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KUK U4



   KUK U-4 Austrian Submarine, a type U-3 was launched on the 20th November 1908 and commissioned on 29th August 1909 She was commanded by: Hermann Jüstel 7 Jul 1913 - 2 Apr 1915, Edgar Wolf 2 Apr 1915 - 9 Apr 1915, Rudolf Singule 9 Apr 1915 - 30 Nov 1917 and Franz Rzemenowsky von Trautenegg from 30th of Nov 1917 onwards.

She claimed 14 ships sunk with a total of 15,039 tons, 2 ships damaged with a total of 3,535 tons, 3 ships taken as prize with a total of 13 tons, 1 warship sunk with a total of 7,234 tons and 1 warship damaged with a total of 5,400 tons.

  • 28 Nov 1914 k.u.k. U4 Hermann Jüstel Fiore Del Mare (prize) 13 al
  • 9 Jun 1915 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Dublin (hms) (damaged) 5,400 br
  • 18 Jul 1915 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Giuseppe Garibaldi 7,234 it
  • 9 Dec 1915 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Gjovadje (prize) unknown al
  • 9 Dec 1915 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Papagallo 10 al
  • 3 Jan 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Halil (prize) unknown al
  • 2 Feb 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Jean Bart Ii 475 fr
  • 30 Mar 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule John Pritchard 118 br
  • 14 Aug 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Pantellaria 204 it
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Inverbervie 4,309 br
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Ml 246 (damaged) 37 br
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Italia (damaged) 3,498 it
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Ml 230 37 br
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Ml 253 37 br
  • 14 Sep 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Ml 255 37 br
  • 13 Oct 1916 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Margaretha 2,092 it
  • 4 May 1917 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Perseo 4,857 it
  • 30 May 1917 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Italia 1,305 fr
  • 19 Jun 1917 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Cefira 411 fr
  • 19 Jun 1917 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Edouard Corbiere 475 fr
  • 12 Jul 1917 k.u.k. U4 Rudolf Singule Berthilde 672 fr

She was scrapped in 1920.

14th May 1917 Battle of Straits of Otranto  The 1917 Battle of the Strait of Otranto was the result of an Austro-Hungarian raid on the Otranto Barrage, an Allied naval blockade of the Strait of Otranto. The battle took place on 14–15 May 1917 and was the largest surface action in the Adriatic Sea during World War I. The Otranto Barrage was a fixed barrier, composed of lightly armed drifters with anti-submarine nets coupled with minefields and supported by Allied naval patrols. The Austro-Hungarian navy planned to raid the Otranto Barrage with a force of three light cruisers and two destroyers under the command of Captain Miklós Horthy. It was an attempt to break the barrier to allow U-boats greater access to the Mediterranean and Allied shipping. An Allied force composed of ships from three navies responded to the raid and in the ensuing battle, heavily damaged the Austro-Hungarian cruiser SMS Novara. However, the rapid approach of the Austro-Hungarian relief force persuaded Rear Admiral Acton, the Allied commander, to retreat.

Under the command of Horthy, three Austro-Hungarian cruisers (Novara, Saida, and Helgoland) modified to resemble large British destroyers, were to attack the drifters on the night of 14 May and attempt to destroy as many as possible before daybreak. The destroyers Csepel and Balaton were to mount a diversionary raid off the Albanian coast in order to confuse any Allied counter-attack. Two Austro-Hungarian U-boats, U-4 and U-27 together with the German U-boat UC-25, were to participate in the operation. A supporting force composed of the armored cruiser Sankt Georg, two destroyers, and a number of torpedo boats was on standby if the raiders ran into trouble. The old pre-dreadnought battleship Budapest and a screen of torpedo boats were also available if necessary. An Allied destroyer patrol was in the area on the night of 14 May, to the north of the Barrage. The Italian flotilla leader Mirabello was accompanied by the French destroyers Commandant Rivière, Bisson, and Cimeterre. The Italian destroyer Borea was also in the area, escorting a small convoy to Valona. A support force was based in the port of Brindisi, consisting of the British cruisers Dartmouth and Bristol with several French and Italian destroyers.

Raid on the drifters

The Italian convoy escorted by Borea was attacked by the Austro-Hungarian destroyers Csepel and Balaton at approximately 0324. The Austro-Hungarians sank Borea, a munitions ship and a second was set on fire and abandoned. The three cruisers were able to pass through the line of drifters and at 0330 began attacking the small barrage ships. The Austro-Hungarians frequently gave the drifter crews warning to abandon ship before opening fire. In some instances the drifter crews chose to fight. Gowan Lee returned fire on the Austo-Hungarian ships. The ship was heavily damaged, but remained afloat. Her captain, Joseph Watt, was later awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions during the battle. There were 47 drifters in Barrage on the night of 14 May. The Austro-Hungarians managed to sink 14 drifters and damage four more. The lack of sufficient Allied escorts forced the withdrawal of the remaining blockading ships, although only for a short time.

Battle

By this time, the Allied naval forces in the area were aware of the raid and were in a position to block the Austro-Hungarian retreat. Rear Admiral Alfredo Acton, the commanding officer of the Italian Scouting Division, ordered Mirabello's group southward at 0435, while he embarked on the British light cruiser HMS Dartmouth. By 0645, the cruisers Dartmouth and Bristol, along with the Italian destroyers Mosto, Pilo, Schiaffino, Acerbi, and Aquila,were sailing north in an attempt to cut off the Austro-Hungarian cruisers. The Italian light cruiser Marsala, the flotilla leader Racchia, and the destroyers Insidioso, Indomito, and Impavido were readying to sail in support as well. The Mirabello group engaged the Austro-Hungarian cruisers at 0700, but were heavily outgunned and instead attempted to shadow the fleeing cruisers. At 0745, Rear Admiral Acton's ships encountered the destroyers Csepel and Balaton. After 20 minutes, the Italian destroyers were able to close the distance to the Austro-Hungarian ships. The two groups engaged in a short artillery duel before a shot from Csepel struck Aquila and disabled the ship's boilers. By this time, the Austro-Hungarian destroyers were under the cover of the coastal batteries at Durazzo and were able to make good their escape. At 0900, Bristol's lookouts spotted the smoke from the Austro-Hungarian cruisers to the south of her position. The Allied ships turned to engage the Austro-Hungarian ships. The British ships had both a superiority in numbers and in firepower. Dartmouth was armed with eight 6 inch guns and Bristol had two 6 inch and ten 4 inch, compared to the nine 3.9 inch guns on each of the Austro-Hungarian ships. Unfortunately for the Allies, their numerical superiority was quickly lost, as their destroyers were either occupied with mechanical problems, or protecting those destroyers suffering from breakdowns. The support forces of both sides—the Sankt Georg group for the Austro-Hungarians, and the Marsala group for the Allies—were quickly dispatched to the battle. Dartmouth, faster than Bristol, closed to effective engagement range with the Austro-Hungarian ships and opened fire. A shell from Dartmouth struck Novara, at which point the Austro-Hungarian ships laid a smoke screen in order to close the distance. Dartmouth was struck several times and by 1100, Acton ordered the ship to reduce speed to allow Bristol to catch up. Novara was hit several more times and her main feed pumps and starboard auxiliary steam pipe had been damaged, which caused the ship to begin losing speed. At 1105, Acton turned away in an attempt to separate Saida from Novara and Helgoland. At this point, Sankt Georg was approaching the scene, which prompted Acton to temporarily withdraw to consolidate his forces. This break in the action was enough time for the Austro-Hungarians to save the crippled Novara. Saida took the ship under tow while Helgoland covered them. Unaware that Novara had been disabled, and fearing that his ships would be drawn too close to the Austrian naval base at Cattaro, Acton broke off the pursuit. The destroyer Acerbi misread the signal, and attempted to launch a torpedo attack, but was driven off by the combined fire of the Novara, Saida, and Helgoland. At 1205, Acton realized the dire situation Novara was in, but by this time, the Sankt Georg group was too close. The Sankt Georg group rendezvoused with Novara, Saida, and Helgoland, and Csepel and Balaton reached the scene as well. The entire group returned to Cattaro together. At 1330, the submarine UC-25 torpedoed Dartmouth, causing serious damage. The escorting destroyers forced UC-25 from the area, but Dartmouth had to be abandoned for a period of time, before it could be towed back to port. The French destroyer Boutefeu attempted to pursue the German submarine, but struck a mine laid by UC-25 that morning and sank rapidly.

Aftermath

As a result of the raid, it was decided by the British naval command that unless sufficient destroyers were available to protect the barrage, the drifters would have to be withdrawn at night. The drifters would only be operating for less than twelve hours a day and would have to leave their positions by 1500 every day. Despite the damage received by the Austro-Hungarian cruisers during the pursuit by Dartmouth and Bristol, the Austro-Hungarian forces inflicted more serious casualties on the Allied blockade. In addition to the sunk and damaged drifters, the cruiser Dartmouth was nearly sunk by the German submarine UC-25, the French destroyer Boutefeu was mined and sunk, and a munitions convoy to Valona was interdicted. However, in a strategic sense, the battle had little impact on the war. The barrage was never particularly effective at preventing the U-boat operations of Germany and Austria-Hungary in the first place. The drifters could cover approximately 5 miles apiece of the 40 miles wide Strait, only slightly more than ½ of which was covered. The raid risked some of the most advanced units of the Austro-Hungarian fleet on an operation that offered minimal strategic returns

19th February 1918 U-Boat Index - WW1  KUK U-41 Austrian Submarine.

Type U-27 Shipyard Ordered Launched 11th November 1917 Commissioned 19th February 1918

Commanders
19 Feb 1918 - 31 Oct 1918 Edgar Wolf

Career
No flotilla information available

Successes 1 ship sunk with a total of 4,604 tons.
13 Sep 1918 k.u.k. U41 Edgar Wolf Amiral Charner 4,604 fr

Fate Scrapped in 1920

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