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HMS Nigeria in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

HMS Nigeria



   

HMS Nigeria (pennant number 60) was a Crown Colony-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy completed early in World War II and served throughout that conflict. She was named for the (then) British territory of Nigeria.

Nigeria served in Home waters and off the Scandinavian coast for the early part of the war. On 28 June 1941 Nigeria, in company with HMS Bedouin, HMS Tartar and HMS Jupiter intercepted the German weather ship Lauenburg in thick fog north-east of Jan Mayen Island. The German ship was detected through the use of HF/DF. The crew of the Lauenburg abandoned ship after they were fired upon, allowing the British to board her. Valuable codebooks and parts of the Enigma machine were found aboard and recovered. This was one of the earliest captures of Enigma material of the war, and came a few weeks after HMS Bulldog had captured the first complete Enigma machine from the German submarine U-110 on 9 May 1941.

In July 1941, Nigeria became the flagship of Force K, commanded by Rear Admiral Philip Vian. During this period, Force K made two expeditions to Spitsbergen (Norwegian territory), the first to ascertain the situation and the second, in September, to escort a troopship, Empress of Australia,[1] with Canadian troops and a team of demolition experts (see Operation Gauntlet). Their task was to evacuate Norwegian and Soviet personnel from the archipelago and destroy coalmines and fuel stocks that might be of use to the enemy. Bear Island was also visited to destroy a German weather station. The two cruisers of the task force, Nigeria and HMS Aurora diverted to intercept a German convoy. During this action, Nigeria sank the German training ship Bremse, but suffered serious damage to her bow, possibly having detonated a mine. On return to Britain, she was sent to Newcastle for repairs.

The Mediterranean and Far East

Nigeria was then assigned to operate in the Mediterranean. On 12 August 1942 she was participating in Operation Pedestal, escorting a convoy bound for Malta. She was the flagship of the close escort group, commanded by Admiral Harold Burrough. Nigeria was torpedoed and damaged by the Italian submarine Axum but managed to make it back to Gibraltar escorted by three destroyers. Admiral Burrough meanwhile transferred his flag to the destroyer HMS Ashanti whilst Nigeria returned to Gibraltar. p> She was sent from there to the United States for repairs, which took nine months to complete. After these were complete, she operated off the South African coast, and on 12 March 1943 she picked up 30 survivors from the American merchant James B. Stephens that was torpedoed and sunk on 8 March 1943 by the German submarine U-160 about 150 nautical miles (280 km) north-east of Durban. Nigeria was then assigned to operate with the Eastern Fleet from February 1944 until December 1945, when she returned to the UK to be refitted. During her time in the far east, she participated in raids on Sumatra.

Nigeria survived the war and continued in service with the Royal Navy until 29 August 1957 when she was sold to the Indian Navy, who renamed her Mysore. During her time with the Indian Navy, she collided with the destroyer HMS Hogue, severely damaging the Hogue's bow. Mysore was in service with them for a further 28 years until she was decommissioned on 20 August 1985.

 

   

HMS Nigeria
HMS Nigeria

HMS Nigeria 1942.

The crew chipping the ice of the superstructure to prevent capsizing.

The crew chipping the ice of the superstructure to prevent capsizing. Early in 1942 just before the Malta Convoy on PQ16 to Archangel in Northern Russia.

HMS Nigeria near Archangel

HMS Nigeria near Archangel.

HMS Nigeria near Archangel

HMS Nigeria near Archangel.

Catapult

A Walrus seaplane



 

2nd Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria sails from the Clyde  HMS Nigeria sailed from the Clyde 2 August 1942 in company with a large number of other ships.

2nd Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria sails from the Clyde

9th Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria joins convoy  HMS Nigeria arrived off Gibraltar on the 9th of August 1942 to join the escort to convoy WS21S, designated Operation Pedestal. The convoy consisted of 14 ships bound for Malta, escorted by 2 battleships, 3 cruisers and various destroyers, with other forces (aircraft carriers mainly) providing distant support.

9th Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria joins convoy

10th Aug 1942 Convoy WS21S passes through straights of Gibraltar

11th Aug 1942 HMS Eagle lost  In the Mediterranean Convoy WS21S (Operation Pedestal), is located by the Italians and came under sustained and heavy attacks after that. Aircraft Carrier HMS Eagle is sunk 70 miles south of Cape Salinas, Majorca, by four torpedoes from the German U-73 (Kptlt. Helmut Rosenbaum) of her crew of 1,087 a total of 160 perished, two officers and 158 ratings.

11th Aug 1942 HMS Eagle lost

12th Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria, HMS Cairo and tanker Ohio damaged  During the 12th of August, air attacks and submarine attacks caused damage and numerous casualties to Convoy WS21S. At sunset the Italian submarine Axum successfully penetrated the defence screen and fired a torpedo salvo which made two hits on cruiser Cairo, one on Nigeria and one on tanker Ohio. Position was then 37.40N 10.06E Nigeria turned back to Gibraltar. After temporary repairs at Gibraltar, she went to Charleston Dockyard, South Carolina, USA, where she stayed for about 9 months. The crew were put up in barracks for 4-5 months, they were then sent to New York to pick up a Merchant vessel to take back to Scotland.

12th Aug 1942 HMS Nigeria, HMS Cairo and tanker Ohio damaged


If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Those known to have sailed in

HMS Nigeria

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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Able Seaman. Ernest Fox HMS Nigeria (d.12th Aug 1942)

My grandad, Ernest Fox, died before my Dad was born so he never got to see what he looked like or meet him, we had a pic sent to us with a memorial plaque with his name on from some memorial but it doesnt say where the memorial is. Does anyone have a picture of him?

His uncle Frank Fox was a petty officer but not we are sure which ship he served on.

Editors Note: Ernest's name is on the Chatham Naval Memorial which overlooks the town of Chatham in Kent.

Lisa Thomas



Able Seaman Alex Biggam HMS Nigeria

Alex Biggam whilst training at HMS Collingwood

My father Alex Biggam served on HMS Nigeria as an able seaman. He would not talk much about his time during the war but did tell me of the extreme cold of the Russian convoy. He was also on the Malta convoy when the ship was hit by a torpedo. The ship was sent to Charleston, South Carolina for repair. He would talk about his time there and how well the Americans treated the crew and the interest they had shown about the war.

Thank you, this is a very informative site.

Gil Biggam



Richard Pollard HMS Nigeria

I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    R G Stocker HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    Geordie Burns HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    R J Harris HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    G Kent HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    P Rayment HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    W Wheatley HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    D Chapman HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    H J Fisher HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    D P Sweeney HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    A Whitehead HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    H Locklear HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    Blimp Palmer HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A ?? Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    G Kent HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    J Arnold HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    A Chapman HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    J "Jock" Robertson HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    R E Fisher HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    D Mercer HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    R E Riley HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    W L Gilbert HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    Bo'sun 1st Class F J Fulcher HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    D Hughes HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    G L Bowers HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    E Ticehurst HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    F C Welch HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    G W Downes HMS Nigeria

    I have a photo of H.M.S. Nigeria with lots of signatures on the back. It says Torpedo Division 1945 and is dated 19th September 1945.

    The names are:

  • R G Stocker
  • Geordie Burns
  • Ronald J Harris
  • G Kent
  • P Rayment
  • W Wheatley
  • D Chapman
  • H J Fisher
  • D P Sweeney
  • A Whithead
  • H Lockear
  • Blimp Palmer
  • G. Kent
  • J Arnold ~(Sussex)
  • A Chapman
  • James Robertson(Jock)
  • R E Fisher
  • D Mercer
  • R E Riley
  • W L Gilbert
  • F J Fulcher (Wind Bo'sun 1st class)
  • D Hughes TGM
  • G L Bowers
  • E Ticehurst
  • F C Welch
  • G W Downes

  • Jo Russell



    Derek Dicks HMS Nigeria

    My father Derek Dicks served on HMS Nigeria from 1942-1945, he would like contact with anybody or information about this time on board. Please contact me and I will forward any information.

    Steve Dicks



    Kenneth Thomas Bradshaw HMS Nigeria

    Mark Bradshaw



    Able Seaman Leslie "Tug" Wilson Gunlayer HMS Nigeria

    Les Wilson (my late father) was in the Royal Navy from 1940 - 46 and served on convoys to Murmansk and Malta. I can remember his stories of The Gut, Trincomalee and Kandy. Before Nigeria he served on defensively equipped merchant ships. His captain on the Silverthorn was actually a German, granted asylum because he was Jewish. My father's older brother Walter (also known as Tug by shipmates but nicknamed Choy in civvy street) was a Petty Officer on HMS Trumpeter. Another brother, Frank, was accidentally shot down by trainee Spitfire pilots while towing a target drogue .

    Mike Wilson



    Ldg Tpdmn Reginald Harry Summers HMS Nigeria

    Reginald Summers served on board HMS Nigeria from 1941 to 1945. He served during Operation Pedestal as a torpedo operator. He also went to Charleston, South Carolina where he had an appendix operation. He would like to hear from anyone who served with him on board Nigeria

    Michael Fleetwood



    Able Seaman Alfred Price Rouse HMS Nigeria (d.11th March 1942)

    I see a second cousin of mine, Able Seaman Alfred Price Rogers, from Liverpool, listed as one of those who died on this fascinating historical ship, HMS Nigeria. Known as Alfie to his mates, he apparently fell from the ship’s crane while loading or unloading goods in very icy conditions at Archangel and fell 40 feet into the Nigeria’s cargo hold. He died on March 11, 1942, aged 32, and is buried at the Lyness Naval Cemetery on the island of Hoy. Alfie was already a regular in the Royal Navy at the outbreak of war, and he had four half brothers also named Rogers who also served in the navy in WW2. One, Frederick A Gordon Rogers, known as Gordon - a stoker - was one of the few who survived the sinking of Mountbatten’s flagship, HMS Kelly, and his story opens the book of that name. Another, Douglas, was killed in the steamship Rohna in November 1943. The third, Able Seaman Leslie Rogers, served on the Icelandic run and is believed to have settled in Iceland after the war while the fourth, Able Seaman Harold Rogers, emigrated post war to Sydney, Australia, working as a security officer for an oil company. I would be delighted to hear from any of the Rogers brothers or their descendents.

    Stephen Paterson



    Stoker 2nd Class. Linton Selfridge HMS Nigeria

    My Grandad, Linton Selfridge, and his best friend Jonny Freeman served on the HMS Nigeria during the duration of WWII as 2nd Class Stokers. Unfortunately, he died when I was 2 so I do not remember him. He originally was from Port Glasgow but later moved to Coleraine, N.Ireland, and that's where he met Jonny Freeman. I would love to find out if his, or their names have come up on anybody elses research, especially any photos or tales including them.

    Francis Darby



    CPO Stoker. John Walter "Wally" Stevens HMS Nigeria

    My father, Wally Stephens served on HMS Nigeria (I believe he was on Arethusa before that). We know that he went in as Ordinary Seaman and came out Chief Petty Officer (Stoker). He rarely spoke of the war but did mention a couple of funny things like getting so drunk (on board) ending up on the poop deck with no recollection of how they got there. One time they were in the Med and were told they were going for a swim - one chap dived in before order given and he was put on jankers for 'jumping ship'.

    It was only a couple of years before his death in 1994 that he told us of the story of being torpedoed and having to go to Charleston for repairs and the Captain asking for volunteers to help the shipmates who had perished during that terrible time. They worked 12 hour shifts and lived on a tumbler of whisky and not much else until the grim task was completed. We now knew the reason he hated the smell of whisky.

    I would love to hear from others who knew or knew of my father.

    B Spry



    Musician Peter Keld HMS Nigeria (d.26th Oct 1914)

    My granddad, Peter Keld, served as a Royal Marine Musician on the Nigeria, joining her during her refit in Charleston and only leaving after the war for service with various aircraft carriers (including the Eagle, Ocean and Implacable), before leaving the Navy in 1954.

    Andrew



    PO. William Kennedy HMS Nigeria

    My grandad served on Nigeria and Albrighton during WW2, his name was William Kennedy and I know that he was involved with signals and was a petty officer. He didn't really share much of his experiences with me as I was probably too young at the time. I know he was torpedoed twice and was also invloved in the Anzio landings. I have recently read with huge interest Jack Edwards "Twenty-Two Hundred Days To Pulo We" and recommend it to anyone else interested in HMS Nigeria during WW2. If anyone can help me by sharing info on links, websites, or anything else that would help me track down a record of my Grandads history in the Navy then I would be most grateful.

    Duncan Kennedy



    L/Sig. William Norman HMS Nigeria

    My sisters, Margaret and Elizabeth and I spent our childhoods during World War 2 in a small village in the hills behind Perth and the port of Fremantle in Western Australia. My cousin Edna, and mother Ethleen billeted crew members from British ships when they called at Fremantle. Among the ships that called were HMS Kenya - and, memorably, HMS Nigeria.

    I was 9 years of age, Maggie was 7 and Liz was 4. Commander Oliver was first billeted with us in our big airy house on the hills above Darlington. We have fond memories of him - my sisters remember seating this senior serviceman on the floor of their playroom and dressing him in their play-clothes! Then came Bill. We have never forgotten him. He became an embedded part of our memories of our childhood. We were deeply fond of 'our sailor Bill' Nigeria was in port for 3 weeks I think and Bill stayed for about a week. Mum and Dad served him breakfast in bed. We roamed our orchard picking fruit from the trees. We went for long walks in the hills - I remember taking him on one of my 'secret' tracks to see what I regarded as my own discovery of a glade of rare spider orchids. We knew that he enjoyed the dances held in the tiny local hall when all his shipmates from the billets in the districts had a chance to meeti some of the local girls - and, I imagine a doughty cohort of watchful local matrons as well!. The Japanese war was threatening Australia at the time - Darwin had already been bombed among some 15 air raids in the north-west - but our childhood focus was very much on England, and Bill in his smart uniform represented everything heroic we imagined of the Empire, though I am sure he would not have regarded himself as a hero.

    Many years later I realized he was only 18 at the time - a boy himself, swept up into the maw of that dreadful war. In a letter to my Mother (Ethleen) and Father (Ted), after leaving Fremantle, he called us 'my three children'. I am now 74 and If Bill is alive he would now be about 83 years of age. We only know he came from Kings Lynn in Norfolk.

    This request is inspired by the fact that 60 years on, my great niece and god-daughter is in a primary school in rural Oxfordshire and I have been asked to provide a few memories of a childhood in Australia during WWII. I would be a wonderful convergence of time and fate if someone among your membership remembered 'our Bill' and could direct us to him or his descendants. Whatever happens - or doesn't happen as a result of this request, please accept it as a modest but heartfelt tribute to a fine young man and to his years of service for his country.

    Storry Walton



    Cpl. William Croft HMS Nigeria

    My father-in-law, William Croft, was a Royal Marine Band Corporal aboard the HMS Nigeria. He married Marjorie Pauline Viviers in the Dutch Reformed Church in Simonstown, South Africa on 31 May 1947. We have a cutting of the article which appeared in the local newspaper. If anybody has any recollection or memories of him, we would be very happy to hear from them.

    Gail Croft



    Mst at Arms. William John Woodfine HMS Nigeria

    I just inherited my Grandfather's Royal Navy record and have discovered he, William Woodfine served as Master at Arms aboard HMS Nigeria Aug '43 Dec '45 not much more known at present but am just beginning my research.

    Graham Woodfine



    MA. William Barritt HMS Nigeria

    My father, Bill Barritt served on HMS Nigeria, I would like to know if there is anyone out there who remembers him?

    Alan Barritt



    Lt. David Brand DSC HMS Nigeria

    My father, Lieutenant David Brand, served in the Royal Navy during WWII on HMS Nigeria and was in Combined Operations Pilotage Party COPP's Middle East (ME) 1. He did not speak about his time during the war but as usual stories leaked out about some of his adventures.

    In March 1943 he was part of a 15 man team doing sea reconnaissance. While on a "Sicily" mission David and Lieutenant Robert Smith, the expedition leader surveyed the Gela area on the south west coast. Due to a storm on completion of their mission, they missed the rendezvous with their carrier, the Royal Navy submarine P44 United. To avoid risk of capture they made an epic 75 mile trip back from Gela to their Malta base at Valetta in heavy seas and with just one paddle. After 40 hours of paddling and bailing water every few minutes from their open canoe they eventually made it back, exhausted. Brand and Smith were awarded the DSC for their courage but overall the operation was not a success. Of the 15 men that set out, 5 were captured, 5 were lost and only 5 returned to base.

    Kerr Brand



    Robert Ernest Steadman HMS Nigeria

    My father, Robert Ernest Steadman, who was a Royal Marine on HMS Nigeria, during the WW2. I am not sure how long he was on there. I do know that he was on there and after the war, as I have got pictures of him in Malta and South Africa. I have several pictures of him with other Marines and sailors. I have one large picture of the ship's crew. They seem to be in the Mediterranean, only because they are all in their whites.

    It seems strange. I have gone through the crew list but there are no references to my father, or any other Royal Marines on board, but from the pictures I have he definitely was there and I remember him talking about the ship. But like most men during war, he did not talk much about it. He did talk about the other Marines because they were his friends. Unfortunately, I cannot remember much about it now, so if anybody out there remembers my father, please get in touch.

    Robert Edward steadman



    Bandsman William Croft HMS Nigeria

    My father, William Croft, served on board HMS Nigeria as a Royal Marine Bandsman. He served during the Russian convoys and was still on board as a Band Corporal during the ship’s visit to Simonstown in 1947.

    I would like to get in touch with anyone who might have known him.

    Paul Croft



    P.O. Alfred J Perry HMS Nigeria (d.12th Aug 1942)

    My Grandfather, Petty Officer Alfred J Perry, served on the HMS Nigeria during 'Operation Pedestal'. He was killed on the 12th August 1942 after the Nigeria had been torpedoed by the Axum. My Mum was 2 years old and never met her Father, she only had a couple of photographs.

    This site has been a trove of information, I look forward to reading more stories as they are added.

    James Edwards



    Basil Keith Deeley HMS Nigeria

    I joined HMS Nigeria shortly after her trials in Norfolk, Carolina. One of our first jobs on returning to the UK was to escort the Diadem cruiser to the breakers yard in Greenock from there we proceeded to Scapa Flow to join the home fleet or so we thought. I remember piping King George IV aboard. My other memory of Scapa was falling over the side while painting ship much to the pleasure of some of the ship's company. Fortunately the water was quite calm but 250 feet seemed hell of long way in shoes and overalls. However a tot of rum and a few hours in the laundry room put that right.

    Settling down to what we thought a few cold weather convoys was soon dispelled by the issue of tropical kit. Soon we were heading east. My sea duties were the enviable captain's runner. Telegraphsman Helmsman WPO Edwards and I remember taking a message to Captain Paton and he enquired if I was afraid. I apprehensively replied trying to sound butch he gave me a cigarette and winked. Shortly on leaving action stations were sounded there were more depth charges sent over the stern than I care to remember. Shortly after that I was doing a spell in the crow's nest when spotted a mine this gave the bridge officer's gunnery practice. On through the Suez to Columbo and Trincomalee our base for the coming months. We took part shelling Subang Surabeya parts of Burma were we lost Lt Irvine of the Marine Contingent. We heard he stepped on a mine. A great fitness fanatic Marine Bell was another great guy. I could say more but space is limited like our good times in South Africa and Western Australia - that's another story!

    B.K. Deeley



    AB. Hugh Montgomery Crozier HMS Nigeria

    I just want to say that I recognise all the stories and photos about the HMS Nigeria as My dad, Hugh Crozier served on the Nigeria with them, they were mostly boys really and I am very proud of them.

    Juliana McNamee



    Stoker Sydney Lacey HMS Nigeria

    While on HMS Nigeria it went for repairs in the USA and my dad, Syd Lacey must have attended this dance - see photos.

    Bob Lacy



    Eric Wilfrid Brown HMS Nigeria

    Eric Brown worked for my company as a freelancer from 1999 intil recently. Sadly he passed away suddenly in late November. I did not know unil the funeral that he had served on the ship (in fact he had never disclosed his real age or mentioned his wartime service!) and I would love to know if anyone remembers him. Apparently he was at Cambridge University and did not have to serve but volunteered anyway - I believe in some capacity in Gunnery. Eric was a real gentleman and incredibly courteous. He is sadly missed by us all. He was working until the end and had an enviable social life!!

    Ian Grey



    CPO Stanley John "Woody" Woodruff HMS Nigeria

    Stan Woodruff

    Stanley John Woodruff CPO Stoker. Father of John, Colin & Malcolm, married to Thurza and known to his Navy pals as Woody he joined the Reserves in 1936 at HMS President then on to the RN in Sept 1936 serving his earlier time on the ships: HMS Walpole, HMS Ramilies and his first commission in HMS Arethusa in 1937 in Middle East, Malta and later taking Spanish refugees in the Franco war to France.

    He joined the Nigeria patrolling the Denmark straights until the Russians entered the war when the Nigeria carried out Convoy duties usually to Murmansk, one after the other and in his own words in utter misery every time. Temperatures in excess of minus 51 deg of frost were recorded. Sailing deep into the article circle the Nigeria was involved in evacuating Spitsbergen escorting the Norwegian's to Scotland on the Empress of Australia and taking Russians to Archangel. Involved as others have said in the PQ17 Convoy in 1942 where many were lost, the Lofoten raid in March 1941 and the ramming of the German ship in September 1941. his recall of this action was that it followed picking up two Norwegian's in a fiord. The Nigeria had its bow repaired in Newcastle before being sent back to the convoys allowing dad a short time to see new son John. Staying in Scotland for a while the Nigeria witnessed merchant vessels being readied for what turned out to be the Malta Convoy (operation Pedestal) August 1942 where the Nigeria was torpedoed losing 61men limping back to Gibraltar for repairs before being sent to Charleston USA for major repair.

    Dad was then transferred to the Virago a destroyer which went straight back up to Russia again and on Boxing day started chasing the German battlecruiser Scharnhorst, the Virago was in the final torpedo action to destroy her. following this trip he was transferred again to another destroyer (name not known) and back up again to Russia before being brought back to Liverpool before Escorting the Queen Mary and other Liners along the Western Approaches. Finally as the war was coming to a close the ship was sent to Singapore where they collected Japanese prisoners of war from different islands around Java, Bali etc returning to Chatham after showing face around Indonesia for awhile.

    The above is a précis of dads own words he had many friends during his time in the Navy and would have dearly loved to read the accounts on this web site. He stayed in touch with his Pal Ted Caldwell until his passing . Photo’ s exist of his friends Fred, Sharky, Bob, Dick & Syd. The USSR 40th Gold Star anniversary Medal was awarded to him by the Russians.

    Colin woodruff



    Andrew Ewing HMS Nigeria

    My Father, Andy Ewing, served in HMS Nigeria throughout the war as an RDF operator, and conducted the operations described in the record on the site. I was intrigued to find reference to him by name and would be delighted to hear from or add to the records of any other surviving veterans or relatives.

    Sadly, Dad took his photographic records from their time in Charleston to Charleston when he visited me in the USA. He struck up conversation with an individual while visiting the city who asked to make copies of the photographs for the Maritime Museum. A trusting soul, my father gave the photos to the individual who promised to meet him the following day. The result was inevitable, we never saw the photos again. They may be on show in the city somewhere but despite the efforts of the local Naval Association they have not been found. They depicted the ships company in and around the city and there were some excellent shots of her arriving and departing taken from the now dismantled Charleston Bridge, as well as those of Arctic Icing and Mediterranean operations. On a lighter note I know he would be pleased to see this record made by individuals and relatives and would have known many. and I am sure he would have much to add.

    I have a precious copy of the HMS Nigeria magazine, dated 1946, edited by J W Aubrey, with sketches by Able Seaman John Smith and contributions (post VJ Day) from Reverend Anderson Nichol, the Church of Scotland Chaplain. The booklet contains photographs of the ship and the company which may be of interest to many. The Foreword is written by Captain H A King at the end of her commission in 1946 (I think). The 63 pages provide a topical record of the ship her characters and actions. The final page records the names of all those who lost there lives and will never be forgotten.

    My father was proud of his association with the ship and the Royal Navy. If anyone would be able to preserve these mementos I would be delighted to hear from them.

    David Ewing



    C.Stkr. John Henry Walton HMS Nigeria

    Both my father, John Henry Walton and his brother Stanley Walton, served on the HMS Nigeria. Although this was not allowed. My uncle Stanley Walton had lied about his age and about his family connection. When this was discovered they both had to see the Captain, who after much consideration allowed them to continue serving together, as my father was a stoker therefore working in the bowels of the ship, and my uncle was a signalman, therefore working on deck, so the Captain decided that it was less likely that both would be killed at the same time! My father served from 1939 right until 1946 on the same ship, spending 9 months in America whilst the ship was being refitted, following Operation Pedestal. My Uncle joined after the ship returned from America. Sadly, their time in the far East, caused a mole on my uncle's face to react to the strong sunlight, and he died of melanoma in 1956, at the age of just 25 years. My father lived until age 70 but rarely talked of his experiences during the war. We heard a lot about his time in America, and for may years received parcels from the family with whom he had stayed. I have learned so much from Jack Edward's book, and now from the research on the internet. What brave men they all were.

    Geraldine Kenny



    LdgSea. Charles Edward Jones HMS Nigeria

    My Dad, Chas Jones, served aboard Nigeria throughout much of WW2 seeing action as an AA Gunner (PomPoms) in the North Atlantic, on the Russian convoys and on Operation Pedestal. He was still serving aboard her throughout her repair stay in the USA and later in the war when the ship served in the Pacific. His best pal (Oppo) also served aboard Nigeria. His name was Ken Hole and when I was born in 1951, Ken accepted the role of my Godfather. Mum and Dad brought us to New Zealand in 1957 where I ultimately joined the RNZNVR and then became a Sea cadet Corps Officer, Commanding my own Unit during the 1990s. In 1997 I visited the UK with four teenage Sea Cadets and had an opportunity to meet my Godfather, Ken, sadly though just a few years before he passed away. I'm sure he and my Dad are still happily reminiscing about their wartime exploits. My daughter Adrianne, one of the four Cadets in my group on the UK visit later joined the RNZN as a medic before leaving to marry and start her own family.

    I have very fond memories of sitting with my Dad and hearing about his time aboard Niferia and I'll never forget the regrettably little time I spent with Ken not long before his death. I'd love to hear from anyone who remembers my Dad or Ken.




    Ldg.Sea. Norman Greenhouse HMS Nigeria

    Norman Greenhouse served on HMS Havock at Narvik and then in the Mediterranean and took part in the Battles of Cape Spada and Matapan. Later was on HMS Resource from 25 July 1941 to 16 April 1942. His record shows that he joined HMS Nigeria on 11 June 1944 until 21 May 1945; I believe it was during this time that he earned his Burma Star.

    He was stationed back at HMS Pembroke on 22 May 1945 and spent the last months of his naval career on HMS Solebay, which, I believe made goodwill visits around Britain. He was transferred to Reserve service 7 December 1946 and remained on reserve until 1953.

    Norman later served more than 20 years with the National Fire Service, and later was Chief Fire Officer at the Royal Festival Hall until his retirement.

    Pat Whitter



    Able.Sea. Hugh Montgomerie Crozier HMS Nigeria

    Hugh Montgomerie Crozier enlisted in the Royal Navy and served on board HMS Nigeria.

    Juliana McNamee



    AB. Peter Collis HMS Nigeria

    My Grandfather was an able seaman on HMS Nigeria. His name was Peter Collis. I know he served during the Malta and Russian convoys. If anyone can remember him, we would be very happy to hear from you.

    Julie Ballard



    William Burrows HMS Nigeria

    My father Bill Burrows served on HMS Nigeria from 3rd September 1940 to 16th January 1943. He died in Canada in 1992 and spoke very little about his experiences.

    Bill Burrows



    PO. Arthur Henry Baker HMS Nigeria

    My father Arthur Henry Baker served on the Nigeria and was on board when the torpedo struck. He was Petty Officer and took the ship to the USA for refitting. I am sure he would have been fascinated by this page, but unfortunately he passed away recently.

    Mark Baker



    Capt. John George Lawrence Dundas MID HMS Nigeria

    I was thrilled to see the accounts and pictures of the HMS Nigeria. My father, Captain John G. L. Dundas, born on 3rd November 1893 in London, from 18th June 1940 was first commander of the Nigeria. At that time she was Admiral Philip Vian's flagship taking supplies to the Russians between 1941 and the summer of 1942. I assume that some of the photos of the ship covered with ice must have been from that time. As far as I know, she was doing convoy duty to Archangel and Murmansk.

    The story we were told was that one night in the fog in late summer of 1941 she ran into another vessel, assumed German, and since the fog fortunately held, was able to limp back into South Shields where she spent about three months in dry dock having her bow repaired. It was a special time for us because we were living in Scotland up in the Ochil Hills and my father was able to be home on leave. We were also in South Shields with him during air raids soon before Christmas 1941. Presumably the Germans were trying to get the Nigeria.

    My father remained on the Nigeria until 28th June 1942. That summer, probably just before Nigeria went into the Mediterranean, my father was sent to Alexandria as the Admiral's Chief of Staff, and he moved to Algiers in the same position in 1943.

    He retired as a Vice-Admiral in the late 1940s, and died in 1952, so I am always glad to hear about him. I had always understood that the Nigeria was sunk in the South Pacific before the end of the war, and would be glad to hear about the truth of that.

    Elgiva



    Leo Nolan HMS Nigeria

    Leo Nolan was part of the first crew of the Nigeria in May 1940 and was still on the vessel when it was damaged in the Mediterranean in 1942 and went to Charleston South Carolina. Leo joined the Kilmarnock in 1943. Prior to the war he was on the Sheffield and Sussex and a ship called the Emerald from 1936-1938. Leo was born in Motherwell Scotland and after the war immigrated to Australia.

    Jim Nolan



    PO. Joseph Evans Price HMS Nigeria

    My grandfather, Joseph Evans Price, served as a Petty Officer on HMS Nigeria during WW2. Sadly he passed away in 1992. When I was younger he told me about some of the operations the ship under took during the war. I would be most interested in locating anybody that knew my grandfather or has any more information.

    Mark Jones



    Alfred Longbottom HMS Nigeria

    I wasn't 'called up' for War Service but I volunteered for the Royal Navy and was accepted. I joined HMS Wellesley at Liverpool for training; this was very near to Gladstone Dock. At that time there was heavy bombing of Liverpool on a regular daily basis. Around 4 p.m. each day, German Aircraft came in, flying across North Wales. Some of the streets were littered with shrapnel, which 'crunched' under your shoes as you walked, and many streets were cordoned off with notices such as 'unexploded bomb' or 'land mine'. If you took a couple of hours leave and crossed the Mersey by Ferry, you could be stranded on the wrong side of the river when the ferries were cancelled due to air raids. One weekend I went home on leave to Halifax and shortly after I arrived there was a dull 'thud' in the distance. I told my parents, "That's a bomb!" They said, "No, not in Halifax - you've seen so much in Liverpool you're 'bomb - happy." The next day the local paper reported bomb damage to several properties in the town, and some casualties. I've never known if this was caused by enemy aircraft, or by the R.A.F. in error."

    Alfred Longbottom of Halifax in West Yorkshire spent the Second World War years in the Royal Navy and three years on Russian and Malta Convoys as a decoder aboard the Colony Class Cruiser HMS Nigeria with a complement of 750 men. The Convoys carrying arms and ammunition, tanks and planes were vital to the allied war effort. The ships were prime targets for German aircraft and submarines, and were continuously under attack from air and sea as they battled their way to Murmansk and Archangel with their armoured escorts. Alfred said, "Escorting those convoys was sheer murder. We were continually under attack, even after we docked at Murmansk. It was only 50 miles away from German-occupied Norway." "Sometimes the temperatures fell to minus 40 degrees C. We were given sheepskin hoods and clothing by the Russians but they didn't keep the cold out. There was no heating on board and ice formed on the inside of the cabins...we couldn't win either way - when it melted everything got soaked. The days were long and exhausting." Alfred remembers the PQ17 Convoy of 36 ships out of Scapa Flow in 1942 when only six arrived in Russia. In Russia the sailors saw very little of the people, except for the queues outside the bread shops and Red Army patrols. "We used to exchange bars of chocolate with them for the Red Army badges. Russia looked a very poverty-stricken country", he remembers. A Pedestal Convoy to Malta was so battered it was estimated so many ships were sunk on approach to the island there were 2000 men in the water at any given period. During a particular Dog-watch Alfred says of his own ship, "It was 7.58 pm and Charlie, his friend, was almost due to relieve George who was on watch. But George rang to say he was feeling groggy and could Charlie relieve him straight away. No sooner had Charlie relieved George and he came up top - a torpedo struck and Charlie was killed. George soon felt better and was fine, but Charlie's death preyed on his mind and caused him a lot of trouble. I would have been Charlie's best man at his wedding next leave. I still have the letter I received from Charlie's fiancée."

    The Iceberg

    "The Navy were trying to locate a German Station providing weather and movement of shipping news to their own ships and submarines. I was on HMS Nigeria (a colony cruiser), and before getting under weigh we had a good idea of the general area in which the Weather Ship would be found but, immediately before the incident, it is most likely we simply 'came across' her. We were not at Action Stations, always triggered off by radar contact and often the result of locating floating debris, empty lifeboats and even whales! I was on deck as HMS Nigeria sailed into proximity to a large iceberg when I first saw an orange glow in the 'iceberg', followed by splashes of water in the sea near the stern of Nigeria. Almost with disbelief, I realised the iceberg had opened fire on us with enormously heavy guns, the splashes so clearly disturbing a perfectly calm sea - like a sheet of glass. At this point I could not see a ship. It was covered from stem to stern in white canvas. Together with our two destroyer escort we had located the German Weather Ship Lauenberg and it was June 1941. (Alfred only recently discovered that on the day a copy of the Enigma Code was taken from the Lauenberg by the boarding party from the destroyers. It was not the job of Nigeria to stop or to take prisoners.) Scuttling-charges sent the Lauenberg to the bottom. I well recall seeing two lifeboats packed with her crew being rowed away from their ship to the destroyer HMS Bedouin and internment."

    "On the 12th August, 1942, I was on the sloping deck of a torpedoed ship, and in what appeared to be a hopeless situation. Everything was out of action - the guns, radar, radio, steering, - all gone. Flames were leaping out of one of the funnels, with the diesel on fire. Down below, fifty officers and men had perished, and others were wounded - some mentally. Stationery, we were a sitting target for a further attack. Privately, I said 'good - bye' to my mother and father and my brothers, as I was absolutely convinced that I would never see them again. As a final act, our code books and other secret machines were put into sacks weighted with lead, and sent to the bottom of the Mediterranean. Suddenly there appeared on the horizon a group of Italian torpedo bombers which were flying straight towards us - their huge torpedoes clearly glistening in the evening sunshine. They flew straight through the destroyer screen, directly towards us. At this point, there was a loud cry from the Chief Yeoman high up on the bridge - 'For what we are about to receive ....', and immediately my thoughts went back to the little village where I used to live and the vicar saying those words before a meal at local events. With massive damage amidships, we could hear water rushing into the HMS Nigeria. Down by the bow, and with the stern rising, she was in danger of going down. Admiral Burrough left the ship to continue the mission in the destroyer HMS Ashanti. As the torpedo bombers got nearer, the Chaplain led a group of men in reciting the Lord's Prayer - there was nothing else we could do. A three-badge 'Stripey' next to me said, 'Keep your feet dry laddie as long as you can', (I was only 21)".

    "Now the end was surely near as the Italian aircraft dropped their several torpedoes on to the water. We watched, with bated breath. Incredibly, every torpedo missed us, nor (I believe) did they strike any other ships in the convoy. This was so remarkable since we were a motionless target, simply waiting for the end. A few hours later, I felt a sudden vibration under my feet which reverberated throughout the ship. Engines were running! None of us could believe it but, and miraculously, some power was restored to the engines. This in itself was beyond our wildest dreams, and must have required tremendous skill and courage down below to bring it about. I believe some form of emergency steering was set up, and slowly we moved, escorted by destroyers, to start the long journey back to Gibraltar. On the way we survived another torpedo attack from a submarine but eventually reached 'Gib', and were able to bury, with full military honours, so many pals we had lost on just this one journey."

    Last Word from Alfred

    "These events had a profound effect on me - I'll admit to shedding a few tears as I wrote it! But I am not ashamed of this! I have never regretted being there. Most of the friends I made were killed. I think of them often - unfortunately almost every night when I have nightmares."

    In May 1941, HMS Nigeria escorted the 'pride of the Navy' - HMS Hood - out of Scapa Flow into the North Atlantic, and left her to return at full speed, to Scapa. Shortly after anchoring, the whole of the Navy, and indeed, the country, was 'rocked' by an Admiralty announcement that the Hood had been sunk in the Denmark Strait by the German Battleship Bismarck, with only three survivors out of a total of 95 officers and 1,323 ratings.

    Sometime later, a signal was received by Nigeria from Admiralty stating that Midshipman Dundas was one of the three survivors of Hood, and as this signal was read by the Captain of Nigeria, Captain Dundas, informing him that his own son was one who had survived. I was told that tears were streaming down his face. Homeward bound and just a couple of hours out of Murmansk, Nigeria encounted a submarine on the surface at a distance of several miles. She was proceeding slowly, and was immediately challenged and asked to give the necessary recognition signal. There was no response. Repeated attempts were made to gain contact with her, but it was all to no avail. So the order was given for "full speed ahead, stand by to ram submarine." As Nigeria got closer and closer, the Admiral (we were flagship of the 10th Cruiser Squadron) arrived on the Bridge and at the very last minute, ordered the Nigeria to take avoiding action. With probably only seconds to spare, we immediately altered course and left the scene. Later that day the Nigeria received the following signal from the Naval Officer in Charge, Murmansk, "Disabled Russian Submarine has arrived at Murmansk". No doubt a major international crisis had been averted!!

    On the 6th September 1941, to the East of North Cape, Norway, Nigeria met a German Convoy in very heavy weather and poor visibility. In the action which followed, the German Training Ship Bremse was sunk, but the two troopships she was escorting, reported to be carrying 1,500 troops, managed to make good their escape. Nigeria was badly damaged and her bow was ripped off. (One report was of torpedo damage, the other of having struck a submerged shipwreck.) As the forward part of the ship was not strong enough (although shored up by the shipwrights) to go "head on" into the waves, she sailed stern-first from North Cape to Scapa Flow, escorted by the Cruiser Auroa. On arrival on 10th. September, she was "cheered" as she sailed through columns of the whole Home Fleet which was assembled to welcome her back - a wonderful sight and a unique experience. As a result of this action, several medals were awarded to officers and men of Nigeria.

    Heavily damaged in the "Pedestal" Convoy to Malta of August, 1942, HMS Nigeria was temporarily 'patched up' in Gibraltar before sailing to Newcastle-upon-Tyne (our home port) for permanent repairs. We looked forward to some leave and many of the crew bought a bunch of bananas to take home, as they were almost impossible to get in the UK. As we headed north through the Bay of Biscay, we received a signal prefixed (O-U) which meant "Most Immediate" - the very highest degree for action. I myself decoded this message, which was exactly as follows:- To : Nigeria From Admiralty. (Most Immediate) owing to a dock strike at Newcastle, divert forthwith to Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A. Repeat Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A. So bang went all thoughts of home leave, and we had now to eat all our own bananas! A dock strike in War Time? Yes, it's true.

    Iceland - January 1944 to May, 1945

    For seventeen months, I was in Iceland assigned to working in the Radio Station of the Admiral in charge of Icelamd Command. The Naval Camp was just outside Reykjavik, and was known as H.M.S.BALDUR 2. The Radio Station was a short distance from the camp, and was manned by telegraphists, coders, and teleprinter operators who decoded messages on the Enigma machine which we called Typex.

    We were accomodated in Nissen Huts, and the only heating was from a small coke stove in the middle of the hut. Quite often, the water in the separate Nissen Hut, used as a washroom, would be frozen, and the only way to have a wash, or shave, was to put some snow, or ice, into a tin can on top of the coke stove. The weather in winter could be cruel, and it was sometimes impossible to breath when walking against a gale-force wind, so the answer was to walk backwards! We understood that anyone who served for nine months or more in Iceland could never be sent there again by the Navy, as strong winds could possibly affect the lungs. It was well known that any fractures could not be treated in Iceland, so a broken ankle meant an immediate return to the UK. For this reason alone, some would deliberately fall off a ladder, or break a finger!

    The weather in Spring and Summer could be beautiful. Sunday mornings saw Church Parades marching into Reykjavik for worship in the church there. When off duty, I was able to go skiing, or visit some of the hot springs and geysers, and magnificent waterfalls. Strange as it may seem, Iceland has an abundance of wild flowers of many varieties. The Icelandic people were very much anti-British. I believe they felt we had invaded their country. They would not sit next to you in the local Cinema, and as you walked in Reykjavik you could expect empty bottles to be aimed at you from the top of buildings. So we had little contact with the local population. After one year, I was granted 14 days home leave, and spent 4 days in travelling by sea and rail to Halifax, West Yorkshire, only to be greeted, on arrival, by a telegram ordering me to return immediately to Iceland! I found out that an invasion by German Paratroops was imminent. As it turned out, some paratroops were dropped, but were quickly rounded up and marched into Baldur 2 under armed guards.

    On V.E. Day (8th May 1945) around the coast of Iceland U-Boats surfaced flying a white flag of surrender. On the 31st May 1945, I embarked in an old Depot Ship (HMS Baldur) which had been moored in Reykjavik harbour for some time, for passage back to U.K. She had no engines and so had to be towed back to England. It was a hair-raising experience, as several times the tow-rope broke and we simply drifted in the North Atlantic. And so I left Iceland, to await my next draft, which turned out to be Colombo.

    In The Jungle Outside Colombo 1945.

    Having left Iceland, August, 1945, saw me travelling through the night on a crowded troop train to Southampton, to join a troopship for transit to HMS Mayina, a huge camp in the jungle, a few miles out of Colombo. Some joker had chalked on the railway carriages the words. "Tokyo Express"! In the camp were thousands of sailors who were to form the biggest fleet ever assembled for an invasion of Japan. Conditions in the camp were pretty grim - water was strictly rationed - and was delivered to the camp each day by tanker lorries. There were snakes and scorpions, and 'tree-rats' which lived in the trees, together with many strange noises from animals and birds which lived in the jungle. Because of scorpions, it was not a good idea to sit on the toilet, so you stood up on it! The heat was intense, and around noon each day we were not to be out of doors in the open, as the temperature could rise to 120 degrees in the shade. Many suffered from tropical boils, beriberi, skin rashes and deafness, the latter said to be caused by insect bite.

    Unexpectedly, the Atom-Bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and that was to signal the end of the war and so - the largest naval force ever to be assembled never sailed for Japan!

    Postscript:

    At the age of 67 Alfred was awarded a medal by the Presidium of The Supreme Soviet of the USSR - the country's highest state authority. It was only given to men who served on the convoys. The medals are inscribed in Russian to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945. He made 13 trips on the convoys, including the PQ17 convoy of 36 ships in 1942. Only six ships arrived in Russia as the rest were sunk. Alfred died suddenly in May 2004 just after he wrote his story.

    Audrey Lewis



    Jack Abrahams HMS Nigeria

    I stood by HMS Nigeria in the summer of 1940 while she was still brand new in the dockyard at Walker, Newcastle upon Tyne. Three months billeted ashore with Newcastle on the doorstep; a cushy number! Then two years on Russian convoys and Atlantic patrols...not so cushy. A couple of trips to Spitzbergen to evacuate Russian and Norwegian mine-workers before the mines were destroyed by Royal Engineers to stop the enemy getting hold of them. A scrap with some Germans in a fjord up in northern Norway when, due to a bit of dodgy seamanship, we managed to collide with a sinking enemy destroyer, losing our bow in the process. We limped back home under heavy escort because the Jerries thought we were a sitting duck and paid us quite a bit of attention. Then another great three more months in Newcastle getting the new bow fitted.

    I left her in June of 1942 so missed the infamous Operation Pedestal convoy. I knew some of the casualties of course. Bandmaster Ridout was one. A fine musician and a true gentleman. I knew him because we did a couple of concerts ashore in the Newcastle area. I wasn't a musician, just the compere of the show. I had done a bit of DJing on board (before DJs had been invented) playing records on the internal system, and Mr Ridout asked me to front the band.

    If you want to add some names to the ship's company list I remember Cook Jock Aberdeen, L/Wtr. E. Smart, A.B.J. Smith, Commander Ransome (Second in Command) and the Skipper, Captain Dundas.

    Jack Copley



    Sig. George Geoffrey Farrow HMS Nigeria

    My late father, George Geoffrey Farrow, served as a signalman on HMS Nigeria from the age of sixteen on the Russian convoys and on operation Pedestal.

    This photo was taken just after she was torpedoed.

    Captain Dundas HMS Nigeria

    Captain Dundas of HMS Nigeria
    King George on Nigeria

    King George on Nigeria
    Crew of HMS Nigeria

    Crew of HMS Nigeria
    HMS Nigeria burial at sea.

    HMS Nigeria burial at sea.
    Signal man George Geoffrey Farrow (left) on bridge of Nigeria

    Signalman George Geoffrey Farrow (left) on bridge of Nigeria
    Signalman George Geoffrey Farrow & pal in USA

    Signalman George Geoffrey Farrow & pal in USA
    Signalman George Geoffrey Farrow  (right) in Quebec

    Signalman George Geoffrey Farrow & pal in Quebec

    Thank you for your hard work and dedication

    Steve Farrow



    A/Ldg Sea. Edmund Wiley HMS Nigeria

    My Uncle served on the HMS Nigeria he was A/Ldg Sea. Edmund Wiley. He joined the Navy in 1933 and joined the Nigeria on 3rd September 1940 after spending two weeks in May at the Gunnery School in Portsmouth and was then based at Chatham awaiting ship. My mum said that he loved the Nigeria and he said that no one would ever sink her. However my Uncle 'Teddy' was one of the many young brave men who was killed during Operation Pedestal on August 12th 1942. He was just 27 years old and left behind a young widow of 26 and four young children as well as a mother and father who had lost their only son, and two sisters who had lost a brother. It always haunted my mother, she could never talk about her brother without crying her heart out. From my aspect it is the terrible price of war that ripples through the generations of a family.

    I was born in 1964 so I never experienced the war nor sadly was I able to know my Uncle Teddy. However I proudly display a photo of him on my wall at home and try to pass on his memory as much as possible. I will never forget all those who gave so much for our freedom today. I would so love to get in touch with anyone who may have known him. My mum said that he was very well liked on the ship and the fact that none of his friends from the ship visited after he was killed must have ment that they too were also killed on that day.

    John Hancock



    Ldg.Torpedo.Op. Robert Tervit HMS Nigeria

    My father Robert Tervit was a Leading Torpedo Operator on board the HMS Nigeria, and was demobbed in 1945. He used to tell my brothers and me of how they were torpedoed, and had to find refuge in Charleston S.C. for repairs Prior to serving on the Nigeria he was with the Med Fleet aboard the HMS Troubridge.

    This is a great site and a greater tribute to the men who went to sea in defence of their country and way of life!

    James J Tervit



    Able.Sea. Philip Rayment HMS Nigeria

    Taken as HMS Nigeria was leaving Charleston Navy Yard after repairs of torpedo damage, July 1943

    I have three photographs of HMS Nigeria on which my father, Philip Rayment served as a torpedo rating from 1942 till the end of the war. He experienced some good times and bad times on the ship, and often spoke fondly of the family he stayed with in Charleston while the ship was being repaired. He kept in touch with them and visited them in the '80s and the local paper made a big thing of it. He also spoke of how some of the crew swapped their billeting arrangements to be with their mates, some were lucky and others were obviously very unlucky on the 12th August. He also said that the Spanish shipyard workers at Gibraltar were very reluctant to go on board upon its return as there were dead bodies on board.

    Peter Rayment



    Jack Edwards HMS Nigeria

    Jack Edwards served on HMS Nigeria throughout her WW2 service and has written a book detailing his experience of Royal Navy training and time aboard this ship. 'Twenty-two Hundred Days to Pulo We: My Education in the Navy' is available from Amazon. In the book, Jack recounts many of his experiences on the ship allowing us to appreciate what these sailors did for us all in what were often extremely hard conditions at sea.

    Jack joined the Royal Navy as a Boy Seaman in 1939 and during his five years or so on HMS Nigeria undertook many Arctic Convoys, got torpedoed in the Mediterannean, was involved in the capture of Enigma machines, experienced Russian visits ashore, ending up in the Far East. The ship had a busy war with many interesting events befalling her and it seems important to me that stories like this get told and don't become events that get forgotten or are not even heard of by the rest of us. Thanks Jack - to you and all your shipmates who served on HMS Nigeria.




    Ronald James Stocker HMS Nigeria

    My uncle Ronald James Stocker served on the Nigeria, during WW2, sailing to Murmansk and the Pacific. He was in the Navy from 1939 – 1946, and died in 1956.

    If any of his old shipmates have any memories of him, I would like to hear from them.

    Mick Stocker



    Stk. Alfred Osborne Charlton HMS Nigeria

    My late father-in-law, Alfred Osborne Charlton, (born 1913) served as a Stoker aboard H.M.S. Nigeria on the Malta and Archangel convoys. He spent time with the ship in America (presumably in the aftermath of the Italian torpedo) and at Trincomalee and in Burma. He died in South Shields, in 1989 aged 76.

    Robert Kerr



    Stk. James Simmonds HMS Nigeria

    A few photographs from my dad's scrapbook. Jimmy Simmonds is front row, second left, and a few of the crew, probably from the engine room. I believe his mate, G. Shepherd, is front row, third left. I am still trying to put a name to the rest of the fellas in the photo.

    My father Jimmy Simmonds served as a stoker on the Nigeria from 1941-45. He kept a bit of a scrap-book cum photo album of the time, along with a couple of mementoes like the crest. Crew members mentioned along with photos are G.Shepherd, Buster Brown, T. Cleary, Slugger Wood, Jock Milne, McGee and J. Bergen. He joined the ship at Scapa where she was inspected by King George, and was at first on the Arctic convoys to Murmansk. In 1942 he was on the Malta convoy where the Nigeria was torpedoed. The only recollection of this time he passed on to me was how the hatches were screwed down when the torpedo hit and although terrified, like everyone there I should imagine, was too busy to be affected by it. Xmas that year was spent in Charleston U.S.A. where Nigeria had made her way for repairs. His scrapbook mentions a Capt Dundas, Capt Paton, and Capt King. Later in the war he went various places including Norway, Gib, Suez, Aden, Ceylon, Sabang, Australia, & Bombay. He was demobbed in Nov 45 and like much of his generation who had lived through a war thereafter lived life to the full. In 1974 after 40 years of marriage he died suddenly aged 61.

    John Simmonds



    Thomas Leslie Bellamy HMS Nigeria

    Thomas Leslie Bellamy served on HMS Nigeria as a R.D.F operator , his name is Mr his nick name was Ralph after the actor Ralph Bellamy. The names on a list I received from Mr Bellamy’s daughter are of R.D.F operators which served with Mr Bellamy.
    • Jock Gross
    • Johnny Bull
    • Andy Ewing
    • Glynn Palmer from swansea
    • John Mcpherson
    Mr Bellamy has given me some photographs, they are of historic value and as for as Mr Bellamy knows there are only 2 of HMS Nigeria listing after the torpedo strike.

    P.F.Quinn



    Henry Horace Lockyear HMS Nigeria

    My father served on HMS Nigeria. His name was Henry Horace Lockyear, and I know that he served on the ship when it was in the Far East. His friend, Ron Harris, and my landlord's father, Gifford, although I don't know his initials, both served with him.

    I would love to receive mail from anyone who remembers my father. He died last year.

    Kris Lockyear



    ERA. Jordan HMS Nigeria

    My father served onboard HMS Nigeria from 23rd July 1941 to 16th January 1943. He was an Engine Room Artificer at the time of Operation Pedestal, and had just handed over his watch when the torpedo hit (the engine room, I was told). He was climbing a ladder when the torpedo hit, and the man he had handed his watch over to was killed.

    I have some memorabilia, especially from South Carolina. My father, like many, preferred not to talk about World War 2 much.

    Nick Jordan



    Robert Fleming HMS Nigeria

    My Grampa Robert Fleming was also on the Nigeria he is the man in the photo with his back to the camera and all the ice is round him. His name was Robert Fleming and I have been try to find a book that one of the crew wrote. It was given to members of the crew but over time it has gone. If anyone has information regarding this or any other stories please contact me. Thanks. This web site has made my day.

    Yvonne Fleming



    Norman White HMS Nigeria

    My Grandfather, Norman White, served on Nigeria. He was present when she was hit by both torpedoes and took part in the Russian convoy. I have the certificate that he was given when he crossed over the equator framed downstairs.

    David DuBois



    George Robinson HMS Nigeria

    I have recently found out that my Uncle, George Robinson was serving on HMS Nigeria on the 12th August 1942 off the coast of Malta. If there is anyone who could give me any information about him I would be most grateful.

    Jane Lyons



    Les Wright HMS Nigeria

    I served on HMS Nigeria from 1942 to 45 in Berma based in Trincomale. I wonder if any shipmates want to talk?

    Les Wright



    Alfred Willats HMS Nigeria

    My cousin Alf Willats from London, served on the Nigeria. He often told me of its exploits on convoys to Russia and trips to the USA. I was in the RN at the same time and tried to get a 'compassionate draft' to her but my request was refused. I cannot recall what exactly he did on that ship, all I can tell you is that he wore 'Square' rig. I believe that he was on her at the end of the war but I've lost all trace of him.I hope this may help in some small way.

    Ralph Goodfellow



    Petty Officer Douglas Flood Seamans Branch (Gunnery) HMS Nigeria

    My Father Douglas Flood, served in the Royal Navy on board both HMS London (Dec.1940-Feb.1943) and HMS Nigeria (Sep. 1943-Mar.1946). He is now 83 and living in Ontario, Canada. He has a lot of photographs and notes from the war. We have visited many websites about the Royal Navy and are looking for information on any surviving members from both ships, who may be living in Canada. My father served in the Seamans Branch (Gunnery) and left the Navy as a Petty Officer. If there are any reunions or gatherings in the near future please let us know.

    Duane Flood



    Chief Stoker Arthur Leonard Jones HMS Nigeria (d.Aug 1942)

    My grandfather , Arthur Jones was killed on the HMS Nigeria when she was hit by a torpedo during Operation Pedestal in August 1942, they were off the coast of Malta. He was 39 yrs old and had the position of chief stoker.

    I never knew him and am trying to find out what I can, also to help my mother who lost him when she was 10 years old it would mean so much to her for any kind of info regarding him. If anyone out there has any small grains of information please let me know, thank you in advance.

    Julie A Clark



    John Kenneth Dixon HMS Nigeria

    John Dixon wrote an account of his war service in the Royal Navy, serving on HMS Nigeria and other vessels including HMS Leamington, which escorted merchant shipping convoys en route to Murmansk, and HMS Brilliant, which took part in the rescue of US soldiers from SS Leopoldville which was torpedoed and sunk in December 1944 en route to reinforce troops at the Battle of the Bulge. Follow the link given above for his full account.




    Cook Jock Aberdeen HMS Nigeria

    Jock Aberdeen served on board HMS Nigeria during ww2.




    Ord. Tel. John G Aris HMS Nigeria (d.12th Aug 1942)

    John G Adis served as an Ordinary Telegraphist on board HMS Nigeria during ww2 and died on the 12th August 1942. This was probably as a result of a torpedo attack on that day by the Italian submarine Axum.




    Brinley "Taff" Powell Royal Marines

    My father, Brinley Powell (Taff), Royal Marine, was on the Nigeria on the Russian convoys and was on board when she was torpedoed in 1942 and taken off on a tribal class destroyer,the Ashanti. One of his best friends was 'Jock' King who later became a policeman. I grew up with many of these photos.

    Richard Powell



    PO. Harry "Buster" Brown HMS Nigeria

    My dad Harry Brown (Buster) joined HMS Nigeria from 6th August 1940- 1946. He was Petty Officer and Seaman of the Gunnery branch. Because he served six years on her, he has many stories to tell, and although he will be 85 this year his memory is still pretty good.

    I can't promise anything but if anyone wants to ask him a question, send it to me and I will pass it on. A special thanks to all who served on her, especially to those who did not return.

    Beverly Colvin



    Marine John Croft "Lofty" Nuttall HMS Nigeria Royal Marines

    My Dad was Marine John Croft (Lofty) Nuttall who is on the list of those who served on HMS Nigeria. I remember visiting the ship when she came back to Chatham in 1943. There was a captured U-Boat moored close by. I have a number of photos of the ship and some of my father in South Carolina.

    Bill Nuttall



    Ord. Sea. (R.D.F) Henry Grose HMS Nigeria (d.12th Aug 1942)

    Henry Grose served on HMS Nigeria. He died in August 1942.




    Stoker. Alfred Osborne Charlton HMS Nigeria

    My late father-in-law, Alfred Osborne Charlton, (born 1913) served as a Stoker on board HMS Nigeria on the Malta and Archangel convoys. He spent time with the ship in America (presumably in the aftermath of the Italian torpedo) and at Trincomalee and in Burma. He died in South Shields, in 1989 aged 76.

    Robert Kerr



    Thomas Leslie "Ralph" Bellamy HMS Nigeria

    Thomas Leslie Bellamy served on HMS Nigeria as a RDF operator, his nick name was Ralph after the actor Ralph Bellamy. The names on this list I received from Mr Bellamy’s daughter are of RDF operators who served with Mr Bellamy.
    • Jock Gross
    • Johnny Bull
    • Andy Ewing
    • Glynn Palmer from Swansea
    • John McPherson

    Mr Bellamy has given me some photographs, they are of historic value and as far as Mr Bellamy knows there are only two of HMS Nigeria listing after the torpedo strike.

    P F Quinn



    ERA Jordan HMS Nigeria

    My father served on board HMS Nigeria from 23rd July 1941 to 16th January 1943. He was an ERA at the time of Operation Pedestal, and had just handed over his watch when the torpedo hit (the engine room, I was told) and was climbing a ladder. The man who had just relieved him was killed. I have some memorabilia, especially from South Carolina. My father, like many, preferred not to talk about WW2 very much.

    Nick Jordan



    EA. Charles Darby BEM. HMS Nigeria

    Charles Darby  CMX 46153 Electrical artificer HMS Nigeria

    My father, Charles Darby CMX 46153, was an Electrical Artificer on HMS Nigeria from 5th June 1944 to 5th May 1946. Dad received a BEM from King George whilst serving on the Nigeria and I am trying to trace why he received the medal. There were only 48 of these medals given for bravery in WW2 and I think it was due to his action in trying to save sailors on the HMS Blanche which was sunk at the start of the war by a mine in the English Channel.

    Geoff Darby



    WTel. Alfred Arthur Martyr HMS Nigeria (d.12th Aug 1942)

    Alfred Martyr was killed in action on 12/08/1942 whilst serving on HMS Nigeria. I presumed then buried at sea. I see that the date is that of the attacks on the Convoy to relieve Malta, Operation Pedestal. The records show that the Nigeria was badly damaged in the attack.

    Should anyone have further information on the incidents on that day or indeed any details regarding Alfred I would be very interested.

    Hugh Martyr



    Steward. Robert Fleming HMS Nigeria

    My Great Grandfather Robert Flemming served as a steward on the HMS Nigeria during the Second World War. I was wondering if anyone had any information about him or any pictures of him during his time at war? If you would be as kind as to share this information with me and my family please.

    Samuel Milne



    PMR Mid. Ronald Walter Harris HMS Nigeria

    My father, Ron Harris, served on HMS Nelson(1940-1941), King George V(1941) and Nigeria(1941-1943). The only thing he really mentioned about the war was the sweetheart he left behind in Charleston, Carolina!

    I guess a lot of what they saw wasn't that pleasant. He did say how guilty he felt as he was the only midshipman in his gun turret to have survived one bombardment. I have a photo of Ron in Murmansk on Ski's with 6 shipmates maybe his shipmates families might be able to identify them for me!

    Madeleine Treloar



    Able Sea. William Ashton HMS Nigeria

    My father, Able Seaman William Ashton served on the HMS Nigeria between 1942-1944. He told us about how cold it was on the Russian Convoy and the Malta Convoys when they got torpedoed.




    Benjamin George Charles Webster HMS Nigeria

    Damaged by German ship Bremse

    HMS Nigeria arctic crossing

    HMS Nigeria in Georgia USA

    HMS Nigeria 1942

    George Webster served on the HMS Nigeria WW2. These are some photos passed down through the family of George's time on the Nigeria.

    Michael Robertson



    Ord.Sea. Aldene "Fletch" Fletcher HMS Nigeria

    I have always been very proud of my Dad's service during World War 2, his name was Aldene Fletcher, known as "Fletch". To anyone who knew him, he had a long and good life but sadly passed away in 2002 at the age of 80. He loved his Navy days, mostly on HMS Nigeria.




    Able Sea. Richard Alexander Makinson HMS Nigeria

    My uncle Richard Alexander Makinson (whose name I proudly bear) joined the Royal Navy in September 1935 he was 17 years old. He served on HMS Nigeria from September 1940 to January 1944. When he was discharged from the Royal Navy in 1957 he returned to coal mining. He died in 1955. To my shame and regret I know nothing else, so if anyone has any information I'd be grateful.

    R A Makinson



    Able Sea. William Patrick "Asho" Ashton HMS Nigeria

    My dad, William Ashton, (according to his Certificate of Service) joined the Royal Navy on 18th October 1941, when he was 19 years old. The name of the ships he served on were: Raleigh, Pembroke and Nigeria. I believe Raleigh was a training vessel. He served on Pembroke from 16th December 1941 to 10th January 1942, and on Nigeria from 11th January 1942 to 18th July 1944 and then from 19th July 1944 to 10th December 1945. Under the name of ship it states `u/Russia', but I am not sure what that means. It finishes with his being on the Pembroke again from 11th December 1945 to 13th April 1946. He was released, Class A, 30747.

    The stories he related were about escorting the Merchant Navy ships on the Malta Convoys and the Russian Convoys in the Atlantic. I am sure he said he was torpedoed, but not on what ship or where. He said the Malta Convoys where scary, but escorting the Russian Convoys was a nightmare, not with just the attacks by submarines, but the planes and the sub-zero conditions with ice and frost on the ships. They had to knock the ice off with picks, hammers and any other available tool they had. The water coming over the ships was sub zero. I have some photos of a ship being fired on and then sunk by enemy fire. It seems like the photos were taken of the ship my dad was on, then two photos of my dad's ship being fired on. Also a photo of the high waves coming over his ship, which look like Atlantic waves. I have a photo of someone, who must be an officer, being saluted and whistled aboard. Another photo is of a crowd of sailors and (in the background) the flags of Britain, Russia and America, so I presume it could be in Russia. I believe he spent some time in Ceylon because I have a photo of him and two friends standing by some lush vegetation, but there is no information about where they are.

    My dad had a twin named Ernie, who was also in the Royal Navy, but I don't know which ships he served on.

    Paul Ashton



    Kenneth Tutty HMS Nigeria

    My father Kenneth Tutty served on HMS Nigeria in the Mediterranean. The ship was involved in Operation Pedestal. Does anyone remember my dad?

    S. Tutty



    Peter Huckle HMS Nigeria

    Peter Huckle served aboard HMS Nigeria as a RDF Operator. Does anyone remember him?

    Jim Huckle



    Stoker William Henry Mercer HMS Nigeria

    My father, Stoker William Henry Mercer, served on HMS Nigeria. He saw service on the North Atlantic convoys and was aboard when the ship was torpedoed in the Mediterranean. He spent time in the USA where the ship was repaired. He was also on the Nigeria when it sailed to Ceylon and Australia, but I do not know when this was. Dad passed away in 2003. I would appreciate any information/links anyone can provide relating to his time on the Nigeria.

    Peter Mercer



    Gunner Clifford Turnock HMS Nigeria

    My grandfather, Clifford Turnock, served on HMS Nigeria when it was torpedoed. I believe he was a gunner. All the information I have found so far suggests that he is no longer living. If anyone knows anything about him, please contact me.

    Alison Heywood



    PO Arthur L. Jones HMS Nigeria

    My grandfather, Chief Stoker PO Arthur L Jones, served ,during the Pedestal Convoy to Malta. HMS Nigeria was torpedoed and sadly my grandfather was killed.

    Dave Clark



    Peter Huckle HMS Nigeria

    My dad served as an RDF operator on HMS Nigeria. Does anyone remember him?

    Jim Huckle



    Arthur Frederick Jackson HMS Nigeria

    My father, Fred Jackson served on HMS Nigeria between 1942 and 1945 in Malta, Burma and with the Russian convoys.

    Alan Jackson



    Jeff Groom HMS Nigeria

    My father, Jeff Groom served on HMS Nigeria during the Malta conflict when the vessel was torpedoed and later on the HMS Centaur. Like many he refuses to recall his memories. He joined as a boy at 16 in 1941/1942 and lied about his age. He served for 18 years. I would love to hear from anybody who knew him.

    Roy Groom



    Richard Kennedy HMS Nigeria

    I served on HMS Nigeria from May to August 1945 and HMS Chinkara from September 1945 to September 1946.

    Richard Kennedy



    Ldg. Sgnlmn. Edward Robert Lambert HMS Nigeria

    My father sadly passed away last year, but he did serve on HMS Nigeria during Operation Pedestal. Not sure if he was a leading signalman at that point, but he was by the end of the war. He was usually known as 'Ted' or 'Jigger'.








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