 Star. His specialist military qualifications was the Lewis Gun. He transferred to the Army Reserve on 25th March 1919.




1206390

Sgt. Thomas Owen Ackers

British Army 23rd Btn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers

from:Portmadoc N.Wales

(d.2nd Nov 1918)

Thomas Owen Ackers served with the 23rd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers during WW1. My grandfather was a patient at 1st Eastern General Hospital between 6/11/17 and 28/12/17 when he was discharged on medical grounds. He had been an asthmatic since childhood but didn't let this stop him being an active and dedicated soldier. After discharge he became a photographer and drill teacher at the local grammar school in Portmadoc. Sadly this was a very short career, he died of Spanish 'flu on Nov 2nd 1918.




216596

Pte. Frederick Charles Ackroyd

British Army 23rd Btn Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.27th Sep 1918)

Frederick Charles Ackroyd enlisted at Bradford and was formerly with the West Riding Regiment. He was killed in action in Flanders.

Update: On the Commonwealth War Graves site he is incorrectly listed as P Ackroyd With the same Service No. 61021. He was aged 42 when he died. He is buried at Trois Arbres Cemetery, Steenwerck (Grave Reference: II. Q. 29.). Additional information is given: He was the son of Richard and Mary Ackroyd; husband of Elizabeth Eacret (formerly Ackroyd), of 17, Northbrooke St., Bolton Rd., Bradford, Yorks.

From this we can deduce his estimated birth year to be 1873 and find him on the 1911 census. He was aged 38 and living at 35 Irving St Bolton Rd Bradford Yorkshire. He was a Railway porter. Other family members were Elizabeth Ackroyd (36), Mary Ackroyd (17), Frederick Ackroyd (16), Elizabeth Ackroyd (12) and Albert Ackroyd (8).




218619

Capt. Harold Ackroyd VC, MC.

British Army Att. 6th Btn. Royal Berkshire Regiment Royal Army Medical Corps

(d.11th Aug 1917)

Harold Ackroyd served with the Royal Army Medical Corps and was attached to the 6th Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment during WW1. He was killed in action on the 11th August 1917 and is commemorated on a special memorial (No.7) in Birr Cross Roads Cemetery. He is also buried here.

An extract from The London Gazette, dated 4th September 1917, reads as follows:- For most conspicuous bravery. During recent operations Capt. Ackroyd displayed the greatest gallantry and devotion to duty. Utterly regardless of danger, he worked continuously for many hours up and down and in front of the line tending the wounded and saving the lives of officers and men. In so doing he had to move across the open under heavy machine-gun, rifle and shell fire. He carried a wounded officer to a place of safety under very heavy fire. On another occasion he went some way in front of our advanced line and brought in a wounded man under continuous sniping and machine-gun fire. His heroism was the means of saving many lives, and provided a magnificent example of courage, cheerfulness, and determination to the fighting men in whose midst he was carrying out his splendid work. This gallant officer has since been killed in action.




500788

Pte. Herbert Ackroyd

British Army 23rd Btn. C Coy Middlesex Regt

from:Nottingham

(d.7th Jun 1917)




230861

Pte. Irving Proctor Ackroyd

British Army 16th (1st Bradford Pals) Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Bradford




218254

Pte. Edmund Acornley

British Army 6th Btn. Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment

from:Burnley, England

(d.9th Feb 1917)

Private Edmund Acornley served with the 6th Battalion, Kings Own Lancaster Regiment during WW1 and was killed in action, age 21, on the 9th February 1917. He is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial, Iraq. Edmund was the son of Elijah and Dina Acornley, of 24, Spencer St., Burnley.




222469

Pte. Edmund Acornley

British Army 6th Btn. Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment

from:Burnley

(d.9th February 1917)

Edmund Acornley died on the 9th of February 1917, aged 21 and is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial in Iraq. He was the son of Elijah and Dina Acornley, of 24 Spencer St., Burnley.




214005

Stk. Samson Henry Acres

Royal Navy HMS Murray

from:Hertford

(d.20th Dec 1914)

Samson Henry Acres, Stoker 1st Class 301402, served with HMS Murray, Royal Navy and died age 35 on the 20th December 1914. He is buried in Jarrow Cemetery. Samson was born in Hertford 1879, son of Samson and Sarah Acres (Somerville) of Hertford.




1206164

Pte. Abraham Acton VC

British Army 2nd Btn. B Coy. Border Regiment

from:Whitehaven, Cumberland

(d.16th May 1916)

Abraham Acton was killed in action on the 16th of May 1915, aged 21 and is commemorated on Le Touret Memorial in France. He wasthe son of Robert and Elizabeth Eleanor Acton, of 4 Regent Square, Senhouse St., Whitehaven, Cumberland.




500772

2nd Lt. Gordon William Acworth

British Army 15th Btn London Regiment

from:19, Forest Drive West, Leytonstone, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




232125

Pte Rob Adair

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Sherburn Hill




222891

Pte. Robert Adair

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Sherburn Hill

(d.9th April 1917)




213246

Sgt. William James Creagan Adair

British Army Royal Irish Fusiliers

from:37 Crosby Street, Belfast

My grandfather Sgt. William James Creagan Adair, served with the Royal Irish Fusiliers. I've been looking for information for a number of years, I was hoping somebody might know something.




214267

Fireman James Adam

Mercantile Marine Reserve HMS Viknor

from:Jarrow

(d.13th Jan 1915)

Brass plaque on the Palmer Cenotaph (west face) Jarrow

Brass plaque on the Palmer Cenotaph (west face) Jarrow

James Adam served as a Fireman onboard HMS Viknor with the Mercantile Marine Reserve. He was aged 30 when he died on 13th January 1915. He was the son of Roland A. Adam and Mary Jane Adam of Jarrow and husband of Amy Adam (nee Humfress) of 61 South Street Jarrow. On the 1911 census, James Adam age 26 is recorded as a Ship Platers Helper in Shipyard living with his wife Amy and children at 44 Nixon Street, Jarrow.

James is remembered on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (plaque on west face) Jarrow and on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.

James Adam commemorated on family grave at Jarrow Cemetery

James Adam commemorated on family grave at Jarrow Cemetery




217387

Sgt. Robert William Wyllie Adam

Australian Imperial Force 11th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.26th July 1916)

Robert William Wyllie Adam was born in Perth, Western Australia during 1889. He was educated in England where he attended schools at East Molesey, Surrey and Rugby, Warwickshire.

The Adam family were a distinguished British political family and Robert was related to the famous Admiral Sir Charles Adam. His mother, Jane Emily Adam, was the daughter of George Leake who was twice the premier of Western Australia. Robert returned to Perth at age 18 and worked as a farmer. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 3 February 1915. He was assigned to the 11th Infantry Battalion. Following basic training at Blackboy Hill, he departed Fremantle on 25 April 1915 aboard HMAT Hororata.

Robert served at Gallipoli from June to November 1915, inclusive of a period of illness during July and August. He was transferred to France in April 1916 where he fought in the battle of the Somme and was fatally wounded at Pozières. For his actions at Pozières, Adam was recommended for a Military Medal. Robert Adam died of wounds on 26 July 1916 and is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, France.




225658

Arthur Adams

British Army Army Service Corps

from:Great Yarmouth, Norfolk

Arthur Adams didn't serve overseas during WW1. He served in the UK with the ASC (transport) because he had a club foot and had been kicked in the head by a horse before the war. It is said that he helped to recover the bodies after the Silvertown Explosion in London during WW1.




217388

Drv. Arthur James Adams

Australian Imperial Force

from:Australia

(d.9th Aug 1916)

Arthur James Adams was born in England at Wolverton, Buckinghamshire during 1888. He was educated at the Wolverton County School and the Wolverton Science and Arts Institute. Adams migrated to Australia at age 22 and worked as a carpenter and joiner in Brisbane. His father, a Mr G Adams, still resided in Buckinghamshire at the outbreak of war.

Arthur enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 13 August 1914. He had some prior military experience in the reserve forces, having served for about 3 years in the 1st Bucks Territorials. He initially served as a Driver in the 3rd Field Ambulance, but was later transferred to the rank of Private in the 13th Field Ambulance. Following basic training he boarded HMAT Rangatira, and embarked from Brisbane on 25 October 1914. Adams was seriously wounded on 8th of August 1916 during the battle of Pozières. He died of wounds shortly afterwards on 9th of August 1916. Arthur Adams is buried at Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery, France




224705

Pte. Bertie James Adams

British Army 7th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Kelbrook, Yorkshire

(d.14th Nov 1916)




224604

Pte. Charles George Adams

British Army 2nd Btn. Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

from:West Ham

(d.1st July 1915)

The DCLI records show that Charles Adams joined up at Stratford on the 31st of August 1914, only a few weeks after the outbreak of war. He was just a few days short of his 20th birthday, though the record shows him as being 20 years old.

Charles arrived in France on 30th of April 1915, which was also the day he wrote his will. After arrival in France, he was soon in the trenches near Sanctuary Wood in the Ypres Salient as part of A Coy 2 DCLI. Later the battalion moved to Houplines further South of Ypres.

He was one of three soldiers killed in trench 80 near Houplines on the 1st of July 1915 by a German trench mortar. The other two soldiers killed were Pte Drew and Pte Andrews. The Battalion War Diary describes how the three died even down to the time, it says: "Between 2 & 3 am No. 80 Trench was again bombarded by a trench mortar, 15 bombs were fired 2 of which landed in the trenches killing 3 and wounding 2 men. At 11:30 am enemy working parties were observed in the neighbourhood of LES 4 HALLOTS FARM and further South. They appeared to be employed on making communication trenches behind their first line but work was stopped by our fire. Our snipers accounted for 3 enemy snipers in front of trenches 80 & 81 behind the enemy's second line. In the evening a trench howitzer was brought up to 80 trench to deal with the enemy's trench mortar should it again become active. The artillery were also pointed out the position of the enemy's trench mortar & and were kept in readiness to cooperate with the trench howitzer if required. Casualties 3 other ranks killed and 2 wounded." The War Diary records that the trench mortar had been firing for some days and usually at about the same time.

Pte. Charles George Adams No.11937 2 DCLI, was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was 20 years old at the time of his death and had been on active service for just two months and two days.

Charles's uncle, my grandfather Albert Alexander Adams, also served in 2 DCLI and though he was reported, on 28th of May, as being wounded, we believe he was with Charles on that fateful 1st July. Grandfather survived the War though wounded and gassed. The family say he was a broken man on his return home, he died aged 46 from various lung problems, no doubt caused by the gassing.




208300

Pte. Charles John Adams

British Army 6th Essex Regiment

from:Castle Street, Ongar, Essex




235315

Pte. David Adams

British Army 2nd Btn. Yorkshire Regiment

from:Heselden, Co. Durham

(d.29th Sep 1918)

My great grandfather, David Adams, was the oldest boy of six in a family of nine children. He worked in the local colliery before being called to war, by which time he had married and had two children, a daughter and a son. He never really got to know his children, particularly his son, Joseph, my maternal grandfather, who was born very shortly before David was sent to France and he sadly never returned.

Grandad Joe never forgot his father despite his mother marrying again shortly after the end of the war. As proof of this remembrance he sported a homemade tattoo on his arm with David's death date on a cross. It was not until I was doing the research that I understood the significance of this date as it was not something spoken about in the family. My mother is currently in possession of David's Victory war medal having received it when Grandad died.

David Adams in uniform

David Adams in uniform




207276

Rfm. Dickson Adams

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

(d.7th Sep 1916)




216599

Rfmn. Dickson Adams

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.7th Sep 1916)

Dickson Adams was born and enlisted in Dublin. He served with the 11th Battalion, the Royal Irish Rifles and was killed in action in Flanders on the 7th September 1916.




232126

Cpl. E Adams

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Wallsend




222892

Cpl. E. Adams

British Army 24th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Wallsend

Cpl Adams was wounded in Sept. 1916




1206343

Pte. Edmund Adams

British Army 2nd Btn. King's Own Scottish Borderers

from:Scotland

(d.15th April 1918)

Edmund Adams formerly served with the Territorial Force, Highland Cyclists Btn. he was killed in action 15/04/1918 and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing in Belgium. He was born in Perth, Scotland. Husband to Christina Brown Henderson and father to Edna.




682

Pte. Frederick Adams

Army 59th Divisional Supply Train (MT) Royal Army Service Corps

from:Southsea, Hants.

(d.10th Nov 1917)




213727

L/Cpl. Frederick Adams MM.

British Army 8th Btn. York & Lancaster Regiment

from:Beighton, Derbyshire

(d.30th Sep 1917)

Frederick Adams is one of the thousands remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial (Panel 125 to 128)in Belgium. Sadly, online history for the regiment is pretty skinny - I can't even link to the museum and its records. You just get sent round in circles via the Rotherham Council and National Army Museum sites. I should say that the issue is made more complex because I live in Australia so all my research is conducted online. I've tried the National Archives site, but Frederick's name doesn't appear. He was only 21 when he was killed. I'm hoping that by posting my ancestor's name, I will be able to uncover more about his life and service. I have been unable to find out what he received his Military Medal for, but I presume it was awarded for the events that led to his death. Hopefully, I will be able to track down the war diaries one day to find out what his battalion was up to when he was killed. My passion is driven, of course, by the forthcoming 100th anniversary of the outbreak of WWI. To date, I have managed to track down partial histories on six direct descendants - three who were killed during the war and two (including my own grandfather) who died earlier than expected as a consequence of being gassed. My grandad, James Henry Cropper, lost two brothers-in-law in the space of eight days when the Battle of the Somme began on July 1, 1916.

Editor's Note: From the date of Frederick's death, 30th September 1917, it is likely he was killed in action in the early stages of the Third Battle of Ypres possibly at Menin Road or Polygon Wood.




220007

Pte. Frederick Guildford Adams

British Army 2nd Btn. D Coy . Royal Sussex

from:8 Providence Row, Hastings

(d.13th Oct 1915)

Frederick Adams served with D Coy, 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment He was my dad's oldest brother. He was killed before my father was born. He was killed at Loos on Wednesday 13th October 1915 when he was just 18 years of age. He was the son of Frederick and Milly Kate Adams of 8 Providence Row, Bourne Walk, Hastings.

In 1996 I took dad across to France to visit Frederick's grave, it was a very moving experience. We were the first of the family to get to see where Frederick was buried. He is buried in Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos.




1130

L/Cpl. George Adams

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Gleniffer, Ballina, NSW.

George Adams was a farm hand from Richmond, Ballina, he enlisted at the RAS Grounds in Sydney on the 30th March 1916 at the age of 21. He sailed for England in September 1916 and proceeded to France in February 1917. George was wounded in action on the 11th June 1917 at the Battle of Messines, with an injury to his back due to a gun shot, he was treated by 12th and then 9th Field Ambulance and returned to duty on the 21st of June.

George was wounded for a second time on the 31st August 1918, this time a shrapnel injury to his head, he was treated by 9th Field Ambulance and transferred through 53rd CCA at 10th General Hospital then moved to England on the 3rd September. He was admitted to the Baptist School Hospital in Yeovil with a severe flesh wound to his scalp. George remained in various Hospitals in England through out the remainder of the war and returned to Australia in December 1918 onboard the Nestor.




1131

Pte. George Charles Thomas Adams

Australian Imperial Forces B Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Bioara, NSW




216597

Chief Mate. George Edward Adams

Mercantile Marine SS Rhenass

from:Dublin

(d.22nd May 1916)

George Edward Adams was born at Glasthule, Co. Dublin. He was the son of George Hamilton Adams and Catherine Adams and husband of Helen Caroline Adams George (aged 56) was killed when his ship SS Rhenass struck a mine. His name is recorded at Tower Hill Memorial.




1206277

L/Sgt. Herbert Adams MM & Bar.

British Army 1st Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Fulham, Middlesex

Herbert Adams served with the 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment during WW1.




223614

Pte. Herbert John Adams

Britisj Army 1st/7th Btn. London Regiment

from:152 New Church Rd. Camberwell

(d.2nd December 1917)




232127

Pte. J. Adams

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




500856

Pte. James Adams

Australian Imperial Forces 41st Btn.

from:Peak Downs, Cleremont, Queensland.

(d.3rd Jul 1917)




231393

Sgt. James George Adams DCM

Army 78th Field Coy Royal Engineers

(d.29th Mar 1918)




216598

Mate. John Adams

Mercantile Marine SS Kangaroo

from:Skerries, Dublin

(d.18th Jun 1917)

John Adams was born at Skerries, Co. Dublin. He was the husband of Mrs. I. Adams, of Little Strand St., Skerries, Co. Dublin. John, aged 68, was drowned as a result of enemy action and is remembered at Tower Hill Memorial, London.




217389

Lt. John Adams MC MID.

Australian Imperial Force 54th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

John Adams was born at Combe Florey, Somerset, England, on 26th September 1890. Prior to the First World War he emigrated to Australia and worked as a valet.

He had served with the Royal Navy for two-and-a-half years before he he enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force on 18th August 1914, a month before his 24th birthday. It was around this time that he also started documenting his experiences in his diary, a practice that he would continue until mid-1916. After two months of training he departed Sydney with the 2nd Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Suffolk on 18th October 1914.

The 2nd Battalion were part of the second and third waves sent ashore at Gallipoli on 25th April 1915. He writes extensively about the landing in his diary, particularly about the confusion that pervaded the initial stages and his attempts to find members of his battalion during the subsequent days. Although Adams remained with his unit until the evacuation in December 1915, he was wounded on several occasions. During the battle of Lone Pine in August the glass of the periscope he was looking through was shattered and his eyesight was damaged. In September 1915 he was knocked unconscious by a loop-hole plate sent flying by shell-fire.

After being transferred to the newly formed 54th Infantry Battalion in February 1916, Adams served during its first major engagement on the Western Front, the disastrous battle of Fromelles. He was promoted to lieutenant on 2nd August 1916, having risen quickly through the non-commissioned ranks. In April 1917 he was Mentioned in the Despatches of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, Commander of the British Expeditionary Force, for his work as an intelligence officer with 14th Brigade headquarters and also for his actions at Fromelles. This was followed by the receipt of the Military Cross in June 1918 for his work as an intelligence officer during the winter campaign on the Somme and his subsequent conduct in Belgium during 1917 on return to his battalion. It was reported that his "fearlessness, gallantry and devotion to duty" left a good impression on those with whom he came into contact. Adams was later awarded a bar to his Military Cross for "conspicuous gallantry and brilliant leadership during the operations at Peronne" in 1918, where he was wounded while rushing a machine-gun post.

After the war he left for Australia on 6th May 1919, though he would briefly return to England to be married. John Adams died at the age of 90 at Concord, New South Wales, on 21st June 1981.




500767

Lance Sjt. John Albert Adams

British Army 9th Btn. Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards)

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500759

Pte. John Edward Adams

British Army 11th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Camblesforth, Selby, Yorkshire.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




840

Chief Engine Room Artific Leonard Adams

Royal Navy HMS K4

(d.31st Jan 1918)




500770

Pte. Leonard Adams

British Army 11th Btn. Sherwood Foresters

(d.7th Jun 1917)




231461

L/Sgt. Percy Harold Adams

British Army 19th Battalion Royal Welch Fusliers

from:Hanley, Staffordshire

Percy Adams served with the 9th and 19th Battalions, Royal Welch Fusiliers and as a Platelayer with the 298th Railway Construction Company, Royal Engineers




216600

Pte. Peter Adams

British Army 1st Btn. Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.8th April 1915)

Peter Adams was born and enlisted in Dublin. He served with the 1st Battalion the Prince of Wales Leinster Regiment. Peter was killed in action in Flanders on the 8th April 1915.




500839

Spr. Philip James Adams

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




500713

Gnr. R. Adams

British Army 103rd Bde. C Bty Royal Field Artillery

from:Gateshead

(d.4th Jun 1917)




216601

Pte. Richard Adams

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.16th Jan 1915)

Richard Adams was born in Dublin and enlisted there. He died of wounds at Flanders.

Update: Richard is buried in the London Rifle Brigade Cemetery, Belgium




207058

Pte. Richard Winstanley Adams

Australian Imperial Force. 34th Btn.

from:Gunnedah, NSW, Australia

(d.7th Jun 1917)




216602

Pte. Robert Adams

British Army 14th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.17th Apr 1918)

Private Robert Adams was born and enlisted in Dublin. Before fighting with the Northumberland Fusiliers he was a member of the Army Ordnance Corps. The 14th Battalion landed in France in September 1915. Private Adams died of wounds in Flanders three years later and is buried in Belgium at the Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery. He is also commemorated on the brass plaque war memorial inside Christ Church, Leeson Park, Dublin.




231213

Pte. Robert Henry Adams

Royal Irish Fusiliers 9th Btn.

from:Bachelors Walk, Keady, Co. Armagh, Ireland




213489

Lt. Samuel Allen Adams

Royal Navy HMS Indefatigable

from:England

(d.31st May 1916)

Samuel Adams was Killed in Action in the Battle of Jutland




213134

Therese Suzanne Adams

British Army Forage Corps

My mother, Therese (Terry) Suzanne Adams, was a member of the Forage Corps which was a military organisation under the direction of the Army Service Corps. It existed to provide the forage needed by the horses behind the Western Front. My mother served with this from 1916 until the Corps was disbanded in 1920. At its greatest it numbered some 6000 members. The records of the Corps do not seem to exist nowadays. Enquiries some years ago of the National Archive, The Royal Logistics Corps, the Army Museum and the Imperial War Museum disclosed very little.




206193

Pte Thomas Adams

British Army 36th (Ulster) Division

from:66 Killowen Street, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry.

Thomas Adams, his wife Charlotte and only son, Thomas

Thomas Adams, his wife Charlotte and only son, Thomas

It was only recently, while doing some family tree projects,that I discovered my grandfather, Thomas Adams (Snr)had actually fought in the first Great War. He joined the 36th (Ulster) Division before I was born,(I was born on 9 June 1950), and after it was all over, it was never talked about. ..

He served with distinction at Dadizeele, receiving a Certificate and Medals. Unfortunately, a number of years ago, the medals were stolen, and never replaced. The Certificate only survived, along with a photo of him and his wife and young son (my father).

He was born on 29 June 1880. He married Charlotte Turner, from Ballyness, Somerset, Coleraine, County Londonderry at Camus Juxta Bann, St. Marys Church in the village of Macosquin on 26 Dec 1911.

After the Conflict he was demobbed and their Division was disbanded. (I only today found out, while reading your brilliant site that he could have been attached to any one of the 3 Irish Regiments, here in Ulster - but which one, I haven't been able to find out yet).

Upon returning to Ireland he became a labourer and worked as a docker at Coleraine Harbour, on the banks of the River Bann, which at that time had dozens of ships per week coming in. This dock area now, sadly, is a large supermarket and carpark.

He sadly died on 23 Nov 1973, aged 93 years. A good innings.. I think this website is a remarkable idea, to keep the memory alive of those who gave up so much, so that we could have our tomorrow. Good luck for the future.




234710

Pte. Walter H Adams

Royal Navy Royal Marine Light Infantry

from:Yeovil

(d.5th June 1916)

The parents of Private Walter Adams received a post card to say he had survived the Battle of Jutland on board HMS Hampshire with Lord Kitchener, but the ship had already been sunk by a mine. He is buried in the Naval Cemetery in the Orkneys.




1206375

Pte. Walter Thomas "Brickey" Adams

Australian Imperial Forces 10th Australian Machine Gun Coy

from:Melbourne

(d.24th May 1917)

Walter Adams was a runner and was killed just before the Messines Battle. I am trying to find out more about Walter, information, photo's etc. if anyone could help me out in any way it would be very appreciated.




111

Adamson

Army 7th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




232098

Gnr. Archibald Adamson

British Army 232 Brigade, B Battery Royal Field Artillery

from:Derby

(d.30th July 1917)

Archibald Adamson was born in Cardross, Scotland, but enlisted in Derby, England where he was working as a railway clerk. Born in 1888 Archie was killed on July 30 1917 aged 28. He served in the Royal Field Artillery in 232 Brigade B battery. He had married in 1916 but sadly he and his wife Beatrice never had children in their very short marriage.

Archie, along with his brother Cpl Thomas Adamson of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, is commemorated on the Menin Gate in Ypres.




1422

Pte. Arthur Surtees Adamson

British Army 2nd Btn. A Coy. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.24th May 1915)




1132

2nd Lt. C. S. D. Adamson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




232128

Pte. F. Adamson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Murton




2132

Pte Frederick Varley Adamson

British Army 2nd/4th Btn, "A" Coy Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Garden Cottage Allotment, Shiremoor, Northumberland

(d.4th Nov 1918)

Adamson, Frederick, Varley. Private,63882, Killed in action on 4th November 1918. Aged 20 years.

Remembered on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, Pas de Calais, Panel 8.

Son of Henry Varley Adamson and Martha Ann Adamson, of Garden Cottage Allotment, Shiremoor, Northumberland.

Was originally in the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers with service number 19/1844, Transferred to the 2nd/4th Btn of K.O.Y.L.I. "A" Coy, where he had service Number 63882.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




218164

Pte. James Stark Adamson

British Army 7th Btn. Cameron Highlanders

(d.23rd Nov 1917)

James Adamson served with the Cameron Highlanders 7th Battalion. He was executed for cowardice on23rd Novmber 1917 aged 30 and buried in St. Nicolas British Cemetery, St. Nicolas, France.




217694

John Edward Adamson

British Army 3rd Btn. Coldstream Guards

from:Chester le Street

(d.2nd Feb 1915)

John Adamson was the son of John Edward Adamson and Annie and was born in Hartlepool in 1894. However in 1901, he was living with his Uncle, Stephen Adamson in Chester-le-Street and he is shown as being his adopted son. In 1911, he was still living with his Uncle in Chester le Street and was shown as Jack.

The UK De Ruvigney's Roll of Honour states the following:- Adamson, John Edward, No 10473, 3rd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, nephew and adopted son of Stephen Adamson of South View, South Pelaw, Chester le Street; died on 2nd February 1915 of wounds received in action in Cuinchy.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission gives his date of death as 20th February 1915 however and states that he was buried in the Bois-Guillaume Communal Cemetery in France. John Edward was my 3rd Cousin 3 times removed.




300357

Pte. John Robert Adamson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:31 Bond Street, Monkwearmouth

(d.1st Jul 1916)

John Robert Adamson was born on the 1st November 1891 in Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, to Esther and Robert Adamson. He enlisted with the County Battalion DLI at Sunderland on the 1st of October 1914, giving his occupation as pianist. In the 1911 Census John's occupation is listed as Coupler-On in the coal mine, which involved coupling tubs together on the underground railway. His father was a Coal Mine Charge Man underground.

John went missing in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme and was presumed dead. He is remembered on the Theipval Memorial in France.




1133

Lance Claude Adamson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




500840

2nd Lt. Robert Wilson Adamson

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




110

Company Sjt Mjr. W. Adamson

Army 2/8th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




205437

A/Cpl. William Anthony Adamson

British Army Durham Light Infantry

from:Gateshead




1269

L/Sjt. Arthur Adcock

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.16th Apr 1915)




215812

L/Cpl. Octavius Adcock

British Army 14th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:South Shields

(d.19th Dec 1915)

Octavius Adcock most likely died in a gas attack at Ypres. He is commemorated in the Potijze Burial Ground Cemetery, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.




216603

Mjr. St.John Adcock

British Army 3rd Btn. Leinster Regiment

from:Blackrock, Co. Dublin

(d.9th May 1915)

Major St John Adcock served with the 3rd Battalion, the Leinster Regiment and was attached to the 1st Battalion the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment He was killed in action age 45 on the 9th May 1915 at the Battle of Aubers Ridge. He is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

He was the son of Mrs. S. C. Adcock and St. John Adcock, of "Loughnavale," Strand Rd., Merrion, Co. Dublin; husband of Ethel Maud Adcock, of 7, Waltham Terrace, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. He had previously served in the Anglo-Boer War.




216604

Pte. Richard Adderley

British Army 7th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.19th Oct 1915)

Private Richard Adderley was born and enlisted in Dublin. In October 1915, at the request of the Prime Minister of Greece, the 7th Battalion landed in Salonika in October 1915 to assist Serbia during the Macedonian campaign. He died in the Balkans on October 19th, and is buried at East Mudros Military Cemetery, Greece.




216605

Pte. William Addie

British Army Royal Army Medical Corps

from:Dublin

(d.17th Mar 1918)

William Addie served with the Royal Army Medical Corps during WW1 and died on the 17th March 1918. William as born in St. James, Dublin and enlisted in Dublin. He was the son of Elizabeth and the late James Addie, of 31, Emerald Square, Dolphin's Barn, Dublin. He died of wounds in Flanders and is buried in Nine Elms British Cemetery, Poperinge.




236888

Pte. William Thomas Addis

Australian Infantry, A.I.F. 4th Btn.

(d.13th January 1917)

Private Addis is buried in the Kavieng European Cemetery in New Guinea, Grave 13.




1134

Archibald Walter Addison MM.

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Inverell, NSW




217390

Cpl. Archibald Walter Addison MM.

Australian Imperial Force 33rd Infantry Btn.

Archibald Walter Addison was born at Inverell, New South Wales in 1898. A mercer before the outbreak of war, Addison enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 9th September 1915. He was assigned to the 30th Infantry Battalion which initially trained at the Liverpool Depot before moving to R.A.S. Grounds in Moore Park on 21st September 1915. He was later reassigned as a regimental police officer to the 33rd Infantry Battalion. After completing basic training, he left Sydney on 9th November 1915 aboard HMAT Beltana. He spent time in Egypt before being deployed to Gallipoli and then the Western Front He was caught in gas attacks on several occasions and was wounded in action on 19th April and again on 24th September 1918.

He received the Military Medal for his involvement in defensive action on 22nd August 1918. His recommendation for the Military Medal contains a hand written note from General Morshead, which attests to Addison's bravery in maintaining communication between Headquarters and the frontline. He was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 1st July 1919. He returned home aboard HT Plassy on 5th September 1919. Archibald Addison was formally discharged in Sydney on 30th November 1919.




214269

Pte. James Addison

British Army 2nd Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.3rd Dec 1915)

James Addison's Medal Index Card

James Addison's Medal Index Card

James Addison Private served with the 2nd Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He was aged 29 when he died on 3rd December 1915. He was born in 1886, and lived and enlisted Jarrow. He was the son of George Addison and late Barbara Addison of Jarrow, and husband of Margaret Spence (nee McGuinness) of 3 Stanley Street Jarrow. On the 1911 census he is recorded as James Addison age 25 Fitters Engineers Labourer at Dry Dock living with his wife Margaret and child at 26 Queens Road, Jarrow. James is buried in Carnoy Military Cemetery. He is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




222848

Pte. John Williams Addison

British Army 1st Btn. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:35 Admiral Street, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.4th Jun 1915)

John Addison died on the 4th of June 1915 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




233945

L/Cpl. Richard Addison

British Army 8th Btn. C Coy. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

from:Preston, Lancashire

(d.23rd Oct 1916)

Richard Addison was born in Preston in 1886 and was the eldest son of Richard and Charlotte Addison (nee Foreman/Forman). Richard`s parents were married on 29 July, 1883 at St. Saviour with St. James Church, Preston. Richard and Charlotte Addison had another eleven children. The others being Alice A (1883), Margaret Alice (1885), Robert (1889), Lizzie (1892), Betsy Ellen (1894-1894), Archibald (1895), Mary Jane (1898), Betsy Ellen (1900), Frederick (1903), Walter (1904) and Joseph (1906). In 1901 the family were living at 17 Tennyson Road, Preston. Richard`s father was working as a grinder in the card room of a cotton mill. According to his service papers Richard married Elizabeth Johnson on the 22 September, 1906 at St. Ignatius RC Church, Preston. On the 20 December, 1907 Richard and Elizabeth had their first child, a daughter and they named her Alice Ann. Eighteen months later she was followed by another daughter Elizabeth who was born on 6 June, 1909. In 1911 Richard, Elizabeth and their two daughters were living at 9 Hopwood Street, Preston. Richard was working as a lap piercer in a local cotton mill and Elizabeth was at home looking after the two girls. On the 8 May, 1913 a son was born and they named him Richard.

On the 5 September, 1914 Richard went off to enlist at the age of 28 years and 1 month. His occupation at the time was a labourer working for Messrs. Irvin and Sellers a Wood Turning and Shuttle Manufacturers in Preston. Richard confirmed that he had no previous military experience. The Medical Officer noted that he was 5`5" tall and weighed 116 lbs, he had a fresh complexion, blue eyes and brown hair. He was posted into C Company of the 8th Battalion and allocated the service number 13466. The 8th Battalion stayed in England for a year training and growing in strength until the 24th September, 1915 when they embarked for France. Richard was appointed Lance Corporal (paid) on the 11th of July, 1916 when the 8th Battalion had been in action on the Somme. The previous day the Battalion had lost a total of 247 Officers and men who had either been killed, wounded or missing in the area around Ovillers.

On the 12th of October, 1916 Richard was wounded in action and was admitted to No. 22 General Hospital with gunshot wounds. The wounds he received resulted in the amputation of one of his legs but sadly he did not recover and he died at 1 am. on the morning of the 23rf of October 1916.




1460

Pte. Robert Addison

British Army 108th Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps

from:87, Grove St. East, Belfast

(d.7th Jun 1917)

Robert Addison enlisted in January 1915, he was killed on the 7th of June 1917 aged 23, and lies in Dranoutre Military Cemetery.




222849

Pte. Thomas Addison

British Army 1st Btn. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:82 Helena Street, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.11th May 1915)

Thomas Addison died on the 11th of May 1915 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




1135

L/Cpl. Thomas Edward Addison

Australian Imperial Forces B Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Marions St, Tamworth, NSW

Thomas Addison was a 29 year old married labourer when he enlisted, he was wounded in the left arm, in action at the Battle of Messines on the 9th of June 1917 and was treated at the 6th general Hospital in Rouen. In April 1918 he was gassed and was admitted to the Beaufort War Hospital, after his convalescence he was attached to the Australian Provost Corps and served at Tidworth and in London. Thomas returned to Australia in late 1919 and declared that he was "fit and well" when he was discharged from the army.




217391

2nd Lt. Wilfred Emmott Addison

Australian Imperial Force 18th Infantry Btn.

from:Australia

(d.22nd Aug 1915)

Wilfred Emmott Addison was born at Yass, New South Wales during 1887. He was educated at Singleton Grammar School. His parents were Glentworth Addison and Harriet Binning Addison. Four of his uncles and several of his cousins also saw active service with the Australian Imperial Force. At the outbreak of the First World War, he was working as an accountant at the Commercial Bank of Australia. He had some previous military experience as he had completed 10 months service with the 25th Scottish Rifles and enlisted in the AIF on 23rd December 1914 and his prior military service helped secure him a commission as a second lieutenant. Addison was assigned to the 18th Infantry Battalion and departed Sydney aboard HMAT Ceramic on 25 June 1915. They were was stationed briefly in Egypt before deployment to Gallipoli.

He was killed in action on 22nd August 1915 during the landings at Suvla Bay. He died as part of a charge against Turkish positions on Hill 60. Wilfred Addison is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli




1136

Pte. John Henry Addleson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




210903

Pte William Adey

British Army 8th Btn. South Staffordshire Regiment

from:Willenhall

Pte William Adey, my great grandfather, had already served in the 4th Militia S.Staffords, in the Boer war. Born in 1875 he joined as part of K2 in 1914 or 15 at the tender age of 39. Home life can`t have been good! He was posted to the 8th South Staffords; a service battalion.

He was wounded a couple of times. On one occasion he was granted leave and upon arriving home had all his uniform stripped off by his wife Gertrude and the lice removed from it. He went upstairs and collapsed asleep. Upon waking he came downstairs and looked as white as a sheet. He had had a nightmare concerning an event which happened on the front line. Some of the younger soldiers were kicking a German head around like a football. He remonstrated with them when one of them picked the head up and threw it at him. He automatically caught it, only to drop it again pretty quickly. He had dreamt that he was in his bed (which he was) and the dead headless German was standing at the foot of the bed demanding to know where his head was.

He survived the war. My father reckons he was probably shell-shocked because the immediate family used to put him on the veranda at the back of the house in Willenhall and leave him. He was considered to be "embarassing". He died in the mid 1950s. I never knew him, but wish I had. My grandfather told me a little, and one story was that at one point casualties were so high that the colonel was 23. He also mentioned that he thought William was a sniper, and considered one of the steadier men in the battalion. I`ll never know. Sadly I have no photos of him in WW1.




222850

Pte. William Adkin

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

(d.6th Aug 1915)

William Adkin died on the 6th August 1915 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




230767

Sgt. Joseph B. Adkinson MH.

U.S. Army Company C. 119th Infantry Regiment

Joseph Adkinson's citation reads: "When murderous machine gun fire at a range of 50 yards had made it impossible for his platoon to advance, and had caused the platoon to take cover Sgt. Adkinson alone, with the greatest intrepidity, rushed across the 50 yards of open ground directly into the face of the hostile machine gun kicked the gun from the parapet into the enemy trench, and at the point of the bayonet captured the 3 men manning the gun. The gallantry and quick decision of this soldier enabled the platoon to resume its advance."




217392

Lt. John Evan Adlard

Australian Imperial Force 1st Division Ammunition Column

from:Australia

John Evan Adlard was born in Surrey, England in 1888. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force as a driver on 3rd February 1915. Adlard had 4 years prior military service in the British Army Horse Artillery, also as a driver, which contributed to his commission as an officer.

He departed Melbourne with the 1st Division Ammunition Column from Melbourne aboard HMAT Bakara on 14 May 1915. After a stopover in Egypt, he embarked for Gallipoli aboard RMS Snaefell in June 1915. He landed at Cape Helles from the River Clyde. Adlard soon fell ill and was admitted to hospital in Malta on 16th September 1915. He left Malta aboard the hospital ship HMHT Dunluce Castle on 13th October 1915 and set sail for England. On 12th January 1917, he was admitted for training at the Royal Artillery Cadet School in St John's Wood, England. He was subsequently reassigned to the 1st Division Column on the Western Front.

John Adlard was wounded on 23rd October 1917 and transferred to England before returning to Australia aboard SS Balmoral Castle on 1st February 1918. He died in Australia in 1980




217427

Herbert Alexander Affleck

Australian Imperial Force 1st Field Artillery Brigade

from:Australia

(d.17th Aug 1917)

Herbert Alexander Affleck was born in 1891 on a station near Wilcannia, New South Wales. He completed his schooling at Armadale State School before commencing tertiary studies at the Working Men's College of Melbourne (the predecessor of RMIT University). At the outbreak of the First World War, Affleck was working as an Architects pupil in Armadale, Melbourne and had spent time with a reserve regiment.

Affleck enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 19th September 1914. He was assigned to the 1st Field Artillery Brigade and departed Melbourne aboard HMAT Shropshire on 20th October 1914. He was stationed briefly in Egypt before being deployed to Gallipoli.

Affleck was wounded on 6th August 1915 and subsequently transferred from Gallipoli to a rest camp on Lemnos. He re-joined his unit at Gallipoli on 6th October 1915 but was transferred to a hospital on Mudros due to appendicitis on 9th December 1915. After Gallipoli, Affleck spent time at Tel-el-Kebir in Egypt recuperating and preparing for the Western Front. He left Alexandria on 22nd March 1916 and arrived in Marseilles on 28th March 1916.

Affleck s brother, William Lindsay, also served with him as a gunner in the 3rd battery of the 1st Field Artillery Brigade. Their commanding officer said that Affleck was a good man and 'had he lived he would have received a decoration'. Herbert Affleck was killed in action while trying to rescue the wounded on 17th August 1917, and is buried at Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium




300688

Pte. Robert William Affleck

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




300693

Cpl. John William Agar

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Darlington

J W Agar is recorded as "Pte Agar, J, W. Lord Durham's County Battalion DLI" in the Roll of Honour held in Darlington Library, believed to have been complied by the Town Council in the 1920s. He was Commissioned into 2nd DLI




208145

L/Cpl. Allen Ager

British Army 11th Btn Royal Sussex Regiment

from:Haughley, Suffolk

(d.3rd Apr 1918)

I have just recently found out about my Uncle Allen Ager. He died in The Great War. I have no living relatives to tell me anything but I am trying very hard to get as much info as I can about him. He, along with my father Arthur and their siblings, were all born in the vicinity of Haughley which is near Stowmarket in Suffolk. My Dad was born in 1888, he was 63 when I was born and we never spoke much about WW1 but when another uncle died a few photos came my way and a little info to say that Allen had died on the Somme. I hope to get the military history of Allen, and also of my Uncle Hugh who was wounded and lost his left arm in 1917.




1205432

Rfm. George Robert Aggas

British Army 9th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

(d.7th Jun 1917)




300077

Pte. Walter Aggas

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




216606

Andrew Eric Hamilton Agnew

British Army Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.3rd Nov 1918)

Andrew Agnew died on 3rd November 1918. He was a member of Member of Trinity College, Dublin O.T.C. Gazetted 3rd Royal Dublin Fusiliers, August 1914. He is remembered on the St. John the Baptist, Church of Ireland, Clontarf Memorial.




226671

Pte. George Agnew

British Army Black Watch Rgt.

Pte George Agnew was a POW at Friedrichfeld, Rhein. He worked at the Zeppelin factory at Freidrichshafen.




232129

Pte. J. Agnew

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Consett




207644

Pte. James Arthur Agnew

Australian Imperial Force 56th Battalion

from:Euchareena, New South Wales, Australia

Sixteen year old Australian soldier, 3006 Private James Arthur Agnew, was wounded in action near Wimeraux, France 20 July 1916. On 22 July 1916 he was evacuated on Hospital Ship Jan Breydel through Boulogne and taken to England. He was admitted to 1st Northern General Hospital, Newcasle on 23 July 1916 for treatment and recovery. He later returned to his unit in France.




211827

Rfm Joseph Agnew

British Army 10th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Belfast

(d.1st July 1916)




1137

Pte. Bert Aguis

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




213053

Cpl. Harold Algernon Joseph Ahearn

Australian Imperial Force 9th Australian Field Ambulance

from:Broad Rd, South Randwick

Harold Ahearn was my 1st cousin 3 times removed. On the 12th of Aug 1914 her enlisted in the Naval and Military Expeditionary Force, Tropical Unit Army Medical Corps as part of the Naval assault against the Germans in PNG. On the 8th of Mar 1916 he has a second enlistment in the AIF Cpl 9th Field Ambulance. He returned to Australia 21 June 1919




223008

Nurse Anne Wilhelmina Ahern

Voluntary Aid Detachment

from:Co. Meath, Ireland

Anne Wilhelmina Ahern was born in 1890 in Dublin and lived in Co. Meath in Ireland. She served as a nurse at Norfolk War Hospital around 1915-1917. On a postcard of herself sent to her family, she wrote: "Rather a sad looking dog, but I was really trying to look serious as there one of the nurses grinning in front. Don't worry about the Zeppelins. There's no danger. With Love Annie" later she has written "At Norfolk War Hospital" and "Me at 26"

She married a Canadian soldier from the Princess Pat Division named Verne Howard Getty in Norwich in August 1916. They had two sons while in England and then left for Canada in 1919.

George W. Ahern, Verne H. Getty, and Anne Ahern Getty, ca. 1917

George W. Ahern, Verne H. Getty, and Anne Ahern Getty, ca. 1917




216607

Pte. Francis Ahern

Australian Imperial Force 3rd Battalion

(d.16th Apr 1918)

Francis Ahern was the son of Walter and Isabella Woodley Ahern, of 6, Carlisle Terrace, Malahide, Co. Dublin. He died age 37 and is remembered on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, Somme, France




950

Pte. John Ahern

Australian Imperial Forces D Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Walcha, NSW

John Ahern was a red haired labourer from Walcha, he was 27 years old when he enlisted. Whilst training at Larkhill Camp he was recorded as absent without leave from midnight 24th Oct 1916 until 4.5pm the following day and was fined fined 1 days pay and given 14 days field punishment no 2 by Lt Coll Morshead. In France John was promoted to Lance Corporal on the 14th of November but he lost his stripe on the 6th of May 1917 being found absent from billets after 9pm the previous evening. John saw action in the Battle of Messines and received a severe gunshot wound to the left shoulder on the 10th of June. He was evacuated to England from Boulogne on the Hospital Ship St Patrick and was admitted to the County of Middlesex war hospital on the 13th. He returned to Australia in September on board the Ulysses, was treated at No 4 Australian General Hospital, Randwick and was later discharged.




142962

Acting Corporal Jeremiah Francis Aherne

British Army Royal Engineers

from:Church Street, Cahir, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Jeremiah Aherne was attested as a sapper on 3 January 1910 in the trade of carpenter in the Royal Engineers. He served at home from 1910 to 1914, then in Bermuda from January to October 1914 and finally in France in 17 Field Company and then the 32nd Railway Operating Company from 20 November 1914 until July 1918 when he returned home as he had applied and been recommended for a commission. By the end of the War he was an acting Corporal. Having started his Officer training he was told that commissions were being suspended because the War was over. All cadets were offered the choice of returning to their units or continuing training, but they would be discharged immediately on commissioning and would not receive any uniform allowance or pay as an Officer. Jeremiah chose the latter option and was appointed to a temporary commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Munster Fusiliers on 5 March 1919 and immediately discharged to the Reserve. At the outbreak of WWII he returned to military service. In 1943 he was listed on the Regular Army Reserve of Officers in the Auxiliary Pioneer Corps as a Class II 2nd Lieutenant 18 January 1940 (War Substantive Captain 22 July 1941). He subsequently attained the rank of Major. His family believes that he oversaw the construction and development of coastal defences during WWII and that he was based in Aberdeen, Scotland.




1206076

AM3. Henry Aiken

Royal Air Force attd. 67th Bde. Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Accrington, Lancs

(d.5th Nov 1918)

Harry Aikin died of influenza on the 5th of Novemeber 1918, aged 21 and is buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery in France. He was the son of Charlie and Ellen Aikin, of 104 Burnley Rd., Accrington, Lancs.




217705

Pte. George Ainley

British Army 1st/4th Btn. Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Sheffield.

(d.30th Jul 1918)

George Ainley was executed for desertion on 30th July 1918 , aged 20 and is buried in Hagle Dump cemetery, Belgium. He was the son of George and Alice Mary Ainley, of 82, Randall St., Sheffield, Yorks.

Private Ainley had been tried on 28th January 1918 for a self inflicted wound but before the end of the Summer of 1918 he had deserted three times. The Courts Martial was apparently on the 13th July and was for the three offences of desertion. The Commanding Officer of the Battalion submitted a report for the Court; 'Private Ainley appears to be lacking a sense of responsibility, and his military character in consequence is not good.' He was executed on the 30th July 1918 when he was 20 years of age, almost certainly a conscript originally from Sheffield.




216608

Pte. George Alfred Ainscow

British Army 9th Battalion Royal Fusiliers (City Of London Regiment)

from:Stratford

(d.18th Sep 1918)

George Ainscow was born in Dublin, son of Mr and Mrs George Ainscow, of 57, Blessington Street, Dublin. He resided and enlisted in Stratford. He was killed in action age 21 and is buried in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery, Epehy, Somme.




300531

L/Cpl. John Arnold Ainsley

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




300698

Pte. Jonathan Arnold Ainsley

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




112

William Ainsley

Army Durham Light Infantry

(d.22 Aug 1916)




300631

Pte. William Ainsley

British Army 21st Btn Durham Light Infantry

Served with 18th DLI




207095

Claude John Ainslie

British Indian Army 222nd Coy. Machine Gun Corps

My grandfather, Claude John Ainslie, served with the 222nd MGC Company in 1917 and 1918 in Campbellpur, (modern Attock), in what was then British India. In 1913 he helped form the Calcutta Scottish and trained all recruits in the use of the Vickers, forming the 22nd (sic not 222) Machine Gun Battery. This was an Indian Army Unit. as he was issued with a British Commission in 1917.

He later in 1918 joined the staff of the Rawalpindi Division who fought in the 3rd Afghan War. Attock is of course very close to Pindi which




233918

Lt. Montague Forwood Ainslie

British Army 12th Btn. Kings (Liverpool) Regiment

from:Lancashire

(d.17th Apr 1916)

Montague Forwood Ainslie

Montague Forwood Ainslie

Lieutenant Montague Forwood Ainslie was the son of Richard M. Ainslie and Mabel Bower Forwood, and brother of Dorothy, Margaret and Ruth Ainslie, of Childwall Vicarage, Liverpool. Before the war he worked as a bank clerk. He died aged 23 in Boesinghe, Belgium, as a result of amputation due to grenade splinters in his leg. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery. He is also commemorated on a cross in Windermere burial ground erected by his officers; is named on the Childwall Church, Sedbergh School and Martins Bank war memorials, and on a panel in the Liverpool Town Hall of Remembrance.




300783

Pte. Walter Ainslie

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




1205701

Pte. Albert Ainsworth

British Army 12th Btn. (Teesside Pioneers) Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards)

from:Middlesbrough, Yorks

(d.10th Apr 1918)




224523

Cpl. Albert Ainsworth

British Army 7th (City of London) Btn. London Regiment

(d.7th Oct 1916)

Albert Ainsworth started off as a private in World War One and joined the London regiment in the 7th (City of London) Battalion at Hammersmith, London under the regiment number: 3937. He lived in Notting Hill, London. The 1/7th battalion was formed in August 1914 in Finsbury square, a district in central London and was assigned to the 2nd London Infantry Brigade in the 1st London Division.

Later on in his military career, he was promoted to Corporal and his service number changed from 3937 to 351464; this was because before 1917 all men serving with Territorial Force units were given either three digits or four digit service number. So from this information we know that Albert Ainsworth was initially a territorial forces soldier.

The 1/7th battalion embarked and landed in France in 1915 and first saw action in Festubert in May 1915. The battalion took part in several major battles in World War One such as the battle of Loo’s in the September of that year, Vimy in May 1916, High Wood in September 1916 and many other major battles.

The battalion did suffer major casualties in these heroic battles and Corporal Albert Ainsworth was one of the many casualties, killed in action on the seventh of October in 1916. The 1/7th battalion were, at the time of Corporal Albert Ainsworth’s death fighting at Butte de Warlencourt. There was a lot of casualties as the soldiers were pinned down by machine gun fire. Around 300 officers and men lost their lives. The battalion was awarded the battle honour Le Transloy, a sector of the Somme.

Albert Ainsworth is remembered at the Thiepval memorial.




233628

Pte. Jack Ainsworth

British Army 1st Btn. North Staffs Rgt.

from:75 Mills St, Leek, Staffs

(d.31st August 1918)




222851

Pte. Walter Ainsworth

British Army 9th Btn. Warwickshire Regiment

from:19 Campbell Street, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.25th Sep 1915)

Walter Ainsworth died of dysentery on 25th September 1915, aged 35. Commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




300556

Pte. William Ainsworth

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




223486

Pte. A P.M. Aird

British Army 15th Btn London Regiment




1138

Pte. Lachlan McDonald Aird

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Dundee House, Raglan St, Balmoral,NSW

Lauchlan Aird was born in Helensburgh, Scotland, when he enlisted in the army he was a 25 year old labourer, He was 5 feet 4 iches tall with fair hair and grey eyes, his records list that he had a tattoo on his right forearm, showing an anchor, a heart and the name of his wife, Hughina.

He arrived in France on the 14th June 1917 and saw action with the 36th Battalion, he was wounded in the back on the 27th July at the Battle of Messines, he was treated by 11th Field Ambulance them transferred to hospital, he rejoined his unit on the 5th of August. He transferred to the 33rd Battalion in May 1918 and after the end of hostilities spend three months undertaking training as a Rigger with shipbuilders, Vickers Ltd in Barrow in Furness. He returned to Australia and was discharged from the army on October 1919.




220818

Sgt. Richard Airey

British Army 6th Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Hull, East Yorks

(d.22nd Aug 1915)

Richard Airey, my Great Uncle, was born in 1869 at Undermillbeck, Westmorland and was the son of Richard Airey and Jane Airey nee Slater. He was married to Amy Kate Airey and had five children (three surviving after 1903). He was mentioned in the 1901 and 1911 census forms as a Storekeeper with Hull Corporation.




216609

Cpl. W H Airey

Btitish Army 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars

W H Airey is remembered at the Memorial on the St. John the Baptist, Church of Ireland, Clontarf.




1206102

Spr. William Glennie "Bill" Airs

British Army Royal Engineers

from:Edinburgh

My father, Bill Airs, must have been one of the few who served all four years in France during WW1. He was demobbed eventually and became an engineer with Scottish Omnibuses in Edinburgh. He never spoke about his war experiences but just dismissed it all with the words if your number was on it (the shell/bullet etc) then that was it. For him, thankfully, it never was. I vaguely remembered my father chatting to his nephew Flying Officer Wilfred Airs during the second world war.




1930

Sjt. Paul Airson

British Army 19th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:5 North Row, Portabella, Durham

19th Durham Light Infantry

19th Durham Light Infantry

Paul Airson was a miner, he enlisted at Hartlepool on the 1st of March 1915, requesting to join "Bob's Durham Bantams", he is described as being 5 feet 2 inches tall and 29 years old. He was married with two young daughters and a son. He emarked for France from Southampton on the 31st of January 1916. He returned to Britain suffering from Influenza and was later transferred to 188th Coy. Labour Corps and returned to France, possibly based at Bologne.




234223

Pte Robert Airton

British Army 9th Btn Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Bury lancashire

(d.4th Oct 1917)




300557

Pte. Thomas Aiston

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Darlington

(d.23rd April 1918)

CWGC list Thomas Aiston's regimental number as 18/8 (Medal Roll records 18/5), aged 24, he is buried in Plot I. Row C. Grave 14. at Morbecque British Cemetery. The son of Francis and Elizabeth Aiston, of Darlington, his headstone bears the inscription: "Ever dear to our memory". The inscription fee was was paid for By Miss Eveline Aiston of 73, Stanhope Road, Darlington.

Thomas is recorded as "Pte Aiston, Lord Durham's County Battalion DLI" in the Roll of Honour held in Darlington Library, believed to have been complied by the Town Council in the 1920s. He was one of ten soldiers remembered on a white marble plaque which was situated in St Luke's Church, Darlington. The plaque is now missing but the names on it have been recorded by the North East war Memorial Project via a newspaper article in the Darlington Stockton Times of the 14th of February 1920. Thomas is also included amongst 700 names recorded on the wall plaques which line the entrance to Darlington War Memorial Hospital in Hollyhurst Road, Darlington.




207465

CSM. Matthew James Aithwaite

British Army 2nd Btn. B COY York and Lancaster Regiment

from:Thornaby on Tees

(d.21st Sep 1916)

Matthew enlisted in Feb 1900, he served as a Private in B coy 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment. On 9th September 1914 he landed at St Nazaire as part of 16th Brigade in 6th Division.

Matthew reached the rank of Company Sergeant Major during WW1 and fought a battle to take The Heidenkopf on the 18th of September 1916. The York and Lancasters (16th brigade) also the 14th Durham Light Infantry (18th brigade)and the 1st West Yorks (18th brigade) took The Heindenkopf and helped to secure 7 German machine guns and took 140 prisoners.

Matthew was wounded on the 18th Sept and died on 21st Sept 1916. He died of a gunshot wound to the neck. Matthew is buried at Grove Town Cemetery, Meaulte, France Plot: I. H. 1.




216610

Sqd.Sgt.Mjr. George Taylor Aitken MM.

Canadian Forces D Company, A Squadron Canadian Light Horse

(d.10th Oct 1918)

George Aitken was the son of Mr George Aitken and Mrs M A I Shannon (formerly Aitken) of 32, Gilford Road, Sandymount, Co. Dublin. He was killed in action age 36 and is buried in Drummond Cemetery, Raillencourt. He was awarded the Military Medal and Russian Medal of St. George, 4th Class.




214272

Pte. Thomas William Aitken

British Army 14th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow

(d.3rd Sep 1917)

Thomas William Aitken's Medal Index Card

Thomas William Aitken's Medal Index Card

Thomas William Aitken served with the 14th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. He was aged 26 when he died on 3rd September 1917. Born in Jarrow in 1891, son of Thomas and Jane Aitken (nee Moss), he lived and enlisted North Shields. On the 1911 census Thomas William Aitken is recorded as being age 21, a Gas yard Labourer living with his wife Kathleen (nee Gray) at 6 Shakespeare Street, North Shields.

Thomas is buried in the Menin Road South Military Cemetery. He is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




214276

Pte. W. Aitken

British Army

from:Jarrow

W. Aitken is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




214275

Private William Robertson Aitken

British Army 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.27th Sep 1915)

William Robertson Aitken served wth the 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He was aged 26 when he died of wounds on 27th September 1915. He was born in Jarrow in 1889 and enlisted in Jarrow. William is remembered on the Loos Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




235422

Capt. Francis Akenhead

British Army 5th Btn. Manchester Regiment

from:Newport, Mon.

Francis Akenhead of Morgan and Co, Solicitors, Newport, Monmouthshire was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant of the 5th Battalion Manchester Regiment and attained the rank of Captain. He survived the Great War.




500768

Cpl. Harold Akers

British Army 9th Btn. Yorkshire Regiment

(d.7th Jun 1917)




1139

Pte. Henry Herbert Akers

Australian Imperial Forces 36th Btn.




232160

Pte. Adam Akinson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Hebburn

(d.1st July 1916)




217429

P/Sgt. William Alabaster MM.

Australian Imperial Force 13th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.5th Apr 1918)

William Alabaster was born in London, United Kingdom in 1890. He was educated at a state school in East Ham, London and immigrated to Australia in 1911. At the outbreak of the First World War he was working in the building trade as a carpenter and joiner.

Alabaster enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 27th October 1914 and was assigned to the 13th Infantry Battalion. He departed Sydney aboard HMAT Ulysses on 22nd December 1914. After completing training in Egypt he was deployed to Gallipoli on 12th April 1915. He was wounded on 20th May 1915 and did not re-join his unit until 30th October 1915. Following the evacuation of Gallipoli, Alabaster was transferred to the 45th Battalion and arrived in France on 8th June 1916.

Alabaster was awarded the Military Medal on 23rd June 1917 for organising and repeatedly leading parties of men over open country during intense bombardment to supply the front lines with munitions. He received several promotions and was promoted to Pioneer Sergeant on 14th April 1916. He died of wounds received from a shell at Doullens on 5th April 1918. He is buried at Doullens Communal Cemetery in France.




221769

Pte. William Albany MM.

British Army 23rd (Sportmans) Btn. Royal Fusiliers

from:London

(d.2nd August 1916)




1140

Pte. Frank William Albertson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Tamworth, New South Wales.




221344

Pte. William Albinson

British Army 10th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:Stockport, Cheshire

(d.13th Oct 1916)

William Albinson was the son of William H. Albinson and his wife, Elizabeth Emma. He was called up and enlisted on 23rd March 1916. At the time of his enlistment he was 27 years old and gave his occupation as Brewery Worker. At the time of his death, his Battalion were part of 25th Division, which was engaged in the Battle of Ancre Heights. He is interred in the Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension.




233427

Pte. Thomas Charles Albrighton

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:Baddesley Ensor

(d.3rd Sep 1918)

My grandfather Thomas Albrighton, my dad's dad, was killed in the last couple of months of the war. He left his wife pregnant after home leave and my dad was born in April 1919. We think it's doubtful if he even knew his wife was pregnant but he certainly never got to know he had a son. He was a postmaster in Baddesley Ensor before the war and was married to Annie (nee Chetwynd). My dad served in the RAF in WWII but always missed not having a father. His childhood was difficult we believe. What a waste and a tragedy.




1141

Pte. Arthur Ambrose Alchin

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:La Mascotte, Palmerstowe, Kogarah, New South Wales.




216614

Sgt. Alexander Francis Alcock

British Army 2nd Btn. Border Regiment

(d.25th Oct 1914)

Alexander Alcock was born in Dublin and enlisted Birr, King's Co. He was killed in action in Flanders.




726

Pte. C. C. Alcock

Army 8th Btn. Lincolnshire Regiment

Pte Alcock on the 16th of Jan 1915 taken at Leighton Buzzard.

Pte Alcock on the 16th of Jan 1915 taken at Leighton Buzzard.

Pte Alcock enlisted in the North Staffordshire Regiment and served with the 8th Btn of the Lincolnshire Regiment.




226598

L/Sgt. Frederick Alcock

British Army 2nd/5th Btn. Gloucestershire Regiment

from:Bristol, England

(d.30th September 1918)

My uncle, Frederick Alcock, lived in Bedminster, Bristol, England and was 39 years old when he was killed in action in France. He is buried in the Rue-Due-Bois Military Cemetary.

There was a fight at "Junction Post", SE of Fleurbaix on 30 September 1918 in which two officers of his unit were also killed - so I am assuming he could have been with them, though this has not been verified.




235157

Pte. Ernest Charles Alden

British Army 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment

from:4 Bathurst Parade Bristol

(d.4th September 1918)




217431

Cpl. Arthur Gladstone Alderdice

Australian Imperial Force 2nd Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.15th Aug 1916)

Arthur Gladstone Alderdice was born at Beechworth, Victoria and was educated at Beechworth Grammar School. At the outbreak of the First World War he was working in the shearing industry as a wool scourer.

Alderdice enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 6th April 1915. He was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Battalion and departed Sydney aboard HMAT Karoola on 16th June 1915. Alderdice was stationed briefly in Egypt before being deployed to Gallipoli on 6th August 1915, where he took part in the reinforcement of Lone Pine. He was reported ill, most likely suffering from diphtheria, on 26th November 1915 and subsequently sent to Malta for recovery. After Gallipoli he was redeployed to Egypt, arriving on 18th February 1916. He was promoted to corporal on 24th March 1916. Alderdice departed for Marseilles on 28th May 1916 aboard HMT Ivernia and was soon deployed to the Western Front.

He was seriously wounded in action by an enemy shell on 25th July 1916. He was transferred to a field hospital at Rouen on 27th July 1916, and then to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth. He died of tetanus on 15th August 1916. Arthur Alderdice is buried at Wandsworth (Earlsfield) Cemetery, England.




223757

Pte. Percy Robert Alderman

British Army 51st Btn. Gordon Highlanders




300865

Pte. Benson Alderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Raby House, Sadberge

Benson is recorded as "Benson Alderson, Raby House, Sadberge, Pte 1257 18th DLI" in the Roll of Honour held in Darlington Library, believed to have been complied by the Town Council in the 1920s. On the same roll is listed Alderson ?R. of the same address, Pioneer 183413 Special Battalion, who died of wounds at Popperinge 19th Oct 1917-




300684

Pte. Frederick Alderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




300840

Pte. Frederick Alderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




300615

Pte. John George Alderson

British Army 21st Btn Durham Light Infantry

Served with 18th, 19th and 20th DLI




500763

Pte. John W. Alderson

British Army 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

(d.7th Jun 1917)




300811

Pte. John William Alderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

served with 18th & 14th DLI




224143

Driver Robert Alderson

British Army 31st Signal Company Royal Engineers

from:49 Spencely Street, Woodhouse Moor, Leeds, Yorkshire

Robert Alderson volunteered in May 1915, serving the signal section of the Royal Engineers as a driver. He served in Egypt (Cairo and Alexandria) and later transferred to France, where he was a driver for the signal section of RE in Ypres, the Somme, Albert, Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele. He was demobbed in June 1919 holding the 1914-1915 Star and General Service and Victory Medals




1619

Pte. Robert William Alderson

British Army Northumbrian Div. Army Veterinary Corps

from:West Pelton

(d.11th Nov 1915)




1142

Pte. Alfred Miller Connovy Alderton

Australian Imperial Forces C Coy. 36th Btn.

from:Cookshill, Newcastle, NSW

Alfred Alderton was a 23 year old carriage painter from Newcastle NSW. He saw action at with C Company 36th Battalion and was wounded in the left knee at the Battle of Messines on 11th June 1917.




1206267

Pte. John Henry Alderton

British Army 38th Btn. Machine Gun Corps. (Infantry)

from:Ilford, Essex

(d.18th September 1918)

John Alderton died on 18th September 1918, aged 19 and is buried inthe St Sever Cemetery extension in France. He was the only son of Charles & Edith Annie Alderton (Nee Chittock) of Ilford, Essex, UK.




500841

Spr. Tom Alderton

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




232130

Pte. G. Aldons

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




233476

George Aldous

British Army 8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment

from:Kent

(d.16th Jun 1916)

My great great grandfather, George Aldous, died on the 16th of June 1916 and is the only one from his regiment buried in Bray Military Cemetery. We recently visited his grave 3 days before the 100th anniversary of his death to pay our respects. We unfortunately have no photos of him so if anyone has any photos of his battalion we would love to see them. Many thanks

Lest we forget.




1206242

Pte. George Albert Aldous

British Army 14th and 2/7th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:London

Arctic uniform

Arctic uniform

My Grandfather was George Albert Aldous, he served as a private No26729 in the Durham Light Infantry from 1915 to 1919. Initially he was in the 14th Battalion and served in France but later in the 2/7th. He went to Russia in operation ELOPE and it was there that a photograph was taken of his unit of 60 men. They are shown in conventional DLI uniform and in the same formation in Arctic wear. The photos are of good quality and almost all faces are recognisable. His British War and Victory Medals wrongly spell his name as Aldons but have his correct service number on. I still have the medals in their original registered packet that they came to him in. He was so disgusted with the miss- spelling of his name he never took them out of their wrapping. I also have his dog tags and 11 other photos of Archangel but none show identifiable personnel.

Normal uniform

Normal uniform

George and wife Alma

George and wife Alma




237121

Pte. John James Aldred

British Army 20th Btn. Manchester Regiment

from:Oldham

(d.4th October 1918)




1205946

Cpl. Archie Aldridge

British Army Rifle Brigade

from:Hadleigh, Essex

Archie Aldridge enlisted in 1914, probably in either the 14th or 15th Reserve Battalions which were recruiting in Southend. He survived the war and was awarded the 1914-1915 campaign star as well as the other regular WW1 medals. Since these two Reserve battalions were used to provide replacements to the other battalions I would like to find out which one he ended up in when he shipped to France.




212587

L/Cpl. Frederick William Aldridge MM.

British Army 12th Btn. London Regt

from:Lysia Street, Fulham, London

(d.27th Sep 1917)

Freddy Aldridge was educated at Latymer Upper School Hammersmith and enlisted in January 1915. After 2 years training in England he was posted to France in March 1917. He was wounded on September 27th and died the same day in hospital at St.Omer. The Military Medal was awarded for remaining at his post and sending messages back to headquarters when he was stuck by a machine gun bullet which cost him his life.




237072

Sgt. A. Alexander

British Army Tank Corps

I have somehow acquired the war medal of Sgt. Alexander of the Tanks Corps. I think it may have been put into a Poppy Appeal collecting tin which I counted. I have tried to trace him to no avail. By putting his name on this website, at least there is some small acknowledgment of his existance and the hope that someone will have more success than I in tracing him and possibly his descendants who may be able to have his medal back.




225872

Gnr. Arthur John Alexander

British Army 83rd Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Manor Park, Essex

(d.22nd March 1918)

Arthur Alexander was my great uncle. He served with 83rd Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery




500655

Lt Charles Henry Alexander

Australian Imperial Forces 9th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery

from:71, Frankfort Avenue, Dublin, Ireland.

(d.8th Jun 1917)




216615

Lt. Charles Henry Alexander

Australian Imperial Forces 9th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery

(d.8th June 1917)

Charles Alexander killed in action age 33 during the Battle of Messines, he is buried in Toronto Avenue Cemetery.




222884

Pte. David Alexander

British Army 2nd Btn. King's Own Scottish Borderers

from:Camelon, Falkirk

My Grandfather, David Alexander, was born in Camelon, Falkirk in 1895, he joined the KOSB in September 1914 and was sent to France on January 15th 1915. David was joined by his best mate from Camelon called Robert Baird. They fought together right up to the Battle of Falfemont Farm where sadly Robert was hit by a shell and killed. David was wounded but made it back to the starting off trench the 2nd KOSB lost 114 men that day.

David went back into the Battalion after his wound was healed and continued to see action right through to the 3rd Battle of Ypres where he was wounded again. On his return to fitness David was moved into the MGC around 1918 where he stayed until he came out in 1920.

David got married after leaving the army and he and his wife Annie had 4 sons. He found a job as a boilerman in the Tar works in Camelon and lived into his mid seventies.




217432

Pte. David Gibson Alexander

Australian Imperial Force 13rd Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.15th Aug 1915)

David Gibson Alexander was born at Ballytiglea, Ireland. Alexander migrated to Australia about 1890 and was living and working as a barman in Sydney at the beginning of the First World War. At this time, his mother, Annie Sophia Alexander, was still living in County Carlow, Ireland.

Alexander enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 21st December 1914. He was assigned to the 13th Infantry Battalion and departed Sydney aboard HMAT Seang Choon on 11th February 1915. He was fatally wounded by shrapnel during the August landings at Suvla Bay and died at sea aboard HS Rewa on 15th August 1915. David Alexander is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.




216616

Pte. Donald Alexander

British Army 11th (Service) Battalion Highland Light Infantry

from:Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire, Scotland

(d.19th Dec 1915)

Donald Alexander was born in Dublin and enlisted in Bordon, Hants. He was killed in action in Flanders.




207389

Pte. Edward Lyon Alexander

British Army 5th Battalion (Buchan & Formartin),D Company Gordon Highlanders

from:Turriff, Aberdeenshire

My grandfather, Edward Alexander volunteered for the 5th Battalion (Buchan & Formartin),D Company Turriff, Gordon Highlanders in 1914. I think he was wounded in 1915. He was transferred to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers & Labour Corps. I am trying to find out why he would have been transferred and if there are any records of him in the Inniskillings.




1205978

Pte. Frank George Alexander

British Army Signals Sub Section Royal Engineers

from:14 Castle Street East, Banbury Oxfordshire

(d.21st Nov 1918)

Private Alexander – RGA and Royal Engineers domiciled at 14 Castle Street East, Banbury has died in the Number 9 General Hospital (Lakeside USA) Rouen, France. He was working as a butcher before the war, again probably at his Uncles shop in Warwick Road. No records exist save for a couple of postcards and the existence of a photograph of his memorial at Rouen, Northern France taken by a relative before the stone grave markers were erected.

249631 Private Frank George Alexander served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and the Royal Engineers during WW1 and died on the 21st November 1918, aged 26, in hospital at Rouen. He is buried in St Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France. He was the son of Mrs. Ada Makepeace, of 15, Castle St. East, Banbury, Oxon.

He was serving with the Royal Engineers Signals Sub Section possibly attached to the headquarters of 41st Brigade RFA part of 2nd Division Troops. Alternatively if initial reference to RGA is correct then it was likely to have been 41st Siege Battery RGA as the Brigade and Battery names were interchanged during the course of WW1.




226335

Pte Frederick James Alexander

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Berkshire Regiment

from:Reading

(d.12th Aug 1917)




1205544

Pte. Frederick Lionel Alexander

Australian Imperial Force. 3rd Australian Pioneer Bn.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




648

J. G. Alexander

Royal Naval Division Nelson Btn

(d.13th Jul 1915)




236718

Pte. James Alexander

British Army 218th Company Machine Gun Corps

from:46 Henslowe Road, East Dulwich, London




1206097

James William Alexander

British Army 20th Battalion (5th Pals) Manchester Regiment

from:Bolton

(d.9th Oct 1917)

James Alexander served with the 5th Manchester Pals Battalion.




211130

Pte. John William Alexander

British Army 7th Service Batallion Gloucestershire Regiment

from:167 Pennywell Road, Bristol

(d.6th Feb1917)

John Alexander was born 3rd February 1892 the son of Robert and Hannah Maria (nee Arnold). He worked as a furniture remover before the war. John died of wounds in the British Mesopotamian campaign and buried at Al Amara cemetery (modern day Iraq)




716

Kenneth Henry Alexander

Army Durham RGA caa Battery

My grandfather, Kenneth Alexander, Service number 166096, was a member of the Durham RGA, caa Battery, and served from 27.4.1914 until 10.3.1919, being discharged at Dover. A family story says that he worked on the "big guns" at Hartlepool and spent time on active service abroad. I have been unable to find his service record, possibly one of the burned ones, and would be grateful for any information.




2034

Pte Matthew Alexander

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:116, City Rd., Newcastle-on-Tyne

(d.24th Jul 1917)

Alexander, M. Private, 28344, Killed on 24th July 1917. Aged 24 years.

Buried in Tincourt New British Cemetery, in grave I. C. 2.

Husband of Jane Ann Alexander, of 116, City Rd, Newcastle-on-Tyne.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




231022

Pte Michael Alexander

British Army 6th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

from:Lanark, Scotland

(d.22nd Feb 1917)

Michael Alexander was born in Lanark, Scotland on the 5th of November 1897. He enlisted in 1916 before conscription was introduced. He died aged 19 in the battle of High Wood near Thiepval and his body was never identified, so his name is on the Thiepval Memorial. Opposite High Wood is the London cemetery. There are un-named graves within that have the bodies of Cameronians, but no identification. It may be he is buried in one of these graves. His younger brother John was my Grandad.




237159

Maj. Sydney Dawson Moray Alexander

British Indian Army Indian Ordnance Department

from:United Kingdom

(d.14th January 1917)

Major Alexander is buried in the Raichur Railway Cemetery in India, Grave 251.




216617

Pte. Thomas Alexander

British Army 8th Btn. Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers)

from:Ringsend, Dublin

(d.10th Nov 1916)

Thomas Alexnder was born Limerick and enlisted in Manchester. He served with Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish) Fusiliers 8th Battalion and died of wounds in Flanders in November 1916.




217811

CQMS. W. Alexander

Canadian Expeditionary Force 10th Btn.

(d.18th Oct 1917)

CQMS W. Alexander served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force 10th Battalion. After going absent without leave for two days he was executed for desertion on 18th October 1917 aged 37 and is buried in the Barlin Communal Cemetery Extension in Pas-de-Calais, France.




1205522

Flt Sub. Lt. W. M. "Mel" Alexander

Royal Naval Air Service B Flight 10 Naval Sqd.

from:Canada




211391

Pte. William Alexander

British Army 1st Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Morpeth

(d.16th Sep 1914)

William Alexander was a reservist in the Terriorial Force who was mobilised on the outbreak of war in August 1914 and was sent to Portsmouth to join the 1st Battalion. He fought at Mons and the Marne then was killed on the Aisne in September.




225915

Pte. William Alexander

British Army 6th Battalion Cameron Highlanders

from:Galsgow

I always knew my grandfather, William Alexander, my dad's dad, was in the Cameron Highlanders and was in the 1st World War, but very little information was passed down. My dad was 22 when his dad died and he would tell us about our grandad and the Battle of the Somme and how he was shot in the shoulder. My dad only found out as a teenager when he asked his dad about the scars on his shoulder, the answer was "son they are there, so you will never have to have the same" and that was that.

It wasn't until after his death that my grandmother spoke about my grandfather's injuries and the effects it had on him. He never spoke of it and never told any of his four children. He went on to have two billiard rooms in Glasgow, one in the Trongate up from the old C&A and one in the Great Western Road, near his beloved Glasgow Rangers. He and my grandmother also had a boarding house in Beach Way Largs for many years. He died in 1951 aged 61. I never met him as I was born 10 years later, but my dad said he was a wonderful, kind, loving man that everyone loved, a real gem. His mother was Clementina Shand Daniel, the daughter of the poet William Shand Daniel and they originated from Fraserburgh and the Shands of Craigellie. And old highland and patriotic family. I wish I had met him, I feel so honoured and proud of him.

If anyone has anymore information on the 6th Battalion Cameron Highlanders, please could you let me know. Thank you.




1143

Pte. Albert Sydney Aley

Australian Imperial Forces 4th Btn.

(d.9th Oct 1917)




230114

Bombdr. Charles Henry Alford

British Army 298th Bgde., D Bty. Royal Field Artillery

(d.18th April 1918)

I am currently compiling a family history and have discovered that this person is related to me. He was 24 at the time he joined the Royal Field Artillery on 29 May 1916. He was killed in action on 18 April 1918 and was buried at Chalto Lane Cemetery south of Corbie. He was re-interred at Adelaide British Cemetery, Villers - Bretonneux. His war medals were the British War and Victory medals. That is all I know.




216618

AB. James Alford

Mercantile Marine SS Memphian

(d.8th Oct 1917)

James Alford was born in Dublin. He was the son of Patrick and Kate Alford and husband of Kate Alford (nee Brady), of 7, Chestnut Place, Lower Clambrassil St., Dublin. He drowned as a result of an attack by enemy submarine in the Irish Sea age 49. He is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Update: James appears on the 1911 census, religion RC and is a sailor. He is living with his wife, Kate (38) and sons James (20. 12th Royal Lanar) sic., Patrick (18) and Thomas (16).

He was previously in the RN Reserves (Number: D2205). He was born on 4th April 1868. A reference was found on the Internet to him by someone who has acquired his long service medal and says James was discharged in 1915 as medically unfit. He then joined the Mercantile Marine and was drowned while serving on SS Memphian.




216619

Act.L/Sgt. Walter Algar

British Army 10th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:64, Lower Beechwood Avenue, Ranelagh, Dublin

(d.13th Nov 1916)

Acting Lance Sergeant Walter Algar, son of Herbert and Cecilia Algar, was born in Ranelagh, County Dublin, and later enlisted in Dublin. He was one of the 10th Battalion's 81 men killed in action on 13th November 1916 during the Battle of the Ancre. He was 19 years old, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in Somme, France.




1206209

Lt. Wallace Lloyd Algie VC

Canadian Expeditionary Forces 20th Btn. (Central Ontario Regiment),

from:Toronto, Canada

(d.11th October 1918)

Wallace Algie was killed in action 11th October 1918 aged 23 and is buried in the Niagara Cemetery in France. He was the son of Dr. Algie, of 1155, King St., Toronto, and the late Rachel Algie

An extract from The London Gazette, No. 31155, dated 28th Jan., 1919, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice on the 11th October, 1918, north-east of Cambrai, when with attacking troops which came under heavy enfilade machine-gun fire from a neighbouring village. Rushing forward with nine volunteers, he shot the crew of an enemy machine gun, and, turning it on the enemy, enabled his party to reach the village. He then rushed another machine gun, killed the crew. captured an officer and 10 enemy, and thereby cleared the end of the village. Lt. Algie, having established his party, went back for reinforcements, but was killed when leading them forward. His valour and personal initiative in the face of intense fire saved many lives and enabled the position to be held."




233430

Gnr. Ambrose Richard Alick

Bermuda Militia Artillery

from:Bermuda

(d.17th February 1915)

Gunner Alick was the son of Richard Thomas and Louisa Burch Alick, of Devonshire Parish, Bermuda.

He was 23 when he died and is buried in the Somerset Military Burial Ground in Bermuda, Grave 13.




216620

Pte. Edward Allabyrne

British Army 2nd Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.23rd Apr 1915)

Private Edward Allabyrne was born and enlisted in Dublin. He was killed in action during The Second Battle of Ypres on April 23rd 1915, and is buried at Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery, France.




224347

Pte. Alfred Allan

British Army 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders

from:Keith, Banffshire

(d.4th July 1917)




216621

Rfmn. Arthur James Allan

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.21st Nov 1917)

Arthur James Allan served with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles and died of wounds on the 21st November 1917 in Flanders. He was formerly with the Wiltshire Regiment. Arthur was born in Holloway, Middlesex and enlisted in Salisbury, Wiltshire.




220530

2nd Lt. Edward Allan

British Army 10th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Edinburgh

2nd Lt Edward Allan joined the 10th Service Battalion in France in early August 1917. He was a Scot from Edinburgh. He survived the Passchendaele campaign and went to Italy where he is presumed wounded at Asiago in June.

In August he was home with a SWB and discharged back to Edinburgh.




113

Lt. F. C. Allan

Army 13th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




219764

George Thomas Cockburn Allan

British Army Black Watch

from:High Street, Cowdenbeath

George Thomas Cockburn Allan served with the Black Watch during WW1 and his home address is given as Cowdenbeath.




232131

Pte. John Allan

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Gateshead

John Allan enlisted on the 12th of Nov. 1914




234707

Pte. Norman Dunstan Allan

British Army 8th Btn. Seaforth Highlanders

from:Braes of Enzie, Near Buckie

(d.23rd April 1917)

Extract from the Morayshire Roll of Honour: "Allan, Norman Dustan. No. 8447, Pte., Seaforth Highlanders; born at Cullieshangan, Keith, 1892; residing at Braes of Enzie Bellie, for 2 years; joined at Elgin, April, 1915; served in France; killed 23rd April, 1917. Son of Alexander and Anges Stewart Allan, Blinkbonny, Portgordon. Occupation, farm worker."




217299

Sgt. Percival Robert Allan MSM.

Manchester Regiment 18th Btn.

from:Manchester

My relative Percy R. Allan survived in the Manchester Pals 18th Battalion. He went to war on the 18th November 1915 & gained the Meritorious Service Medal. His name on the battalion photo is listed incorrectly as Allen P. Percy started as a private and later became a sergeant.

Percy was one of the lucky ones that survived the war & owned his own butchers shop on Lloyd St Manchester. I am told he had a wound to his leg. He married and had one son. He is buried in Southern Cemetery in Manchester with his wife and son. (he has no headstone). We don't have any photos or medals and we do not know what he did during his service.




143985

Robert Allan

British Army Seaforth Highlanders

My grandad was apparently born in Elgin, Scotland in about 1898.As a member of The Seaforth Highlanders he served in the 'Great War'and was badly wounded in 1916 when he he received a bullet in the spine.He was returned to England with the injury. He married a nurse from Norfolk, named Florence, in 1917 and my mother was born in 1918.He worked for the post office between 1920 and 1930 as an odd-job man.In 1930 he moved to Herne Bay in Kent where Florence became the manager of 'The Chez Laurice' restaurant and dance hall.Robert died in 1950.




300589

Pte. Robert Allan

British Army 20th Btn Durham Light Infantry

served with 20th, 14th & 18th DLI SWB




300916

Pte. Ronald Allan

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:30 Houghton St, West Hartlepool

(d.3rd Oct 1916)

Pte Alan was aged 22 when he was killed. He is buried in Bethune Town cemetery. he was the husband of Elsie Lily Allan. Son of Robert Bruce Allan of Middlesbrough.




1039

Pte. W. Allan

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

(d.1st Jul 1916)




216622

Lt. George Gilmour Allardyce

Australian Imperial Force 4th Btn

(d.18th May 1918)

Lt. George Gilmour Allardyce was born in Dublin and was the son of George and Janet S. Allardyce, of "Viewmount," Archiestown, Carronon-Spey, Morayshire. He died at Oxford, from wounds received in France age 22. He was an undergraduate of Trinity College, Dublin and is buried at Mount Jerome Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.

Update: there is a very detailed account of his military service here: Lt. George Gilmour Allardyce




208630

T/Lt.Col. John G.B. Allardyce

British Army 106th Battery Royal Field Artillery

My great grand father, Kala Khan, and his two nephews Hadatulla Khan and Khan Ali Khan worked for the British Army. They were tailors for the British Army (Royal Artillery) Kala Khan (Tailor Master) did job in British Army for about 21 years. They performed his services in unit of 10 Battery R.A (1891 - 1898), 12 Battery R.F.A (1898 _ 1902) and 78 Battery R.F.A (1903 _ 1913)

I have 2 documents Britsh army certificate handwriting & autograf of Sir John.G.B. Allardyce . One another document in my opinion is very important, he gifted wherein name of clothes were mentioned which he dressed himself The British Officer named in the certificate was Sir John. G.B. Allardyce.

On the 2nd of Nov 1914 he was promoted to Major and on the 22nd of June 1915 he is serving with Royal Field Artillery, 106th Battery. Major J.G.B Allardyce was made temporary Lt-Col on April 26th 1916.

I have personal dairy ok Mr Kala Khan in which he prescribed his time spend with Sir John.G.B. Allardyce. I want to present all these things (documents, name of clothes document) to any of Sir John G.B. Allardyce family members.




216623

Surgeon Prob. William Swirles Allardyce

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve HMS Negro

from:Dublin

(d.21st Dec 1916)

William Swirles Allardyce was the son of George and Janet Swirles Allardyce, of Advie, Grosvenor Road, Dublin. Educated at St. Andrew's College and Trinity College (Dublin University) he drowned as the result of a collision in the North Sea age 19. He is remembered on the Chatham Naval Memorial.




1205903

Pte. William Stanley Allars

Australian Imperial Force 39th Btn. 39th Btn.

from:St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia.

(d.2nd May 1917)

William Allars was died on the 2nd of May 1917, aged 21. Buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension (Nord), he was the son of Alfred Charles and Emily Ann Allars. Native of St. Kilda, Victoria, Australia. Survived by his brother Sydney George Allars Private 816 who was also wounded. 39th Bn. Australian Infantry, A. I. F.




300694

2nd Lt. W. Allbeury

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




218892

Cpl. Henry "Harry" Allcock

British Army 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle corps

from:Aberafan, Port Talbot

(d.10th Mar, 1915)

Harry Allcock married my grandmother's sister, Agnes Nixon, in 1911. From Davenham, Cheshire, he enlisted in Manchester, and he may have been a reservist who was one of the first to be 'called up'. They moved to South Wales where Harry had found employment, probably in the Port Talbot steel works. They had a baby daughter and named her Beatrice after my grandmother.

In 1912, Gran and her Irish born fiancé where planning to emigrate to America; he would go on ahead and find work and a home,then send for Gran. Early in the year Beatrice found that she was pregnant... a disaster, especially for a Catholic couple. The fiancé wasn't supportive, and neither were her parents. She spent most of her pregnancy in a convent, and when my mother was born, she took work as a live-in domestic servant. She never heard from her fiancé again. She had trained as a seamstress, and this new work and living arrangement was proving so taxing that she was on the point of giving up her baby daughter to a children's home. Then Harry said to Agnes 'Ask Beatty and Mary to come and live with us; Mary'll be company for Beatrice'. So they moved from London to Port Talbot.

Harry served with the King's Royal Rifle corps 1st Battalion and was reported 'missing, presumed dead' on 10th March 1915. His memorial is at Le Touret, Pas de Calais.

Agnes remarried a friend of Harry's in 1924, but her daughter died from TB in 1926. Gran married a widower and moved to a nearby mining village where my mum grew up happily and met and married my father in 1938. I owe my existence to this generous, hospitable man, for had Mum and Gran not moved to Wales my parents would never have met! Thank you Harry.




216624

Pte. Louis Allcock

British Army 2nd Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Birr

(d.21st Sep 1914)

Louis Allcock served with the 2nd Battalion, Durham Light Infantry and was killed in action on the 21st September 1914 in Flanders. He was born in Golden Bridge, Dublin and resided in Birr.




234125

Cpl. Frank Charles Allcroft

British Army 13th (Kensington) Btn. London Regiment

from:Fulham

(d.6th Nov 1918)

My Great Uncle Frank Allcroft, enlisted 1st Btn London Regiment in November 1914. He was with the London Regiment throughout and was killed in action in Angre, Belguim on 6th of November 1918. This was the units last day on the front line before the war ended.




235871

Pte. George William Allcroft

British Army Royal Fusiliers

from:Leicester

George Allcroft was captured during the Germany's Operation Michael on 21st March 1918. He told his daughter after the war, that he had been taken prisoner while tending to an injured soldier in a dug-out.




208003

Pte. Henry John Allcroft

British Army 16th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment

from:Chelsea

My father, Henry John Allcroft, served with the Royal Sussex Regiment during World War 1. He was born in Chelsea, Middlesex on the 31st of May 1898 he enlisted on 11th May 1916 having falsified his age. He was exactly 17 years 11 months when he joined up.

In 1917 he travelled to Egypt where the 16th Battalion was forming and there he joined at Mersa Matru. He took part in the Battle for Gaza and other battles on the advance on Jerusalem. In 1918 the Battalion embarked for transfer to the Western Front in France arriving at Marseilles, travelling by train the length of France to arrive on the Flanders battlefields.

Harry Allcroft was involved in the push forward that took place during late August and early September of 1918 across a front stretching to the north of Peronne. On 3rd September 1918 he was wounded during actions at or around Brunn Trench near the Canal du Nord by the village of Haut Allaines. He was wounded by shell blast which caused him to be quite deaf in his left ear and only partially sighted in his left eye. He also carried scarring to his left shoulder.

Harry went on, after the War, to qualify as an architect and became Clerk of Works for Trowbridge in Wiltshire. He married and had three children, two girls and one boy. Harry died in 1952. The boy he had remains very proud of him.




231962

L/Cpl. Harold Allemby

British Army 14th (Barnsley Pals) Btn. York and Lancaster Regiment

from:Barnsley

(d.1st July 1916 )

Harold Allemby was one of the first over the top on the tragic day of 1st July 1916. His body was never found. He was the only son of Walter and Mary Allemby who owned the Manx Arms on Sheffield Road. Walter had only died just a few weeks before his son. Mary must never have got over her losses so close together, but lived on until 1934.




213981

Private A. Allen

British Army 1st Battalion Royal Scots

(d.9th Mar 1915)

Private A. Allen, 1st Battalion Royal Scots was killed in action in the Ypres Salient on March 9th 1915 and was buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery.




233549

Pte. Albert Allen

British Army 12th Btn. Middlesex Regiment

from:Hatfield, Hertfordshire

(d.15th July 1916)




236408

Pte. Albert George Allen

British Army 3rd Battalion Welch

from:Southsea, Portsmouth

(d.14th January 1919)




300555

Pte. Alfred Allen

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

(d.29th Mar 1918)

Alfred Allen was born on 9th of July 1894 at 28 Emily Street, Stockton. He lives with his parents George and Louisa, brothers John and George, sisters Louisa and Florence and grandfather Edward. Alfred worked as a Grocers Assistant and then as a driller, he enlisted in the 18th Battalion DLI on 2nd of October 1914. He was promoted to Lance Corporal and was killed in action on the 29th of March 1918 during the German Offensive Operation Michael. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.




210354

Pte Arthur Allen

British Army Northumberland Fusiliers




1205787

Pte. Arthur Allen

British Army 1/5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Burnley, Lancashire

(d.9th Aug 1915)

Arthur Allen died of Dysentry on the 9th August 1915, aged 29. He is buried in the Alexandria Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt. He lived at 2 Hartley Street, Burnley, Lancashire




221704

Arthur Allen

British Army 8th Btn. Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Whitstable

(d.31st July 1917)




210736

Cpl. Arthur Alfred Allen MM.

British Army 123rd Battery 28th Brigade Royal Field Artillery

from:London

Arthur Allen was stationed in Dundalk, Ireland when War broke out, serving with 123rd Battery, 28th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, 5th Division. He arrived in France on 16th August 1914 aged 18. He was in charge of a battery and was on Hill 60 the first time the Germans used mustard gas. He was awarded the MM for rescuing casualties under fire. He was eventually gassed again and was sent home on a hospital ship in June 1918 on his birthday. He lived to the age of 91, after having a lengthy career in the Metropolitan police achieving the rank of Superintendant.




216632

Pte. Arthur Crawford Allen

British Army 8th (Service) Btn Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

from:Rathgar, Co. Dublin

(d.19th Oct 1916)

Arthur was born in Rathgar, Co. Dublin and was the son of James and Mary Elizabeth Allen, of "Allendale," Highfleld Rd., Rathgar, Co. Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders age 18 and is buried at, Warlencourt British Cemetery.

Update: Warlencourt, the Butte de Warlencourt and Eaucourt-L'Abbaye were the scene of very fierce fighting in 1916. Eaucourt was taken by the 47th (London) Division early in October. The Butte (a Roman mound of excavated chalk, about 17 metres high, once covered with pines) was attacked by that and other divisions, but it was not relinquished by the Germans until the following 26 February, when they withdrew to the Hindenburg Line. The 8th Black Watch Report - Operations, 19 October 1916 states: 3 officers killed and 8 wounded.

18 men were killed, 25 missing, 152 wounded, 2 wounded and at duty.




1929

Lt. Arthur Hewitt Allen

British Army 1st Btn. att 72nd MGC. orth Staffordshire Regiment

Arthur Hewitt Allen was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment on the 23rd of July 1915 and joined the battalion in France. During the Battles of the Somme, he was attached to 72nd Company, Machine Gun Corps and commanded of a section of two Vickers machine guns. He was promoted to Lieutenant on 10th January 1917. He served at Arras in April 1917 and at the Battle of Messines Ridge, which opened with massive Mine explosions which rocked the German defenders. Despite early set backs, the Germans staged a vigorous defence of the ridge and the slopes. As Lieutenant Allen led his Machine Gun Company forward in support of 1st North Stafford’s, they came under heavy artillery & machine gun fire. He located and attacked an enemy machine gun that was mowing the men down. He personally killed and captured the crew, then took command of an infantry company whose Officers had all been hit, and was soon joined by the survivors of the whole Battalion. He was awarded the Military Cross which was Gazetted on the 26th of September 1917. His citation reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry & devotion in leading his company in an attack. He directed an attack on an enemy machine gun , which was holding up our advance, captured the gun and killed or captured the crew. Afterwards believing himself to be the only officer surviving in the attacking companies, he directed their fire on enemy machine guns and snipers, moving from shell hole to shell hole with utter disregard of his own personal danger to satisfy himself that the line was being properly maintained. Later, he was knocked down & severely bruised by a shell, but refused to leave his company and directed the carrying of rations to the front line.”

He later fought in the 3rd Battle of Ypres in the Autumn of 1917. Having suffered effects from his close encounter with the shell at Messines and also possibly being further wounded in action, he returned to ‘Blighty’ in 1918 and served for a period with the Ministry of National Service.




239495

Lt. B. H.B. Allen

British Army 173rd Brigade, B Bty Royal Field Artillery




1206672

Charles S. Allen

Royal Navy HMS Spitfire

from:Valentine Grove, Anfield




226724

Pte. Cyril Sheldon "Sid" Allen DCM.

British Army A Btn. Tank Corps

from:Burton Stather

(d.20th Nov 1917)




232132

Pte. Ed. Allen

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Wheatly Hill

(d.7th Aug 1916)

Ed Allen is buried in Caberet Rouge Cemetery




224070

Pte. Edward Allen

British Army 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment

from:Ramsey, Huntingdonshire

(d.9th May 1915)

Edward Allen was my great-uncle, my grandad's brother. Edward was born in Huntingdonshire and married Rose Hannah Sneesby in 1914. I am currently trying to find all information I can on his time in the Great War before he sadly went missing. Edward is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial.

Le Touret Memorial

Le Touret Memorial




217435

Pte. Ernest Allen

Australian Imperial Force 49th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.25th Apr 1918)

Ernest Allen was born at Gin Gin, Queensland, on 8th October 1883. He was considered an expert horseman with considerable skill as a marksman and became champion of the Wide Bay region in Queensland in 1914. The 32-year-old farmer and grazier enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force on 5th July 1916. Two of Allen's brothers, Josiah and James, also enlisted that same day. Together the three brothers departed Sydney with reinforcements for the 49th Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Ceramic on 7th October 1916.

Having been sent to England and then to the Western Front, Allen and his two brothers fought at the battle of Messines on 7th June 1917. It was on this day that both of his brothers were killed in action. Allen frequently wrote letters home, describing the conditions on the front. His experiences there led him to write in one letter that he was quite pleased the 1916 referendum on conscription had failed, a sentiment shared by many other soldiers at the time.

In April 1918 the Australian 13th Brigade (of which the 49th Battalion was a part) was given the task of recapturing Villers-Bretonneux from the Germans. Ernest Allen was killed in action on 25th April 1918 while fighting to recapture the town. He is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France.

Sadly, whilst Allen's family requested any and all information about his burial and belongings, the transport ship carrying his personal effects from England back to Australia was sunk by a German submarine. All they received were two photographs of his grave and his service medals.




223817

Gnr. Ernest Robert Allen

British Army Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Bethnal Green

My nan's brother Ernest Allen served in World War 1, he was a gunner. He was discharged in November 1918 with shell shock. He lived with his sister Harriet at 2 Alma Road, Bethnal Green, Middlesex.




235231

Pte. F. G. Allen

Royal Welsh Fusiliers 1st/7th Btn.

(d.25th November 1919)

Private Allen was buried in the Famagusta Military Cemetery in Cyprus, Grave 24.




1876

Pte. Frank Allen

British Army 2nd Btn. B Coy. Cheshire Regiment

from:56, Runcorn Rd., Barnton, Northwich, Cheshire

(d.15th Apr 1918)




216251

Pte Frank Allen

British Army 2nd Btn. B Coy. Cheshire Regiment

(d.15th April 1918)




225190

L/Sgt. Harry Allen

British Army 16th (Public Achools) Btn. Middlesex Regiment

(d.1st July 1916)

Harry Allen died on the Somme serving with the 29th Division at the attack of Beaumont-Hamel.




207090

Pte. Henry Edward Allen

British Army 5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:Tolvadden East Cowes

(d.21st Jun 1915)

Henry Allen was my uncle and was married to Rose Rann. They had a son Henry.

Henry senior was a sniper with the Territorials Royal Warks Regt, the unit was based at Thorpe Street Barracks in Birmingham City Centre. Harry, as he was known, was shot by a German sniper. Apparently, so the story was told to his mother by a fellow that served with him and was present at his death. He went to fetch some water when he was shot in the head which took the back of his head off. He is buried at, Comines-Warneton, Hainault, Belgium in Berks Cemetery Extension.




500773

Cpl. Henry Furner Allen

British Army 1st/7th Btn. London Regiment

from:Balham, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500774

Cpl. Henry James Olaf Allen

British Army 1st/6th Btn. London Regiment

from:Great Dalby, Leicestershire.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




212967

Cpl. Henry James Olaf Allen DCM.

British Army 1/6th Btn. London Regiment

from:10 Paradise Place, High St, Marylebone

(d.7th Jun 1917)

I am currently researching my Great Uncle Henry Allen's history. We have an article from the Supplement to The London Gazette dated 10th March 1916 stating that on the 11th March from the War Office with reference to the announcement of the award of Distinguished Conduct Medals in the Honours Supplement to the London Gazette, dated 14th January, 1916, the following are the acts of gallantry for which the decorations have been awarded:- 1437 Lance-Corporal H.J.O. Allen, 6th (City of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (Rifles), T.F. For conspicuous gallantry on many occasions, when he carried out reconnaissances at night outside the front trenches under heavy fire.

I am trying to find out more information regarding his service from his joining until his death on 7th June 1917, If anyone can help in anyway I would greatly appreciate it.




1144

Pte. Henry Walter Allen

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Woolgrolga, NSW.




1570

Pte. Herbert Allen

British Army 8th Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

from:Epping, Essex

(d.5th Aug 1917)

Bert was the son of Edward and Margaret Edith Allen, of Chapel Road. Born in Epping, he enlisted into the Dorsetshire Regiment in Chiseldon, Wiltshire, and later transferred to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was killed in action during the Third Battle of Ypres. There is a memorial to him on the Allen family grave headstone in Epping Cemetery, and he is commemorated in a memorial tablet in Epping Methodist Church.




225938

Pte. Horace Allen

British Army 2/6th Btn. Sherwood Foresters

from:Sudbury, Derbyshire

Horace Allen, with chums, bottom right.

Horace Allen, with chums, bottom right.

On 21st March 1918, the 2/6th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) were in positions west of Bullecourt, France. The German Spring Offensive commenced on that day and the 2/6 were in front of the main line of attack. My grandfather, Horace Allen, was wounded by shrapnel and then shot by a German with a pistol through the shoulder and left for dead. He was then treated for his wounds and sent to Münster II POW camp and later moved to Friedrichsfeld POW camp until the end of the war. In common with the local population, Horace was dreadfully malnourished and weighted little more than 7 stones when he returned to the UK.




217436

Pte. James Edward Allen

Australian Imperial Force 49th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.7th Jun 1917)

James Edward Allen was born at Gin Gin, Queensland, on 11 March 1886. He was considered a skilled marksman and was a member of the Gin Gin Rifle Club. The 30-year-old farmer and grazier enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force on 5th July 1916 along with two of his brothers, Ernest and Josiah. Together the three brothers departed Sydney with the reinforcements for the 49th Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Ceramic on 7th October 1916

Having been sent to the Western Front, Allen frequently wrote letters to his brother William back in Australia, in which he responded to news from home and described the conditions at the front. In a letter dated 4th June 1917 he wrote of a large-scale offensive to take place over the coming days, and on 7th June Allen and his two brothers fought at the battle of Messines. Initially listed as missing in action, Allen was later confirmed to have been killed in action on that day along with his brother Josiah. One witness reported seeing him killed by an artillery shell. James Edward Allen is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium.




1599

S/Lt.Eng. John A.C. Allen

Royal Naval Reserve HMS Bergamot

(d.13th Aug 1917)




206673

Mjr. John Harcourt Allen MC. MID.

British Army 144 Siege Battery. Royal Garrison Artillery

John Allen served in France with 122, 220 and 144 Siege Batterries and was mentioned in Despatches in 1918 the same year he was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry for saving the battery's guns during a retreat.

After the war he served with Territorial Service, Suffolk Heavy Brigade, winning King's prize on four occasions. In 1938 he was Lieutenant-Colonel of the Brigade and commanded East Coast of England's defences 1939 - 1942.




225979

Sgt. John Henry Allen

British Army 2nd Btn. Sherwood Foresters

from:Balderton

Sgt. John Allen was invalided out in either 1917 or 1918. He had been blown up but survived.




223660

Lt-Col. John Stanley Allen MC.

British Army 9th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Bellingham

(d.11th Apr 1918)

My great uncle, John Allen was a Lt Colonel with the Northumberland Fusiliers.




226672

Lt. Joseph Allen

Royal Flying Corps

Lt. Allen was a POW at Holzminden in Brunswick.




231322

L/Cpl. Joseph Allen

British Army 10th Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

from:Coleraine, Northern Ireland

(d.30th September 1918)




216633

S/Sgt. Joseph Frederick Allen

British Army 34th Signal Coy Royal Engineers

(d.4th Nov 1916)

Joseph F Allen was born in Castle Knock, Co. Dublin and enlisted at Chatham, Kent. He died in Turkey




217438

Pte. Josiah Allen

Australian Imperial Force 49th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.7th Jun 1917)

Josiah Allen was born at Gin Gin, Queensland, on 11th February 1890. He was considered a skilled marksman and horseman, and was a member of the Gin Gin Rifle Club. The 26-year-old farmer and grazier enlisted for service with the Australian Imperial Force on 5th July 1916, as did his brothers Ernest and James Edward. The three brothers departed Sydney with reinforcements for the 49th Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Ceramic on 7th October 1916.

Having been sent to the Western Front, Allen wrote two letters to his brother William back in Australia in which he responded to news from home and described the conditions at the Front. Grateful for the food packages from home he despaired at the continual rain and cold weather on the Front. On 7th June 1917, Allen and his two brothers fought at the Battle of Messines. It was on this day that Josiah Allen, initially listed as missing, was later confirmed to have been killed in action, along with his brother James. His body was never recovered, and today Josiah Allen is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.




216634

Pte. Martin Allen

British Army South Irish Horse Household Cavalry

from:Dublin

(d.26th Sep 1916)

Martin Allen was born in Dublin and enlisted there. He was the son of Mrs. Mary Allen, of 1, Connaught St., Phisborough, Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders age 21 and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.




216635

Pte. Matthew Allen

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Glasgow

(d.21st March 1918)

Matthew Allen was born in Dublin and lived in Townhead, Glasgow. He enlisted in Glasgow. He was killed in action in Flanders.

Update: he died aged 28 And is buried in Unicorn Cemetery, Vendhuile.




232133

Pte. Michael Allen

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Gateshead

Michael Allen transferred to the Royal Engineers




205943

Lt. Owen Augustus Ellis Allen

Royal Flying Corps 81 Squadron

(d.3rd Nov 1917)

Pilot. He was flying an Avro 504J (aircraft B3194) when he collided in mid-air with another Avro flown by Lt. C. P. F. Lowson. He was taken to the 4th Northern General Hospital in Lincoln, where he was pronounced dead.




216636

Pte, Paul Allen

British Army 1st Btn Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.15th June 1915)

Paul Allen was born and enlisted in Dublin. He was killed in action in Gallipoli and is buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Helles.




209855

Pte. Peter Allen

British Army 9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Blyth, Northumberlans

(d.5th Nov 1915)

Peter Allen served with the 9th Northumberlands, he died of serious wounds received in action at the front, whilst being traeted at the 4th Northern General Hospital in Lincoln on the night of the 5th of November 1915, he was 34 years olf and resided at Cowpen Quay. He leaves a wife, Roseann and four children. His body was brought home and his funeral held on the 8th of November at Cowpen Cemetery, Blyth. Peter is remembered on the Blyth War Memorial at the north end of Ridley Park, Blyth.




1598

Able.Sea. Philip H. Allen

Royal Navy HMS Bergamot

(d.13th Aug 1917)




235099

Sgt. Reginald Hercules Allen MM.

British Army 6th Btn. Dorsetshire Regiment

from:Birmingham

Reginald Allen was the unknown grandfather of my husband, who died watching Villa play in Sheffield 1956. Reginald served with the 1st and 6th Battalions, Dorsetshire Regiment, received the MM and was clearly a brave man, but sadly nothing is known about his war nor what happened to his medals. His son, my husband's father, never talked about him nor his own experience of army life in the Second World War. There is no family surviving who would know. However, Reginald deserves to be remembered for his part in that terrible war.




216626

2nd Lt. Richard Gerrard Ross Allen

British Army 5th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

(d.16th Nov 1916)

Lieutenant Richard Gerrard Ross Allen, son of Richard and Lucy Allen of Cambrian House, Burgess Hill, Sussex, was born in Dublin and lived in Cavan, County Cavan when he enlisted with the Royal Flying Corps. He later travelled to France to fight with the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own) 5th Battalion. He died in France during The Battle of the Somme aged 26, and is buried at Serre Road Cemetery No. 1, Pas De Calais, France.




1205702

Pte. Robert Allen

British Army 12th Btn. (Teesside Pioneers) Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards)

(d.23rd Dec 1916)




214277

Pte. Robert Allen

British Army 13th (Forest of Dean Pioneers) Battalion Gloucester Regiment

from:Jarrow

(d.1st Mar 1917)

Robert Allen Medal Index Card

Robert Allen Medal Index Card

Robert Allen served with the 13th (Service) Battalion Gloucester Regiment (Forest of Dean Pioneers) He was aged 24 when he died of wounds on 1st March 1917. He was born, lived and enlisted Jarrow, the son of William and Emily Allen (nee Evans) of Jarrow and husband of Annie (nee Fay) at one time Mayor of Jarrow. On the 1911 census, he is recorded as Robert Allen age 17 Rivet heater in Shipyard living with his parents William and Emily Allen at 30 Ferry Street back, Jarrow. Robert is buried in Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery.

Robert Allen WW1 Memorial Plaque (Death Penny)

Robert Allen WW1 Memorial Plaque (Death Penny)

Robert Allen with his wife and child

Robert Allen with his wife and child




217439

Pte. Robert Beattie Allen

Australian Imperial Force 13th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.14th Aug 1916)

Robert Beattie Allen was born in the Sydney suburb of Balmain in 1888. As a 27-year-old labourer he enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force on 9 July 1915. His brother Stephen enlisted just over a week later, and both brothers departed Sydney with reinforcements for the 13th Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Ballarat on 6th of September 1915.

The following June the two men arrived on the Western Front with other members of the 13th Battalion. Despite the circumstances, Allen remembered to send a birthday card to his sister half a world away back in Australia. The battalion fought in its first major actions at Pozières and at nearby Mouquet Farm in July and August 1916. On 14th August, in the midst of the fighting around Mouquet Farm, both Allen brothers failed to report back after fatigue duty. Initially listed as missing in action, a court of inquiry found that the two brothers had been killed in action by the same artillery shell, close to the front line. Robert Beattie Allen is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France.




230823

Pte. Ronald Percy Allen

British Army Royal Sussex Regiment

from:Bognor Regis, Sussex

Ronald Allen was my great grandfather. He was a baker in Bognor Regis before the war. From his letters home he seems to have been a kind, gentle and loving man to his wife and children. He was made a prisoner of war in 1917 and, while a prisoner, accused of throwing another prisoner off a cart, which my grandma could never believe.

He came home after the war and the family planned to emigrate to Canada via Liverpool but he was discovered to have TB and turned away. He may have contracted this in the war. He died in 1926.

Ronald Percy Allen

Ronald Percy Allen




217440

Pte. Stephen Charles Allen

Australian Imperial Force 13th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.14th Aug 1916)

Stephen Charles Allen was born in the Sydney suburb of Balmain in 1891. The 23-year-old carter enlisted with the Australian Imperial Force on 18th July 1915. His brother Robert had enlisted just over a week earlier. Both brothers departed Sydney with reinforcements for the 13th Infantry Battalion aboard HMAT Ballarat on 6th September 1915.

The following June, Allen and his brother arrived on the Western Front with other men of the 13th Battalion. In letters home to his mother and sister he wrote that he was glad to have left Egypt and described the incessant rain at the front. In one letter to his sister Allen included a preserved poppy. He was with the 13th Battalion when the unit fought in its first major actions at Pozières and at nearby Mouquet Farm in July and August 1916. On 14th August, in the midst of the fighting around Mouquet Farm, both Allen brothers failed to report back in after fatigue duty. Initially listed as missing in action, a court of inquiry found that the two brothers had been killed in action by the same artillery shell, close to the front line. Stephen Charles Allen is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial in France.




216637

Pte. Thomas Allen

British Army 2nd Btn. Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment

from:Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin

(d.14th June 1918)

Thomas Allen was born in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin and enlisted there. He was the son of Thomas and Mary Anne Allen, of Kingstown, Co. Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders aged 20 and is buried in Cinq Rues British Cemetery.




218031

Thomas Henry Allen

British Army 10th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:65 Elthem St, Waterloo

(d.27th Mar 1918)

Thomas Allen served with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 10th Battalion and died aged 19 in Flanders. His grave is yet to be visited by either family or friends.




237529

QMSgt. Thomas William Allen

British Army 1st County of London Yeomanry

from:Hastings

(d.29th March 1919)

Thomas Allen was the son of Edward and Janet M Allen, husband of Daisy Evelyn Allen of 100 Elphinstone Rd. Hastings. He was 27 when he died and is buried in the Birr Military Cemetery, Grave 46, in Co. Offaly, Ireland.




222168

Pte. Tom Allen

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Ivy Street, Burnley, Lancashire

(d.8th Feb 1917)

Tom Allen died on the 8th of February 1917 and is buried in the Amara War Cemetery in Iraq.




216625

W. L. Allen

Royal Navy

WL Allen is remembered on the Memorial at St. John the Baptist, Church of Ireland, Clontarf.




300353

CSM Walter Leonard Allen

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

Commissioned (roll states no medals issued auth EF-1-4764)




216639

Pte. Wellington L Allen

British Army 44th Coy. Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

(d.22nd Aug 1917)

Private Allen, son of Walter and Margaret Allen, of North Croft, Bowness-on-Solway, Carlisle, was born in St. Columbus, Dublin, and later enlisted there. Before joining the Machine Gun Corps he was a member of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 9th Battalion. He landed at le Havre in February 1916, and was killed in action aged 21 whilst in Flanders fighting The Battle of Passchendaele. Private Allen is buried at Dochy Farm New British Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.




210961

Pte. William Allen

British Army 8th Bn Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

from:Portinode, Kesh, Co. Fermanagh

(d.9th Sep 1916)

William Allen was living in Boston, USA at the outbreak of the war. He went home to enlist. He died in the Battle of Ginchy. His body was never recovered. His name appears on the Thiepval Memorial. His two brothers went to Canada and enlisted there.




212995

Pte. William Allen

British Army 8th Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

from:Portinode Kesh, Fermanagh

(d.9th Sep 1916)

William Allen and his brothers were living in Boston, Massachusetts at the out break of the war. He returned home to enlist in the RIF - his brother went north and joined the Canadian Army. William died in the Battle of Ginchy.




300354

Pte. William Allen

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




208160

Pte. William Henry Allen

British Army 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment

from:Charles Street, Ashton-under-Lyne

(d.11th Jun 1917)

William Allen was my great uncle who died in France. His brother, Sgt. George Allen of the same address, was also serving in France but at a different locale was not notified of his death till weeks later. William is buried at the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery




1837

Pte. William Oswald Allen

British Army 2nd Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:137, Wallace Rd., Parkwood Springs, Sheffield

(d.29th May 1918)




231779

Spr. William Thompson Allen

British Army 121st. Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Belfast

Willie Allen was severely wounded by shrapnel during the Somme offensive in 1916. As an older man and a very heavy smoker, he was diagnosed as having lung cancer following an X-ray. As he appeared to be recovering, a further X-ray showed the cancer to be shrapnel which he was still carrying from 1916! Like many men who served in the trenches he rarely spoke about the war, however, during a bout of fever my father remembers him reliving the worst of the trenches as if it was happening all over again.

Fortunately, I still have his tunic buttons, cap badge, wounded stripe and lots of photos of him taken during the war. My most precious keepsakes, however, are several panoramic pictures of his Company (121st. RE, 36th Ulster Division) taken during training and a lovely piece of shellart produced by a German POW which he appears to have become friendly with in France.




213804

Field Marshall Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby MID

British Army Inniskillings 6th Dragoons

from:England

Field Marshal Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby, 1st Viscount Allenby of Megiddo, was Inspector of the Cavalry between 1910 and 1914. He was General Officer Commanding of the 1st Cavalry Division, British Expeditionary Force in 1914. He was General Officer Commanding of the Cavalry Corps between 1914 and 1915. He fought in the First World War between 1914 and 1918, for which he was mentioned in despatches seven times

He fought in the Battle of Megiddo on 19 September 1918, where he defeated the Turks




1838

Pte. P. W. Allenby

British Army 4th. Yorkshire Regiment

from:98, Lumley St., Middlesbrough

(d.6th Oct 1916)

Pte. Allenby is buried at Linthorpe Cemetery, middlesbrough, he was 21 years old and was married to Elizabeth.




205872

Private Joseph A Allerton

Royal Marine Light Infantry

I would like some information on my grandfather please as I'm doing up a gift for my grandson of his grandfather and great grandfather's service medals from both WW1 and WW2. Any help would be fantastic. Hoping you can help.




212594

Cpl. William Frederick Alley

British Army 22nd (Service) Battalion (Kensington) Royal Fusiliers

from:37 Lynton Road, Kilburn, London

Frederick William Alley 1891-1959

Frederick William Alley 1891-1959

Will Alley is my maternal grandfather. He had a glass eye which he would sneakily place on my shoulder and say "I've got my eye on you!" The glass eye was the result of an injury in the trenches in 1916. He always told us that a sniper's bullet killed the soldier next to him and then shot out his eye. According to his military records: Disability Gun shot wound. Date of disability: He states 4.2.1916, Place of disability: He states Givenchy. He states that while on sentry duty in trench at Givenchy he was shot through the mouth by rifle bullet which continued its course through nose and entered left eye. His eye was removed same day at Bethune Hospital, France. His MHS shows that his eye was removed for bullet wound same day in France. The report states No 654 Pte E.R. Clark, 22nd Roy Fus, is supposed to have wounded Pte Alley by the accidental discharge of his rifle in the front line trench., There were no witnesses of the accident Present condition is reported as: His left eye is enucleated and has left a socket which is fairly healthy but is occasionally subject to attacks of conjunctivitis. RE vision = 6/36 [myopic] and with glass vision is 6/12.




207277

Capt. B. Allgood

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Irish Rifles




216640

L/Cpl. Henry Allgood

British Army 1st Btn. Irish Guards

from:Drumcondra, Dublin

(d.14th Feb 1915)

Lance Corporal Allgood, son of George and Margaret Allgood of 28 Claude Road, Drumcondra, Dublin, was born Dublin and later enlisted there. The 1st Battalion embarked for France in August 1914 and Henry Allgood died aged 32 in Flanders in February 1915. He is buried at Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, France.




224015

Dmr. John Allibone

British Army 19th (St Pancras) Btn. London Regiment

from:Camden Town.

John Allibone lived in Camden Town and joined the London Regiment in 1911. He was wounded by gun shot to his left hand side at Loos on the 25th of September 1915 and was sent home where he was eventually attached to the Provosts of the 3rd London Regt. He received the Kings Silver War Badge in October 1916. John died on 25th June 1925 aged only 33yrs.




114

Sjt. T. Allinson

Army 2/7th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




206351

Pte. Alfred Edward Allison

British Army 5th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Grimsby

(d.13th Oct 1915)




1145

Pte. Andrew Mitchell Allison

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Newcastle, New South Wales

(d.26th Jun 1918)




217442

Pte. Arthur Charles Allison

Australian Imperial Force 29th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

Arthur Charles Allison was born at Euroa, Victoria in 1897. At the outbreak of the First World War he worked as a clerk and lived with his uncle, Frederick William Allison, in Fitzroy, Victoria. Both of his parents were deceased. Allison enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 6th March 1916 with three years of experience in the cadets.

After completing training at the AIF Signal School, he was assigned to the 29th Infantry Battalion. Private Allison departed Melbourne aboard HMAT Berrima A35 on 4th July 1916. He then proceeded to France aboard SS Princess Clementine on 30th December 1916. Allison was wounded in action on 2nd March 1917. Following a gunshot wound to his left forearm, he was admitted to Southwark Military Hospital on 13th March 1917. He returned to Australia aboard HMAT Themistocles on 5th November 1917. He was officially discharged from the AIF on 1st July 1918. Arthur Allison died in 1963 in Victoria, Australia




221907

Pte. Fred Allison

British Army 10th Btn. Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Cleethorpes




300211

Cpl. George Frederick Allison

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




500656

Pte. Godfrey Hugh Wallis Allison

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Gunyerwarilda, Australia

(d.9th Jun 1917)




1146

Pte. Godfry Hugh Wallis Allison

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:The Plantation, Boomi, NSW.

(d.9th Jun 1917)

Godfry Allison joined the 33rd Battalion at the front on the 23rd March 1917. He was wounded in the left leg on 7th May 1917 and was treated by 11th Field Ambulance. He rejoined his unit on the 25th May and took part in the launch of the Battle of Messines. Godfry was Killed in Action on the 9th of June and was laid to rest in Toronto Avenue Cemetery. The personalised inscription on his headstone was chosen by his siblings, he was the eldest of the boys and three brothers Hugh, Stephen and Matthew survived him. He had nominated his sister Agnes as his next of kin and names his nieces and nephews as beneficiaries in his will.




1252

Pte. James Allison

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow, Co Durham

(d.12th Mar 1915)




214290

Pte. James Allison

British Army 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow

(d.12th Mar 1915)

James Allison Medal Index Card

James Allison Medal Index Card

James Allison served with the 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. He was aged 41 when he died on 12th March 1915. Born in Scotland, he was the son of Hugh and Mary Allison of Jarrow and Husband of Margaret Elizabeth Allison (nee Carrick) of 148 High Street Jarrow. On the 1911 census he is listed as James Allinson age 36 Shipyard Platers Labourer is with his wife Elizabeth and children at 148 High Street, Jarrow. James is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




2153

Cpl John Allison

British Army 14th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:224, Windsor Avenue, Gateshead.

(d.28th Oct 1917)

Allison, John, Corporal, 19/676, Killed in action on 28th October 1917. Aged 22 years.

Buried in The Huts Cemetery, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, in grave XII. C. 14.

Only son of William and Margaret Ann Allison, of 224, Windsor Avenue, Gateshead.

Corporal Allison was a member of the 19th Btn N.F. with service number 19/676, but was attached to 14th(Pioneer) Btn Northumberland Fusiliers.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




500758

Pte. William Allison

British Army 56th Coy. Machine Gun Corps

from:Edinburgh

(d.7th Jun 1917)




214292

Rfmn. William Allison

British Army 9th Battalion Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consorts Own)

from:Jarrow

(d.25th Sept 1915)

William Allison's Medal Index Card

William Allison's Medal Index Card

William Allison served with the 9th Battalion Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consorts Own) he died on 25th September 1915 at the age of 23. He had been born in 1892 in Jarrow, son of Arthur and Margaret Elizabeth Allison (nee Wilson) and lived and enlisted in Jarrow. On the 1911 census he is listed as William Allison age 18 Apprentice Patternmaker in Shipyard is with his parents Arthur and Margaret Allison at 59 Albert Road, Jarrow . William is remembered in Ypres on the Menin Gate Memorial and is commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (north face) Jarrow.




226673

Lt. A. B.W. Allistone

British Army 6th Btn. Middlesex Regiment

Lt Allistone was a POW at Torgau camp, Saxony.




210666

Thomas William Allman

British Army 2nd Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:Ellesmere Port

My Gt Grandfather, Thomas William Allman, enlisted in the 2nd Cheshire Reg't on 30/6/1915. He was posted to Salonika on 20/1/1916. On 15/4/1918 he was reported missing, but in May that year he was located by the United States Consul being held as a Prisoner of War at Radomir, Bulgaria. News was released that he had suffered severe gun shot wounds but was recovering well. Thomas was eventually freed from the camp on 31/10/1918 and arrived home the following January, where he was discharged from the service due to his health.




209873

Pte. William Allon

British Army 1/5th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Stockton-on-Tees

(d.10th Nov 1916)

William Allon is remembered on Theipval Memorial for soldiers with no known grave.




224600

L/Cpl. Percival Allen Allso

British Army 16th Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:Rugby

(d.27th July 1916)

Percy Allso served with the 16th Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment.




217959

Rfln. Arthur E. Allsop

British Army 12th Btn. King's Royal Rifle Corps

(d.15th Jun 1917)

Arthur Allsop served with the King's Royal Rifle Corps 12th Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 15th June 1917 aged 21 and is buried in Favreuil British Cemetery, Favreuil, France.




1641

Pte Harry Allsop

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:38, Church St., Tutbury, Burton-on-Trent

(d.28th March 1918)

Allsop , Harry. Private, 48459 Killed 28th March 1918, aged 40 years.

Remembered on the Pozieres Memorial panel 16 to 18.

Son of Joseph Henry Allsop, of Hatton Rd., Tutbury; husband of Mary Ann Allsop, of 38, Church St., Tutbury, Burton-on-Trent.

From the Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour




500657

Pte. Ivan William Allsop

Australian Imperial Forces B Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Rockwood Farm, Quirindi, NSW

(d.8th Jun 1917)




1147

Pte. Norman John Allsop

Australian Imperial Forces B Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Quirindi




226003

Matthew Allsopp

British Army 14th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Belfast

(d.1st Nov 1916)

Matthew Allsopp is my great uncle and was killed in Belgium or France. I would love to know where he is buried.

Editors Note: Matthew lies in Pond Farm Cemetery near Wulvergem in Belgium.




234832

Pte. Thomas Allsopp

British Army 6th Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:Birmingham

Thomas Allsopp was born in 1892 at Berners Street, Birmingham. He served with the 6th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment (a territorial unit). The regiment mobilised on 5th August 1914 and was deployed on 19th March 1915. The regiment arrived in Le Havre on 22nd March 1915.

Thomas experienced a gas attack on 22nd and 23rd April 1915, was again under gunfire and gas attack at Ypres on 24th May 1915 and enemy attack on 28th May 1915. On 17th July 1915 Thomas was in hospital. He was discharged from hospital to duty on 22nd July 1915. He subsequently died of a brain tumour on 26th November 1929, aged 37.




1813

L/Cpl. Percy Allsup

British Army 11th Btn. Y Coy. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Clayton Green, Nr. Chorley, Lancs.




500791

Pte. David Allum

British Army 26th Btn. Royal Fusliers

from:36, Field Lane, Teddington, Middx.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




220758

Pte Walter Charles Allum

British Army 2nd Btn East Yorkshire Regiment




224519

Pte. Albert Almond

British Army 16th Btn. King's Royal Rifles

from:Astley Bridge

(d.20th Jul 1916)

Albert Almond was born to Thomas Almond and Nanny Braithwaite Holt in 1884. He enlisted in the King's Royal Rifles in September 1914 and was sent to France, but returned to England to recover from wounds received in January 1915. He married Minnie Shaw in 1915 and returned to the front. He was killed in action on the 20th July 1916.




234117

Pte. John Almond

British Army 2nd Coy. Machine Gun Corps

from:81 Norfolk Rd, Islington, London

(d.19th Aug 1916)

On the 31st May 1915, when the first Zeppelin bombs were dropped in London only half a mile from his home, John Almond, aged 17 and his brother Alfred aged 20, travelled to Holborn, London and enlisted as volunteers with the Hampshire Regiment. The brothers were given consecutive service numbers 18143 & 18144.

John was clever, good at mathematics, and quickly selected for training for the regiment's machine gun team. The Machine Gun Corps (MGC) was created by Royal Warrant on14th October 1915, by Army Order. Later that same year, John was informed he was to be compulsorily transferred to the new unit, thus separated from his elder brother.

On 26th January 1916, he joined his new Regiment at the highly secretive MGC Training Centre in Belton Park, Grantham, where he was issued with a new service number MGC 26764. Here, he undertook 6 months of specialist training on Maxim and the newly introduced Vickers Machine Guns.

After leaving Folkestone on 13th July, John crossed the Channel to Boulogne, France and joined 2nd Company MGC, in the field, on 18th July. On 14th August, the 2nd Company War Diary records the following: They were in front at Mametz Wood, Somme and on 18th August, the 2nd Coy moved up to the Intermediate Trench to the west edge of High Wood in support of 2nd Infantry Brigade. During a series of attacks on the afternoon of 18th August by The Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, The Kings 4th Liverpool and 4th Suffolk, John was in a forward machine gun position. With increasing casualties and orders to retire, the machine-gun section was also ordered to pull back to the support line, which was done under fire, their guns mounted to cover the edge of the wood so as to give some protection to the retreating wounded. John was seriously wounded sometime during the actions of that day at the west edge of High Wood, and was reported dead on 19th August 1916, aged 18.

John Almond was listed as missing and would have remained, as such, except that when his remains were, eventually, found he had on him a spoon, a shaving brush and razor that were engraved with his Hampshire service number, HTS 18144. These items, together with his MGC cap badge and buttons, were enough to identify him. John's remains are buried in a named grave at the High Wood Cemetery, London Extension, Longueval, Somme, France.




226674

L/Cpl. P. Almond

British Army 1st Btn. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

(d.2nd April 1915)

L/Cpl. Almond was a POW at Wittenberg camp in Saxony. He died during the typhus outbreak which raged through the camp from January to July 1915. Sixty British POWs died, along with about 125 men of other nationalities. There were nearly 2,000 typhus cases in all. L/Cpl Almond is buried in Berlin Southwestern Cemetery.




214293

Alpine

He is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




222878

Pte. Thomas Alston

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:6 Brunshaw Square, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.9th Aug 1915)

Thomas Alston died on the 9th August 1915, aged 27 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




221186

Pte. William Henry Alston

British Army 9th Btn. Essex Regiment

from:Brentwood, Essex

(d.3rd Jul 1916)

William Henry Alston

William Henry Alston

William Alston volunteered for the army in 1915 and joined the 9th Battalion, Essex Regiment at Warley Barracks. On July 3rd 1916 the battalion were called into the front line opposite the town of Ovilliers on the Somme in France. Their objective was to take the town. In the last couple of days other regiments had failed to take the village with large losses of men. The Essex Regiment went over the top at 3.20am into darkness and the smoke of battle. One company (C Coy) of which William was a part completely lost their way, and by accident took some German trenches that they weren't supposed to and returned with many prisoners. However, they had been badly shelled just before they went over the top and many of their men were killed including William. Ovilliers still wasn't taken!

Editor's Note: Private Alston was the son of Samuel Henry and Rachel Alston, of Hutton, Essex, and husband of Florence Alston, of 36 Myrtle Road, Warley, Brentwood, Essex. He died aged 37, and is buried in Ovillers Military Cemetery, Somme.

William Henry Alston

William Henry Alston




222871

Pte. Arthur Gilbert Altham

British Army 2nd/2nd Bn. East Lancashire Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps

from:49 Rosehill Road, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.13th Aug 1915)

Arthur Altham drowned on the Royal Edward on 13th August 1915, aged 17. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey. He was the son of Alfred Edwin and Annie Altham of 28 Cromwell Street, Stoneyholme, Burnley.




235372

Rflmn. Richard Altham

British Army 1st Battalion, C Coy. Rifle Brigade

from:Blackburn

(d.3rd May 1915)




224780

Pte. William Alton MM.

British Army 10th Btn. Sherwood Foresters

from:Rose Terrace, Tupton

(d.11th Jun 1918)

William Alton worked with his dad at the Grassmore colliery as a pony driver. He enlisted at Chesterfield in 1914, and entered France in July 1915, serving with C Company, 11th Platoon, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters. He received the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty near Plouvain on 5th of August 1917, when taking part in a patrol which entered enemy trenches. William was wounded three times before his death.

He was killed in action at Auchonvillers and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.




213047

Sgt. Robert Amberson

British Army 59th Brigade Royal Field Artillery

Robert Amberson went out in 1915 with 459 battery. He was posted to D Bty in 1916 and remained with the brigade until demobbed in 1919




214312

Spr. George Ambler

British Army 1st/3rd (Durham) Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Jarrow

(d.7th Sep 1916)

George Ambler Medal Index Card

George Ambler Medal Index Card

George Ambler served with the 1st/3rd (Durham) Field Coy. Royal Engineers. He was aged 28 when he died on 7th September 1916. He had enlisted in Jarrow. George is buried in Delville Wood Cemetery. Longueval and is commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (west face) Jarrow.




234221

Cpl. Henry George Amblin MM.

British Army 18th Briade Royal Field Artillery

from:Slaughterford, Wiltshire

Henry Amblin enlisted in the the Wiltshire Regiment on 1st of Apr 1896 . He was trained at the Regimental Depot at Devizes and then posted to the 2nd Battalion on 8 Jul 1896 who were serving in Guernsey before transferring to 1st Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment on 22nd of Feb 98 with whom he was posted to India after serving 1 yr 327 days in Britain. Whilst serving in India with the Wiltshires he transferred to 30th Battery Royal Field Artillery with effect the 30 Nov 1903. Whilst in India he also served with 44th Brigade, 59th Battery RFA, of the 3rd Lahore Division. He served in India for 16 yrs and 185 days and remained in India until being sent to France at the start of the Great War

He arrived in France on 26th of Aug 1914 and remained there until 25 Jan 1919 serving in France for 4 yrs and 123 days when he returned to the UK and was discharged on the 23rd of Feb 1919 with 22 yrs 329 days service. During his time in France he was awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field on 27th of September 1918 for an action in or near the village of Moislains on the first day of the Battle of Canal Du Nord, this was published in the London Gazzette on 11th of Feb 1919.




216641

Rflm. John Francis Ambrose

British Army 3rd Btn. Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own)

from:Camberwell, Middlesex

(d.19th Jun 1918)

Rifleman John Ambrose, son of William and Kathleen Ambrose, was born in Dublin and later enlisted in London. He died of wounds aged 23 whilst in Flanders, and is buried at Pernes British Cemetery.




232134

Cpl. S. Ambrose

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




214316

Pte. William Ambrose

British Army 6th Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers

from:Jarrow

(d.28th Mar 1918)

William Ambrose's Medal Index Card

William Ambrose's Medal Index Card

William Ambrose served with the 6th Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers. Aged 28 he died of wounds on 28th March 1918. He was born, lived and enlisted Jarrow, son of Robert and Mary Ann Ambrose (nee Headley) O1911 census William Ambrose age 21 Private is with 1st Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers, his mother Mary Ann Ambrose and family are at 7 Burns Street, Jarrow.

William is buried in Honnechy British Cemetery and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




2098

Pte Joseph Amers

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.30th Jul 1916)

Amers, Joseph. Private, 19/1369, Killed in Action on 30th July 1916.

Remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 10 B 11 B and 12 B.

19th Btn, Northumberland Fusiliers records show that he was killed in action on 30th June 1916, but CWGC has the date as 30th July. Buried by 1/4 Lancshire Regt near Maltzhorn Farm, Somme.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




500787

Pte. Ernest Thomas Ames

British Army 11th Btn. Royal West Kent Regiment

from:"Vale View," Elham, Canterbury, Kent.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




211175

Pte. Henry Richard Thomas Ames

British Army 1/5 Btn. Gloucester Regiment

from:Cheltenham




213781

Pte. Henry Richard Thomas Ames

British Army Gloucestershire Regiment

from:Cheltenham

Henry Richard Thomas Ames was the grandfather I never knew, having died in 1963 when I was only 2 years of age. From my father I was able to obtain some insights into Harry's war, including being gassed and buried alive twice, eventually surviving the war and emigrating to Australia in 1921.

From my research I have been able to obtain his medal card and medal roll details and also find out a lot of extra information including Harry's older brother William, who served with the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and I was able to obtain his (William's) full service record from the Canadian Archives. Harry went on to become one of the first life members of the Campsie RSL in Sydney and I believe one of the only British Army members to become a member of the Australian RSL. Harry's wife, Vera, was also actively involved with the RSL until her death in 1958. I hope someone who reads this maybe able to fill in some of the "blanks" regarding The Royal engineers, The 2nd South Midlands etc.

Editor's Note: His medal record does mention the Gloucester Regiment twice with different Regimental Numbers 1718 and 240173 also Royal Engineers Regimental Number 497926. He was discharged on the 15th April 1919. It is not obvious which Battalion(s) of the Gloucesters he served in. The mention of 2nd South Midlands is more likely to refer to : 61st (2nd South Midland) Division. Within this Division Battalions of the Gloucesters served in two of the Brigades; 183rd (2nd Gloucester and Worcester) Brigade had 2/4th and 2/6th Battalions Gloucesters and 184th (2nd South Midland) Brigade had the 2/5th Battalion Gloucesters. The Royal engineers item may refer to an attachment to an RE Company in the 61st (2nd South Midland) Division.




1148

Lt. Albert Bissett Amess MC.

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Kyogle. NSW.




209223

Pte. Edmund Victor Amey

British Army 1st Btn. Rifle Brigade

from:London

(d.6th July 1915)

I don't have any real details of my Great Uncle, Edmund Amey, but have Ivisited his grave which is at the Talana Farm Cemetry. I do not have a picture of him, and am hoping one day I may find there is one somewhere in Military records.




218965

Pte. Arthur Stanley Amor

British Army 1/4th Btn. Wiltshire Regiment

from:Bromham. Wilts.

(d.8th Nov 1917)

Stan Amor was my uncle who joined 1/4th. Battalion Wiltshire Regiment at Trowbridge, Wiltshire. He was born in Wiltshire and saw service in India before being posted to Palestine in 1917. He took part in the 3rd Battle of Gaza on the 6/7th November and died of his wounds on the 8th November. He is buried at Dehr el Belah cemetery. He was 19 years old.

I have tried to visit his grave during the last few years to pay our Family respects. However, this has not been possible due to the continuing problems and strife within Gaza etc. and the difficulties in obtaining a visa to this area.




214317

Pte. Andrew Amos

British Army 10th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.9th Aug 1916)

Andrew Amos' Medal Index Card

Andrew Amos' Medal Index Card

Andrew Amos served with the 10th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He was aged 28 when he died on 9th August 1916. He was born in Jarrow 1888, son of Ernest J. and Margaret Amos (nee Green). On the 1911 census, Andrew Amos is listed as age 22 General Labourer in Shipyard living with his widowed mother Margaret Amos at 54 Walter Street, Jarrow He enlisted in Jarrow and is remembered at the Thiepval Memorial.




500775

Rfm. Harry Amos

British Army 1st/21st Btn. London Regiment

(d.7th Jun 1917)




234662

L/Cpl. Joseph Amos MM.

British Army 5th Btn. South Lancashire Regiment

from:St Helens

Joe Amos was my father. I regret I have no written or photographic records of his service with the South Lancs but from what he told me (war stories) he was amongst it. He was awarded the Military Medal but never discussed it with me. I am now 94 years of age and would like to see my father's name recorded.




1149

Pte. Owen Alexander Eugene Amos

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Alandale, Ridley St., Auchenflower, Queensland

(d.30 Sep 1918)




217239

Rfmn. Thomas Harry Amos

British Army 13th Btn. D Coy. Rifle Brigade

from:Colchester.

Rfmn. Thomas Harry Amos served with the Rifle Brigade, 13th battalion. D company.




214318

Pte. Thomas Amour

British Army 22nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Hebburn

(d.20th May 1918)

Thomas Amour Medal Index Card

Thomas Amour Medal Index Card

Thomas Amour served with the 22nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He was aged 23 when he died on 20th May 1918. He was born and was living Hebburn, he was the son of the late Thomas and Matilda Amour (Rickard) of 33 Arthur Street Hebburn Colliery. On the 1911 census, Thomas Amour is listed as age 16 Miner Driver at Colliery living with his widowed father Thomas Amour and family at 33 Arthur Street, Hebburn Colliery He enlisted in Jarrow and died in Clitheroe. Thomas is buried in Hebburn Cemetery and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




220681

Pte. Basil John Amyes

British Army 3rd Monmouthshire Regiment

from:Honeysuckle Cottage, Govilon, Abergavenny

(d.11th May 1915)

This is to remember my great uncle Basil Amyes who died aged only 20. Records show that on 10th May 1915 there were only 29 men left from 500 who had gone out to fight. Basil died on 11th May 1915. By the end of May the battalions were having to merge as there were so few men left in each unit. It is hard to imagine going from 'Honeysuckle Cottage' to life in the trenches. Basil has no marked grave but is remembered on the Yypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.




207964

L/Cpl. Horace Ancell

British Army 28th Btn (1st Artists Rifles) London Regiment

from:Box, Wiltshire

(d.27 Mar 1918)

I have just started researching my family history, and have discovered that my Grandmother married Horace Ancell in January 1918. Like so many others, Horace then went off to war and was killed on 27 March 1918. He is commemorated on the memorial at Arras, and I hope to pay my respects to him, and all the fallen, in the near future. My Grandmother remarried in 1919. I have very little information about Lance Corporal Ancell, either as a person or as a soldier, and would appreciate any assistance in getting to know more about this man and his comrades.




1690

Pte. Anderson

British Army 22nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers




1966

Pte. Anderson

British Army 22nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers




214320

A. Anderson

A. Anderson is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




500800

Capt. A. E. Anderson

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.




216643

2nd Lt. Alan James Ramsay Anderson

British Army 3rd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.20th Oct 1914)

Second Lieutenant Alan James Ramsay Anderson served with the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Regiment and was attached to the 2nd Battalion. He died in France aged 21 on the 20th October 1914 and is remembered on the Le Touret Memorial Pas de Calais, France.

Alan was the son of Robert Andrew and Mary Teresa Anderson, of The Plunkett House, 84, Merrion Square, Dublin. He was educated at Strangeway's School, Dublin, Beaumont College, Eton, Bedford Grammar School and University College, Oxford.




221444

Rflmn. Albert Anderson

British Army 11th Btn. Rifle Brigade

from:Battersea

(d.3rd Sep 1916)

I have just found out that I had a great uncle, Albert Anderson who served in WW1. His name is on the Thiepval War Memorial and I guess that he died in the Battle of Guillemont. Very proud and keen to learn more about him and to keep his memory.




1150

Pte. Albert Alexander Anderson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Logan St, Tenterfield, NSW.

Albert Anderson was a 20 year old railway porter when he enlisted in June 1916. He arrived in England on board the SS Port Napier and joined his unit on the front line on 4th May 1917. He was wounded in action on the 6th April 1918, and admitted the the 2nd General Hospital at Le Harve with a gunshot wound to his scalp. He returned to his unit on the 20th July and returned to Australia in June 1919.




1151

Pte. Albert Barkley Anderson

Australian Imperial Forces 3rd Div Signals School

from:42 College St, Sydney, NSW.




214321

Pte. Albert Edwin Anderson

British Army 1st Battalion Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

from:Jarrow

(d.4th Oct 1917)

Albert Edwin Anderson's Medal Index Card

Albert Edwin Anderson's Medal Index Card

Albert Edwin Anderson served with the 1st Battalion Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) he was aged 19 when he died on 4th October 1917. Son of Robert and Jane Anderson of 63 James Street Jarrow he was born, enlisted and lived Jarrow. On the 1911 census he is recorded as Albert Anderson age 12 at School is with his parents Robert and Jane Anderson and family at 63 James Street, Jarrow.

Albert is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




214319

Pte. Alexander Anderson

British Army 19th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.13th Sep 1916)

Alexander Anderson Medal Index Card

Alexander Anderson Medal Index Card

Alexander Anderson served with the 19th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He was aged 27 when he died of wounds on 13th September 1916. He was born Liverpool and lived in Jarrow, the son of William and Esther Anderson of 47 Queen's Road Jarrow. On the 1911 census Alexander Anderson age 22, a Rifleman is with his regiment Durham Light Infantry, his parents William and Esther Anderson are with their children at 5 South Street back, Jarrow. He enlisted in Sunderland. Alexander is buried in Harbarco Communal Cemetery Extension and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




1152

Pte. Andrew Anderson

Australian Imperial Forces C Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Oakwood, Inverell NSW.

Andrew Anderson was a 39year old farmer from Inverell who joined up in 1916, he was 5'10" tall with dark brown hair and brown eyes. He arrived in England in July 1916 and proceeded to France on the 16th September 1916 to join the 3rd battalion at the front. On the 11th January 1917 he was admitted to the 25th Stationary Hospital at Rouen in France suffering from Mumps. on the 6th February he was transferred to England aboard the Hospital Ship Sr David having developed Bronchitis. By March he had recovered enough to leave hospital and return to camp in England. In September he returned to France to join the 33rd Battalion. Andrew was reported as wounded in Belgium on the 20th October, but this was then amended to reported Sick. He was killed in Action near Ypres on the 13th November 1917 and was reported to have been buried in that vicinity by men from the 36th Battalion. His name is amongst those with no known grave who are remembered on the Menin Gate in Ypres.




1642

Pte Archibald Anderson

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.28th March 1918)

Anderson, Archibald. Private, 59133 Killed 28th March 1918,

Remembered on the Pozieres Memorial panel 16 to 18.

From the Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour




216652

Pte. Arthur Anderson

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

from:Inchicore, County Dublin

(d.8th Jun 1917)

Private Arthur Anderson, son of George and Mary Anderson, of Arbour Hill, Dublin, lived in Inchicore, County Dublin when he enlisted. He died of wounds whilst fighting the Battle of Messines in West Flanders. Private Anderson was aged 24, and is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension.




232135

Pte. B. Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle




1153

Pte. Carl Hugo Anderson

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:70 Marion St, Leichhardt, Sydney, NSW

Carl Anderson was born in Horrkoping Sweden, he was 36 years old, married and working as a fireman in Sydney when he enlisted in the AIF in November 1916. He is described as being 5'6" tall with brown hair and brown eyes, he had a tattoo of a lady on his left forearm and a vase of flowers on his right.

Carl arrived in England at the end of January 1917 and undertook training at Sutton Mandeville and Larkhill before proceeding to France on the 25th June 1917. He joined the 33rd Battalion on the 20th July 1917. After three months in action he was admitted to hospital suffering from Trench foot and was transferred to England for treatment at the 1st Western General Hospital. Carl returned to the front on 16th March 1918 and was Killed in Action on the 30th near Fouilloy, he now lies in the Villers-Bretonneux Cemetery.




225616

Pte Charles Fred Anderson

British Army 9th Btn Suffolk Regiment

from:Long Sutton, Lincs.

(d.23rd November 1915)

Charles Anderson worked as a farm labourer until enlisting in the Suffolk Regiment. He died of his wounds on 23rd November 1915 and is commemorated at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery (IID3).




2191

Charles Patrick Anderson

British Army 11th Btn. London Regiment

This photo was taken in 1922 when he was in the

This photo was taken in 1922 when he was in the "Black and Tans"

My Grandad, Charles Patrick Anderson served with the 1/11th London Regt. After the war he was in the "Black and Tans"




300207

Pte. Christopher Anderson MM.

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




1205646

Sjt. D. B. Anderson

Australian Imperial Force. 3rd Salvage Coy.




1205690

Cpl. D. O. Anderson

Australian Imperial Force. 3rd Salvage Coy.




224712

Pte. Donald Anderson

British Army 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. London Regiment

from:Owston Ferry




218684

Pte. Edward Anderson

British Army 20th (Tyneside Scottish) Bn. Northumberland Fusiilers

(d.28th December 1916 )

Edward Anderson was my grandfather and was killed on 28th December 1916 while mending trenches in Armentieres. He was wounded on the first day of the Somme - shot in the head he did not survive. Edward originally tried to enlist in the Artillery but his doctor said he was unfit to enlist he went and enlisted in the Tynesideside Scottish. Edward was the father of three children when he enlisted and a miner. What drove him to enlist no one knows but he gave his life like many others.

He may not have won any medals but he is a hero to me and I have I visited his grave at Ration Farm, La Chapelle-d'Armentieres on several occasions.




115

Pte. F. Anderson

Army Durham Light Infantry




2142

Pte Frank Burnett Anderson

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:57, Sanderson Rd, Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne

(d.16th Oct 1917)

Anderson, Frank, Burnett. Private, 19/523, Died of sickness on 16th October 1917. Aged 24 years.

Buried in Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen,in grave I. A. 16.

Son of Annie Anderson, of 57, Sanderson Rd, Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and the late William Edgar Anderson.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




204994

Pte. Frederick Joseph Anderson

British Army 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:138 Back High Street, Sunderland

(d.31 March 1918)

Fred was the twin brother of my grandmother Edith Walker nee Anderson. They were born on 16th March 1891. He enlisted in the DLI 15th Battalion at Newcastle-upon-Tyne on 28 February 1916.

My husband and I studied movements of 15th Battalion DLI at Durham Records Office. The Battalion was billetted at Frechencourt (12kms north of Amiens)on the Somme on night of 30th March 1918. They moved to nearby Allonville (8kms north of Amiens)on 31st March 1918, the fateful day when Fred was Killed-in-Action. By then he was aged 27yrs 15 days. He has no known grave but is remembered with honour on the Pozieres Memorial.

Sadly, none of the family possess a photo of Fred.




232136

Pte. G. Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle




236149

G. Anderson

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

(d.1st July 1916)

I have a photograph of G.Anderson found with Thomas William Moore's memorabilia. G. Anderson was killed on 1st of July 1916 during the battle of the Somme. Thomas William Moore found a photograph in G. Anderson's breast pocket pierced by shrapnel, it is of G. Anderson's girlfriend.

Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th battalion. G.Anderson is on the back row on the Right.

Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th battalion. G.Anderson is on the back row on the Right.




116

Lance Sjt. G. W. Anderson

Army 8th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




220989

L/Cpl. George Anderson

British Army 7th Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Sheffield

(d.20th Jul 1916)




1274

Pte. George Henry Anderson

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.16th Apr 1915)




216647

L/Cpl. George Henry Anderson

British Army 3rd (Reserve) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment

from:Plumstead, Kent

(d.11th Sep 1915)

George Henry Anderson was born in Dublin and enlisted in Bedford. He died at home in Plumstead, Kent




206416

Grace Dolman Anderson

Women's Land Army

from:Bethnal Green

I am not sure of many facts regarding my great grandmother Grace Anderson (married name Lucas) as she died before I was born and my grandfather remembers very little. He says she was in the Women's Land Army as a young woman and married a middle class man called George Samuel Lucas. Apparently this caused a stir in the middle class Lucas family and George was cut off as he had married beneath himself.

I do have a photograph of her as an old woman, but none when she was young, as my grandfathers house burned down in the seventies and most family photos were lost. I really want to find out more and would be so grateful for anything anyone can tell me.




232137

Cpl. H. Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Witton Park

H Anderson was wounded in the right knee and evacuated in July 1916. He was aged 21




216648

Pte. Henry Campbell Anderson

British Army 28th (County of London) Battalion (Artists Rifles) London Regiment

from:Leicester

(d.30th Oct 1917)

Henry Campbell Anderson served with the 28th (County of London) Battalion (Artists Rifles), London Regiment. He was killed in action on the 30th October 1917 in Flanders. Henry was born in Dublin and enlisted at Leicester.




216644

Lt. Henry McDonnell Anderson MC

British Army D Coy, 5th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.30th May 1918)

Henry McDonnell Anderson was a native of Portaferry, Co. Down. He was the son of John and Mary Anderson, of 32, Dargle Rd., Drumcondra, Dublin. He was attached to the 63rd Battalion, Machine Gun Corps and died of wounds, received in an enemy air raid at Doullens age 25. and lies in Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt.




232138

Pte. Issac Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:St. Ives Hunts

(d.1st July 1916)




232139

Pte. J. Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




217960

Pte. James A. Anderson

British Army 12th Btn. King's (Liverpool) Regiment

(d.12th Sep 1916)

James Anderson served with the King's (Liverpool) Regiment 12th Battalion. He was shot for cowardice on 12th Sptember1916 aged 30,and is buried in Fienvillers British Cemetery, Fienvillers, France.




214324

Pte. James Mackie Anderson

British Army 1st Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own)

from:Jarrow

(d.26th Nov 1943)

James Mackie Anderson enlisted in Sunderland and served with the 1st Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own). He was born in Jarrow in 1893 and died on 21st March 1918, age 24. James is remembered on the Arras Memorial Bay 4.




222561

Pte. John Anderson

British Army 6th Btn. Highland Light Infantry

from:Glasgow




224199

L/Sgt. John Anderson

British Army 19th (St Pancras) Btn. London Regiment

from:Chalk Farm

John Anderson resided in Chalk Farm, his occupation was a French polisher. He was 5ft 3” and joined the 19th Battalion, London Regiment (number 1920, then 610032).

On the first day of the Battle of Loos, 25th September 1915, he was wounded in the head by gunshot. John survived and returned to his unit on 14th of October 1915. He was promoted from Private to Lance Corporal on 28th of June 1916 and then to Corporal on 12th of August 1916. On 15th of September 1916 John was appointed Lance Sergeant. On this day the 19th London Battalion were part of the second wave of the attack that captured High Wood (a part of the Battle of Flers-Courelette, itself part of the Somme offensive) and he received a bayonet wound to his wrist but only appears to have been away from his regiment for two days.

In 1917 he was posted to the London command depot in England and served there between 10th of April 1917 and 24th of September 1917 when he was discharged from the army due to the effects of wounds.




300741

A/WO.Cl.II John Anderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

served with 18th & 52nd DLI




216649

Pte. John Charles Anderson

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.23rd Oct 1916)

John Anderson was born and enlisted in Dublin. he was the son of William P. and Mary Anderson, of "St. Johns", Tritonville Rd., Sandymount, Dublin. John was killed in action aged 19. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.




214325

Gnr. John Craig Anderson

British Army 9th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Jarrow

(d.6th Sep 1917)

John Craig Anderson's Medal Index Card

John Craig Anderson's Medal Index Card

John Craig Anderson served as a gunner with 9th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery. Aged 33 he died on 6th September 1917 in Warrington. He was born in Jarrow in 1882 and was living in Jarrow when he enlisted in Newcastle. On the 1911 census he is listed as John Craig Anderson aged 27 Caulker in Shipyard living with his wife Edith Anderson at 37 Percy Street, Jarrow, John is buried in Jarrow Cemetery and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow. He was also commemorated on the Triptych (left panel) in St. Mark's Church Jarrow (it is no longer a Church and the Triptych is no longer there)

John Craig Anderson CWGC headstone in Jarrow Cemetery

John Craig Anderson CWGC headstone in Jarrow Cemetery

Triptych (left panel) in that was in St. Mark's Church in Jarrow (it is no longer a Church)

Triptych (left panel) in that was in St. Mark's Church in Jarrow (it is no longer a Church)




210994

Gunner John Edward Anderson

British Army 34th Brigade, C Battery Royal Field Artillery

from:167 Langham Road, West Green, Tottenham, London

(d.22nd Apr 1917)

John Anderson was an American citizen from Pensylvania. He came over with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) and married Mary Ann Darby. I have a photo of him and his unit but family do not know much about him and how he died.




212963

Spr. John J Anderson

British Army 175th Tunneling Company Royal Engineers




214326

Pte. John Thomas Anderson

British Army 1st/5th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow

(d.30th Oct 1916)

John Thomas Anderson's Medal Index Card

John Thomas Anderson's Medal Index Card

John Thomas Anderson served with the 1st/5th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. Living in Jarrow he enlisted Wallsend. He died on 30th October 1916. John is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




301018

Pte. Joseph Anderson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

Joe Anderson was wounded in the arm on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.




216642

S/Sgt. M. J. Anderson

South African Forces Camp Commandants Staff

(d.2nd August 1919)

M J Allen was born in Dublin and was the son of Beresford and Nora Anderson. He died aged and is buried in Thaba Tshwane (Old No. 1) Military Cemetery, Gauteng, South Africa.




216645

2nd.Lt. Mervyn Kebble Anderson

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

from:Brentford, Orwell Park, Rathgar, Dublin

(d.11th May 1915)

Mervyn Anderson was the son of James and Olive Anderson, of 28, Clarinda Park East, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. He served with the Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion and died of wounds in May 1915 aged 23. He is commemorated at Brentford, Orwell Park, Rathgar, Dublin and Rathgar Presbyterian Church.




218491

Pte. P. Anderson

British Army 11th Btn. Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

from:Aberdeen, Scotland

(d.21st Nov 1918)

P. Anderson died on 21st November 1918 and is buried in Plovdiv Central Cemetery in Bulgaria. He was the son of Mr. & Mrs. Anderson of Sessnia, Methlick, Aberdeen, Husband of Mary Anderson of South Constitution Lane, Aberdeen. He was 30 when he died so he was born circa 1888.




216646

2nd Lt. Philip Maurice Ramsey Anderson MID.

British Army 3rd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

(d.24th Feb 1915)

Philip Anderson was a native of Ballyellis, Buttevant, Co. Cork and son of Robert Andrew and Mary Teresa Anderson, of 1, Earlsfort Mansions, Dublin. He died of wounds, received on 14th February 1915 near Hill 60, he was aged 26 and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery.




232140

Pte. Richard Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Gateshead

Richard Anderson was wounded in July 1916




166084

Robert Anderson

British Army

from:Hightae Dumfriesshire Scotland

I don't really know much about my grandfather Bob Anderson but i do know he served in WW1. I have the only surviving picture of him in his World War 1 uniform taken at a photographers studio in Paisley. I think he was only 17 at the time. Judging by the spurs he was wearing he probably served with a cavalry regiment.My mum thinks he was in Egypt at some point during the war. There is an embroidery of the crossed rifles of the machine gun corps but no one seems sure who it belonged to but it did mysteriously appear after my grandads brother died so grandad may have been in the artillary as part of a machine gun grew. He did survive the war but sadly died in 1927, aged 27 from tuberculosis so regretably ,as i am particularly fascinated by the Great War, i did not have the privilage of meeting him or of talking to him about his experiences.I would like to know what regiment he was in, where he was, and what battles he fought in. Can you help please?




214328

Cpl. Robert Anderson

British Army 12th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.15th May 1917)

Robert Anderson's Medal Index Card

Robert Anderson's Medal Index Card

Robert Anderson served with the 12th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. Aged 28 he died on 15th May 1917, son of Joseph Anderson of 74 Stead Street Jarrow. On the 1911 census Robert Anderson age 24 Private is at Aldershot with 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards, his father Joseph Anderson and his stepmother are at 49 Stanley Street (Lodging house).

Robert is buried in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




216650

Pte. Robert Anderson

British Army 7th Btn. Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment

from:Achill Sound, County Mayo, Ireland

(d.23rd Mar 1918)

Private Anderson was born in Dublin, and enlisted at Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland. Before joining the Royal West Surrey Regiment he was a member of the 5th Lancers. He was killed in action in Vendeuil, France, and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme.




236726

Cpl. Robert Anderson

British Army 2nd Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Sheffield

(d.14th July 1915)

Robert Anderson died when a German mine was detonated under the trench where he was situated. He has no known grave and is commemorated on Menin Gate memorial.




232141

Pte. Septimus Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Wreketon

(d.1st July 1916)




1205433

Rfm. Stanley Orme Anderson

British Army 14th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:5, Baronet's Grove, Tottenham, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




232142

Pte. T. Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




216651

Pte. Thomas Anderson

British Army 8th (Service) Btn. Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

(d.27th Sep 1915)

Private Anderson, son of the late George Anderson, of Edinburgh, was born in Dublin and enlisted in Edinburgh. The 8th Battalion landed at Boulogne on 10 March 1915. He was killed in action six months later aged 37 during the Battle of Loos, and is commemorated on Panel 78 to 83 of Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.




232143

Pte. Thomas Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle

Thomas Anderson was wounded in October 1916




500786

Rfm. Thomas Edward Anderson

British Army 18th Btn. Kings Royal Rifle Corps

from:26, Norris Rd., Devons Rd., Bow, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




235023

Dvr. Thomas Lacey Anderson

British Army 39th Brigade, 54th Bty. Royal Field Artillery

from:Mansfield Rd, Walthamstow

(d.13th Dec 1915)

Thomas Lacey Anderson forever rests in Lillers Communal Cemetery. He was aged 25 at the time of his death.




229922

Valentine James Anderson

British Army 12th Btn. Duke of Wellington's Regimet

from:Staffordshire

(d.7th April 1916)

My story goes back to 45 years ago. As a young boy in Staffordshire, my grandfather used to tell us about his brother, Private 20743 Valentine James Anderson, who was in the Army but died in the War. After a few years my family moved to Australia and I forgot about this story. Then in 1971 we went back to the UK but my family moved back to Western Australia. In my late twenties I started into looking into Val. He was the son of James and Ada Anderson from Little Bridgeford, Staffordshire. I started looking for records of his service. The first stop was the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Weeks later I had some information. The next stop was the family, but no luck because no one remembered him and there were no medals or photos, only a name, number and grave. Then come the computer age and the internet and I could access his records. He enlisted on 8th December 1915 and was posted to South Staffs no 20264; then he was posted to the 12th Labour Btn, West Riding Regiment on 25th March 1916, no 20743. He embarked for France on 1st April 1916 and disembarked on the same day. Valentine James Anderson died on the 7th April 1916 at Queen Alexandra Red Cross Hospital St.Malo, France of cerebral spinal meningitis. He was awarded the British war and victory medals.

As years have gone by a family member in England died and photos where found of my late great uncle. Sad to say my grandfather never got to see what I had found out about his brother. (My grandfather was in the Home Guard but that's another story.) Over the years, photos of Valentine James Anderson's grave have come to light, almost a 100 years this year. May he rest in peace.




219456

Pte. Walter Anderson

British Army 2nd Batt Northamptonshire Regiment

from:Northampton

Pte. Walter Anderson was my Grandfather. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment and was stationed in Egypt at the outbreak of war. The battalion was transferred to France in November qualifying for the comptemptables bar of which he was very proud. What research I have been able to do shows he was injured early on but returned to the unit for the Battle of Aubers Ridge where he was shot through the throat going over and was treated by Indian doctors from the neighbouring Indian battalion. He was returned again to France and family history is that although on crutches was sent to the Egyptian front and was at the taking of Jerusalem. I have been unable to fill in gaps of his war service as records are patchy and he did not always return to the same battalion. Again family memories are that he was also on the Somme and Ypres salient

Having been a regular soldier for about eight years prior to the war he was discharged I believe in 1919 however his war experiences seemed to have affected him as I am told by his daughter my mum he was unable to speak for many months after. I have few memories of my grandfather but those who knew him spoke of a kind gentle man well respected by all. He passed away in 1950 as a result of an accident at work.




232144

Pte. Walter Anderson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle

Walter Anderson was wounded in March 1917




1205571

Spr. Wilfred Laurier Anderson

Canadian Army 1st Canadian Tunnelling Coy.

from:Avonport, Kings co. Nova Scotia

(d.8th Aug 1918)




1206165

Cpl. William Anderson VC

British Army 2nd Btn. Yorkshire Regiment

from:Elgin, Morayshire

(d.13th March 1915)

William Anderson was killed in action on the 13th of March 1915, aged 29 and is commemorated on The Le Touret Memorial in France. He was native of Dallas, Elgin, Morayshire.

An extract from The London Gazette, dated 21st May, 1915, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery at Neuve-Chapelle on 12th March, 1915, when he led three men with bombs against a large party of the enemy who had entered our trenches, and by his prompt and determined action saved, what might otherwise have become, a serious situation. Cpl. Anderson first threw his own bombs, then those in possession of his three men (who had been wounded) amongst the Germans, after which he opened rapid rifle fire upon them with great effect, notwithstanding that he was at the time quite alone".




500776

Pte. William Charles Anderson

British Army 1st/22nd Btn. D Coy. London Regiment

from:27, Station Avenue, Prittlewell, Southend-on-Sea, Essex

(d.7th Jun 1917)




217963

Pte. William Edward Anderson

British Army 5th Btn. Dorset Regiment

from:Barking, Essex, England

(d.31st Mar 1917)

Pte. W. E. Anderson served with the Dorset Regiment 5th Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 31st March1917 aged 21 and is buried in Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension, Gezaincourt, France. He was the son of William Henry Anderson, of 65 Fanshawe Avenue, Barking, Essex.




1206524

Lt/Col. William Herbert Anderson VC

British Army 12th Btn. Highland Light Infantry

from:Kensington, London

(d.25th March 1918)

William Anderson was killed in action on 25th March 1918 aged 36 and is buried in the Peronne Road Cemetery in France. He was the son of W. J. Anderson, C.B.E., of Strathairly, Largo, Fife, husband of Gertrude Campbell Anderson, of 23, Abingdon Court, Kensington, London.

An extract from the London Gazette,"dated 30th April, 1918, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery, determination, and gallant leading of his command. The enemy attacked on the right of the battalion frontage and succeeded in penetrating the wood held by our men. Owing to successive lines of the enemy following on closely there was the greatest danger that the flank of the whole position would be turned. Grasping the seriousness of the situation, Colonel Anderson made his way across the open in full view of the enemy now holding the wood on the right, and after much effort succeeded in gathering the remainder of the two right companies. He personally led the counter-attack and drove the enemy from the wood, capturing twelve machine guns and seventy prisoners, and restoring the original line. His conduct in leading the charge was quite fearless and his most splendid example was the means of rallying and inspiring the men during the most critical hour. Later on the same day, in another position, the enemy had penetrated to within three hundred yards of the village and were holding a timber yard in force. Colonel Anderson reorganised his men after they had been driven in and brought them forward to a position of readiness for a counter-attack. He led the attack in person and throughout showed the utmost disregard for his own safety. The counter-attack drove the enemy from his position, but resulted in this very gallant officer losing his life. He died fighting within the enemy's lines, setting a magnificent example to all who were privileged to serve under him."




236676

Pte. William James Anderson

British Army 10th Btn., D Coy. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

from:Knockloughrim, Co. Londonderry

(d.12th Aug 1917)




214329

Spr. William John Anderson

British Army 12th Fld. Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Jarrow

(d.21st Mar 1918)

William John Anderson enlisted at Newcastle and served with the 12th Field Company Royal Engineers, attached to 6th Division. He died age 43 on the 21st March 1918 and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow and is remembered on the Arras Memorial.

William was born in Hebburn, the son of Edward and Catherine Anderson (nee Fairley) and was married to Sarah Jane Anderson (nee Hutchinson) of 202 High Street Jarrow.




1216

Pte. William Whitfield Anderson

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.21st Feb 1915)




207897

A/Mjr. Albert Anderton MC & 2Bars

British Army Royal Field Artillery

(d.4th May 1918)

Albert changed his name by Deed Poll from Albert Cuckow. I am a Cuckow with a keen interest in the Great War. Can anybody throw any light on the life of Major A. Anderton MC and 2 Bars.




235139

L/Cpl. Alfred Reuben Anderton

British Army 7th Btn. King's Royal Rifles Corps

from:London

(d.6th December 1917)




205585

Lt. George "Dirty" Anderton MID.

British Army 15th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Oldham, Lancs

I have copies of four letters dated 9-14th March 1916 from BEF France. In the first, my Uncle Norman Hurst Anderton of the 16th battalion, the Lancashire Fusiliers is writing to his parents while in the front line for the first time under heavy bombardment.

In the second and subsequent letters, my father Lieutenant George Anderton of the 15th Battalion which was in the immediate rear, writes to console his parents that his brother Norman was probably taken prisoner, as there was no blood in the trench when he went forward to investigate.

George Anderton was an intelligence officer and sniper. His nickname "Dirty" related to his many forays into "no man's land", hands and face camouflaged with a good layer of mud. He had a narrow escape when, standing on the firestep, a German sniper bullet hit the end of his telescopic sight and ricocheted into the trench below wounding one of his men. He was wounded later in 1916, shot through the neck. He is alleged to have told stretcher bearers not to bother with him as "they have blown my head off".

After hospital treatment he eventually landed up in the Convalescent Hospital on the Promenade in Southport where he met my mother to be, who was serving as a VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment). Another relic is a torn piece of paper with the medical details of his wound recorded in red crayon, perhaps written by one of the MOs of a Field Ambulance or CCS. He survived the war ending up as a Captain.




222872

Pte. William James Anderton

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:45 Stockbridge Street, Padiham, Lancashire.

(d.9th Aug 1915)

William Anderton died on the 9th August 1915, aged 19 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey. He was the son of Mrs. Elizabeth Jane Anderton of 46 Burnley Rd., Padiham, Burnley.




205959

2nd Lt. Frederick William Andre

British Army 8th Battalion (Territorial) Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment)

(d.16th Aug 1917)




500777

Rfm. W. Andress

British Army 8th Btn. London Regiment

(d.7th Jun 1917)




1873

Pte. Charles Herbert Andrew

British Army 6th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:56, Lloyd St., Heaton Norris, Stockport, Cheshire

(d.1st Mar 1917)




213065

Pte. George Ernest Thomas Andrew

Australian Imperial Forces 10th Australian Machine Gun Coy

from:Port Broughton, South Australia

(d.18th July 1917)




1206504

Pte. Joseph Arthur Westwood Andrew

British Army Royal Warwickshire Regiment

from:77 Cox Street West, Balsall Heath, Birmingham

Joseph Arthur Westwood Andrew enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Birmingham on 22 August 1915. He was wounded and sent to Folkestone for an operation in early 1918. He lost a hand and a foot and was discharged from the Army & awarded the Silver War Badge on 31st July 1918. He wore badge with pride for the rest of his life. He married and had a son, became a coach painter and lived to the ripe old age of 84. He lived in a purpose built bungalow for wounded soldiers at 8 Haig Place, Birmingham. My husband John Andrew, Joseph's grandson remembers playing as a child with the cardboard box that he kept his artificial leg in!




223554

Pte. Ronald Andrew

British Army 15th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:Waterfoot, Lancashire

(d.13th June 1917)

Ronald Andrew was the son of Edwin And Margaret Alice Andrew of 41 Burnley Road, Waterfoot, Lancashire. He was an old boy of Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School and had attested aged 18 years and 10 months (attestation dated 7th Jun 1916 and approved for service 29th of September 1916.) Prior to service Ronald was a bank clerk.




221196

Sgt. William Andrew

British Army 2/8th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Leeds

My great grandfather, William Andrew served in the First World War. He was wounded on the 27th November 1917, and was conveyed back to England on the Hospital ship SS Grantully Castle. At the time he was wounded, his Battalion, part of the 62nd Division, were involved in the capture of Bourlon Wood We have a photograph of him with two of his children, and some of him with members of his regiment.




1205693

A. J. Andrews

Australian Imperial Force. 3rd Salvage Coy.




216653

Pte. Charles Andrews

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dun Laoghaire, County Dublin

(d.1st Jul 1916)

Private Charles Andrews, son of Thomas and Mary Andrews, was born in Blackrock, County Dublin and later enlisted in Cardiff. In March of 1916 the 1st Battalion landed at Marseilles for service in France. Private Andrews was killed in action aged 43 on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.




210757

Pte David Andrews

British Army Suffolk Regement 7th Battalion

from:Hinxton Grange

(d.15th October 1916)

David Andrews was my Grandfather. All I know is he was killed a few days before my father was born.

We migrated to Australia in 1952 when I was nine. my Grandmother left me in her will two and one half Sovereigns which she said was her late husband last pay. Gran also migrated to Australia in 1980 she lived to 99.9 years and never remarried.

The coins have been keeped in a safe place at home. I mentioned to my wife that one day I would have the half Sovereign made into a ring. It was my 70th birthday just recently and she surprised me with the sovereign ring, since then I have been researching that time in the war where Grandfather was when he was killed. It must have been hell on earth for those men in the valley of the Somme,I have told my Grandson that he will have the ring when I pass on and to pass it onto his children with all the details. God bless you Grand father I will think of you every time I look at the ring Rest in Peace




234098

Pte. Ernest Percy Andrews

British Army 138th Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps

Ernest Andrews was born in 1890. He was employed as a Leather Manufacturer in Northampton when he enlisted on the 21st of October 1915. He went to France in May 1916. Ernest was discharged on the 3rd October because he was no longer physically fit for war service. Not sure what happened to him, but think he may have been gassed.




211102

L/Sgt. Ernest William Andrews

British Army Machine Gun Corps

from:Rose Cottage, Totteridge

My Grandfather, Ernest William Andrews, was a Lance Sargent-Light horseman/Farrier who was a rough rider with the City of London Yeomanry 1914-1916. I am trying to find out information about him as I believe his serving records were destroyed in a fire. He was born 26th Feb 1896 and died 10th Feb 1955 and lived at Rose Cottage, Totteridge. His only son and my father, Robert Andrews, now 86 is living in Australia and would like to find out more details if somebody could help.




236993

Cpl. George Arthur Andrews

British Army 1/5th Btn. Hampshire Regiment

from:Southampton

(d.29th May 1915)

Corporal Andrews was the son of Richard and Elizabeth Andrews; husband of Norah Kathleen Andrews, of 46 Westwood Rd., Southampton.

He was 29 when he died and is buried in Benares Cantonment Cemetery in India, Plot K, Grave 18.




220468

Pte. Harry Andrews

British Army 1st Btn. King's Own Scottish Borderers

from:Hessle Road, Hull

(d.4th Oct 1917)

Harry Andrews was my great grandfather. He joined the Colours in September 1916 but before this he was a rullyman employed by Messers Hayes, Alfred Street, Hull general carters. He was shot by a sniper on the morning of 4th of October 1917 age 27. An officer wrote to his wife and young son (my grandfather).

"I must send you some expression of my deep sympathy with you in the great loss you have sustained. Private Andrews was a good soldier who fought nobly for home and honour and we all grieve over his death. He was killed by a sniper on the morning of 4 October 1917 whilst he was engaged in a successful attack of that day. He was later buried by his comrades. I commend you to him who is able to bind up the wounds of our hearts. May he be very near you in your darkest days."

We still have the letter, death plaque and medals. We as a family are very proud of Harry. My father is named after him. Lest we forget. Your great grand daughter Sue and your Loving family in East Riding of Yorkshire.




1205778

Capt. Henry John Andrews VC MBE.

British Army Indian Medical Service

(d.22nd Oct 1919)

Henry John Andrews was killed 22/10/1919, Age: 48 P he is buried in Bannu Cem. and remembered on The Delhi Memorial (India Gate).

An extract from the Third Supplement to the London Gazette, dated 7th Sept., 1920, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the 22nd October, 1919, when as Senior Medical Officer in charge of Khajuri Post (Waziristan) he heard that a convoy had been attacked in the vicinity of the post, and that men had been wounded. He at once took out an Aid Post to the scene of action and, approaching under heavy fire, established an Aid Post under conditions which afforded some protection to the wounded but not to himself. Subsequently he was compelled to move his Aid Post to another position, and continued most devotedly to attend to the wounded. Finally, when a Ford van was available to remove the wounded, he showed the utmost disregard of danger in collecting the wounded under fire and in placing them in the van, and was eventually killed whilst himself stepping into the van on the completion of his task."




222120

Capt. Henry John Andrews VC, MBE.

British Indian Army Indian Medical Service

(d.22nd Oct 1919)

Henry Andrews was killed in action 22nd Oct 1919, aged 48 during the Waziristan Campaign, on the North West Frontier and is commemorated on the The Delhi Memorial (India Gate). He is buried Bannu Cemetery.

An extract from the Third Supplement to the London Gazette, dated 7th Sept., 1920, records the following:- "For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on the 22nd October, 1919, when as Senior Medical Officer in charge of Khajuri Post (Waziristan) he heard that a convoy had been attacked in the vicinity of the post, and that men had been wounded. He at once took out an Aid Post to the scene of action and, approaching under heavy fire, established an Aid Post under conditions which afforded some protection to the wounded but not to himself. Subsequently he was compelled to move his Aid Post to another position, and continued most devotedly to attend to the wounded. Finally, when a Ford van was available to remove the wounded, he showed the utmost disregard of danger in collecting the wounded under fire and in placing them in the van, and was eventually killed whilst himself stepping into the van on the completion of his task."




213812

Capt. James Allfrey Andrews

British Army 2nd Btn. Devonshire Regiment

(d.1st Jul 1916)

James Allfrey Andrews died on 1st of July 1916 at age 26 while leading an attack as second in command on Ovillers-la-Boiselle, Somme, France, killed in action in the Battle of the Somme.




230804

Pte. John W. Andrews

British Army 23rd Btn. Middlesex Regiment

from:Newcastle upon Tyne

(d.22nd Sep 1917)

My great grandfather John Andrews was killed in action at the Battle of the Menin Road on 22nd September 1917, whilst serving with 23rd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment.




216654

Pte Joseph George Patrick Andrews

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment

(d.27th April 1917)

Joseph Andrews was born in Dun Laoghaire, Dublin and enlisted in Birmingham. He was killed in action and is remembered at the Arras Memorial.




209586

Cpl. Leslie Wilton Andrews VC, DSO.

New Zealand Expeditionary Force 2nd Battalion Wellington Infantry Regiment

from:New Zealand

Leslie Wilton Andrew was born 23 March 1897 in Manawatu, New Zealand. At 20 years old, a corporal in the 2nd Battalion, Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionary Force during the First World War, he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions on 31 July 1917 at La Basse Ville, France:

"Corporal Andrew was in charge of a small party in an attack on the enemy's position. His objective was a machine-gun post which had been located in an isolated building, but on leading his men forward he encountered another machine-gun post which was holding up the advance of another company. He attacked it, capturing the gun and killing several of the crew. He then continued with his attack on the original objective and finally captured the post, killing a number of the enemy and putting the remainder to flight."




216655

Pte. Patrick Andrews

British Army 8th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.29th Apr 1916)

Private Andrews, son of Christopher and Elizabeth Andrews, of 8 Moss Street, Dublin, was born and enlisted in Dublin. In December 1915 the 8th Battalion, as part of 48th Brigade of the 16th (Irish) Division landed at Le Havre, France. He was aged 24 when he was killed in action during the Gas Attack at Hulluch, France. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.




222940

Pte. Percy George Andrews

British Army 9th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Dulwich, London

Pte. Percy G. Andrews was my grandfather. Sadly he died before I was born but my grandmother told us this story.

Nowadays we hear of the Christmas Day Truce when English and German soldiers had a game of football. Well, my grandfather was not a sporty person, probably down to the fact that he had very poor eyesight. In civvies he was an accountant but his love was for music and he played both the piano and the violin. So when he explained that he could not play football, only the piano, he was taken over to the German camp where he spent an afternoon entertaining the Germans. Eventually he had exhausted all his memorised pieces but they weren't ready to let him go so he played as his finale a jazzed-up version of 'God Save the King' which they thoroughly applauded, but did not recognise!




223759

Rflmn. Thomas Joseph Andrews DCM.

British Army 1/5th Btn. South Lancashire Regiment

from:Salford, Lancashire

My late grandfather Thomas Andrews was listed in the London Gazette on the 2nd of December 1919. He was awarded the DCM for 'Marked gallantry and fearless leadership on the 7th November 1919'.

His personal history was just tragic. He was born in 1893. His mother committed to an asylum when he was 10 months old. His father died 4 years later and he was, after a short stay with aunts, sent to a Catholic children's home. I was unable to track down the name of the home. He surfaced again at 18 in Salford and married a year later, his wife Jane in 1912. They had 2 children, my mother and her brother, Tommy.

He joined up in 1915 and was with the 1/5th South Lancashire Regiment where he obviously served with great bravery. In 1918 his wife died in the Spanish Flu epidemic at the age of 24. He was demobbed in 1920, no job, no wife and the children in the care of his mother-in-law. We, his daughter's children, have little contact with our grandfather, although we did meet with him on occasion, as his mother-in-law had very jealously kept his children to herself.

Thomas married again in 1937 when he was working at a cable works in Prescot, to a lady named Frances Winifred Lewis. They had two boys, Philip and John whom I've unfortunately been unable to make contact since my mother and all the family left England in the late '50's. Through research I found that Thomas died at Oldfield, Whiston in July 1975 at the age of 82.




500780

L/Cpl. William Horace Andrews

British Army 1/21st Btn. London Regiment

from:349, Upland Rd., East Dulwich, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




239512

2nd Lt. A. H. Angel

British Army 173rd Brigade, C Bty. Royal Field Artillery




500765

Pte. J. H. Angel

British Army 2nd Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:16, Mill St., West Hartlepool, Co Durham.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500764

Pte. Richard Angel

British Army 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:46, Hill St., West Hartlepool, Co Durham.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




233574

Pte. Ernest Angell

British Army 8th Btn. Norfolk Regiment

from:Norwich

(d.1st July 1916)




223983

Pte. Henry Angus

British Army 1st/7th Btn. Gordon Highlanders

from:Portsoy

(d.13th June 1916)

At time of joining up Henry Angus was residing in Banchory. He died of his wounds after fighting in France, aged 33. He is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension.




232145

Pte. J.E. Angus

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




217443

John Collingwood Angus

Australian Imperial Force 28th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.7th Jun 1915)

John Collingwood Angus was born in England at North Shields, Northumberland and was educated at a Wesleyan boarding school. He worked as a cabin boy on a steamer before migrating to Australia at the age of 18. He worked as a farm labourer near the townships of Pingelly and Narrogin in Western Australia before enlisting in the Australian Imperial Force on 10th March 1915.

Angus was assigned to the 28th Infantry Battalion and departed Freemantle aboard HMAT Ascanius on 29th June 1915. He was admitted to a Gallipoli field hospital on 24th November 1915 before being transferred to Malta. He re-joined his unit on the Western Front. He was seriously wounded on 4th June 1916 and died two days later. John Angus is buried at Camiara Road Cemetery near Étaples, France.




217102

Pte. John Crosby Angus

British Army 6th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Choppington, Northumberland

(d.1st Nov 1918)

My great uncle John Angus was killed 10 days before the war ended, I have very little information about him, other than his unit the 1/6th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment.




232146

Cpl. John E. Angus

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Byker




232147

Pte. T. Angus

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Morpeth

T Angus received Gunshot wounds




221274

Pte John Tregear Angwin

British Army 6th Batallion Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry

from:Penzance

(d.18th Aug 1916)

John Tregear Angwin was killed in action on the Somme aged 19 years.




300678

Pte. Bertram Ankers

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:9 Falmer Road, Darlington

(d.3rd Sep 1916)

Bertram is recorded as "Bert Ankers, 9 Falmer Road, Darlington, Pte A Coy. 18th DLI, killed in action, France 3rd Sep 1916" in the Roll of Honour held in Darlington Library, believed to have been complied by the Town Council in the 1920s. Sapper R Ankers 152414 Signal Corps Royal Engineers, of the same address is also listed on the roll.




223104

L/Cpl. Ernest Annable

British Army 8th Btn. Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Stapleford, Notts.

(d.21st Jan 1916)

I discovered quite recently from my mother, who is 98 years old, that when I was born, my grand father was asked to name me as he was feeling 'a bit down'. He suggested calling me Ernest as, in his words, "He was one of the best". I later discovered that Ernest was in fact his younger brother who was killed in the early stages of WW1, in the town of Merville which is where he is buried.

I have not been able to discover the circumstances of his death which I feel must have been unlucky as he was billeted in Merville which was a clearing station and not directly on the front line. Unfortunately a lot of the KOYLI records were lost during WW2.I would love to know more about my great uncle Ernest Annable as I have carried his name for the past 60 odd years.




780

Lt Cmdr. Wallace Moir Annand

Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve Colingwood Btn. Royal Naval Division

from:South Shields, Co Durham

(d.4th Jun 1915)

Lieutenant-Commander Wallace Moir Annand, was killed with the Collingwood Battalion of the Royal Naval Division at Gallipoli in June 1915. His son Richard was the first soldier to be awarded a Victoria Cross in the Sceond World War.




1217

Sjt. Bertie George Annets

British Army 2nd Btn. B Coy. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.21st Feb 1915)




1206403

CSM. Walter Annis

British Army 6th Btn. The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment)

from:Isleworth, Middlesex

(d.26th July 1915)

Walter Annis died of wounds on the 26th of July 1915, aged 39. Buried in the Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension in France, he was the son of Robert and Elizabeth Anniss of Isleworth, Middlesex. Born: 26 February, 1876 He Served as a Colour-Sergeant in the 1st Battalion, The Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment during the Anglo-Boer War. Married Emily Annie Bolton on 4 August, 1911. They had two children Robert Walter, born 23 May, 1912 and Annie Evelyn, born 7 May, 1914.

He was entitled to the Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, the Queen’s South Africa Medal (4 clasps), The King’s South Africa Medal (2 clasps), the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal, the 1903 Delhi Durbar Medal.




219853

Cpl. Michael Ansboro

British Army 2nd Btn. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Wigan

(d.26th Aug 1914)

It is reported that a Robert Reid from Wigan was the first soldier of the town to be killed in the Great War but I can dispute this. Cpl Michael Ansboro though an Irish immigrant to the town was recalled to his regiment the Lancashire Fusiliers on the outbreak of hostilities. His service number was 791 and he fell on 26th August 1914 at the battle of Le Cateux and is interred at Esnes military cemetery. He married Mary Ann Gallagher originally from Kiltimagh in Ireland in 1913 in Wigan. Michael was employed by the Wigan Coal and Iron Company at their Kirkless site in the town. Although not originally from Wigan Cpl. Ansboro by virtue of having resided in Wigan and married there would seem to be the first Wigan soldier to be killed in action 1914. His name is on the Wigan town centre cenotaph and the Mayo peace memorial in Castlebar. His son who was born after Michael's death was born in Wigan however he and his mother returned to Kiltimagh at a later date.




500789

Pte. George Anscombe

British Army 23rd Btn. Middlesex Regt

from:7, Henstridge Place, st John's Wood, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




207595

Cpl. George Ansell

British Army 1st Btn. Royal London Fusiliers

from:Allington Rd., Somers Town, nr London

(d.21st March 1918)

George Ansell joined the 1/19th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers and trained at St Albans, before going to France and joining the 1st Btn. He was killed on the 21st of March 1918 fighting with a company of the 2/2 Btn Royal London Fusiliers at Travesty, France. His c/o Capt. Harper wrote a citation recording his bravery before his death. Stating that George had killed many advancing enemy before being shot by a sniper. Unfortunately, there is no record on the Roll of Honour of the 2/2 Btn as he was lent from the 1st Btn.

I remember a photo of him at my grandmother's before WW2, when at the age of 5yrs. Sadly his photo was lost during the war. Are there any photos of the 1/19th TA Regt who did their training at St Albans, North London in 1914 before they went to France in March 1915?




208577

CSM. Alexander Anson

British Army 1/5th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Hartlepool

My Grandfather, Alexander Anson joined the 1st VB DLI on 16 March 1906 at Castle Eden. He progressed up the ranks and by the outbreak of WW1 he was a Colour Sgt. He was appointed CSM C Company 1/5th DLI on 30 January 1915 and went with the Regiment to France on 17 April 1915. He was involved in the 2nd Battle of Ypres at the Battle of St Juliaan that month and then in the Battle of Bellewaarde ridge at Sanctuary Wood. He was gassed on 24 May 1915 and invalided home. He was sent to St John Red Cross Hospital in Weymouth to recover and subsequently joined 3/5th DLI at Catterick and was appointed Acting RSM. He was then transferred to the Inland and Waterways Royal Engineers at Port Richborough in Kent for the remainder of the war. (He had been a plater in a shipyard before the war and they needed his skills) He was demobbed in 1919 WO1.




234137

2nd Lt Harris Hartas Anson

British Army 5th Btn West Riding Regiment (Duke of Wellingtons)

from:Hambleton, Yorks

(d.30th Aug 1918)




217829

Pte. Alfred T. Ansted

British Army 4th Btn. Royal Fusiliers

(d.15th Nov 1916)

Alfred Ansted served with the Royal Fusiliers 4th Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 15th November 1916 aged 29 and is buried in the Bertrancourt Military Cemetery in Bertrancourt, France.

He had been recalled from the reserve upon the outbreak of war and on 9th February 1915 had been sent to France to the 4th Royal Fusiliers. Although a wound had necessitated a few months’ hospitalisation, Ansted had served 15 months before going absent in May 1916. He continued to serve with his battalion while under a suspended sentence and then in August 1916 when serving on the Somme at Guillemont, Pte. Ansted yet again went absent after being warned for the trenches. He remained absent for two months before surrendering to the Military Police at Corbie. He told the court that shellfire unnerved him.




215615

Pte. Harry Sidney Augustus Anstiss

British Army 11th Btn. Queen's Own Royal Kent West Regiment

(d.15th Sep 1916)

Private Harry Anstiss was born around 1898 in Greenwich London. Son of Harry and Annie Anstiss. Annie originally from Cambridgeshire 1901 Census shows Harry living with parents at in Greenwich with: Harry (father) 30 Signal Fitter, Annie (mother) 27, Nellie 6, Daisy 4, Harry 3, Mabel 8 mths.

1911 Census shows Harry living with his family at 49,Chalderick Road, New Cross: Harry (father)37, Annie (mother)35, Nellie 16, Daisy 14, Harry 13, Mable 11, Sidney 9, Albert 7, Christopher 5, Agnes 3.

Harry was killed in action on 15th September 1916. I have no photos of my Uncle who died in 1916 listed as missing, there must be a photo somewhere.




218612

Pte. Harry Sidney Augustus Anstss

British Army 11th Battalion oyal Kent Regiment

from:New Cross

(d.15th Sept 1916)

Pte. Harry Anstss served with the Royal West Kent Regiment 11th Battalion Lewisham, after volunteering in 1915. Soon after going to the front he was killed in action on 15th September 1915. His body was never found.




500658

Pte. James Hartley Antcliff

Australian Imperial Forces 36th Btn.

from:15, Council St., Cook's Hill, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

(d.7th Jun 1917)




965

Pte. James Antcliffe

Australian Imperial Forces 36th Btn.

from:Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

(d.7th Jun 1917)




214183

Pte. George Anthony

Army 15th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers

from:9 Kingsbury Road, Balls Pond Road, Islington

(d.2nd Nov 1918)

My Grandfather on my mother's side, George Anthony, served in the 15th Bn, Lancashire Fusiliers. I do not have much information except that at the time he came from 9 Kingsbury Road, Balls Pond Road, Islington, London and was originally in the Middlesex Regiment. Presumably he must have been drafted in after the Salford Pals were depleted. He was killed 9 days before the cessation of hostilities during the Somme/Loos campaign and has no known grave. He is remembered at the Vis-en-Artois Memorial.




217444

Cpl. Robert Edmund Antill

Australian Imperial Force 14th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.5th Jul 1917 )

Robert Edmond Antill was born in England at Islington, London. He was educated at Belmont Road School in Tottenham and worked as a cabinetmaker. Antill left London for Australia on 28th June 1913 at the age of 16. His mother and father, Josh and Alice Antill, stayed in Lancashire and London.

He lived in Windsor, Melbourne prior to the outbreak of the First World War and celebrated his 17th birthday aboard the Norseman. He spent his 18th birthday in Australia, his 19th fighting at Gallipoli and his 20th birthday on the Western Front. Antill was killed in action at Ploegsteert, Belgium on 5th July 1917 while serving with the 14th Infantry Battalion and died a fortnight before his 21st birthday. He had enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 9th October 1914 and misreported his age as 22. Robert Antill is buried at Mud Corner Cemetery, Hainaut in Belgium




218401

Pte. James Anyon

British Army 1/5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Brierfield

(d.6th Mar 1916)

James Anyon served with the 1/5th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment during WW1 and died of wounds on the 6th March 1916, age 26. He is buried in Alexandria Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt. He was the husband of Elizabeth Anyon, of 9, Hartington St., Brierfield.




223359

Pte. James Anyon

British Army 1/5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

(d.6th March 1916)

James Anyon died of wounds on the 6th March 1916 age 26 and is buried in the Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Alexandria, Egypt.




1154

Pte. Joseph Harold Alfred Applebee

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Barker St. Gunnedah, NSW

Harold Applebee was a 19 year old Labourer when he enlisted, he was described as being 5'8", having very dark complexion, black hair and brown eyes. He embarked from Australia in May 1916 and after training in England, proceeded to France in January 1917 where he transferred from 33rd Btn to the 9th Machine Gun Company. He saw action at the Battle of Messines and was wounded on the 18th of July, had a short spell in hospital and was again wounded, this time by gassing on the 31st. After a longer spell in hospital he rejoined his unit in September and suffered a 3rd Wound in action on the 2 October, he was invalided back to England with a severe wound which had fractured his skull and treated at the King George Hospital. By mid February 1918 he was fit enough to return to France and rejoined his unit on the front line. He had another spell in hospital in England, this time at the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley in June 1918 suffering from Tonsillitis but again returned to France. He returned to Australia in 1919.




1155

Pte. Aaron Appleby

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Springsure, Queensland, Australia




213710

Pte. Albert Alexander Augustus Appleby

British Army 1st/1st. Surrey Yeomanry Lancers

from:Marchington, Staffs

Albert Appleby saw service in the Lancers in Northern France up until May 1915 when he was shipped to Salonica, where he served for the remainder of the war spending some of his time as servant to his commanding officer Captain Barclay. He got no medals, no 'mentions in despatches' just good, conscientious service until he was demobbed in May 1919 having finished his time guarding prisoners of war in the Caucasus region. Albert was born in Marchington, Staffordshire December 10th 1882, he married Daisy Warner in November 1918 and died in 1968.




233483

L/Cpl. Henry Appleby

British Army 23rd (4th Tyneside Scottish) Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.1st July 1916)

Henry Appleby was my great grandfather. His name is on the Thiepval Memorial.




232148

Pte. J. Appleby

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Gateshead

J Appleby was wounded in September 1916




216656

Rfn. John Appleby

British Army 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers) London Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.2nd Dec 1917)

John Appleby served with the 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers) and was killed in action on the 2nd December 1917. He was born in Wicklow and enlisted in Dublin having formerly served the 8th Battalion, the London Regiment.




300695

Pte. John R. Appleby

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




236592

Rflmn. John David Appleford MM

British Army 1st (Surrey Rifles) Btn. London Regiment

from:Sansom St., Camberwell, London

John David Appleford signed up at Flodden Road, Camberwell, London. He received the Military Medal aged 19 on 10th May 1916.

He survived the war, but shot himself in the chest with a service revolver in January 1919, being unable to get work. John took 10 months to die in hospital in Peckham, London. The coroner's verdict was "suicide whilst of unsound mind".




216657

Mess Room Stwd. Frederick William Applegate

Mercantile Marine SS Trinidad

from:Bristol

(d.22nd Mar 1918)

Frederick Applegate, son of Sydney Charles and Vina Applegate (nee Dunsford), of 4 Exeter Place, Cumberland Basin, Bristol, was born in Dublin but lived in Bristol when he enlisted. He drowned aged 18 en route from Le Havre, France to Liverpool when the S.S. Trinidad sunk following attack from the German submarine U-101. He is commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial, London.




221532

Rflmn. David Hopkins Appleton

British Army 7th Btn. Rifle Brigade

from:Croydon

(d.14th Oct 1917)




300352

Pte. Frederick Appleton

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




220254

Pte. Frederick William Henry Appleton

British Army 2nd Btn. Grenadier Guards

from:Wantage

Frederick Appleton served with the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards.




500762

Pte. Jack K. Appleton

British Army 13th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:4, Hexham St., Bishop Auckland, Co. Durham.

(d.8th Jun 1917)




229775

James Arthur Appleton

British Army Manchester Regiment

I have been researching my great grandfather who fought in WW1. I have a copy of his death certificate which states that he died of paraplegia, gastritis and heart failure and was wondering what kind of injuries he would have had to cause death. He was in the Army for two years (1913-1915) and, after being injured, was discharged as being unfit. He died sometime in 1922. I would really appreciate any information about him or what happened.




300697

Cpl. George S. Appleyard

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




216658

Pte. Walter D. Appleyard

British Army 7th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.16th Aug 1915)

Walter Appleyard was born and enlisted in Dublin, he was killed in action in Gallipoli.




231055

Pte. Victor George Apps

British Army 6th Btn. Border Rgt.

(d.29th September 1916)




1156

Pte. Victor Maurice Arandale MM.

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Red Range, Glen Innes, NSW, Australia




213490

Rear-Admiral Robert Keith Arbuthnot

Royal Navy HMS Defence

from:England

(d.31st May 1916)

Robert Keith Arbuthnot was killed in action, on board H.M.S. Defence during the Battle of Jutland




223313

Rifleman William Henry Arbuthnot

British Army 9th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dromore

(d.8 January 1916)




214335

Pte. James Archbold

British Army 6th Btn. South Lancashire Regiment

from:Haydon Bridge

(d.5th Apr 1916)

James Archbold enlisted in Carmarthen, Wales as Pte. 11560 in the Welsh Regiment and transferred to the 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment. He was killed in action age 30 on the 5th April 1916. He is remembered at the Basra Memorial.

James was born in Jarrow and lived in Haydon Bridge. His medals were sent to Miss Archbold, 47 Woolmarket, Berwick on Tweed.




216659

Dvr. James Archbold

British Army Royal Field Artillery Royal Horse Artillery

(d.7th Apr 1918)

James Archbold was born in Dublin and enlisted in Birmingham. He was killed in action in Flanders on the first day of the Battle of the Lys, and is buried at Adelaide Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux.




216661

Cpl. Michael Archbold MM.

British Army 9th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Blackrock, Co. Dublin

(d.16th Aug 1917)

Michael Archbold was born and enlisted in Dublin. He served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 9th Battalion and was killed in action in August 1917.




117

Pte. William Archbold

Army 5th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

(d.26 Apr 1915)




206524

Pte. John Henry Archbutt

British Army 12th Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Hull

(d.30th Jun 1916)




213453

Mjr. John Gray Archdale-Porter DSO

British Army 9th Lancers

from:Wales

(d.21 Nov1917)




216662

2nd Lt. Albert Erskine Carson Archer

Royal Flying Corps 242nd Squadron

from:Dublin

(d.9th Feb 1916)

Second Lieutenant Albert Erskine Carson Archer served with the Royal West Kent Regiment (the Buffs) and later with the Royal Flying Corps. He died in France age 19 on the 9th February 1916 and is buried in Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery. Albert was born in Beanfield, Stillorgan, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, the son of Thomas and Emily M. Archer, of Airfield, Donnybrook, Dublin.




1157

C.Q.M.S. Albert John Archer

Australian Imperial Forces A Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Tubbamurra, New South Wales.

(d.4th Apr 1918)




225550

Pte. Alfred Archer

British Army 2nd Btn Durham Light Infantry

from:Edmondsley, Co Durham.

(d.12th Apr 1915)




236505

Rflmn. Frank McDonald Archer

British Army 8th (Post Office Rifles) Battalion London Regiment

from:149 Blythswood Rd, Goodmayes, Ilford, Essex

(d.24th May 1915)

Frank Archer was my grandmother's cousin. He was his mother's only child and his father committed suicide when he was 7. Frank was then admitted to the Alexandra Orphanage. He joined the GPO as an internal messenger in 1911, aged 14, based in Goodmayes, East London. He is remembered by the Royal Alexandra and Albert School




1205920

BSM. George Henry Archer

British Army 147th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Neyland, Pembrokeshire

(d.7th July 1917)

Geroge Archer was killed in action on the 7th of July 1917, aged 30. Buried in the Barlin Communal Cemetery Extension in France, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Archer, of Kent, husband of Mrs. E. B. Archer, of 23 Fredrick St., Neyland, Pembrokeshire.




231488

Pte. P. Archer

British West Indies Regiment Jamaica Contingent

(d.26th July 1918)

Private Archer is buried in the Boscobel (St. Philip the Less) Chapel Yard, St. Peter, Barbados.




216664

R. W. Archer

British Army Royal Munster Fusiliers

R W Archer is remembered on the memorial at the Clontarf Cricket and Football Clubs.




500790

Pte. Robert Archer

British Army 23rd Btn. Middlesex Regt

from:26, Bowring Rd., Ramsey, Isle of Man,

(d.7th Jun 1917)




220008

Pte. Robert Archer

British Army 6th Btn. Highland Light Infantry

from:2 Queen Street, Patrick, Glasgow

(d.14th Aug 1915)

At present very little is known about my grandfather's war service, other than he served with 6th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, together with the fact he served at Gallipoli and died there in action on 14th August 1915. His name was Robert Archer.




222083

2nd Lt. Walter Dunlop Archer

British Army West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Dearham, Maryport, Cumbria

(d.25th April 1918)




222701

Gnr. William Frederick Archer

Y Bty Royal Horse Artillery

from:Tufton, Hampshire

(d.26th of August 1914)

Gunner William Frederick Archer was my great uncle who I am researching. He is buried in Old Caudry Cemetery and I have yet to have this verified but I believe he was killed in the Battle of Le Cateau. I hope to visit his grave in France soon. I now know where I get my love of horses.




216663

Pte. William Henry Archer

British Army 7th Btn Border Regiment

from:Dockray, Penrith, Cumberland

(d.8th Apr 1916)

William Henry Archer was born in Dublin and enlisted at Bovington Camp, Dorset. He died in Flanders. He was 34 years old when he enlisted. He was a labourer and Unmarried. He joined at Carlisle on 3 September 1914 on a short service. His next of kin was Margaret Pelter (mother). She was 85 when she died in 1921. His mother received his victory medal. His 1914-18 star was received by his sister, Annie Daley, (42), formally Patterson who was then living in Bournemouth.

His sister wrote to his regiment about a notice she had seen in the Daily Telegraph just after his death in their roll of honour. She said she had lost sight of him for a number of years. She added that he had been born on March 7, 1881. He joined the army in 1898 in Ireland (Tralee) and was sent to India in 1900. He returned in 1906 to England and the reserve. In India he had been attached to the 1st Oxfordshire Light Infantry. She said he was of small stature and about 5'4", fair haired and slimly built. His enlistment document described him as 5 foot 8 1/2 inches.

His records show that he was feeling ill from the beginning of 1916. He referred to the 52nd and 53rd Field Ambulances with rheumatism. He also suffered from NVD, neuralgia and various other symptoms. He was observed for general German measles and died in the isolation hospital at Etaples from enteric fever. He is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery.




118

Pte. J. Archeson

Army 2nd Btn. Durham Light Infantry




1880

Spr. Adam Archibald VC.

British Army 218th Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Leith, Scotland

Adam Archibald enlisted with the 7th Durham Light Infantry in 1915. He transferred to the 218th Field Company, Royal Engineers during the Second Battle of the Sambre. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for action while his unit was attempting to bridge the Sambre–Oise Canal, he was 39 years old. He received his medal from King George V at Buckingham Palace in May 1919.

His citation reads:

"On 4 November 1918 near Ors, France, Sapper Archibald was with a party building a floating bridge across the canal. He was foremost in the work under a very heavy artillery barrage and machine-gun fire. The latter was directed at him from a few yards distance while he was working on the cork floats. Nevertheless he persevered in his task and his example and efforts were such that the bridge which was essential to the success of the operations was very quickly completed. Immediately afterwards Sapper Archibald collapsed from gas poisoning."




216665

Pte. George Archibald

British Army 4/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

(d.31st Jul 1917)

George Archibald was born in Dublin and enlisted in Edinburgh. He was killed in Flanders.




1158

Cpl. Hixon Archibald

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




217836

Pte. James Archibald

British Army 17th Btn. Royal Scots

(d.4th Jun 1916)

Pte. James Archibald served with the Royal Scots 17th Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 4th June 1916,aged 19 and is buried in Beuvry Communal Cemetery Extension in Beuvry, France.

James Archibald was employed as a Plumber before he enlisted on 8th June 1915. He named his next-of-kin as his sister, Mrs Elizabeth Gray of 9 Rosevale Place, Leith. He was sentenced, after trial by Field General Court Martial, to be shot for desertion and the sentence was duly carried out. He told his comrades he "felt queer" while en route to the trenches at 6.30pm on 14th May 1916. At 3pm the next day, he was found asleep in a barn. He was shot by firing squad three weeks later.




219326

L/Cpl. John Gibb Archibald

British Army 7th Btn. Black Watch

from:Leslie, Fife

L/Cpl. John Gibb Archibald of the 7th Battalion, Royal Highland Regiment, was from Leslie, Fife. His father was a skilled marksman and won medals in the Scottish Twenty Club. This love and skill of shooting was passed to John, who represented Scotland at Bisley and also won Scottish Twenty Club medals. In order to pay for the ammunition and transport to the events John joined the Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch) as a Territorial.

Upon declaration of war the Black Watch was mobilized, but not the Territorial Battalion. John declined to serve in the regular units. Based on his previous experience he was made a Lance Corporal (he refused any high rank since he did not want to be responsible for other soldiers' lives), and was a marksman/sniper. In early 1915 the Territorial 7th Battalion was mobilized and sent to training camps in Perth and Ayr, before being sent to Bedford for two weeks training prior to embarkation to France in May 1915.

John was in the line from May 1915 until an unknown time in 1915 (his service record was destroyed during bombing of the National Archive at Kew in WWII). He only ever recounted one story about sniping while in France - shooting a German officer one morning while shaving.

In 1915 he was invalided out of the army due to an enlarged heart (cardiomegaly) and told to go home, do light work (if any), and prepare to die. He finally passed away in 1970. The memory of taking other men's lives haunted him.




1159

Pte. Lambert Pearce Archibald

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Bracken St, Hillgrave, NSW.




969

Pte. B. V. Archie

Australian Imperial Force 40th Btn

(d.7th Jun 1917)




215447

L/Sgt. Alfred Arculus

British Army 2nd Btn Worcestershire Regiment

from:Salter Street, Tanworth in Arden, Earlswood, Birmingham

(d.26th Sep 1915.)

What I know of Alfred Arculus is taken from records I have come across while researching my ancestors but I think I would have liked him. He actually volunteered for the Army Reserve as a Special Reservist on 6th March 1914, aged 18 yrs 171 days. A farm labourer, he was 5ft 4 inches tall and weighed 128lbs, not exactly a strapping lad but he was willing.

At the outbreak of war he was promoted to Lance Corporal; by the 5th October he was a Corporal and in March 1915 he became L/Sergeant. Then in June he lost his stripe, the reason, curiosity! On the 3rd April at the back of his billet at Essars two R.E officers exploded an aeroplane bomb. A group of men including Alfred watched the proceedings and after the explosion started picking up fragments. Alfred found the nose of the bomb and as the R.E officers had declared the area safe he proceeded back to his billet with his mates and the fragment. This is where his curiosity got the better of him. He started to take the nose of the bomb apart and as witnessed by others it blew up and badly injured his left hand. A court of enquiry came to the conclusion that 'having considered the evidence Alfred was wholly to blame for the accident, and he was not in performance of military duties when injured'.

A month later on the 2nd May he was pronounced fully fit and back with his mates on the 4th. On the 8th September he's again a L/Sgt. On the 26th September 1915 he was killed in action at Vermelles. From what I have now found he is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, originally buried at Barts Alley Cemetery, Vermelles (this cemetery was destroyed in later battles and the remains scattered - what was found taken to Loos and reburied). Of his effects only his identity disc remained. This was sent to his mother, Eliza. She received it in 1916.




240024

2nd Lt. Humphrey Warwick Arden

British Army Royal Field Artillery

(d.6th Jun 1917)

Second Lieutenant Humphrey Warwick Arden, Royal Garrison Artillery died of wounds at Balleul. He was aged 25, the son of the Reverend William Henry Arden, vicar of Whiteparish, Salisbury, Wiltshire.




206595

Pte. Henry Ardley

British Army 5th Dragoon Guards

from:Aldershott, Hmapshire

(d.19th Sept 1914)

I have managed to find a lot of documents for my Great Grandpa, Henry Ardley. His attestation, his medical, death, medal receipts. I am trying to find out as much as I can so that I can ensure my children know all about him.

Henry had 3 children, Henry 1911 (my Grandpa), Daisy 1911 and George 1914. George was born just a month before his father was killed in action. My Granpa, Henry -(or Harry as he was nicknamed) died aged 85 and I never got to speak to him about his father, what he knew or anything. It never came up in conversation. It is a shame as I think he would have loved to have learned about the man he lost so young.

One story I enjoyed reading in the documents I have found was the time he was riding down an incline and his horse falling, his right leg got caught in the stirrups - his horse got back up and bolted - dragging him a few yards, they had court papers to enquire into what happened and whose fault it was. Thankfully he was not charged - he was exonerated - as well as having a badly sprained ankle and 20 days in Hospital!

Henry is buried in the Vailly Cemetary in France and I think was in the Battle of Aisne as far as I can determine. There is still more to research and uncover.




500797

Sjt. Harold Ernest Argus

Australian Imperial Forces 43rd Btn.

from:Adelaide, Australia

(d.4th Jun 1917)

Harold Angus was 30 year old clergyman from Adelaide, he lost his life near Ploesteert Wood on the 4th of June 1917. During a practice barrage two parties from the 11th Brigade where to undertake a trench raid. The lorries bringing up the part from the 43rd Btn, lead by Lt. Coleman and including Sjt. Angus, were delayed at Hyde Park Corner. By the time they arrived at the front line the barrage had just finished, but the keen young Lieutenant lead his party forward. Enemy Machine guns opened fire and Sjt. Angus and Lt. Coleman were both killed. Sjt. Gardiner took over the party and lead them back to their own lines. The battalion suffered eight casualties in this incident. The party from the 44th Battalion succeeded in their raid and captured four enemy prisoners.

Sjt. Angus was laid to rest in Strand Military Cemetery close to the village of Ploegseert.




216666

CSM. B. Arkins

British Army 6th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.9th Dec 1915)

B Arkins was born and enlisted in Dublin. He was killed in action in the Balkans




1160

Pte. William Arnold Arkins

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Public School, South Covona, NSW.

(d.12th Apr 1918)




214336

Writer 2nd Leslie Charlton Arkle

Royal Navy Mercantile Marine Reserve HMS. Viknor

from:Gateshead

(d.13th Jan1915)

Leslie Charlton Arkle Writer 2nd. HMS. Viknor Mercantile Marine Reserve, Age 19 who died on 13th January 1915 was born in Gateshead in 1895. He was the son of John Armitage and Margaret Arkle (Charlton) of Gateshead. Leslie is remembered on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. Panel 9 and is commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (south face) Jarrow.




232149

Pte. William Arkle

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:South Shields

William Arkles was discharged in 1915 due to a Heart condition




119

Company Qtr Mstr Sjt. F. C. Arkless

Army 2/8th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




232150

Pte. Wm. Arkless

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Dunston

(d.1st July 1916)




300206

Pte. Thomas Walter Arkley

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




237323

L/Cpl. Albert Arksey

British Army 10th Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

from:Hull

(d.25th March 1917 )

My wife's grandfather Albert Arksey is remembered on the Memorial Wall at Arras. We know very little of his service in the Army, suffice to say he was registered as missing in action.




216667

Pte. Alfred Stanley Arkwright

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

from:Dublin

(d.25th Apr 1915)

Alfred Stanley Arkwright was born in Charlton, enlisted in Stratford and lived in Dublin. He was killed in action in Gallipoli.




672

Ernest Worrell Gustave Armand

Army Royal Horse Artillery

My grandfather served in First World War in the Royal Horse Artillery, was awarded the Mons Star and fought in the battle of Ypres. His name was Ernest Worrell Gustave Armand. I cannot find any info regarding his call up dates, birth date etc. could anyone please help?




225960

Pte. Samuel Percival Armfield

British Army 9th Btn. Norfolk Regiment

from:Stoke Newington

(d.26th Sep 1915)

Samuel Armfield was killed in action on Sunday, 26th September 1915. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.




221904

Pte. Charles William Armitage

British Army 10th Btn, B Coy. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Leeds

(d.1st July 1916)

Charles Armitage was the son of Mr. Maskill Armitage, of 6 Warrington Row, Station Rd., Kippax, Leeds. He is buried in Fricourt Cemetery.




217454

Capt. Harold Edwin "Rollo" Armitage MID

Australian Imperial Force 10th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

Harold Edwin Salisbury "Rollo" Armitage was born 11 November 1894 at Norwood, South Australia. He was educated at public schools in Adelaide and at the University of Adelaide. Armitage worked as a junior teacher at the school house in Millicent, South Australia and was completing a university course in Arts before the outbreak of the First World War. He had also spent some time with the cadets.

Armitage enlisted on 24 March 1915 as a private, but quickly received a commission as a second lieutenant and was assigned to the 10th Infantry Battalion. He departed Australia aboard HMAT Hororata on 20 April 1915. He was promoted to lieutenant on 7 August 1915 and later captain. Armitage was transferred to the 50th Infantry Battalion on 2 March 1916 while stationed in Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt. He was transferred to France and arrived at Marseilles on 12 June 1916. He received a Mention in Despatches for leading his men on the night of 12 and13 August 1916. Harold Armitage was killed in action on 3 April 1917 and is buried at Noreuil Australian Cemetery, France




1875

Pte. John William Armitage

British Army 1/5th Btn. Cheshire Regiment

from:5, Moss Rd., Northwich, Cheshire.




120

Pte. W. Armitage

Army 22nd Btn. Durham Light Infantry




223501

Pte. James Armour

British Army 2nd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

(d.26th Aug 1915)

John Armour was my great granddad, who came from Greenock, Scotland, and served and died during WW1 in France, leaving his wife Martha widowed.




210611

Pte. John "Jock" Armour

Australian Imperial Force 35th Batallion

from:Weston, NSW Australia

My grandfather, Jock Armour, signed up for the big "adventure" in early 1916 and sailed to England on the Benalla which was the first sailing for the 35th (Newcastle's Own) Battalion. He was a 22 year old coal miner who was married to Mary Jane nee Jenkins and had one child, my father Allan, who had been born in 1913. His uncle by marriage, George Jenkins, who lived in the same town also signed up on the same day.

They went to Salisbury Plain for training and just before being shipped off to France he went AWOL for several days. Perhaps by then I imagine they were hearing more of what to expect once they went over to the Front. He paid his fine (or more likely it was Mary Jane who was deprived of money at this time) and was shipped off to France in November 1916 ready for that harsh winter. I believe he was wounded at Armentieres on 14th Feb 1917 and shipped back to hospital in England. He returned to the front and was wounded again on 13th November 1917. Luckily for him his was was now over and after some duties at various camps in England he returned to Australia.




300081

Pte. Arthur Armstrong

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Crook

(d.29th Mar 1916 )

Arthur Armstrong was the son of John and Mary Armstrong, of 23, High Grey Street, Crook, Co. Durham. He died on the 29th of March 1916, aged 26 and is buried in Bertrancourt Military Cemetery. His father requested the inscription 'At rest' for his headstone.




216670

Sgt. Charles Armstrong

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.12th Mar 1915)

Charles Armstrong was the son of Mrs. Ellen Armstrong, of 12, St. Michael's Terrace, Blackpitts, Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders aged 25 and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial.




216669

Pte. Charles Armstrong

British Army 6th Btn. Connaught Rangers

from:Dublin

Charles Armstrong died of wounds at home.




216668

2nd Lt. Charles Martin Armstrong

British Army 10th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.8th Feb 1917)

Charles Armstrong was the son of the Rev. Chancellor S. C. and Eliza Armstrong (nee Martin), of The Rectory, Finglas, Co. Dublin. He was a student of Trinity College, Dublin.Charles died in France aged 23 and is buried in the Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel.




220506

2nd Lt. Christopher Armstrong

British Army 23rd (Sportsman's Battalion) Battalion Royal Fusiliers

from:The Grove, Huntingdon Road, Cambridge

(d.9th Apr 1916)

Christopher was born on 10th October 1888 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire and was baptised on 21st December at St Mary's and All Saints Chesterfield. His father was Charles Armstrong, born in Little Paxton, a brewer and later owner of the Star Brewery, Cambridge. He was educated at the Perse School, Cambridge, and St Lawrence's School, Ramsgate. Christopher was admitted to Jesus College, Cambridge in October 1907. He excelled at athletics and won the following medals:

  • 1907 Long Jump
  • 1908: 100 yards race. Awarded The Langton Victor Ludorum Medal, Jesus College.
  • 1909: Long jump and 1/4 mile race, run in 52 seconds.
  • 1909: 2nd place 100 yards and Putting the shot.
  • 1910: Long jump
After leaving Jesus, Christopher lived with his parents at The Grove, a beautiful regency house set in large grounds, and was studying to take over the Brewery. In 1914 Christopher enlisted as a Private in the Sportsmen's Battalion and was posted to Hornchurch. His nephew, John Vincent Armstrong, reported that he had bribed a doctor to pass him as fit even though he had poor eyesight. The 23rd (Service) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers and 24th (Service) Battalion (2nd Sportsman's), better known as the Sportsmen's Battalions, were among the Pals battalions formed in the Great War.

Christopher was then commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Royal Fusiliers 14th Battalion attached to the 6th Loyal Northern Lancashire Regiment in 1915. On 13th October 1915 he was writing a letter to his sister Pearl, in South Camp, Seaford, Sussex, about to go on active service to Serbia, he thought. He was in 38 Brigade 13th Division. It would seem that in fact the Brigade went to Gallipoli. On the 14th November he sailed to Mudros on the SS Olympic from Liverpool. In February 1916 the Division began to move to Mesopotamia, to strengthen the force being assembled for the relief of the besieged garrison at Kut al Amara. By 27 March, the Division had assembled near Sheikh Sa'ad and came under orders of the Tigris Corps. It then took part in the attempts to relieve Kut. After these efforts failed and Kut fell.

This is Christopher's last letter, dated:29.3.16 "Dear Baba, lots of letters from you the other day many thanks and all that sort of thing. I don't write as often as I ought but as often as I can. As you will doubtless have heard we have done quite a large move lately. From Port Said to Kuweit where is this?,(sic) . From there transshipped and on to Basra, pronounced Busrh, from there to a river boat with a barge alongside each side squashed on board like sardines. There was not room for all the men to lie down at the same time so you can guess. Well we have endured this for 6 days or so and that was comfort to our present place. We went up the Tigris past Qurnah and Amarah and several places past that I suppose, I must not say to where exactly but probably if you have a map it will be 3 places further up and we are short of the firing line by 2-3 miles and from a town as far as it is from Cambridge to Ely 27 miles. In a few days about Wednesday we are in for shouting and sprinting and cold steel. We have had many tries to get forward but up to now have been very unsuccessful. Now it is our turn to have a cut at it and we shall see what will happen. I could tell you all about if I was allowed to. Perhaps next time I write I shall be able to tell you all about what it feels like and all that sort of thing lets hope I shall be able to. Always hope for the best. Well my dear cheers. I am Chris" Written on the back of this letter ‘Chris’s last letter before Sarnai’.

Over 12,600 men were killed, wounded or missing from the 13th Western Division. Christopher went missing. He was found to have been killed in action on 9th April 1916 at Kut el Amara in modern Iraq. He led his platoon in the 1st line into some vacant Turkish trenches but it was an ambush; the trenches were bombed and very few men survived. His name is on the Roll of Honour in Jesus College, and Great St.Mary's Cambridge. He is buried in Amara War Cemetery in plot xviii.J 12. Amara is on the left bank of the Tigris 520 km from the sea between the left bank and the Chahaila Canal. He was reported 'missing' but not presumed dead and his family continued to hope for months afterwards. His nephew said that he was well loved and greatly missed.




224320

Pte. David Armstrong

British Army 7th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Hazelrigg, Chatton, Northumberland

(d.15th May 1915)

David Armstrong died aged 20 and is commemorated on the Menin Gate, Ypres.




229782

Pte. Edmund Robert Armstrong

British Army 1st/21st Btn London Regiment

(d.3rdJune 1918)

I am trying to trace details of medals awarded to Private Edmund Robert Armstrong Serial No. G/36901, 1st/21st Bn. London Regt. (First Surrey Rifles). Edmund was a POW and died on 3rd June 1918, and is buried in Germany. Have searched the Medal Roll on the National Archives site, with no result. Can anyone assist?




1643

Sgt Francis Armstrong

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.28th March 1918)

Armstrong, Francis. Sergeant, 19/1005, Killed 28th March 1918,

Remembered on the Pozieres Memorial panel 16 to 18.

From the Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour




232151

Pte. G. Armstrong

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

G Armstrong was wounded in Nov. 1917




224051

WO. George Armstrong

British Army Royal Engineers

from:2 Guildford Rd, Ilford, Essex

George Armstrong served with the Royal Engineers

George Armstrong, pre WWI with family

George Armstrong, pre WWI with family




224032

George Eric Armstrong

British Army 62 Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Ilford, Essex

George Eric Armstrong was the oldest son of George and Florence Armstrong of Ilford, Essex. His father was already in the British Army, also in Royal Engineers, at the outbreak of WWI. George had finished school and studied typing and shorthand in preparation for secretarial work. The first firm he worked for soon closed its doors as its factory was converted to manufacturing for military purposes. The new firm he worked for soon followed suit. Young George, still only 16 decided it was pointless to look for a third job so put his age up and enlisted. His father eventually heard the news that his first-born, a very baby-faced, fair haired, blue eyed lad had enlisted. The French women running the cafe he and his father frequented whilst serving in France noted his youthful looks and would them 'La pomme and enfant' referring to his father's rosy cheeks, like an apple and his baby looks.

After the war he found it hard to settle down and rode his pushbike around England at every chance before finally emigrating to Australia in 1924. After a difficult few years during the Great Depression, George wasted no time in enlisting on the news of the outbreak of WWII. This time he served with the 1st Garrison Battalion, Australian Armed Forces, guarding military installations in the Brisbane area. He was sent to Cowra, New South Wales for clean-up operations after the Japanese P.O.W. outbreak. He considered the WW2 years some of the best as he did not smoke or drink and would swap his ration cards for fuel rations enabling many happy camping trips with his teenage children. He would never march on Anzac Day and only mentioned the Great War when he was much older.




300641

Pte. George O. Armstrong

British Army 21st Btn Durham Light Infantry

Served with 2nd DLI, 18th DLI and 2-6th DLI




232152

A-CSM. J.E. Armstrong

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle

Acting CSM J Armstrong was wounded in 1916




841

Able Seaman. James Armstrong

Royal Navy HMS K4

(d.31st Jan 1918)




1161

Pte. John Armstrong

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.




217493

L/Cpl. John Armstrong

British Army 6th Btn Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

from:Nitshill

(d.18th Apr 1917)

John Armstrong is listed on the Nitshill, Glasgow War Memorial. He is buried in Escivres Military Cemetery, Mont-St. Eloi. Born in 1893 in Nitshill, his wife was Sarah (Cameron)Armstrong (later remarried to William Cairney) They had a daughter Janet Armstrong born 22/5/1915. John enlisted at Pollokshaws on 25/05/1915 giving his former occupation as Ironstone Miner.




232153

Pte. John R. Armstrong

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:West Moor

John Armstrong was discharded on the 5th of Dec. 1918




232154

Pte. Jos. M. Armstrong

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Penrith

(d.30th June 1916)




216671

Pte. Joseph Armstrong

British Army 10th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.15th Nov 1916)

Joseph Armstrong died of wounds in Flanders.




300801

A/Sgt. Joseph Sproat or Stuart Armstrong

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

served with 18th & 20th DLI




300687

Capt. Reginald Armstrong

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




300910

Capt. Reginald Armstrong

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




216672

Pte. Reginald George Armstrong

British Army E Squadron North Irish Horse

from:Glasnaris

(d.26th Mar 1918)

Reginald George Armstrong was born in Dublin but enlisted in Antrim. He was the son of Charles B. Armstrong, of Beechfield House, Clontarf, Dublin. >He was killed in action in Flanders age 20 and is buried in Toutencourt Communal Cemetery and is commemorated at the Presbyterian Church, Clontarf.

Update : Private Reginald George Armstrong 'E' Squadron, 5th Army Cyclist Corps Was killed in action age 20, Tuesday, 26th March 1918, when the British 5th Army was driven back across the former Somme battlefields during the German 'Operation Michael'.




214337

Pte. Richard Armstrong

British Army 4th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment

from:Jarrow

(d.26th March 1918)

Richard Armstrong's Medal Index Card

Richard Armstrong's Medal Index Card

Richard Armstrong served with the 4th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment. Aged 31 he died 26th March 1918. He was the son of Robert and Sarah Armstrong of St. Paul's Terrace West Pelton and Husband of Ada Armstrong (nee Archbold) of 19 Park Road Jarrow. On the 1911 census Richard Armstrong is listed as age 24 Timekeeper above ground in Coalmine living with his parents Robert and Sarah Armstrong at St. Paul's Terrace, West Pelton. Richard was born in West Pelton, lived in Jarrow and enlisted Chester le Street. He is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial.




231006

2nd Lt. Sidney Armstrong

Royal Flying Corps 37 Squadron

(d.17th Feb 1918)

2nd Lieutenant Sydney Armstrong, Royal Flying Corp and Royal Field Artillery, died on 17th February 1918 aged 18. Sydney Armstrong crashed in Tolleshunt, Darcy after his aircraft was damaged whilst engaging a Gotha Bomber on its way to bomb London.




988

Thomas Armstrong

Army Royal Artillery

from:Kibblesworth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Thomas Armstrong

Thomas Armstrong

My grandad Thomas Armstrong from Kibblesworth Newcastle upon Tyne (on the right in photo) served in the Royal Artillery during the 1914-18 war. I don't know much else about his army time, but believe this photo was taken in France. He survived the war and worked in the pits for several years, then moved to Gateshead to run a pub.




1162

Lt. Thomas Acheson Armstrong

Australian Imperial Forces C Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Boldon, Mackay, Queensland

(d.12th Oct 1917)

Thomas Armstrong was a 24 year old medical Student studying at Sydney University when he enlisted on the 16th March 1916. He was wounded in action by a shell at the Battle of Messines on the 7th June 1917 and was admitted to the 24th General Hospital at Etaples with a wound to his right shoulder the following day. He was transferred to England and two days later was admitted to the Reading War Hospital. He rejoined his unit at the front on the 17th of August.

Thomas was killed in action on the 12th Oct 1917 in Belgium. His mother, Elizabeth, requested his headstone be inscribed: "How went the fight? I died and never knew, But well or ill, England I died for you." Thomas is commemorated with the missing on the Menin Gate in Ypres.




121

Pte. W. Armstrong

Army 15th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




1644

Cpl William Armstrong

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.28th March 1918)

Armstrong, William. Corporal, 19/957, Killed in action 28th March 1918,

Remembered on the Pozieres Memorial panel 16 to 18.

From the Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour




300209

Pte. William Armstrong

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




230760

Pte. William Armstrong

British Army 12th Btn. Highland Light Infantry

from:Hamilton, Scotland

(d.13th August 1916)




1163

Pte. William Alexander Armstrong

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:55 Micthell St, Glebe, NSW




500796

Gnr. Gerald Mostyn Armytage MM.

Australian Imperial Forces 30th Battery 8th Brigade Field Artillery

from:Yarrala, St Georges Road, Toorak, Vic. Australia

Gerald Armytage was a 19 year old farmer when he enlisted on the 14th Feb 1916. His records describe him as being five foot six and a half, weighing eight stone four pounds with a fresh complexion, blue eyes and black hair.

He was awarded the Military Medal on the 3rd of July 1917 for bravery in the field, including an incident on the 29th of May when he extinguished a fire, set by enemy shelling, which was threatening the ammunition of 30th Battery near Hill 63.

In May 1919 Gerald was granted three months leave without pay or allowances, to return to Australia at his own expense. He returned via America on board the Ventura and was discharged from the army on the 18th of August 1919 and in 1923 was living in Glenthompson, Victoria.




1164

Pte. Thomas Albert Arndell

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Myalla Garah, Moree, NSW




232155

LPCL. H. Arnell

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

H Arnell was discharged on 6th of June 1918




1165

Pte. John Arent Arnesen

Australian Imperial Forces 33rd Btn.

from:Lirvick, Norway

John Arnesen emigrated to Australia in about 1915 and was working as a tram conductor in Sydney when he enlisted. His first experience of military life was very short lived as he was discharged after few weeks being medically unfit. He re-enlisted and arrived in France in May 1917, joining the 33rd Battalion at the front on the 10th June 1917. His time at the front was very short, being admitted to hospital on the 23rd of June having injured his leg on the parapet in the support trenches, some years before he had suffered a compound fracture to this leg and he was discharged from the army for medical reasons and returned to Australia.




500783

Pte. John Arney

British Army 12th Btn. East Surrey Regt.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




220994

2nd Lt. Edward Burra Arnison

British Army 11th Siege Battalion Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Oakfield Gardens, Woodford, Essex

(d.18th Aug 1918)

Edward Arnison was born in Sheffield in 1877, the son of Robert and Frances Ann (nee Bowstead). He worked as a Manager for Silversmiths before war broke out. Edward Arnison is buried in Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres, Picardie, France. He is also commemorated on the Masonic Roll of Honour, Sheffield Cathedral and Lodge 296, Tapton Hall, Shore Lane, Sheffield.




234199

Pte. Arthur Arnold

British Army 1st Btn. Rifle Brigade

from:Swaffham Prior

Arthur Arnold joined the British Army as a Regular on 28th December 1899. He was working as a clerk and had won prizes for his ace marksmanship in competitions. He and his friend Augusto Walston Arturo Blackbory Bampkin Davis from Montevideo, Uraguay (better named as Arthur Blackburn Bamkins), served then onwards in South Africa, India and Malta. They were held in reserve in August 1914 before shipping to Le Havre. They went straight into battle at Le Cateau. They were in action through every major battle from 1914 to 1918 and Arthur ended service 1919.

Arthur came home and then worked at De Havilland in Hertfordshire. He loved his football and looking after his chickens. He had four daughters and one son, and lived in Letchworth Garden City and Stotfold. He was a member of the Old Contemptibles and made regular trips to the Cenotaph and the WWI battlefields and cemetery sites.




236016

CQMS Charles Arnold

British Army 2nd Composite Btn., No 1 Coy. Border Regiment

from:Kingston-upon-Thames

Company Quarter Master Sergeant Charles Arnold served at Mustapha Camp, Alexandria, Egypt in December 1915. The camp was on the sea. Despite having endured the worst Christmas dinner of his seven in the army by that time – the lack of Xmas pudding and walnuts was remarked upon – Charlie would happily have spent the duration of the war there. He was an Old Contemptible who had been badly wounded in August 1914 during the retreat from Mons. Sergeant Arnold was my grandfather and I am transcribing letters he wrote during the Great War to his future wife, my grandmother.




235897

Sgt. Edward Arnold

British Army 11th Battalion Royal Warwickshire

from:Norwich

(d.17th Nov 1916)

Edward Arnold is my great grandfather, I believe he suffered wounds on 13th November 1916 at the Battle of Ancre on the Somme and died four days later. I really would love to find out more. He was formerly with the Lancers. and I really do not know much more than that.




1206564

Spr Edward Percy Arnold

British Army Royal Engineers

from:Doncaster

This story was told by my grandfather Percy Arnold to one of his grandsons who has retold it.

Grandad Percy was a Sapper in the Royal Engineers this would have been an appropriate role for Grandad Percy as in civilian life he was a employed in heavy manual work. Like many of his generation he didn't talk much of his time in the war but as he was laid up poorly one time his daughter asked her son to talk to Grandad and this is one story he told. "




221729

Sgt. Frederick Arthur Arnold MM

British Army 1st/1st North Midland Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Walworth, London

(d.7th July 1917)

Sorry I don't know to much only that Frederick Arnold was killed by enemy aircraft.




217843

L/Bdr. Frederick S. Arnold

Canadian Expeditionary Forces 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery

(d.25th Jul 1916)

Frederick Arnold served with the Canadian Field Artillery 1st Brigade. He was executed for desertion on 25th July 1916 aged 26. He is buried in the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Boulogne, France7. L/Bmdr. Arnold went absent without leave and was arrested in plain clothes.




217455

Pte. Guy Hartley Arnold

Australian Imperial Force 2nd Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

(d.26th Apr 1916)

Guy Hartley Arnold was born in 1887 in Warwickshire, England and emigrated to Australia at the age of 23. In England he had worked as a bank clerk but in Australia he worked as a farmer in Coolamon, New South Wales. He also worked as a labourer in Mackay, Queensland.

Arnold was 27 years old when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 28th January 1915. He was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Battalion and departed Sydney aboard HMAT Seang Bee on 11th February 1915. He spent time in Gallipoli and Egypt before moving to France with this battalion. Guy Arnold was killed during heavy fighting on 26th April 1916 and is buried at Rue-Du-Bois Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix




205141

Pte. Herbert Arnold

British Army 6th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Raunds, Northamptonshire




216673

L/Cpl. John Arnold

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Munster Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.10th Nov 1917)

John Arnold was formerly 30837, Royal Army Medical Corps. He was killed in action in Flanders and is remembered at the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium.




223316

Pte. Joseph Arnold

British Army 15th Batt. B Coy Royal Welsh Fusiliers

from:Waltham Abbey




220991

FMN Llewellyn Arnold

Royal Navy HMS Derwent

from:18 Northill Road, Swansea, Wales

(d.17th May 1917)




237612

Member Margaret Trevenen Arnold

British Army No 16 Stationary Hospital, Le Treport Voluntary Aid Detachment

from:Surrey

(d.12th March 1916)

Margaret Arnold was aged 31 when she died of double pneumonia at the 16th Stationary Hospital in Le Treport, France where she served as a member of the Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD).

She is buried in Le Treport Military Cemetery, Plot 2, Row O, Grave 22. Margaret was the daughter of Edward and Minnie Arnold, Pook Hill, Chiddingfold, Surrey.




145108

Private Richard Henry Arnold

Army 2/5th Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Thurnscoe

(d.3rd May 1917)

In Memory of Private Richard Arnold 242164, 2nd/5th Bn, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, who died on 03 May 1917 Remembered with honour Arras Memorial. Richard was born in Thurnscoe, Yorkshire on 25 Aug 1895 to parents Richard and Sarah Eleanor Owens, who married in Cardiff on 20 Feb 1892. He had four sisters, Eleanor born in Wales 1887, Elizabeth also born in Wales 1888, Maggie also born in Wales 1891 and Dorothy my grandmother who was born in Thurnscoe, Yorkshire 1894. One brother, Thomas born in Wales 1892. The family lived in Cardiff until around 1893 before relocating to Yorkshire and as can be seen the parents did not marry until 1892.




1205941

Pte. Richard Henry Arnold

Canadian Expeditionary Forces 16th Btn.

from:Hyas, Saskatchewan

(d.27th Feb 1917)

Richard Henry Arnold was killed in action on the 27th of February 1917, aged 20 and is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, France. He was the son of Mr. J. W. Arnold, of Hyas, Saskatchewan




218492

Pte. T. Arnold

British Army 5th Btn. Royal Irish Fusiliers

(d.30th Sep 1918)

Private T Arnold lost his life aged 27 on the last day of the Final Offensive in Salonika, most likely during the passage of the Vardar river and pursuit to the Strumica valley (22-30 September). He is buried in Plovdiv Central Cemetery, Bulgaria.




211198

Pte. Thomas Arnold

British Army Royal Warwickshire Regim,ent

from:Abby Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire

My Grandfather Tom Arnold served in the first world war in France, he told us stories of how he got stuck in the wire and another soldier came back and helped him out. He had nightmares sometimes and Mum used to say they were not as bad as when he first came back, he sometimes used to walk around at night because he could not sleep. He told us that when the war finished he had to walk for days to get a boat back to England.

I went to Kew to find his records and all I can find is a record that puts him with another service no. He started with the no. 25336 in the Royal Warwicks and ended with the no.5057 in the Essex Regiment. There is no information on that record to say where he fought in France. Is it possible to tell me why he ended up in another regiment. I have been told that some records were burnt during the second world war and his may have been among them. Any information would be great. Hope someone can help.




216674

Rflm. Thomas Arnold

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.7th Jul 1916)

Thomas Arnold was killed in action in Flanders.




239526

Mjr. W. Arnold

British Army 173rd Brigade, A Bty. Royal Field Artillery

Major Arnold served with `A' Battery in 1917 and `C' Battery in 1918.




222879

Pte. William Arnold

British Army 1/2nd Bn. East Lancashire Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps

from:Burnley, Lancs

(d.21st Jun 1915)

William Arnold died on the 21st June 1915, aged 24 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey. He was the son of Robert and Grace Jane Arnold, of 4 Rowley St., Burnley.




234824

Pte. Thomas Hick Arnot

British Army 21st (Tyneside Scottish) Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle upon Tyne

(d.1st July 1916)

Thomas Arnot was my great grandfather. He volunteered in 1914 and died, aged 37, on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, 1st July 1916. He left behind his wife Emily and eight children: Ada (15), Annie (my grandmother)(13), Thomas (11), Emily (9), Edmund (7), James (6), Mary (4) and Lily (2). They lived at 46 Cookson Street, Newcastle upon Tyne. His youngest daughter Lily, (my great aunt) died in 2014 aged 100.




216676

Capt. John "Punch" Arnott MC.

British Army 15th (The King's) Hussars

from:Dublin

(d.30th Mar 1918)

Captain John Arnott, son of Major Sir John Alexander Arnott, 2nd Baronet, and Dame Commander Lady Caroline Sydney Arnott (née Williams), of 12 Merrion Square, Dublin, was born on July 25th 1885 and lived in Dublin when he enlisted. He was killed in action aged 32 in Warfusee, France. John Arnott is buried at Fouilloy Communal Cemetery. He is also commemorated on The Great War Memorial inside St. Stephen's Church of Ireland, Upper Mount Street, South Dublin City. Captain Arnott was decorated with the award of the Military Cross.




216675

Stdess. Sarah Jane Arnott

Mercantile Marine SS Hare

from:Dublin

(d.14th Dec 1917)

Stewardess Sarah Jane Arnott, daughter of William and Dora McLean (nee Leech), was born in Malahide, County Dublin. Her husband, Private Henry Arnott in 13th Hussars, died in 1916. The next year she was one of 12 aboard the SS Hare, which was en route from Manchester to Dublin, who drowned following a torpedo attack from the German submarine U-62. Sarah Arnott died aged 41, and is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London.




216677

Srgt. Henry Alfred Arnup

British Army 1st Btn. Norfolk Regiment

(d.23rd Apr 1917)

Sergeant Henry Arnup was born in Abbeyleix, Dublin, and enlisted in Norwich, Norfolk. The 1st Battalion landed at Le Havre in August 1914, and Sergeant Arnup was later killed in action in France when the 1st Norfolks were involved in an attack at La Coulotte during the Battle of Arras. He is commemorated on The Arras Memorial in France.




500778

Rfm. Harry Aronow

British Army 1/8th Btn. London Regiment

from:187, Langdale Mansions, Cannon St. Rd., London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




222880

Pte. John Arrandale

British Army 1st/5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Burnley, Lancs.

(d.4th Jun 1915)

John Arrandale was the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Arrandale of 21 River St., Burnley. He died on the 4th June 1915, aged 18 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




206707

Pte. John Albert Arrowsmith

British Army North Staffordshire Regiment

from:Stoke-on-Trent

My grand father Jack Arrosmwith joined the Army at the out break of World War One. He was wounded by shrapnel in his stomach and back, when he was wounded he spent several hours in a shell hole with a dead enemy solider before he was picked up by the medic, and spent time in a French hospital.




223457

Trpr. Clive Arthur

Australian Imperial Force 3rd Btn. Imperial Camel Corps

from:Lismore, New South Wales.

(d.24th Nov 1917)

Clive Arthur died on the 24th of November 1917, aged 20 and is buried in the Cairo War Memorial Cemetery, Cairo, Egypt. He was the son of Samuel Robert and Margaret Arthur and had been born at Lismore, New South Wales.




1206339

Sgt. James Arthur

British Army 5th Btn. E Coy Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

from:Port Glasgow

Sgt. James Arthur: Soldier's Pay Book and Health Memoranda booklet

Sgt. James Arthur: Soldier's Pay Book and Health Memoranda booklet

I have recently come by this T.A. soldier's pay book, for Sgt. James Arthur of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Date of attestation 1-4-08 at age 36. It was on ebay for sale under the heading: Soldiers Pay Book. Sergt. 5th Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders 1908/Soldiers Health.

I thought you might be interested in having pictures for your records before it leaves me, although unfortunately I cannot find the link with all the names of past A&SH soldiers again. I have enclosed pictures of the book as I discovered a few names under 5th A&SH E Company (TA Port Glasgow) and he, an early recruit, is not included. It shows that the company was probably formed about 1908.

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book pages 1 and 2

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book pages 1 and 2

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 2 closeup

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 2 closeup

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book pages 3 and 4

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book pages 3 and 4

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 5

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 5

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 5

Sgt. James Arthur: Pay Book page 5




214338

Blacksmith Walter Davison Arthur

Royal Navy Mercantile Marine Reserve HMS Viknor

from:East Howdon, Northumberland

(d.13th Jan 1915)

Walter Davison Arthur was a Blacksmith on HMS. Viknor Mercantile Marine Reserve. He was age 22 when he died on 13th January 1915. Walter was the husband of Mary A. Colby (formerly Arthur) of Eastern Terrace, East Howdon, Northumberland. he is remembered on the Plymouth Naval Memorial. Panel 9. He is commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (south) Jarrow.




224127

Pte William Thomas Arthur

British Army 15th Btn Welsh Regiment

from:Carew, Pembrokeshire

(d.1st Sep 1918)

William Arthur is buried in Morval British Cemetery, France.




216678

L/Cpl. George C. Arthurs

British Army 10th Btn Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.1st Dec 1916)

George C. Arthurs son of the late George William and Katharine Arthurs, of 38, Frankfort Avenue, Rathgar, Dublin. He died of wounds in a military hospital ages 26 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery.




216679

A/Sgt. William Arthurs

British Army 56th Remount Sqdn. Royal Army Service Corps

from:Dungannon, County Dublin

(d.13th Nov 1916)

Acting Sergeant William Arthurs was born in Dungannon, County Dublin, and enlisted in Liverpool. He was formerly a member of the Lancashire Fusiliers. He died at home of wounds in 1916, and is buried at Fulford Cemetery, Yorkshire, England.




222242

Sgt. Alwyn Arundel

British Army 5th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:York




1205572

Spr. Robert Arundel

Canadian Army 1st Canadian Tunnelling Coy.

from:Marchmont House, North Berwick, Scotland

(d.8th Nov 1917)




231575

Pte. Joseph Asbury

British Army 17th Battalion The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

from:Bootle, Liverpool, Lancashire

(d.12th Oct 1916)

Joseph Asbury is my great uncle. Fortunately I inherited his WW1 War Medals and an original photograph of him in uniform. Long Gone but Not Forgotten.




239350

Drvr. W. T. Ascott

British Army 173 Brigade, B Bty. Royal Field Artillery

(d.8th August 1917)

Driver Ascott died on 8th August 1917 and is buried at Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Grave VIII.D.6.




235016

Drvr. Walter Henry Ascott

British Army 223rd Brigade, D (H) Bty. Royal Field Artillery

(d.18th Oct 1918)

Walter Ascott died on 18th October 1918 whilst serving attached to 63rd (RN) Division and is buried in Montigny Communal Cemetery, France. I have recently bought an item belonging to Walter and I am researching his history.




214339

Pte. George Ash

British Army 22nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Jarrow

(d.27th Apr 1918)

George Ash's Medal Index Card

George Ash's Medal Index Card

George Ash served with the 22nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry. Aged 18 he died on 27th April 1918. Son of the late John and Mary Ash (nee Hoy) he was born in Jarrow in 1899 and lived and enlisted in Jarrow. On the 1911 census George Ash is listed as age 12 at School living with his widowed father and family at 25a Shakespeare Street, Jarrow.

George is remembered on the Soissons Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




228902

Cpl. John Ash

British Army

My grandfather nothing known.




214340

Cpl. Oswald Charles Ash

British Army 18th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow

(d.31st Aug 1916)

Oswald Charles Ash's Medal Index Card

Oswald Charles Ash's Medal Index Card

Oswald Charles Ash served with the 18th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. he died on 31st August 1916 at the age of 20. Son of James and Martha Mary E. Ash (nee Bell) of 12 Beech Street Jarrow, he was born in Middlesbrough, lived Jarrow and enlisted in Newcastle. On the 1911 census, he is recorded as Oswald Charles Ash age 15 at School is with his parents James and Martha Ash and family at 12 Beech Street, Jarrow. He is buried in Contalmaison Chateau Cemetery.




232156

LPCL. H. Ashburner

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle

H Ashburner suffered a gunshot wound.




1206072

Spr. Albert Ashby

British Army 59th Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Birmingham

(d.29th Oct1918)

Albert Ashby died on the 29th of October 1918 and is buried in the Etaples Military cemetery in France. He was the son of Arthur and Hannah Ashby. Native of Birmingham




220745

Capt. George William Ashby

British Army 6th (City of London) Battalion London Regiment

from:Surbiton, Middlesex

(d.25th Sep 1915)

I have been writing short biographies for the men who are listed on the Ratby, Leicestershire War Memorial and died during WW1, Captain George William Ashby is my last biography. He served with the 6th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment.




207724

Pte. Sampson Ashby

British Army 1/6th Btn. North Staffordshire Regiment

from:Stoke-on-Trent

(d.5th Aug 1917)

Before the war Sampson Ashby worked as a pottery labourer in Stoke-on-Trent. Sampson served in France & Flanders and Egypt. He died at the 3rd Battle of Ypres aged just 21.




235890

Pte. Samuel Ashcroft

British Army 14th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Teamside, Co. Durham

(d.28th September 1915)




219516

Pte. Walter Ashcroft

British Army Kings Own Lancashire Regiment

from:Accrington

(d.10th Nov 1918)

Walter was my paternal great uncle. He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery having died of bronchil pneumonia on the day before the armistice. I do not know when he enlisted nor where he served. His regiment was absorbed into the Labour Corps. He left a wife whom he had married in 1917 but they had no children.

His younger brother Tom was my grandfather. I believe that he too tried to enlist but was refused because he has a 'starred occupation'. I do not know what that was but he worked at the famous Dick Kerr's factory later. I have the armband which he was given to wear which identified him as excempt from military service.

I am trying to discover more information about Walter to honour his memory. I visited his grave at Etaples in 1979 and plan to return for his anniversary.




216680

Pte. Patrick Ashe

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.24th May 1915)

Patrick Ashe, the son of Mrs. Ann Ashe, of 20, Asylum Yard, Pearse St., Dublin was killed in action in Flanders age 33. He is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.




216681

Rfmn. Thomas Ashe

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.25th Sep 1915)

Thomas Ashe was the son of Mrs. Ann Ashe, of 20, Mark St., Dublin and husband of Esther Ashe, of 11, Upper Exchange St., Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders age 33 and is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial.




216682

Pte. Thomas Ashe

British Army 9th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Balbriggan, Co. Dublin

(d.30th Nov 1916)

Thomas was the son of Thomas and Mary Ashe, of Darcystown, Balbriggan, Co. Dublin. He was killed in action in Flanders age 19 and is buried in Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery.




207278

W. G. Ashe

British Army 10th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

(d.1st Jul 1916)




223808

Pte. Bertram Gower Asher

British Army 7th Btn. North Staffordshire Regiment

from:Stoke on Trent

(d.7th Jan 1916)

I know nothing about Bertram Asher, other than he was the cousin of my great grandfather. He died, aged 25 during the evacuation of Gallipoli. He is listed on the Helles Memorial.




211148

Pte. Cecil Frederick Asher

British Army 2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Croxton Kerrial

(d.11th Apr 1917)




500781

Pte. H. W. Ashford

British Army 24th Btn. London Regiment

(d.7th Jun 1917)




1205868

Pte. Henry George Ashford

Australian Imperial Force 59th Btn.

from:Scone, New South Wales.

(d.23rd Nov 1916)

Henry Ashford was killed in action on the 23rd of Nov 1916, aged 18. He is buried in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Somme, France and was the son of John Oakenville Ashford and Elizabeth Ashford, of Satur, Scone, New South Wales.




222214

Sgt. Jesse Ashforth

British Army Warwickshire Yeomanry

from:89 James Turner Street, Winson Green, Birmingham

(d.21st Nov 1917)

I have recently acquired a death penny relating to the Warwickshire Yeomanry and I am trying to locate the family of Jesse Ashforth. I have been doing lots of research relating to this item but have hit a dead end and this site is my last chance, please help.




300082

Sgt. Albert Percival Ashley

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

Commissioned into DLI 29th of May 1917




222583

Cpl. William Thomas Ashley

British Army 3rd Battalion Rifle Brigade

from:Brandon, Suffolk




232157

Pte. E Ashman

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




222193

Pte. George William Ashman

British Army 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment

from:Stoke on Trent

(d.11th March 1917)




1205509

Spr. Harold Ashmore

British Army 250th Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers.

from:Hoyland Common, Barnsley

(d.23rd Sep 1917)




217885

Sgt. A. Ashton

British Army 1st Btn. North Staffordshire Regiment

Sgt. Ashton served with the North Staffordshire Regiment1st attalion. He was treated at Red Gables Hospital in Bletchingly, Surrey.




212982

Arthur Edward Ashton

British Army 57th Trench Mortar Battery Royal Artillery

from:Bristol

Arthur Ashton attended St. Luke's College, Exeter.




217765

L/Sgt. H. Ashton

British Army 11th Btn. Cameronians

(d.8th Jul 1917)

Lance Sergeant H Ashton served with the 11th Battalion, Cameronian Scottish Rifles during WW1. He was executed for desertion on the 8th July 1917 and is buried in Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.




206086

L/Cpl. Henry Ashton

British Army Cheshire Regiment

from:Stockport, Cheshire

Henry Ashton (seated)

Henry Ashton (seated)

My father Henry Ashton, served with the Cheshire Regiment, Transports then transferred to the Royal Engineers and then back to the Cheshire Regiment. If anyone has any information about his service, I would love to hear from you.




231687

Pte. John Ashton

British Army 1st Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Ripon

(d.2nd July 1916)




210305

Pte. John Edward Ashton

British Army 12th Battalion The King's Regiment (Liverpool)

from:Leyland, Lancashire




1287

Pte. John James Ashton

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.24th Apr 1915)




231706

Pte. Rowland Otto Ashton

British Army 16th (1st City Pals) Btn. Manchester Regiment

from:Manchester

(d.1st July 1916)

Signallers Rolly Ashton and his pal Harold Ross were both killed in action near Montauban on 1st July 1916.




131363

Private Sam Ashton

Army 5th & 3rd Btns Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Mirfield, West Yorkshire

This is an enquiry as I have been trying to research my Great Grandfather’s War record (what he did, where he went, did he take part in any battles) for 2 years now and seem to be getting nowhere. I am getting old now and only me in my family seems to be interested in finding out. The following two addresses are the only details I have and I know for sure that my Great Grandfather was in Germany at the end of WW1. E. COY. 3rd K.O.Y.L.I. No 9 Hut HEDEN Racecourse. Nr. HULL and 5th K.O.Y.L.I. No.6 Con CAMP. N. Coy. B.E.F. FRANCE. Please could someone help and tell me some history? I have researched in the National Archive, read books etc, but I still cannot figure the history of these Battallions. There is a family rumour that Sam was a sniper but i am not sure at all about this.




224601

Gnr. Albert Henry Ashurst

British Army 76th Siege Bty. Royal Garrison Artillery

(d.5th Nov 1917)

Albert Henry Ashurst served with 76th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, he was 25 years old.




218391

Pte. Wilfred Ashurst

British Army Royal Army Medical Corps

from:Towneley Street, Colne

(d.29th July 1917)

Wilfred Ashurst served with the RAMC and died on the 29th July 1917. He is buried in the Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery in Greece.

He had enlisted in Burnley and lived in Towneley Street, Colne.




223618

Pte. Wilfred Ashurst

British Army Royal Army Medical Corps

from:Colne

(d.29th July 1917)

Wilfred Ashurst died on the 29th of July 1917 and is buried in the Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery in Greece. He had enlisted in Burnley and lived on Towneley Street, Colne




210710

Pte. Percy Frederick Ashwell

British Army 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment

from:Sudbury, Middlesex

(d.2nd Jan 1915)

I never met Percy Ashwell as he passed away 26 years before I was born, but my Grandmother always had a picture of him (her brother) in his Army uniform on the mantelpiece in her living room. This picture was always in a prominent position on his birthday and on Remembrance Day. She loved and respected him very much as he looked so striking, full of life and happiness. I wish I could have met him.




223962

Pte. Richard Ashwin

British Army 11th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment

from:Conderton, Tewkesbury, Glos

(d.4th April 1917)

Richard Ashwin was born in 1875 & not of good health. He signed up 30th December 1914 but his health did not last 8th August 1916 he was discharged. He died in the Union Workhouse Infirmary in Winchcombe, Glos. He is remembered on the Overbury War Memorial.




216052

2/Lt. Alfred Edward "Ted" Ashworth CdeG.

British Army Tank Corps

from:Waterfoot

Abandoned German tank Elfriede, which was recovered from a quarry, some 50 yards in front of the French front line below Villers Bretonneux by 2Lts Ashworth & Gibbings of the Tanks Corps.

Abandoned German tank Elfriede, which was recovered from a quarry, some 50 yards in front of the French front line below Villers Bretonneux by 2Lts Ashworth & Gibbings of the Tanks Corps.

My Grandfather was 2nd Lieutenant A E Ashworth of the 1st Battalion Tank Corps during WW1. I have the Croix de Guerre which he was awarded by the French and two original photographs of the Tank Elfriede, taken after it was captured south of the Somme in 1918.

I had always wanted to confirm my grandfather's involvement in the capture of Elfriede and in 2012 paid a visit to the British National Archives at Kew where I read the war diaries of the 1st Battalion and also of the 5th Brigade, under whose temporary command the 1st Battalion was on the date in question. What I discovered makes the capture of Elfriede all the more memorable. It is clear that the tank was captured by the British with the help of a French guide and that the expedition took two nights, not one as had been previously reported.

1st Battalion Tank Corps received an order from 5th Brigade Tank Corps on 14th May 1918 to send out two tanks to tow out an abandoned German tank from No Man's Land. At 23.00 two tanks left Querrieu Wood, and reached the location of the German tank Elfriede, which was lying on its side in a quarry, some 50 yards in front of the French front line below Villers Bretonneux. It had been jacked up by the French Tank Corps but they needed British help to tow it out.

At 04.00 the next morning the two British female Mark IV tanks, commanded by 2nd Lts A E Ashworth and E Gibbings, under the overall command of Lt (later Captain) E Hawthorn, reached the German tank but had to lay up for the entire day, until 21.00 when they proceeded to tow the tank out a distance of some 9000 yards. Amazingly they do not seem to have come under German fire, no one was injured and the three British Officers were highly praised in the orders of French General Bebeney, Commander of the First French Army. 10 of the 13 British involved were awarded the Croix de Guerre and the trophy was handed over to the French Engineers who subsequently put Elfriede on public display in Paris. Sadly the tank was scrapped in 1919. It seems a miracle that the two British tanks were not attacked in No Man's Land during the daylight hours of 15th May 1918, and the bravery of their crews who waited inside them for a whole day for darkness to fall is immense.




237144

Gnr. Arthur Ashworth

British Army 179th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

(d.7th June 1918)

Arthur Ashworth served with 179th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.




219073

Harry Clifford Ashworth

British Army 236 Brigade Royal Field Artillery

from:36 Bayswater Terrace, Halifax

Harry Clifford Ashworth’s Great War with Royal Regiment of Artillery, 236 Brigade, 47th London Division. Taken from his only surviving war diary covering August to November 1918

22nd August 1918. Expecting a move at any moment. Have just read news of capture of Courcelles by NZ and English; also Achiet Lepetit; read communiqué re Achiet le Grand. Places of lasting memory. Also Bucquey.

31st August. On the morning of the 23rd we moved to a field just outside Warloy. Cookhouse in middle of a field and a long way to go for water because the water carts being left up the line owing to straffing. The guns were near Albert. Early on the 24th after having spent a cold night in a hut at Warloy, an early reveille brought news of an 8 o’clock move. After a quick pack to move, passing across the open by Henencourt and Senlis, we arrived at gun position. The vicinity of the old front line had been terribly desolate. One or two of the dead from the retreat were still lying about. A first glimpse of the Cathedral showed what terrible havoc had been wrought in the city. After waiting for a little we set out on our way to cross Albert. The first row of houses, railway bridge, showed what to expect. The road which had been cleared , ie over the bridge to left, past Cathedral to La Boiselle, was 2 or 3 inches in dust. Not a whole wall of a house was standing. Having arrived here we found a large flooded area close to which we pulled in. At first we pulled the water from the river. Later obtained from pump where we had row in general. Round about were dead men and horses which stank somewhat. Our little bivouac most noted for dirt. Two days later, on 27th August, moved to a place not far from La Boiselle. Here water problem was rather difficult. First night was one to remember. Going forward in afternoon water was not available in Contalmaison. Harwood was sent us back. After tea set off again with Macarthy and Plumer. After going back and along Pozieres Road we obtained about 2/3 load. Got practically in position and could not find way. Started loading and went back . Stanley came up and delivered load. First time at guns since Fonquevillers. Got supply alright on return and got in about 4 am. In time to waken Harrington. On 27th got up about dinner time . In evening went up again but only could get a small load on return. On 29th Carney, Byford and Woods returned from leave. Got water in the morning towards Becourt and on return saw C Bat. moving off. We did quick move . I went up to the guns in cart where I dumped material from cart and left in charge.. Later the wagon line came to the same place in Mametz Wood where water point is just down the road. On 29th we were awakened early and told to be ready to move about 6am Owing to stubborn resistance by the enemy we did not move and unpacked. In afternoon went to guns in most desolate country. Along railway ralway track and saw German signs with familiar names as Troneswood, , Ginchyy, Longueval, Combles, Montauban etc. A few shells were sent over but nothing to mean anything. Scotty says I must go up every day No ban. Today, 31st is a rotten day – drizzzly and cold. Everything is standing still at present.

5th September. Things have now moved pretty quickly for us lately On 1st we moved to Guillemont and guns to Fregicourt through Combles ie early in the morning. In this part there were a good many dead dead lying about and plenty of stench accompanied it. While guns pulled in, an aeroplane was brought down and it seem pretty clear that position was given away. Filled up cart at Delville Wood. In the evening we went up again and saw shells falling along Combles - Sailly - Saillised road, consequently we had to move quick. We found guns had been severely bombed. Having loaded our cart , shells immediately commenced to fall. Horses unhooked etc. In lull we got away safely. Next day we moved up - 2nd in the afternoon. A mistake cause death in B Battery . Here water was a big problem. On 3rd we were waiting in Combles for a very long time. Fortunately Battery were coming out. On 4th got up about 6am to fill up and was fortunate. 10 am moved to Bouchavesnes after many stops on way. Was out all night trying to get water at Clery and finally got it at Le Foret. Bund being the driver. On 5th ie today Dervene and Martin killed and Slack wounded. Report of Douai Cambrai, Lens etc captured.

Tuesday 6th September 1918 The same night ie 5th , guns came out of action and after having remained the night. Set off next morning to Ville-sur-Ancre. Passing through Maricourt and Fricourt . Landing there we found a village very much knocked about but plenty of material still about. It escaped in the first stint and was just behind the lines. This time it had been very hurriedly evacuated.

On the evening of the 7th we set off to Merricourt to entrain. Rather a tedious business. We decided to sleep under GS Wagon. And would have been well of if it had not rained. All the same we stuck getting up when train stopped at Doullens. We stuck close to the grub. Passing through Marles – lez – Mines and Allouagne we came to Lillers and detrained, making the grub in the rain. Lillers had caught it badly in the latest push. Passing through Ecquedecques, Faucqueheme Nedon we arrived at Nedonchelle on evening of the 8th . This is a slow place but we have a decent old woman in the billet. Then there are Henri, Suzanne, Louise etc : all helped to make the fun. We had one concert by DAC . For two days we have had rumours of a move but nothing happens. During the time there has been good news characterised by taking of St Mihiel. Austrian peace move is the latest gag. The pig has had a litter.

Wed 18th September. Today all is excitement, bustle and uncertainty . What seems pretty certain is that we are going a long train ride. Bonner, the all-knowing one says we must be going a sea journey because only one horse may be taken ie OC. On the other hand the Captain asked West to get all his money changed into Italian as soon as possible so for the present, a visit to Italy may be taken as official. On Sunday we were to move at 9. Monday - we did not but orders were issued to move at 9. Wednesday, today - we were settled down for a move to Hesdenon . Late last night I was coming along the road and Stevens came along and said in a frightfully fed up way “cancel all orders” ; I being the first to be informed , I spread the news and some people were glad and some the reverse . We had the wire from West before and were not surprised. This morning points to Italy . Every possible thing is to be left , or dumped and now am waiting for developments.

1pm 19th Sept. We are not being told much news but we have various rumours. (1) Only fighting units to go to Italy (?) (2) Move to spot close to Pernes in early morning and where handing over the entraining will take place. This is practically a certainty . It appears that more material is likely to go with us – mess carts, cooking materials, artificers, tools etc. The captain's gone on leave . Another rumour says eight days journey. Sounds rather a long time , still I’m looking forward to a journey more than anything.

Saturday 29th September. On the 20th we left Nedonchelle and passing through Pernes came to Bours where we met certain French people , vis Marie, Louise, Julien Alice etc. This cookhouse was near water point . After being there a day or two days we cancelled for two days owing to train smash. When sweating again move cancelled for a week. Each time spirits fell to zero. I felt certain that we would go into action on the same front. After a few days rumour came through that we were in wrong area hence came to Monchy Cayeau yesterday. We thought that it was the first move to action but it was backwards to railhead and Amiens, hence we are sweating on going to Italy. Lately have had a couple of letters from Cyril. News on all fronts has been good. Allenby rushing forward. Balkans going well and American gain at Argonne .

Sunday 30th Sept. Mother’s birthday. Now we are getting night frosts and pretty cold sleeps. Today , however, is lovely. Marshall has been taken to officers’ mess and Mac has been put in. The same uncertainty still prevails in regards to moving.

1st October. Early on1st [October] we were called up early and told to prepare to move everything. Later it became Nedonchells and apparently back up to action.

On the morning of the 2nd had to move to Merville sector, more as support. After a long trek through Lillers came to Robecq. On 3rd made long journey through Merville to Meurillon and after tea on again. Dark overtook us and causing much delay etc owing to mines. At the moment Jerry was retreating quickly and so passed our appointed place and came to Fromelles. Day following to Quesnoy ou Gd Mansuar

10th October While here at Quesnoy we have had much good news. Some time ago Bulgaria packed up. A couple of days ago an offer from Germany which has not been accepted. Now we hear that Germany is routed at Cambrai . So let the great big world keep turning and turn us to peace.

14th October Still at Quesnay and nothing much doing. Been straffed once or twice - 4000 yards from Jerry. Italian rumour is very strong again. Infantry man says he has been over the top this morning.

16th October It looks as if Italy is off again for the moment and the Germans having evacuated a little way up here. Infantry and ambulance had gone out but are returning again. On tenterhooks again.

Sunday 20th October. Just written home to say am sweating on top line. 17th October, left Fromelles about 11.am a little after Germans evacuated Lille. While on the way was ‘torpedoed’ at Laventie but fortunately little harm was done . About tea-time landed at Estaives. (17th) and spent the night. 18th October. Left morning to arrive at St Venant where now we are in good billet once an asylum. Beds are the rule. DArty gone to Lillers. It has been a fine place but has suffered a good deal. Canal runs here. Fitted YMCA with water this morning. The war seems to be going good . Ostend and Bruge taken. Italy seems to be off altogether and is never mentioned. Where we are going we do not know. Burges says here for a few days. 1st December. Many things have happened. After St Venant, Riez Balleul and Haubourdin which which we left on 28th to go on leave After leave and Armistice (11th ), 13th Bulougne, 14th St Pol, 15th Lille and Hellemmes. 16th A day in Lille and a night in a good bed. Joined the battery on the Sunday at Bourghelleses where we had a good time. Return to Fouquieres via Fournes. During this time demob and education scheme is topic.

29th December 1918 Up to present Ed. Scheme does not appear to have come up to much. There has been much messing about with demob but no one seems to know exactly how it is working. I’m waiting communication from Reading and House. Have been advised to send Form 56. Christmas has been a lively affair. Inebriation has been the rule. On Christmas Day many men were well away before dinner , which had a sobering influence. Rum punch, beer and private stocks of drinkables soon put men out again. Officers came and made asses of themselves. The concert was far from most men’s thoughts. The object in view from the start was a glorious drunk and rough house. Thomson was out to make a violent nuisance of himself and succeeded ; so much so that he had to be persuaded to leave. Noakes, Hancock, Lorah, Bonner, Keyes, Cross, Daley, Talman are worthy of mention. What a night we had with Daley. Many men were never sober on Boxing Day. Cooks were determined to have a day. Wilkinson was helpless at 10 a.m. Hancock and Cramp rolled Daley in the mud after dinner and then went out to dinner. Cramp, Heyes returned in a horrible state. Former had D.T ’ s. Paddy repeated Christmas day performance and today in a sad state. ‘I shall die ‘

6th January 1919. Today played football for F sub and C subs. Lost 3-0. Credit £3. 8. 11d. Sweating on demob. two going tomorrow, O’Neill and McAra. Bonner gone away to Fromes. Good chance of getting away soon. Dunbar anxous to take up maths and desired me as Instructor. Letter from House a few days ago . Says fares will be more. 19th On 9th it came to my knowledge that I was to proceed to England the following day

On 10th left for imaginary camp at Hesdigneul. After which lorry jumped to Colanne – Ricouart and walked to Camblain Chatelaine and stopped night at 47th Division Camp

On 11th proceeded to Ligny by lorry where stopped for the night in dismal circumstances at X1 Core rest camp.

On 12th to Brias where train never came. On station form 9.30 p.m to 2a.m after which turned in. Boarded train on 13th at 12 but did not leave St Pol until 5 p.m. Arrived on 14th at Havre were we were deloused and sent to embarkation camp. We stayed all 15th - a very wet day at Havre and on 16th left France at 4 p.m. Boat sailed at 6 p.m after which most people were sick. Arrived outside Southampton at 12.50 a.m on 17th where we stayed until 9 a.m. At 12 we left Southampton and arrived at Camp at Clipstone at 7 p.m . After eating and passing doctor, giving in kit etc. I received my ticket at 1.30 am 18/1/19. Left there at 5am and arrived home at 1.30 a.m 18th January 1919 After buying suit came home and changed. Saturday evening Stannary and Sunday evening.

Civvie life Monday 20th January /1919 Have written to Knapman House and Cyril. Wretched day.




1205783

Pte. John Ashworth

British Army 9th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Burnley, Lancs

(d.19th Sep 1918)

John Ashworth died on 19th September 1918, aged 20 and was buried in the Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece. He was the son of Joseph and Margaret Ashworth, of 46, Cleaver St., Burnley.




223580

Pte. John Ashworth

British Army 9th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Burnley, Lancs

(d.19th Sept 1918)

John Ashworth was aged 20 when he died. He is buriedin the Karasouli Military Cemetery in Greece. He was the son of Joseph and Margaret Ashworth, of 46 Cleaver Street, Burnley, Lancashire.




231444

Pte. Thomas Ashworth

British Army 343rd Road Construction Company Royal Engineers

from:Bamford, Lancs

(d.5th Aug 1917)

Thomas Ashworth is buried in the Huts Cemetery southwest of Ypres. The Cemetery takes name from line of huts along the road used by field ambulances.




209112

Pte. Walter Ashworth

British Army 18th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Bradford

Walter Ashworth was my grandfather. He was born in Hebden Bridge in W.Yorks and served and completed his apprenticeship as a tailor in Bradford.

He joined the 2nd Bradford Pals in 1915. After training, he was shipped out firstly to Egypt and then to France for the Battle of the Somme. He was wounded on the 1st June 1916. He had gone 'over the top' with many, many other soldiers and was shot three times, once in the mouth, once in the back and once in the leg. He was left for dead in a bomb crater filled with water for almost three days. Someone noticed him moving and he was removed from the battlefield and sent firstly to an ambulance station where an Army chaplain saw him and sent my grandmother, his fiancee at the time, a letter telling her he had been wounded and was being sent to the hospital at Sidcup. He ended the letter saying, "and may God help him."

He spent many months in hospital having operation after operation on his face and other injuries. He was one of the first soldiers to receive plastic surgery by Sir Harold Gillies and a painting of the medical procedures performed on his wounds is in the Royal College of Surgeons in London. When he was able to return to Bradford, he tried to resume his position as tailor in a leading men's wear shop there. However, he still had bandages on his face and the owners of the business would not put him behind the counter as they told him he would scare the customers away! He worked in their workshop behind, still doing his tailoring but behind the scenes, for one week and then became so upset about the way his bosses were treating him that he resigned and went home. About a week later, his boss appeared on his doorstep begging him to come back because the customers were outraged about what had happend and nobody would deal with anybody in the store but Mr Walter Ashworth, their tailor! He felt a little better about that but still decided not to return. I should add that all the employers in the Halifax and Bradford area had stated quite emphatically that all soldiers who enlisted in the Pals would have their job held open for them when they came back. I'm afraid my grandfather felt too bitter to go back and work for that employer.

He married my grandmother in 1917 in hospital. In 1922, he was still having operations on his face from time to time and his health was not good so the doctors suggested he find somewhere warm to convalesce so my grandfather replied to an ad in the paper from Australia where a sheep station owner was wanting a butler and a cook for two years! He applied for it, got the job and went over to Sydney by himself. When all the details were completed, he sent for my grandmother and my mother, who was a little girl at that time. They worked on this huge sheep station way out in the Aussie bush for two years, he became stronger and regained his health, both physically and emotionally, and they then returned to England. He opened a tailor's shop in Halifax, then moved to Blackpool and had a successful career until he retired in his sixties. He left his daughter, two grandchildren, and three great grandchildren at his passing.

He was a true gentleman, never talked about his experiences in the war but carried his facial scars and a shrapnel-riddled back all his life with dignity and bravery. He was extremely popular with everybody he met and he never let his appearance get him down. We are all very proud of him.




732

Pte. Frederick F. Askew

Army Army Service Corps




1998

Pte J Askew

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.9th Jun 1916)

Askew, J. Private, 19/1247, Killed in action on 9th June 1916.

Buried in Vieille-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, Lacouture, Pas de Calais, in grave I. B. 3.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




1331

Pte. James Askew

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.8th May 1915)




214810

L/Sgt. W. J. Askew DCM

British Army 2nd Btn. Coldstream Guards

My Grandfather, L/Sgt W J Askew, was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal at Zonnebeke on the 23rd Oct 1914.




300782

Pte. John Henry Dobson Askey

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




224724

Rflmn. Albert Aspden

British Army 16th Btn. King's Royal Rifle Corps

from:Rawtenstall

(d.15th July 1916)

Albert Aspden was born in Church, Lancashire on 1st June 1891, the third son of Arthur and Hannah Aspden. They moved to Rawtenstall sometime before 1911 and after 1901. Albert's address before enlisting was 167 Cribden View, Burnley Road, Rawtenstall. He was an office clerk in civilian life and an old boy of Newchurch Grammar School.

Albert died aged 25 on 15th July 1916 during the battle of the Somme when his battalion were part of the second wave assaulting High Wood. They attacked uphill trying to dislodge a well entrenched enemy and met with enfilade fire. They attacked many times, each attack was repulsed and many of the battalion were killed. Albert is buried at Caterpillar Valley Cemetery Longeuval, France. (He is incorrectly listed as Albert Aspen on the CWG site.)




216756

Pte. Michael Aspell

British Army 1st Btn. Irish Guards

from:Dublin

(d.17th Sep 1916)

Private Michael Aspell was born in Dublin, and later enlisted there. He was killed in action in France during the The Battle of Morval, following the 1st Guards Brigade, Guards Division's 15th September attack east of Lesboeufs. He is buried in London Cemetery and Extension, Longueval, Somme, France.




214343

Pte. Patrick Aspell

British Army 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Jarrow

(d.26th May 1915)

Patrick Aspell Medal Index Card

Patrick Aspell Medal Index Card

Patrick Aspell served with the 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, he was aged 37 when he died on 26th May 1915. He was born in Ballinakil, Galway, Ireland and lived in Jarrow. On the 1911 census he is listed as Patrick Aspell age 31 Platers Helper in Shipyard is with his wife Mary (nee Browne) and children at 17 Grey Street back, Jarrow. He enlisted in Wallsend.

Patrick is remembered in Ypres on the Menin Gate Memorial and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church Jarrow.




216757

Pte. Patrick Aspell

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.26th Apr 1915)

Patrick Aspell was the husband of Bridget Aspell, of 8, Garden Lane, Francis St., Dublin. He was killed in action in Flander and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

Update: He enlisted in Dublin and was 38 when he died. His service record on Ancestry shows that he was 5 foot 8 1/2 inches tall with brown hair and hazel eyes. He was 34 years old when he re enlisted having already served 12 years. Patrick and Bridget had two children Mary Ellen aged 4 in the 1911 census and Michael.




216758

Pte. Lawrence Aspen

British Army 6th Btn. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.9th Aug 1915)

Lawrence Aspen was born and lived in Dublin but enlisted in Preston. He was killed in action in Gallipoli in the well known action at Chunuk Bair when the Turks overwhelmed the Loyals who suffered 494 casualties (222 killed).

Lawrence is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.




300208

Pte. Thomas Henry Aspey

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




216759

Pte. William Aspill

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

from:Dublin

(d.26th Aug 1918)

William Aspill was born in St. Thomas, County Dublin, and later enlisted in Dublin. Before joining the Royal Irish Regiment he was a member of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. In April 1918 the 2nd Battalion were transferred to 188th Brigade, 63rd (Royal Naval) Division. William most likely fought in the Battle of Albert in August of that year, and it was a few days after this that he was killed in action in France.

William Aspill is commemorated on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial.




872

Arthur Aspinall

British Army 13th Btn. Cheshire Rgt

from:Russell Road, Birkenhead

My Father, Arthur Aspinall, joined the Cheshires in 1916 in the Bantam section. His Brother George Went in 1914...During the last Months of the War my father actually passed by him my Father coming "off" his brother going into the fray... He never saw him again. He heard that George had died of wounds. My Father Arthur Aspinall suffered during a gas attack and until he died he suffered nose bleeds and severe headaches. The surgeons operated on him and found a massive tumour

I would be so pleased if I could obtain a photo of Dad and especially one of my dear Uncle George who gave his life... I feel quite sad now...I am 81 yrs young going blind, but looking forward to seeing them together at last




144413

Private George Aspinall

Army 15th Cheshire

from:Russel Road, Birkenhead

(d.15th Oct 1918)

My Father, Arthur Aspinall, joined the Cheshires in 1916 in the Bantam section. His Brother George Went in 1914...During the last Months of the War my father actually passed by him my Father coming "off" his brother going into the fray... He never saw him again. He heard that George had died of wounds. My Father Arthur Aspinall suffered during a gas attack and until he died he suffered nose bleeds and severe headaches. The surgeons operated on him and found a massive tumour

I would be so pleased if I could obtain a photo of Dad and especially one of my dear Uncle George who gave his life... I feel quite sad now...I am 81 yrs young going blind, but looking forward to seeing them together at last




751

L/Cpl Wright Aspinall

Army 4th Btn. Royal Welsh Fusiliers

from:Wrexham, Wales

Wright Aspinall landed in France in the 6th of November 1914. He was commissioned into the Liverpool Regiment on the 25th of September 1917.




221357

Pte. Charles Joseph Aspley

British Army 16th Btn. Manchester Regiment

from:Old Radnor, Herefordshire

(d.21st Mar 1918)

Charles Joseph Aspley born 12 February 1898 the only son of James Henry Aspley and his wife, Agnes Jane Powell, Old Radnor, Herefordshire.

Charles was killed in action near St Quentin, France on 21st of March 1918 his name can be found on the Pozieres Memorial and also on the War Memorial adjacent to St Stephens Church, Old Radnor, Herefordshire. Unfortunately I have no further information or a photograph.




222736

L/Cpl. Henry Aspley

British Army 7th Bat. Bedfordshire Regiment

from:Silver Street, Stevington, Bedfordshire.

(d.8th Jan 1916)

Henry Aspley volunteered in September 1914, he was engaged on Coastal Defence duties for a time, and crossed to the Western Front in the following year. In this theatre of war he served as a bomb-thrower and fought in many fiercely contested battles including those at Ypres and Loos.

He gave his life for freedom of England whilst on night patrol in the Loos sector on January 8th 1916. He was entitled to the 1914 -1915 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.




212896

H. C. Asplin

British Army 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment




218255

Pte. George Henry Astin

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:92 Finsley Gate, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.14th Jan 1917.)

Private George Henry Astin served with the 6th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment during WW1 and was killed in action on the 14th January 1917. He is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial, Iraq.




222470

Pte. George Henry Astin

British Army 6th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:92 Finsley Gate, Burnley, Lancashire

(d.14th Jan 1917)

George Astin died on the 14th of January 1917 and is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial in Iraq.




1454

Str.Br. Arthur John Aston

Australian Imperial Force 12th Australian Field Ambulance

from:Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

(d.10th Jun 1917)




500779

Sjt. William Aston

British Army 1/8th Btn. London Regiment

from:10, St. George's Rd., Richmond, Surrey.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500769

Pte. John Atha

British Army 11th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

(d.7th Jun 1917)




232158

Pte. John Atherton

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Pontop

John Atherton enlisted on the 29th of October 1914




300796

Sgt. Arthur Edwin Atkin

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




1423

Pte. George Frederick Atkin

British Army 2nd Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.24th May 1915)




223579

Pte. George Henry Atkin

British Army 2nd Btn Sherwood Foresters (Nottingham and Derbyshire)

from:24 Oak Street, Birkenhead, Cheshire

As George Atkin had previously been in the army he was called up in August 1914, despite being 31 years old and having a young wife Elizabeth who was pregnant. George survived the war and went on to have a further 7 daughters, one being my grandmother.




223417

Pte. Joseph Atkin

British Army 3rd Batallion South Wales Borderers

from:Sheffield




222245

Pte. Walter Edward Atkin

British Army 1st Btn. Somerset Light Infantry

from:Canning Town

(d.9th August 1916)




223194

Rflmn. Bert Atkins

British Army 9th Btn. Rifle Brigade

from:Mile End, London

(d.18th August 1916)




224487

Rifleman Bert Atkins

British Army 9th Btn Rifle Brigade

from:23 Stayner's Rd, Mile End, London

(d.18th August 1916)




122

Lt. H. de C. Atkins

Army 15th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




210178

Pte. Herbert Ernest King Atkins

British Army 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers

from:Battersea

(d.26 May 1915)

One of four brothers from London who fought in the First World War, Pte Herbert Atkins was a Regular soldier with 2nd Royal Fusiliers who took part in the Gallipoli campaign from its commencement until he was killed aged 23 on 26th May 1915 - the same day as his younger brother, William Frederick Atkins, was killed in action aged 20 at Givenchy in France. Herbert survived the initial landings and subsequent fierce fighting, but after a month of combat was shot in the head by a sniper after he and some of his comrades had climbed onto a trench parapet to avoid flooding. He is commemorated on the Helles memorial at Gallipoli, having no known grave.




212807

2nd Cpl. John Charles Atkins

British Army 5th Divisional Signals Company Royal Engineers

from:London

A Londoner, my grandfather, John Charles Atkins joined the South Lancashire Regiment in 1906, transferring to the Royal Engineers in 1913. He was a member of 5th Divisional Signals Company, and went to France with the Division in August 1914 - part of the famous "Contemptible Little Army" of the BEF. After the retreat from Mons, he took part in the Battle of Le Cateau on 26th August where he was taken prisoner in the fierce fighting which stemmed the German advance. His only mention of the btn.'s later years was to say he was captured by Uhlans, the German lancers. Two of his younger brothers, William and Herbert, were killed in May 1915; his youngest brother Percy joined the Royal Engineers and survived the war.

John also survived the war but was a POW until repatriation in 1918, when he returned to the Royal Engineers and later the Royal Corps of Signals. At the end of his period of service in 1927 he settled in Brighton, Sussex, having reached the rank of Quartermaster Sergeant. In 1939 he was recalled to the colours to train mobilised troops for the Second World war, being discharged on completion of this role in 1940 as a Company Sergeant Major. Three of his sons fought in this war, one in each of the Services.




213744

Cpl John Charles Atkins

British Army 5th Divisional Signals Company Royal Engineers

from:London

My grandfather, 2nd Corporal Jack Atkins, was a Londoner, a career soldier and an "Old Contemptible"; he was born in the City of London although his family subsequently moved to Lambeth. He served for seven years in the infantry before transferring to 5 Signals Company in 1913. The Company provided communications for 5 Divisional HQ and for each of the three infantry brigades of the division.

In August 1914 the Division left Carlow in Ireland to join the BEF in France, and Jack experienced the rigours of the Retreat from Mons. Next came the hard-fought Battle of Le Cateau on 26th August, the engagement which famously saved the BEF and fatally slowed the German advance into France. Jack is believed to have been part of the HQ Section Signallers based at the village of Reumont, and during the morning was sent to lay a cable between 5 Div HQ and the 19th Brigade to their north. The unit War Diary says "Sgt Holmes and his cable det. were detailed to lay a cable line to the 19th Brigade, but were evidently captured by the Germans for his party (men, horses and wagon) has not been heard of since. The cable line was last seen running through a line of German infantry."

He spent the rest of the war as a POW in Germany and then, in 1918, Holland to which neutral country he was repatriated as suffering from "barbed-wire fever". On his return to Britain at the end of the war he learned that two of his three younger brothers had been killed in May 1915 (coincidentally both on the same day - 26th - although one, Herbert, was at Gallipoli with 2nd Royal Fusiliers and the other, William, in France with 1/23rd London Regiment).

Jack reenlisted and served with the Royal Signals as it became until the end of his enlistment in 1927 by which time he was a Quartermaster Sergeant. He settled in Brighton with his wife and young family, returning briefly to the Colours in the next war as a Company Sergeant Major. A quiet man, he never spoke of his brothers or of the Great War except to say that they'd been kept very hungry in captivity. He died in Brighton in 1955, just two weeks after the death of his wife.




217880

Sister May Atkins

Red Cross Red Gables Hospital, Bletchingly, Surrey.

May Atkins served as a sister at Red Gables Hospital in Bletchingly, Surrey.




221964

Pte. Moses Atkins

British Army 12th Btn. Suffolk Regiment

from:Oldham, Greater Manchester




212808

Sapper Percy Thomas Atkins

British Army Royal Engineers

from:London

The youngest of four brothers who served in the war, Percy Thomas Atkins was only 17 when he arrived in France in June 1915 as a Royal Engineers sapper - I don't know much about him or his service, but he must have misled the recruiting board to get overseas at that age! Of Percy's three brothers two were pre-War regular soldiers and one a Territorial so perhaps he just thought he didn't want to be left out? Unlike Herbert and William, who were killed, and John, who was made POW, Percy survived the war; he went on to have a family, and lived in Barnet.




232159

Pte. T. Atkins

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




212041

L/Sgt. William Frederick Atkins

British Army (TF) D Coy 1/23rd London Regiment

(d.26th May 1915)

William Atkins was from Lambeth and was working as an off licence porter when in February 1912 he joined his local Territorial unit, D Coy 1/23rd (County of London) Bn London Regiment. He was 17 years old when he joined up, and 20 when he was killed in action on 26th May 1915.

Two of William's brothers were pre-War Regular Army soldiers: John (Cpl 2307347 John Charles Atkins) was with 5th Divisional Signals Coy, RE, and was taken POW at the battle of Le Cateau on 23rd August 1914; Herbert(Pte 14413 Herbert Ernest King Atkins) was with 2nd Bn Royal Fusiliers and was part of the invasion force which landed at X Beach at Gallipoli on 25th April.

In August 1914 the Londons were mobilised while on summer camp at Salisbury Plain, and they disembarked from SS Copenhagen in France on 16th March 1915, entering the trenches on 11th April. As part of 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division, they took part in the frontal attack on the German 56th Infantry regimentat trenches just north of Givenchy on 25th May in concert with their sister Territorial battalions from the Brigade (20th, 22nd and 24th Bns).

Attacking at 6.30pm William and his D Coy comrades charged and took the German front and support lines, and subsequently the battalion held them against counterattack and heavy enfilade shelling and machinegun fire until the few survivors were relieved at 3pm the next day by 20th Londons. William, along with at least 200 of his comrades, was killed in this action; 304 more soldiers of 23rd Londons were wounded.

On the same day but many hundreds of miles away in Gallipoli, William's 23-year-old brother was also killed, shot dead by a sniper while negotiating a flooded trench.




212805

L/Sgt. William Frederick Atkins

British Army 1/23rd Battalion, D Coy. London Regiment

from:Battersea

(d.26th May 1915)

William was an off-licence porter and as a Territorial soldier was on manoeuvres at the outbreak of War; he arrived in France in March 1915, serving in the trenches there until the Battle of Givenchy in May that year. In the evening of 25th May his Battalion attacked just north of the hamlet of Givenchy, going over the top with the bayonet, and took and held the German front line. By the time the few survivors of the 23rd Londons were relieved the next afternoon William had been killed in action, probably by either shellfire or machine gun fire.

He was 20 years old, and died on the same day as his brother Pte 14413 Herbert E K Atkins 2nd Bn Royal Fusiliers who was killed at Gallipoli. William is commemorated on the memorial to the missing at Le Touret in France, having - like his brother - no known grave.




230629

Gnr. William John Atkins

British Army 190th Brigade, C Coy. Royal Field Artillery

from:Hersham, Surrey

(d.27th March 1918)

William Atkins was born on 21st April 1892 in Broad Lane, Hersham, Surrey the son of William John (General Labourer) and Emma [Adams] Atkins. William lived and grew up in 21, Arch Road, Hersham with his parents, brothers and sisters: Wm John (Labourer) and Emma Atkins, children - Wm John aged 8, Rose Amelia, Bertha Jane, Elizabeth May and Arthur Henry as listed on the 1901 census and in 1911 he has work as a gardener while continuing to live at home. William John (Sewerman) and Emma Atkins, children- William John aged 19 [gardener - domestic], Elizabeth May, Arthur Henry, Mabel Emma and George Edward.

William enlisted in London and, served in Italy and France and the CWGC data states that he left behind his parents, William John and Emma Atkins, of Arch Rd., Hersham, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey. His is one of 117 names being researched because they are on the St Peter's Hersham Roll of Honour.




217916

L/Cpl. A. Atkinson

British Army 1st Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

(d.2nd Mar 1915)

L/Cpl A. Atkinson served with the West Yorkshire Regiment 1st Battalion. He was executed for desertion on 2nd March 1915 aged 24 and is buried in Chapelle-d'Armentieres Old Military Cemetery in La Chapelle-d'Armentieres, France.




216760

Pte. Alexander Young Atkinson

Canadian Army 1st Btn, A Coy. Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment)

(d.5th Jun 1916)

Alexander Young Atkinson was born Dublin, the son of Mrs. Mary J. Atkinson, of 60, Lower Beechwood Avenue, Ranelagh, Dublin, Ireland, and Mr. F. R. Atkinson. He served with the Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment) 1st Battalion and died in Belgium aged 20 in June 1916. He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.




220763

Pte. Arthur Atkinson

British Army 23rd (Tyneside Scottish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Bingley, Yorkshire

(d.21st Oct 1918)

Arthur Atkinson was my grandad, I am researching his life.




230901

Spr. Arthur James Atkinson

British Army 518 Field Company Royal Engineers

from:Battersea, London

Arthur James Atkinson served with 518 Field Company, Royal Engineers




223372

Cpl. Brumfitt Atkinson

British Army 19th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery

from:Addingham




218722

Pte. Edwin Atkinson

British Army 10th Btn. Yorkshire Regiment

from:Water End, Brompton, North Yorkshire

(d.26th Apr 1917)

Pte. Edwin Atkinson served with the Yorkshire Regiment 10th Battalion. He was injured had one leg amputated and died of his wounds at the age of 26 on 26th April 1917 in France. Edwin is is buried in Abbeville Communial Cemetery. The son of a farming family,his father was Thomas Joseph Brompton and his mother was Rose Helen (Nee Chapman York). Edwin was my Grandfather's brother. Edwin's name is on the 1st World War Memorial Brompton Parish Church North Yorkshire.




822

Frederick Atkinson

British Army Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

from:Marple, Cheshire

(d.19th Oct 1914)

My Great Grandfather, Frederick Atkinson was in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (Prince of Wales Volunteers) and was killed, as far as we can tell, on the 19th of October 1914 in the battle of Le Bassie in Nothern France. No grave, and his name is on the Le Tournot memorial in the same area. I would love any information that anyone would have of the regiment, the battle etc. His name is the first one on the war memorial in Marple in Cheshire where he is from.




224509

Frederick Atkinson

Canadian Expeditionary Force 10th Battalion

(d.15th Aug 1915)

Fred Atkinson was born at Appleby, Westmoreland in July 1893, and had previously served in the 4th Battalion, Border Regiment (T.F.) prior to enlisting in the Canadian Expeditionary Force in December 1914. Initially posted to the 32nd Infantry Battalion, he transferred to the 10th Battalion, another overseas unit of the Canadian Infantry, before arriving at the Front in April 1915.

According to official records, he was ‘instantly killed by a bullet from the rifle of an enemy sniper’ at Ploegsteert on 15th of August 1915.




300498

Pte. Frederick Atkinson

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

Served with 11th & 6th DLI




223305

Pte. Frederick Clement Atkinson

British Army 1/5th Btn. East Lancashire Regiment

from:Rawtenstall

(d.7th Oct 1915)

Frederick Atkinson died on the 7th of October 1915, aged 23 and is commemorated on Sp. Mem. A. 86 in the Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Gallipoli, Turkey He was the son of Cramshaw and Nancy Atkinson, of 11, Vulcan St., Nelson, Lancs.




214347

Pte. Frederick Harrison Atkinson

British Army 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:South Shields

(d.18th Apr 1918)

Frederick Atkinson of the 15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry was aged 20 when he died on 18th April 1918. He was the son of John Edward and Jane Elizabeth Atkinson (nee Venus) of 18 Dean Road South Shields. He had been born in South Shields in 1898 and lived in South Shields. He is remembered at the Tyne Cot Memorial and is commemorated on the Palmer Cenotaph (west face) Jarrow.




208255

Pte. Harold Victor Atkinson MM.

British Army 15th Battalion, C Company Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Burnley, Lancashire

My Great Uncle Harold Atkinson fought in WW1 with the Lancashire Fusiliers. My grandfather, a gunner in the Royal Field Artillery, said that Harold had been a despatch rider. He enlisted in Burnley, Lancashire and initially was in the East Lancs Regt (23517) but eventually became 35736 in C Company of the 15th Lancashire Fusiliers.

During The 3rd Battle of Ypres 1-3rd December 1917 he is cited in the book 'The Lancashire Fusiliers' on page 277 as, "Much individual good work had contributed to the battalion's achievement. The Military Medal was awarded to 2 runners, Privates H. V. Atkinson & G. Beardsall, for gallantry in carrying messages throughout operations." The Burnley Express says he did this "under heavy shell fire, work for which he volunteered to do." The award of his Military Medal was also reported in the London Gazette, Issue number: 30573 Page:322, 13th March 1918.

He died not long after winning his medal on 25th December 1917 - having been killed instantly as reported by his friend Pte, W Smith - the day before he should have had the ribbon of the Military Medal pinned to his chest. He wrote to his parents the day of his death to inform them he had won the Military Medal, having found out about his award on the 23rd.

In a report in the Burnley Express, Captain Kenneth Leeming said "Pte. Atkinson was his own messenger and he had learned to love him like a brother as he was always so cheery. He was thankful that Pte. Atkinson lived to know he had won the Military Medal, which he thoroughly deserved".

He is buried in Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Belgium and is also commemorated on St. Cuthberts Memorial, Burnley, Lancashire. He is also said to be commemorated in Droylsden Cemetery, UK

His elder brothers Roy Atkinson (781701) Royal Field Artillery and Herbert Atkinson (6806) 18th Hussars also served but survived.




204672

Pte. Harry Atkinson

British Army 8th Btn. Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Tebay

(d.1st July 1916)

My Great Uncle Harry Atkinson was killed in action on the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme.




216761

Capt. Hector John Atkinson

British Army Royal Irish Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.26th May 1917)

The Hon. Hector John Atkinson was the Husband of Sybil Atkinson, of 74, Merrion Square, Dublin. He is buried in Dean's Grange Cemetery, County Dublin, Ireland.




223841

Pte. Henry Atkinson

British Army 8th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Gateshead-on-Tyne

(d.2nd Oct 1916)

Henry Atkinson is buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery, France.




225666

L/Cpl. Henry Edward Atkinson

British Army 1st Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Poplar, Middlesex

(d.12th June 1915)

Harry Atkinson was stationed in Portsmouth with the Battalion prior to the war. Before leaving for France he was visited by his family at the Barracks. His younger brother Sidney remembered this visit, sitting round with the soldiers singing songs and making merry.

Harry would have been at Mons, Frameries and Le Cateau. It is believed he stayed with the Battalion all the way through to June 1915. The Battalion were involved in an attack on Hooge Chateau Stables and an earth works. Here on the night of the 2/3rd Harry was wounded and captured by the Germans, taken at some point to a field hospital near Menin. Here he died of wounds on the 12th of June 1915.

He has a memorial stone in the IWGC area of the cemetery in Halluin the French side of Menin. RIP uncle Harry.




1938

Pte Hugh Atkinson

British Army 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

from:5, Dene Gardens, Station Rd., Bill Quay, Pelaw, Co. Durham

(d.1st June 1918)

Atkinson, Hugh. Private, 19/1006, Killed in action Aveluy Wood on 1st June 1918. Aged 31 years. Member of "Z" Coy.

Buried in the Martinsart British Cemetery Somme, in grave I. B. 5.

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Atkinson, of 5, Dene Gardens, Station Rd., Bill Quay, Pelaw, Co. Durham.

From the 19th Btn Northumberland Fusiliers Roll of Honour.




123

Rgmtl Sjt Mjr. J. J. Atkinson

Army Durham Light Infantry




232161

Pte. J.T. Atkinson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Newcastle

J T Akinson was evacuated from the battlefield on the 3rd of July 1916. He was discharged 10th April 1918.




226536

Lt. James Morgan Atkinson

Royal Flying Corps 4 Sqdn.

from:Ferns, Co Wicklow, Ireland

My grandfather James Morgan served as an observer in No 4 Squadron of the RFC and was based at Abeele Aaerodrome in West Flanders in 1917. He and his pilot Wilfred Morgan were shot down in RE8 Plane Serial No B5040 behind enemy lines near Ypres on 12 Oct 1917.

Wilfred Morgan died in a POW camp of his wounds. My grandfather - Morgan as he was known - survived in a POW camp in Baden and Heidelberg until his repatriation in August 1918. His gunshot wound in the back and hip severed his sciatic nerve and he suffered paralysis in his foot. He laterally had several amputations of his leg and ended up with a wooden leg below his knee.

My granddad died in 1970 when I was 8 years old. He never spoke to any of us about his experiences but I do remember there was a picture of the gravestone of his pilot Wilfred Morgan on the mantelpiece on their small holding farm in Clonmore, Co Carlow in the Republic of Ireland. My aunt has spent many years researching our family tree and has produced a little booklet about Granddad's war years. One burning ambition is to try and find out more about his RFC time. He had started in WWI in the ASC Divisional Train - he loved horses.




231216

Pte. John Simeon "Akky" Atkinson

British Army 2/7th Btn. West Yorkshire Regiment

from:Woodhouse, Leeds

(d.19th March 1917 or 19th November 1917)

There is some discrepancy with the CWGC on date of John Simeon Atkinson's death as with his middle name as it is Simeon or Lineon. The Buslingthorpe Road Church Memorial at St. Michaels said John S. Atkinson 265907 which does bear in with all the facts from my aunt who is still alive to date(19/4/16).

His brother, Harry, survived the Great War but when questioned he simply said you don't want to know about that.

Their future brother-in-law, William Kirkley, is on the same memorial of St. Michaels which got demolished in the early 1960's, so the memorial was then placed in St.Marks Church Woodhouse, Leeds.




213720

Sgt. John Atkinson

British Army 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:5 Shildon Street, Darlington

With the outbreak of the First World War John Atkinson enlisted on the 10th August 1914 in the 3rd Training Battalion, Durham Light Infantry (Army Number 22546). The Northern Echo of 1st March 1916 shows him as a Lance-Corp. serving with the 3rd’s in France. On 14th October 1916 he is recorded as a Sergeant, suffering from shell shock and on 26th March 1917 he had been wounded and was in a base hospital in France. He retained the scar of the wound in his right forearm and the remnant of the bullet in his shoulder.

He never talked much about his experiences on the Somme, other than to relate the time when he was in the ambulance from the front to field hospital. Alongside him was a Prussian Guard who, seeing the marksman badge on Dad’s sleeve (he was a sniper), Dad related he would have killed him if he could. He was wounded at St. Eloi, near Ypres, and our former home at Aycliffe bears that name to this day.

Whilst searching the 1943 edition of the Darlington & Stockton Times the following article of 10th September 1943 emerged:

Great War Comrades Meet at Durham.

The swearing in of Mr. Roland Jennings, M.P., of Whitburn, Sunderland, as a county magistrate at Durham Quarter Sessions on Wednesday was followed by an informal reunion with one of his Great War comrades in arms.

On the bench was Mr. John Atkinson, of Great Aycliffe, who during the Great War was a platoon sergeant in the 20th Batt. Durham Light Infantry. Recognising his former officer, Mr. Atkinson left the court and had a happy chat with Mr. Jennings. In particular they recalled an episode at St. Eloi in 1917 when Sergt. Atkinson was wounded while attacking with a Lewis gun a German machine-gun nest at a 40 yards range in no man’s land. Mr. Jennings, then a second-lieutenant, came to the rescue, helped Sergt. Atkinson back to the British lines and dressed his wound. Mr. Jennings, chartered accountant, was M.P. for Sedgefield from 1931 to 1935 and has been M.P. for the Hallam Division of Sheffield since 1939. Mr. Atkinson is Aycliffe representative on the Darlington Rural Council and, as a J.P., sits on the Spennymoor and Darlington County Benches.

Postscript- the 20th (Service) Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Wearside), the "Faithful Durhams", after training at Barnard Castle were at Aldershot on 7th January 1916 (Northern Echo). They were the only North-country battalion in the 41st Division with a high proportion of miners and it became well known for its digging abilities. They moved to France in May 1916 based around Armentieres (my father talked about the place as a place they relaxed in).

From John Sheen’s book emerges a detailed record of the Battalion and its movements as follows: The 20th Battalion DLI was part of the 123rd Brigade along with the 11th Queens, 10th Royal West Kent, and 23rd Middlesex. The Brigade was part of the 41st Division, which in turn was part of the 15th Corps.

  • 1/5/1916 Moved to embarkation positions.
  • 4/5/1916 Entrained Farnborough and embarked SS Arundal at Southampton.
  • 5/5/1916 Gare des Marchandises – Godewaerswelde (Belgium). Probably John joined the Battalion here??
  • 10/5/1916 Ypres Salient – frontline for instruction in trench warfare.
  • 28/5/1916 Le Bizet/Armentieres.
  • 29/5/1916 22 officers & 696 men into the front line.
  • 23/8/1916 Bailleul to Somme Front (Longpre les Corps Sants) then marched to Yaucourt Bussus.
  • 7/9/1916 Train Longpre to Mericourt then camp near Becorel outside Albert.
  • 12 – 13/9/1916 Into line with the 11th Queens.
  • 14/9/1916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt then back to the battle at Flers (with tanks). 123rd Brigade in reserve behind 122nd Brigade (no fighting but with casualties from shelling – possible source of John's shell shock reported in the press on 14/10 1916)
  • 17/9/1916 Moved to the Montauban line then Bercondal for attack training.
  • 27/9/1916 Much reconnaiscence into No Man’s Land.
  • 1/101916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt.
  • 3/10/1916 Camp at Memetz Wood – resting.
  • 7.10/1916 800 yards behind Flers.
  • 17/10/1916 Left Somme and entrained at Dernancourt to Oismont (via Amiens). Arrived 18/19/1916. Battalion strength 1068. From 23/8 to 17/10/1916 casualties 98 dead, 200+ wounded.
  • 20/10/1916 Train from Pont Remy to Godeswaersvelde (Dickebusch Sector)
  • 22/10/1916 Renningshelst.
  • 3/11/1916 Back to trenches – skirmishes.
  • 12/11/1916 Ontario Camp (Dickebusch)
  • 18/11/1916 SNOW – COLD. Fighting dimishes but still casulaties. Battalion strength 29 officers and 828 men.
  • 23/11/1916 Ontario Camp.
  • December 1916 In and out of the line.
  • Christmas Day Trench mortar activity.
  • 29/12/1916 Ontario Camp (Ypres Salient)
  • New Year’s Day 1917. Some had baths – practicing – operating Lewis Guns. Strength 19 officers (-10) and 463 (-365) men.
  • 3/1/1917 In the line – very wet.
  • 8/1/1916 New officers joined the Battalion, including R. Jennings.
  • 17/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • 21/1/1917 Snow – back to Ontario Camp.
  • 28/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • Early February 1917. Clearing trenches – back and forward to Ontario Camp.
  • 17/2/1917 Routine fighting – in and out through February into March. Battalion football competition – church in Reninghelst.
  • 5/3/1917 Took over from East Surrey’s.. Snow and mist. Things described as quiet – in and out the line.
  • 18/3/1917. Skirmishes and shelling – likely time when John was wounded (Northern Echo report on 26/3/1917.
  • 24/3/1917 Battalion out of the line and on ‘stand-by’.

      John used to talk about the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley in Hampshire - an existing pre-war military hospital as the place he received on-going treatment for his wounds prior to him moving to Croydon for a time before ultimately finishing up at Woodside Hospital Darlington where he was Orderly Sergeant. He was finally honourably discharged on 13th December 1917.




214278

Field Sgt. John Atkinson

British Army 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Darlington

With the outbreak of the First World War John Atkinson enlisted on the 10th August 1914 in the 3rd Training Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Army Number 22546) and the Northern Echo of 1st March 1916 shows him as a Lance-Corp. serving with the 3rd’s in France. On 14th October 1916 he is recorded as a Sergeant suffering from shell shock and on 26th March 1917 he had been wounded and was in a base hospital in France. He retained the scar of the wound in his right forearm and the remnant of the bullet in his shoulder.

He never talked much about his experiences on the Somme in W.W.1 other than to relate the time when he was in the ambulance from the front to field hospital. Alongside him was a Prussian Guard who, seeing the marksman badge on Dad’s sleeve (he was a sniper), Dad relates,”he would have killed him if he could”. He was wounded at St. Eloi, near Ypres, and our former home at Aycliffe, near Darlington, bears that name to this day.

However, whilst searching the 1943 edition of the Darlington & Stockton Times the following article of 10th September 1943 emerged:

Great War Comrades Meet at Durham.

The swearing in of Mr. Roland Jennings, M.P., of Whitburn, Sunderland, as a county magistrate at Durham Quarter Sessions on Wednesday was followed by an informal reunion with one of his Great War comrades in arms.

On the bench was Mr. John Atkinson, of Great Aycliffe, who during the Great War was a platoon sergeant in the 20th Batt. Durham Light Infantry. Recognising his former officer, Mr. Atkinson left the court and had a happy chat with Mr. Jennings. In particular they recalled an episode at St. Eloi in 1917 when Sergt. Atkinson was wounded while attacking with a Lewis gun a German machine-gun nest at a 40 yards range in no man’s land. Mr. Jennings, then a second-lieutenant, came to the rescue, helped Sergt. Atkinson back to the British lines and dressed his wound.

Mr. Jennings, chartered accountant, was M.P. for Sedgefield from 1931 to 1935 and has been M.P. for the Hallam Division of Sheffield since 1939. Mr. Atkinson is Aycliffe representative on the Darlington Rural Council and, as a J.P., sits on the Spennymoor and Darlington County Benches.

(Postscripts) – the 20th (Service) Battalion Durham Light Infantry (Wearside), the “Faithful Durhams”, after training at Barnard Castle were at Aldershot on 7th January 1916 (Northern Echo). They were the only North-country battalion in the 41st Division with a high proportion of miners and it became well known for its digging abilities. They moved to France in May 1916 based around Armentieres (my father talked about the place as a place they relaxed in).

From John Sheen’s book emerges a detailed record of the Battalion and its movements as follows:

The 20th Battalion DLI was part of the 123rd Brigade along with the 11th Queens, 10th Royal West Kent, and 23rd Middlesex. The Brigade was part of the 41st Division, which in turn was part of the 15th Corps.

  • 1/5/1916 Moved to embarkation positions.
  • 4/5/1916 Entrained Farnborough and embarked SS Arundal at Southampton
  • 5/5/1916 Gare des Marchandises – Godewaerswelde (Belgium).Probably John joined the Battalion here??
  • 10/5/1916 Ypres Salient – frontline for instruction in trench warfare.
  • 28/5/1916 Le Bizet/Armentieres.
  • 29/5/1916 22 officers & 696 men into the front line.
  • 23/8/1916 Bailleul to Somme Front (Longpre les Corps Sants) then marched to Yaucourt Bussus.
  • 7/9/1916 Train Longpre to Mericourt then camp near Becorel outside Albert.
  • 12 – 13/9/1916 Into line with the 11th Queens.
  • 14/9/1916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt then back to the Battle at Flers (with tanks). 123rd Brigade in reserve behind 122nd Brigade (no fighting but with casualties from shelling – possible source of John’s shell shock reported in the press on 14/10 1916)
  • 17/9/1916 Moved to the Montauban line then Bercondal for attacktraining.
  • 27/9/1916 Much reconnaiscence into No Man’s Land.
  • 1/101916 Back to Pommiers Redoubt.
  • 3/10/1916 Camp at Memetz Wood – resting.
  • 7/10/1916 800 yards behind Flers.
  • 17/10/1916 Left Somme and entrained at Dernancourt to Oismont (via Amiens). Arrived 18/10/1916.. Battalion strength 1068. From 23/8 to 17/10/1916 casualties 98 dead, 200+ wounded.
  • 20/10/1916 Train from Pont Remy to Godeswaersvelde (Dickebusch Sector)
  • 22/10/1916 Renningshelst.
  • 3/11/1916 Back to trenches – skirmishes.
  • 12/11/1916 Ontario Camp (Dickebusch)
  • 18/11/1916 SNOW – COLD. Fighting dimishes but still casulaties. Battalion strength 29 officers and 828 men.
  • 23/11/1916 Ontario Camp.
  • December 1916 In and out of the line.
  • Christmas Day Trench mortar activity.
  • 29/12/1916 Ontario Camp (Ypres Salient)
  • New Year’s Day 1917. Some had baths – practicing – operating Lewis Guns. Strength 19 officers (-10) and 463 (-365) men.
  • 3/1/1917 In the line – very wet.
  • 8/1/1916 New officers joined the Battalion, including R. Jennings.
  • 17/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • 21/1/1917 SNOW – back to Ontario Camp.
  • 28/1/1917 Back in the line.
  • Early February 1917. Clearing trenches – back and forward to Ontario Camp.
  • 17/2/1917 Routine fighting – in and out through February into March. Battalion football competition – church in Reninghelst.
  • 5/3/1917 Took over from East Surrey’s.. Snow and mist. Things described as quiet – in and out the line.
  • 18/3/1917. Skirmishes and shelling – likely time when John was wounded (Northern Echo report on 26/3/1917.
  • 24/3/1917 Battalion out of the line and on ‘stand-by’.

John used to talk about the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley in Hampshire - an existing pre-war military hospital as the place he received on-going treatment for his wounds prior to him moving to Croydon for a time before ultimately finishing up at Woodside Hospital Darlington where he was Orderly Sergeant. He was finally honourably discharged on 13th December 1917.

Postscript by Lewis Atkinson, John’s son: My son and I are currently tracing family records and we came across the following article by my father dated 11th November 1929 in a Darlington newspaper. He served and was wounded twice in the First World War.

“Once again the Empire today does homage to that vast, immortal army who died that we might live. Again it is vividly brought home to us by the sight of Flanders poppies, religious and other national memorial services, of the terrific sacrifices made by the British Empire during that tragic conflict.

Again, we ex-Servicemen think of those with whom we marched along the roads to the familiar strains of ‘Tipperary’, ‘Who’s your lady friend?’ and the like who are no more. We recall the training, the embarkation, our baptism of fire, the walking wounded wending their way back to the dressing stations, followed by screaming murderous shells; the stretcher cases, the lines of men outside the casualty stations, the on-coming troops, guns, transport, ever moving forward; Ypres, Armentieres, Vimy Ridge, Albert, the mud, aerial torpedoes, whizz-bangs, and Heaven knows what else. And I often ask myself, ‘Was it worthwhile?’ I say most emphatically, never again must the British Empire be plunged into such a catastrophe! Never again. They died that we might live”




214025

John Atkinson

British Army 20th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:Darlington




232162

Pte. John Atkinson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Teams Colliery

John Atkinson was wounded in October 1916




237244

Sgt. John William Atkinson MM.

British Army 5th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

My great grand father, John Atkinson, also known as Jack, served in the 5th Battalion the Durham Light Infantry 1914- 1918. He was a coal miner from Trimdon Colliery in County Durham and worked at Deaf Hill pit.

He entered the theatre of war on the 31st of October 1916 and went on to be wounded on the 17th of September 1916 during the battle of Flers Courcelette. He returned to active service in June 1917 and won the Military Medal during the Battle of Estaires on the 9th of April 1918. On the 27th of May 1918 he was taken prisoner during the third battle of the Aisne and was incarcerated in Damstadt POW camp. After repatriation he returned to the mining industry and passed away in 1951 aged 68.

I believe J W Atkinson is seen on a photo supplied to this site by J Miller of Durham Light Infantry prisoners of war- bottom left front row.

Trimdon British legion with J W Atkinson fifth from right middle row.

Trimdon British legion with J W Atkinson fifth from right middle row.




232163

Pte. R. Atkinson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers




211985

Pte. Samuel Atkinson

British Army Lancashire Fusiliers

from:Heywood Lancashire

My Grandfather Samuel Atkinson, Lancashire Fusiliers, enlisted 26th of August 1916. He was wounded on the 14th of Sept 1917 and treated in Royal Victoria Hospital Netley with Gun shot wounds to his right side. Also wounded again 19th April 1918 gun shot wound to his left arm.




219230

Pte. Stanley Robert Atkinson

British Army 2nd Btn Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.26th May 1915)

Stanley R Atkinson is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium




232164

Pte. W. Atkinson

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Durham City

(d.1st July 1916)




222881

Pte. Walter Atkinson

British Army 1st Btn. Lancashire Fusiliers

from:16 Thursfield Road, Burnley, Lancashire.

(d.25th Apr 1915)

Walter Atkinson died on 25th April 1915, aged 22. He is commemorated on on the Helles Memorial in Gallipoli, Turkey.




300625

Pte. William Watson Atkinson

British Army 21st Btn Durham Light Infantry

Served with 18th DLI




216762

Lt. Arthur George Atock MC.

British Army 155th Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Dublin

(d.13th Sep 1918)

Lieutenant Arthur Atock was the son of Arthur M.D. and Marion L. Atock, of Inchicore, Dublin. Growing up he attended Mountjoy School and Trinity College, Dublin. In March 1916 he enlisted with The Black Watch, and in December that year received his commission as Lieutenant in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. A year later in December 1917 he transferred to 155th Royal Engineers, which had joined the 16th (Irish) Division in August 1915.

Arthur Atock was killed in action in France aged 20, and is buried in Houchin British Cemetery. He was twice awarded the Parchment Certificate for bravery in the field, and was also awarded the Military Cross. He is commemorated on the Great War Memorial inside Trinity College, Dublin. His framed photograph can be found on the right-hand staircase inside the School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin's Museum Building.




219295

2nd Lt. John Haddon Attenborough

British Army 8th Btn. Norfolk Regiment

from:High View Gardens, Upminster, Essex

(d.1st Jul 1916)

My Mother in Law mentioned to me one night about six years ago, whilst I was discussing Family History in WW1 that she believed that she had an Uncle that was killed in WW1, she was not sure where but did know his name, John Haddon Attenborough. So off to the Commonwealth War Graves Casualty Details we went, and we found him, she did cry bless her. I am so pleased I was able to do this for her as she died two years ago at the age of 92 years young and knew where his memorial was, and when he died and where.

John Attenborough served with the Norfolk Regiment 8th Battalion and died on 1st July 1916.




232165

Pte. James Attey

British Army 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Old Penshaw

James Attey was wounded in 1918




220900

Rflmn. Leslie Attkins

9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Battalion London Regiment

(d.1st July 1916)

Leslie Attkins played for Middlesex Wanderers FC before the war.




216763

Rfmn. George Attley

British Army 1sr Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Dublin

(d.9th May 1915)

George Attley, the son of William and Catherine Attley, of Rathcoole, Co. Dublin was killed in Flanders age 26. He is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial.

Update: In the 1911 census George was 21 and living with his parents. He was a general labourer in a paper mill. Also at home were his brothers Luke (19), John (17) Christopher (14) and sisters Anne (12) and Elizabeth (9).

George was killed at Rouge Bancs, Belgium. The winter of 1914/15 was terrible and the men suffered badly from frost bite, trench foot and trench fever in the muddy and flooded trenches. The 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles remained in that area throughout the winter and took part in their first major battle at Neuve Chappelle on 10th March 1915. The attack was a part of the overall strategy to capture Aubers Ridge and, thanks to intense and accurate artillery support, the village was captured and held. After three days heavy fighting, with 409 casualties (45% of the battalion), the cost in human terms was high.

The Rifles were held in reserve while they were being reinforced and, on 1st April 1915, back at full fighting strength, they returned to the Aubers Ridge sector to trenches near Fromelles. In another attempt to take the Ridge, the German held village of Rouge Bancs, was attacked by the Rifles on 9th May 1915. Although achieving the Battalions objectives, they could not hold and the order was given to retire to their old trenches. Once again casualties were very heavy, with 477 officers and men out of a total of 600 involved in the attack killed, wounded or missing.




216764

Sgt. William Attley

British Army 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Regiment

from:Rathcoole, County Dublin

(d.31st Oct 1916)

Sergeant William Attley was born in Saggart, County Dublin and lived in Rathcoole, County Dublin before enlisting in Glasgow. In October 1916 the Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion were transferred to 49th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division, and it was not long after this that Sergeant Attley died of wounds in Linselles, France. He is buried in Linselles Communal Cemetery, and is commemorated on the Scottish National War Memorial within the walls of Edinburgh Castle.




116321

Private Robert Atton

British Army 1/5th Battalion Durham Light Infantry

from:Burton-on-Trent.Staffs.

(d.18th Sept 1916)

Robert Atton was my Great Uncle,he died at the Battle of the Somme and his name is on the Thiepval Memorial. He was the son of Dick and Emma Atton who moved to Burton-on-Trent from Hallaton in Leicestershire around 1870.He was one of 7 children and born in 1883.As far as I know he never married. I am still working on his family tree and hopefully may update his life story at a later date




124

Pte. A. W. Attridge

Army Durham Light Infantry




216765

Lt. Robert Erskine Atwell

British Army 4th Btn. Connaught Rangers

(d.2nd Sep 1918)

Lieutenant Robert Atwell was born on October 26th 1882 in Sandymount, Dublin. He was the son of Sarah Margretta Atwell, of 10 Braid Hills Road, Edinburgh, and Richard Atwell, of Blackrock, County Dublin. Before enlisting in December 1914 he worked at the Head Office of Standard Life Assurance Company, Edinburgh. From 1914 to 1917 he served in the Lothians and Border Horse, and on 25th January 1917 he was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th Connaught Rangers. He then travelled to France in March of that year.

For the first three months he was attached to the 6th Connaught Rangers, and from August 1917 to April 1918 he was back in Scotland recovering from shell shock. A few months after returning to France in August 1918 he was promoted to Lieutenant having been attached to the 12th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. Robert Atwell was 35 years old when he was killed in action near Neuve Eglise, France, and he is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery. He is commemorated on the Standard Life Assurance Company Memorial, Edinburgh.




235163

Pte. Leslie Hyde Atwill

British Army 13th (2nd Rhondda) Btn. Welsh Regiment

from:Cardiff

(d.30th January 1917)

Leslie Hyde Atwill was one of three brothers who served and died in the First World War. His parents came from Devon and moved to Cardiff before their sons were born. His two brothers moved to Australia and when war was declared they joined up and both died at Gallipoli, Turkey. They were Percy Gerard Atwill and Thomas Alfred Atwill. Their father died before them so their mother was left with just one daughter.

Leslie died at the battle of Ypres, Belgium. He was a draper working for his brother in law in Cardiff.




300681

Cpl. Melville Hildreth Aubin

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

Melville Aubin was one of the first to enlist with the County Battalion, he was commissioned into the 18th Dli and was promited to Lt.




1206621

Pte. Herbert George Auburn

British Army 6th Btn. East Kent Regiment

from:Tottenham, Middlesex

(d.29th Aug 1918)

My uncle Herbert George Auburn, my fathers eldest brother. My father (aged 3) remembers standing in the kitchen one morning when Herbert, came into the kitchen dressed in full uniform. 'Look at me mum' said Herbert, 'don't I look smart', my grandmother cried and my father never saw him again. So sad.

Still remembered Herbert, you were never forgotten by your brokenhearted parents, brothers and sisters. RIP.

Herbert George Auburn served with the 6th Battalion, East Kent Regiment (The Buffs)during WW1 and died on the 29th August 1918. He is buried in the Peronne Road Cemetery, Maricourt, Somme, France.




500784

Sjt. Charles Octave Aucourt

British Army 12th Btn. East Surrey Regt.

from:Matson's House, Churchill, nr. Bristol.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




218493

Rflmn. F Auger

British Army 4th Btn. Rifle Brigade

(d.20th Aug 1918)

Rifleman F Auger died whilst the 80th Infantry Brigade of the 27th Division were preparing for the Final Offensive in Salonika. He is buried in Plovdiv Central Cemetery, Bulgaria, grave ref: C. 7.




218212

Pte. Fortunat Auger

Canadian Expeditionary Force 14th Btn.

from:Canada

(d.26th Mar 1916)

Fortunat Suguer served with the Canadian Expeditionsry Force. He was executed for desertion on 26th March 1916 aged 25 and is buried in Trois-Arbres Cemetery, Steenwerck, France.

Born in Montreal in December 1890, Fortunat Auger joined the CEF's 14th Battalion in September 1914. Auger was present during both the Second Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Festubert in 1915. After the 14th Battalion was transferred Following his battalion's move to Ploegsteert Wood that summer, Auger's conduct became increasingly belligerent.

He was twice charged with going AWOL, before disappearing for two days in December and returning to find himself charged with desertionHis charge was lessened to AWOL once again, but he was sentenced to serve 12 months hard labour. His sentence was suspended a month later, and he was returned to his battalion, from which he immediately left. He was arrested three days later, on 11th January, and sentenced to death for desertion.




206094

Pte. Walter Aukland

British Army 1st/4th btn Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Grantham

(d.17th Sep 1915)

Today is a memorable day, because I have been able to confirm the whereabouts of my uncle's war grave. My father and cousin visited a war grave in Ypres some years ago believing it to be that of my uncle, however I have since inherited all the details they had pulled together and there were discrepancies.

'My Walter', as I now call him, is buried at Longuenesse cemetery in France. Can you believe there were 2 Walter Auklands who joined the Lincolnshire Regiment at almost the same time, both died in 1915. My Walter died of wounds whilst being transported back home, so he never made it back to his family. He has remained 'undiscovered' until today. I can now make plans to visit his grave and pay my respects.

My father died 7 years ago, believing he had visited his brother's grave. However, he has visited someone's son and they will be indebted to him for that. So, My Walter, I am on my way .




223822

Pte. James Auld MM.

British Army 11th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Guide Post, Choppington

(d.27th Oct 1918)

James Auld lived with his widowed mother at Rutherford Street, Guide Post before enlisting at Morpeth. He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty. His name is on the Giavera Memorial in Italy. The Memorial commemorates more than 150 members of the Commonwealth Forces who died in Italy between November 1917 and November 1918 and whose places of burial are unknown. He was killed in action on 27 October 1918 age 22.

He was probably killed during the battle of Veneto-Vittorio which started on 24th of October 1918 and saw the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire when Italy and her Commonwealth Allies succeeded in defeating the enemy. All hostilities on this front ended on 4th of November 1918 so James was only days away from surviving the War.

The 11th Battalion had served in France since August 1915 until they were deployed to Italy in November 1917, so James could have been awarded his medal when he was in France. Nevertheless, he was awarded the Military Medal and the following was reported in a local newspaper on 9 November 1917: "For gallantry and devotion to duty as company runner during operations. When the other runners of his company had become casualties he proved himself invaluable, and in spite of additional work he displayed remarkable cheerfulness even under the heaviest fire, setting a fine example to his comrades”.

As a volunteer at a local museum undertaking a World War I project, I was asked to choose a name off a local war memorial and research it, I chose James Auld partly because of MM, as I didn't know what this meant and partly because Auld is part of my family history and I thought he might be related in some way, though as yet I haven't found a connection. Having also researched two other local soldiers (brothers) who didn't make it home, I've learned a lot of facts about the war, but most importantly have come to realise just what these young lads endured and sacrificed for their country.




179013

Gunner Henry Charles Ault

British Army Royal Garrison Artilery

from:Marylebone, London

My grandfather, Henry charles Ault is one of those soldiers whose records apart from medal card are lost. He was a Gunner with the RGA and I believe he was with the seige batt. Mobilised to No 1 Depot, Fort Burgoyne, Dover at the end of August 1916. His Regt no is 115850, Roll RGA/166B. Thats it thats all I have and up until 2 months ago I didn't even know he was a soldier in the 1914-1918 war, I'm sure he was brave and hopefully may even have helped save a life.




500760

Pte. James Hodgson Austerfield

British Army 11th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:2, Jacob's Well Lane, Wakefield, Yorkshire

(d.7th Jun 1917)




155051

Chief ERA Albert Victor Austin

Royal Navy H.M.S Amphion

(d.6th Aug 1914)

Albert Victor Austin was my Great, Great Granddad on my Mum's side. I am searching for more details.




1205524

Pte. Alfred G. Austin

British Army 10th Btn. D Coy. Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment

from:7, Higham Rd:, Burton Latimer, Northants.

(d.4th Aug 1917)

Alfred was killed aged just 19. His name is inscribed on the wall of the Menin gate memorial.




223655

Spr. Arthur Ernest Clifford Austin

British Army 93rd Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Oxford Street, Sandfields, Swansea

(d.11th Aug 1916)

Clifford Austin died at Longueval on 11th of August 1916, on the eleventh day of his last front line posting as the 17th Division fought over the village of Longueval and Delville Wood. He has no known grave but is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.




300210

Clr/Sgt. Arthur Warburton Austin

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




968

Cpl. Edward Phillip Austin

Australian Imperial Force 33rd Btn.

(d.13th July 1917)




215908

Pte. Edwin Austin

British Army 6th Btn King's Shrops Light Infantry

from:Oakengates, Shropshire

(d.22nd Aug 1917)

Edwin Austin was killed in action 22/08/1917 aged 28 years and is remembered upon Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. He was son of the late Robert and Ellen Austin of Oakengates. (Also brother of Private Harry Austin 60573, KIA age 24 31/7/1917).

My Great Uncle, so he is not forgotten.




500785

Pte. G. E. Austin

British Army 12th Btn. East Surrey Regt.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




208052

Pte. Harry Austin

British Army Royal Army Medical Corps

from:Wigan, Lancashire

My maternal grandfather, Harry Austin, enlisted on 16th November 1914, aged 19 and joined the RAMC, but I do not know to which army regiment he was attached. He went to France on 18th February 1915 and was badly injured on 4th March 1917, but we do not know in which particular battle apart from "the Somme". He was discharged on 10th October 1917 because of his injuries.




215909

Pte Harry Austin

British Army 17th Btn Royal Welsh Fusiliers

from:Oakengates, Shropshire

(d.31st Jul 1917)

Harry Austin was killed in action aged 24 years 31/07/1917, and is remembered upon Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.He was the son of Robert and Ellen Austin of Oakengates. (Also brother of Private Edwin Austin 11813, KIA age 28 22/8/1917). My Great Uncle so he is not forgotten.




216766

Slr. James Austin

Mercantile Marine SS Memphian

from:Dublin

(d.8th Oct 1917)

James Austin was the son of George and Bridget Austin, of Hogestown Road, Rush, County Dublin. The SS Memphian was on a voyage from Liverpool to New Orleans when it was sunk following an attack from the German submarine U-96. James was one of the 32 who lost their lives. He was 21 years old.

James is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London.




233620

Pte. James William Austin

British Army 8th (Service) Btn. Kins Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

from:Goole, Yorkshire

(d.8th October 1916)

Our great grandfather, Private James William Austin of Goole, died of wounds on 8th October 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He rests in peace at Dernancourt Cemetery, near Albert, France.




222596

Pte. Joseph Austin

British Army 1st Btn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment

(d.9 May 1915)




226675

L. J. Austin

British Army

L J Austin was a doctor. He was a POW at three camps: Magdeburg, Koln and Torgau.




233595

Cpl. Thomas Oswald Austin

British Army 1/7th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

from:Berwick upon Tweed

(d.15th Sep 1916)

Corporal Thomas Oswald Austin served with the 1/7th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers. He was killed in action in France on 15th of September 1916, aged 19, during the Battle of the Somme. He was the son of Mrs Martha Dempster of 4 Station Cottages, Tweedmouth and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Thiepval, Somme, France. He fell in an attack on German positions near Mametz Wood which was only partially successful and cost the Battalion heavily. Three officers and 40 other ranks were killed and seven officers and 219 Other Ranks were wounded. In addition 74 other ranks were posted missing. He had been wounded three times previously. Before the war he had been employed as a miner at Scremerston.




216767

L/Cpl. Charles Authors

British Army 9th Btn. Royal Dublin Fusiliers

from:Dublin

(d.23rd Jul 1916)

Charles Authors, son of Mrs. Annie Authors, of 4 Waters Cottage, Golden Bridge, Inchicore, Dublin, was born in Dublin and later enlisted there. He was 30 years old when he was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme. He is commemorated on Panel 127 to 129, Loos Memorial, Pas De Calais, France.




206758

Gnr. Benjamin Auty

British Army West Riding Regiment

Benjamin Auty joined up with the West Riding Regiment as Private 11377. He was sent to France on the 5th of December 1914 and later transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery as Gunner 211575.




214348

Spr. Frederick Avery

British Army 93rd Field Coy. Royal Engineers

from:Gateshead

(d.18th Feb 1918)

Frederick Avery's Medal Index Card

Frederick Avery's Medal Index Card

Frederick Avery served with 93rd Field Coy. Royal Engineers. He was aged 29 when he died on 18th February 1918. He was born and enlisted Gateshead, the son of John and Mary Ann Avery of Gateshead. Frederick is buried in Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery. Mananourt and is commemorated on the Triptych in St. Paul's Church, Jarrow.




500823

Capt. Wilfred Percival Avery

Australian Imperial Forces 1st Australian Tunnelling Coy.

(d.25th Apr 1917)




216768

Pte. Arthur Thomas Avison

British Army (Cavalry) Machine Gun Corps

(d.15th Nov 1917)

Arthur Thomas Avison was born in Dublin, the son of George Charles and Annie Amelia Avison, of Shandon, St. John's Rd., Sandymount, Dublin. He lived in Hampden Street, London, N.W. and enlisted in St. Swithin's Lane, London, Middx. He was formerly 2512, Royal Bucks Hussars.

He died of wounds in Egypt age 33 and is buried in Gaza War Cemetery, Israel.




236544

Pte. George William Awty

British Army 7th Btn. Seaforth Highlanders

from:Beverley, Yorkshire

George Awty was born in 1899 and joined up in 1915. He was the holder of the silver war badge.




236197

Gnr. Frederick T. Axcell

British Army Royal Field Artillery

from:Stoke Newington




210467

Dorothy NMI Axford

Womens Land Army

from:Elkton, Maryland

My mother, Dorothy Axford, was in the Land Army. She had attended Temple University, probably in Ambler, PA. She worked on a farm owned by people named Barnett. She died in 1984 in Florida.




212803

Pte. Harry Axson

British Army 1/5th Btn. Kings (Liverpool) Regiment

Harry Axson, enlisted in the 1/5th Bn. King's Regiment (Liverpool) on 1st Sept 1914. He arrived in Le Havre on 21st Feb 1915. On the 3rd Jul 1915 he was received by the Field Ambulance and transferred to No 6 Casualty Clearing Station at Merville, France. From there, on 8th Jul 1915, he was transferred to No 5 General (Base) Hospital, at Rouen. On the 11th Jul 1915 he was transferred to England on board HMHS St Andrew from Rouen. After he had a period of hospitalisation in the UK he returned to France, only to be wounded in action, sent back to the lines and then gassed, and eventually casevac'd back to the UK again in 1917 on board the RMT Ville de Liege, a fast evacuation transport ship. Interestingly, by the end of the war when he was demobilised he was classed as A1 physically fit.




220630

Sgt. George Axtell

British Army Royal Engineers

from:Aston Clinton, Bucks

George Axtell, my wife's great grandfather, broke his arm "running and slipping on duck boards in a trench" on Christmas Eve in 1918 (I just hope he was having fun!). He was taken to 12 Stationary Hospital in St Pol, near Arras, and from their to the Military Convalescant Hospital, Woldingham from where he was discharged in 1919




217456

Capt. John William Axtens

Australian Imperial Force 30th Infantry Battalion

from:Australia

John William Axtens was born on 9th February 1895 in Sydney, New South Wales and worked as a draper before the outbreak of the First World War. He was 20 years old when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on 20th June 1915 and was assigned to the 30th Infantry Battalion. John Axtens departed Sydney aboard HMAT Beltana on 9th November 1915 and returned to Australia in 1919




222592

Pte. William Herbert Valentine Ayers

British Army 2nd Battalion Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment

from:London

(d.25th April 1915)




222067

Pte. Frederick Norman Ayles

British Army South Lancashire Regiment

from:Bromley

(d.13th Nov 1914)




221095

Pte. Fredrick Ayles

British Army 2nd Btn. South Lancashire Regiment

(d.13th Nov 1914)

Frederick Ayles was my grandad's brother. He was 19 years old when he died. He had been in France 3 weeks when he along with an officer disappeared, his body being found with the officers many years later. He is listed on the Menin Gate as being in the South Lancs Regiment 2nd Btn.




500782

Pte. Cecil Wallace Ayling

British Army 7th Btn. London Regiment

from:31, Minard Rd., Catford, London.

(d.7th Jun 1917)




1166

Sgt. Frederick Clarence Ayling DCM.

Australian Imperial Forces A Coy. 33rd Btn.

from:Moore St, Gawler, South Australia




208407

Pte. Frederick Ayre

British Army 2/4th Battalion, B Coy. Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Sleaford, Lincolnshire

(d.13th May 1917)

My Grandfather Frederick Ayre was born in 1889 in Boston Lincolnshire and was killed on the 13th May 1917 while serving with 'B' Coy. 2nd/4th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment and is buried at La Chapellete Cemetery. Sadly, I obviously never knew him and would like to get any information I can about his pre army service, life and also any campaign or service information for 'B' Coy. 2/4th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment, also any photos, stories etc. that anyone might have. Please contact me. I am happy to reimburse any reasonable expenses.




300859

Sgt. Richard Ayre

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry




216770

A/CSM. Robert Ayre

British Army 1st Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

(d.24th Oct 1918)

Robert Ayre was born in Dublin and enlisted in Newcastle­ upon­ Tyne.




213914

Rfmn. Samuel Ayre

British Army 11th Btn. Royal Irish Rifles

from:Glenavy, County Antrim

(d.16th Aug 1917)




500793

Pte. Albert Ayres

British Army 26th Btn. Royal Fusiliers

(d.7th Jun 1917)




500794

Pte. George Thomas Ayres

British Army 32nd Btn. Royal Fusiliers

from:New Zealand Cottages, Sunninghill, Ascot, Berks

(d.7th Jun 1917)




224172

Pte. Joseph Edward "Neddie" Ayres

British Army 6th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment

from:Lincoln

(d.1st July 1916)

Neddie Ayres was my great-uncle and died on the first day of the Somme. He always wanted to be a soldier but didn't make the grade until volunteers were needed in WW1. He is buried in Blighty Valley Cemetery, near Aveluy in France.




239351

Drvr. Charles Ayton

British Army 173 Brigade, B Bty. Royal Field Artillery

(d.2nd December 1917)

Driver Charles Ayton was the son of Andrew and Charlotte Ayton, 89A Packington Street, Essex Road, Islington, London. He died, aged 22, on 2nd December 1917 and is buried at Rocquigny-Equancourt Road Cemetery, France.




300866

L/Cpl. W. Ayton

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

from:30 Cleasby Terrace, Darlington

Pte Ayton is recorded as "Ayton, W. Lcpl 1312 18th DLI" in the Roll of Honour held in Darlington Library, believed to have been complied by the Town Council in the 1920s.




300862

Pte. William Ayton

British Army 18th Btn. Durham Light Infantry

served with 18th & 20th& 6th DLI














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Celebrate by honouring members of your family who served in the Great War both in the forces and at home. We love to hear about the soldiers, but also remember the many who served in support roles, nurses, doctors, land army, muntions workers etc.

Please use our Family History resources to find out more about your relatives. Then please send in a short article, with a photo if possible, so that they can be remembered on these pages.















The Wartime Memories Project is a non profit organisation run by volunteers.

This website is paid for out of our own pockets, library subscriptions and from donations made by visitors. The popularity of the site means that it is far exceeding available resources.

If you are enjoying the site, please consider making a donation, however small to help with the costs of keeping the site running.


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is archived for preservation by the British Library





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