You are not logged in.
HMS Sirius in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

The Wartime Memories Project

- HMS Sirius during the Second World War -


Ships of WW2 Index
skip to content


This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to accept cookies.


If you enjoy this site

please consider making a donation.




    Site Home

    WW2 Home

    Add Stories

    WW2 Search

 WW2 Features

    Airfields of WW2

    Allied Forces

    British Army

    Royal Air Force

    Royal Navy

    Axis Forces

    Home Front

    Prisoners of War

    Secrets of WWII

    Allied Ships

    Women at War

    Those Who Served

    Day-by-Day

    Library

    The Great War

 Submissions

    How to add Memories

    Add Stories

    Time Capsule

    TWMP on Facebook

    Can you Answer?

    Printable Form



    Children's Bookshop

 FAQ's

    Your Family History

    Volunteering

    Contact us

    News

    Bookshop

    About

    Links







World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

HMS Sirius



   

HMS Sirius, a Dido Class Light Cruiser, was built at Portsmouth Dockyard and was launched 18 September 1940. The completion of the ship was delayed by heavy bombing of the area. She was completed in May 1942 and joined the Home Fleet. Until August when she headed for the Mediterranean to take part in Operation Pedestal. The South Atlantic was the next destination, patroling against Axis blockade runners on the Far East route. November saw her return to Gibraltar to take part in the North African landings Operation Torch. Sirius remained in and around the Med. until September the following year, when she took part in the occupation of Taranto before transferring to the Adriatic. On the 5th October 1943, she helped annihilate a German convoy in the Dodecanese. Sirius was badly damaged by bombs off Scarpunto Island on 17th October, and sailed to Massawa for repairs. These were carried out between November 1943 and February 1944.

The ship returned to Britain for Operation Overlord, the Normandy landings, as part of the reserve of the Eastern Task Force. In August 44 she returned to Mediterranean waters for Operation Dragoon, the landings in the South of France. Sirius returned to the Aegean and was present during the reoccupation of Athens in October 1944.

After the War HMS Sirius remained with the Mediterranean Fleet. After refit at Portsmouth in 1946, Sirius joined the Home Fleet in March 1947. She was paid off in 1949 and was put up for disposal in 1956. On 15 October 1956 Sirius arrived at the yard of Hughes Bolkow, Blyth and was broken up.



 


If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Those known to have sailed in

HMS Sirius

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

The Wartime Memories Project is the original WW1 and WW2 commemoration website.

Announcements

  • To commemorate the 70th anniversary of VE Day, we are launching a new feature, Second World War Day by Day and also a new Library to allow access to records which have previously been held in our offline archive.
  • Looking for help with Family History Research?   Please read our Family History FAQ's
  • The Wartime Memories Project is run by volunteers and this website is funded by donations from our visitors. If the information here has been helpful or you have enjoyed reaching the stories please conside making a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web. In these difficult times current donations are falling far short of this target.
    If you enjoy this site

    please consider making a donation.

  • We are also looking for volunteers to help with the website. We currently have a huge backlog of submissions which need to be edited for display online, if you have a good standard of written English, an interest in the two World Wars and a little time to spare online we would appreciate your help. For more information please see our page on Volunteering.

Research your own Family History.

Mar 2017 - Please note we currently have a large backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 229915, your information is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

      

We are aware of the issue with missing images, this is due to the redesign of the website, images will reappear as soon as the new version of the page is completed, thank you for your patience.

We are now on Facebook. Like this page to receive our updates.

If you have a general question please post it on our Facebook page.



Wanted: Digital copies of Group photographs, Scrapbooks, Autograph books, photo albums, newspaper clippings, letters, postcards and ephemera relating to WW2. We would like to obtain digital copies of any documents or photographs relating to WW2 you may have at home.

If you have any unwanted photographs, documents or items from the First or Second World War, please do not destroy them. The Wartime Memories Project will give them a good home and ensure that they are used for educational purposes. We are also looking for copies of photos, documents and letters as well as any information on the whereabouts of individual units throughout the war. If you have any information please get in touch. World War 1 One ww1 wwII greatwar great
Did you know? We also have a section on The Great War. and a Timecapsule to preserve stories from other conflicts for future generations.






Thomas Arthur Tinkler HMS Sirius

My neighbour for over 20years was the late Thomas Arthur Tinkler of Nottingham.I know that he spent all or most of his war on Sirius.like many who served their country during that dark time he only spoke about his exsperiences after great deal of prompting.I know that he was on Sirius when she was part of operation Pedastol and when the ship was bombed.He also told me about her being repaired at Massawa. He was also on the D day landings and about being shelled by HMS Nelson when he was part of a shore party sent to help refloat allied landing craft. Seaman Tinkler as I often fondly called him was chosen at random to take lunch on HMS Belfast to mark the 50th anniversary of the D Day landings and their was not a prouder man in the land than he on that occasion. Tommy is pictured on several photographes on this page the best one though is 7th picture from the top of the page.He is front right as you look at it.As to his job aboard ship I think he was below decks and I believe he was "Engineers runner".

John A Nicholls



George Topsy Turner HMS Sirius

My father, George "Topsy" Turner served on board H.M.S. Sirius as a gunner in one of the forward turrets. He has now passed on but he did bring back some memoirs of his time aboard H.M.S.Sirius. Such as a ships bible - a battle penant and a cap band from the german warship Prinz Eugen. I also seem to recall him making a mention of saving the ships cat in a cap after a torpedo attack.

Barry Turner



Ambrose "Joe" Rocca HMS Sirius

My dad, Ambrose Rocca, often known as Joe, was on HMS Sirius. Sadly I don't know much about his service as he died when I was 12, and he 52. I know he was in the Mediterranean and we have pictures of Churchill when he visited. I think he was an officer, and he had a good friend called Ted Gordon who was from South Africa. I would love to hear any information about his war time. Also, he was in the Med for quite a while after the end of hostilities. I would welcome any info about that too.

Madeleine Denton



Thomas Arthur Tinkler HMS Sirius

The late Thomas Arthur Tinkler served on Sirius in WW2. He told me that he served throughout the Mediterranean and was on the ship during a repair period at Massawa (during the "must get through convoy to Malta)and onto the Normandy landings, where I believe he was part of a shore party sent to assist stranded landing craft. He told me whilst ashore they were shelled by HMS Nelson.

Tommy features on some of the photos on the web page, the most notable being on the gun deck to the front right of Harry Bamford. Seaman Tinkler, sadly passed away several years ago. Because I did not acquire a computer until recently, he never knew about the web site. Without doubt he would have been very proud to have seen himself on some of the snapshots.

Tommy was invited to lunch on board HMS Belfast to mark the 50th anniversary of the D-day landings and that really made him very proud. I understand that he was a stoker and acted as Engineers' runner when the ship was at action stations. I tried on several occasions to get Tom's name added to the crew list.

Finally, Tommy, like many men, had to be prodded and prompted to talk about his war, but such is the debt that we owe to the countless departed Tommy Tinklers that we should never forget them.

John A Nicholls



CPO Frank Dines HMS Sirius

My dad, CPO Frank Dines, served on HMS Sirius for nearly all of her wartime service, I am trying to research his story and would be grateful to hear if anyone remembers him. He was with the ship when she escorted Operation Pedestal through the Med to Malta.

I have his crossing the line certificate which is dated August 26 1942 in Longitude 8 degrees 51 minutes West and that he visited HMS Hannibal, the stone frigate at Algiers, and also Freetown in Sierra Leone and Simons Town in South Africa.

On demob – he had passed his exams to become an officer but his employer wanted him back immediately after cessation of hostilities in Europe so he was never promoted – he was Naval Correspondent for the Portsmouth Evening News. In 1951, he was appointed Editor of the Northern Daily Mail in West Hartlepool and in 1965 he became Director of Training for Portsmouth & Sunderland Newspapers Ltd.

Graham Dines



CPO Frank Dines HMS Sirius

My dad, CPO Frank Dines, served on HMS Sirius for nearly all of her wartime service, I am trying to research his story and would be grateful to hear if anyone remembers him. He was with the ship when she escorted Operation Pedestal through the Med to Malta.

I have his crossing the line certificate which is dated August 26 1942 in Longitude 8 degrees 51 minutes West and that he visited HMS Hannibal, the stone frigate at Algiers, and also Freetown in Sierra Leone and Simons Town in South Africa.

On demob – he had passed his exams to become an officer but his employer wanted him back immediately after cessation of hostilities in Europe so he was never promoted – he was Naval Correspondent for the Portsmouth Evening News. In 1951, he was appointed Editor of the Northern Daily Mail in West Hartlepool and in 1965 he became Director of Training for Portsmouth & Sunderland Newspapers Ltd.

Graham Dines



Able Seaman George Douglas "Spunyarn" Elliott HMS Sirius

I joined HMS Sirius in Simonstown in September 1942, together with 32 other South Africans, and served aboard her until April 1943 when I, together with four other South Africans, took passage to Liverpool prior to attending the selection board at the Officers Training Base at Hove.

After commissioning I spent the rest of my service with Coastal Forces in West Africa and the Far East ending up in command of 72 ft harbour defence motor launches.

When looking at the photographs of the Sirius I spotted those showing the port of Bone being bombed by aircraft and as I took them, and hold the negatives, it would be interesting to know who submitted them so that I can get in touch and have a chat as it was probably one of my mess mates.

Doug Elliott



Joiner 3rd Class Reginald Gordon Mort HMS Sirius

My father served on HMS Sirius. His name was Reginald Gordon Mort, Joiner 3rd Class, (No: MX74586) and his service record shows him posted to HMS Sirius on 29/01/43 until 20 /09/45.

He was wounded in action on 17/10/1943 whilst closed up at action stations while the ship was engaging enemy aircraft. According to his Naval “Certificate for Wounds and Hurts” he was wounded in the head by bomb splinters consequent to a direct hit and several near misses. I appreciate the photos recorded on your web site for the Sirius, and note that I have a number of identical photos inherited from my father.

Anthony G Mort



Lt. Frederick Job Watkins HMS Sirius

My father and my god-father both served on HMS Sirius from her commissioning in 1942 until 1945. My father was Fredrick J Watkins RNR, initially a sub-lieutenant, though by the time he was demobbed he had become a lieutenant-commander. My god-father was Philip G E Farwell RN, initially a sub-lieutenant. I don’t know what rank he eventually reached. He left the navy after the war and went into the Colonial Service in Africa.

I could tell you a little more, though mainly I thought it would be good to have their names appear at this excellent site, alongside their many shipmates.

Clive Watkins



Sub.Lt. Philip G. E, Farwell HMS Sirius

My father and my god-father both served on HMS Sirius from her commissioning in 1942 until 1945. My god-father was Philip G E Farwell RN, initially a sub-lieutenant. I don’t know what rank he eventually reached. He left the navy after the war and went into the Colonial Service in Africa. My father was Fredrick J Watkins RNR, initially a sub-lieutenant, though by the time he was demobbed he had become a lieutenant-commander.

I could tell you a little more, though mainly I thought it would be good to have their names appear at this excellent site, alongside their many shipmates.

Clive Watkins



Ord.Sea. Maurice "Lofty" Packham HMS Sirius

I joined HMS Sirius in 1943 at Algiers, I had no idea what I was in for. The following morning in cold light of dawn I was heaving metal ropes in my whites which soon became a different shade. No overalls had been issued. Broken fragments of wire cut my hands. I was put on the "light calibres" which fitted inside guns for trial shooting - for which there was no use in war time. I had cotton waste and heavy turps to clean them. One day a chief asked me what I was doing there and told me my correct place was Look Out on the bridge. After which those sub calibres became rustier and rustier.

Sirius, I seem to remember, rolled and I was sea sick. When we approached Salerno to support the landing the Gunnery Officer told us that the Germans had a device which homed in on ship's funnels. I think one of these was confused when between us and another ship and it didn't know which way to go and missed both of us. I remembered swimming at Bizerta in company with Sub Lieut Havers who later became Chancellor.

One Sunday I had an attack of migraine and should have reported to the gunnery officer to be put on another post rather than Look Out. However it cleared up and I stayed on the bridge which escaped damage when we were hit. I remember with respect and sadness the bodies of the men being committed to the waves. The trips into the Aegian were not exactly picnics. The Penelope was hit, and two other cruisers I think collided. We were ordered back to Alex. I was a CW candidate but when I was commissioned in 1944 they didn't know what to do with us and I went into Naval Control. Best wishes to all Sirius veterans.

Maurice Packham



Sig. Harold "Jock" Abbott HMS Sirius (d.17th Oct 1943)

Jock Abbott was my grandfather who was killed on HMS Sirius during WW2. I have only recently found out that the story about his death, that my mother, his daughter, told me, was not correct, and I think her mother may have fed it to her, as she was barely 16 at the time of her father's death.

If there are any shipmates of his still alive, I would like to hear their memories of him, so I could gain a little more knowledge about my grandfather, whom I never had the chance to meet. He is listed on the Portsmouth War memorial and I believe he was a Signaller.

Loraine Barnes



Ronald Percy "Snowy" Thorne HMS Sirius

My father, Ron Thorne, served as a gunner on HMS Sirius. He was called Snowy because his hair was so blond it was white. He never spoke much about the war but I know he was at the Normandy Landings and in the Mediterranean. He was also on HMS Birmingham. He met my Mother in Cape Town and in 1946 he sent her the money to travel to England. They were married in 1947 in his home town of Sherborne. They returned to South Africa, but settled in Dorset again a couple of years later.

Ann Thorne



Robert Stafford HMS Sirius

My dad, Bobbie Stafford, served on HMS Sirius from Sept 1943 'till Feb 1945. If anybody has pictures or remembers him I would be delighted to hear

Robert Stafford



Able Seaman John George Sydney "Joe" Braggins Asdic Submarine Dect HMS Sirius

My father,John G S Braggins volunteered on Feb 4th 1942 and served at several shore bases including Collingwood Nimrod and Osprey while training as an asdic operator(Submarine Detection). He joined HMS Cormorant(Wishart)on 29th July 1942 and served aboard her, until 31st March 1944,when he was ashore at Osprey for training update. He then joined HMS Sirius and served aboard her from 24th July 1944 until 25th Feb 1946 mainly on Maltese convoys. He was shipped home aboard Hms Blenheim a submarine supply ship which was based in Malta,and was discharged at Hms Victory Portsmouth on 8th July 1946.

During his time in the Navy he detected many enemy submarines and the ships he served aboard sank two for definite. He remembers one brought to the surface and picking up a few survivors but some deliberately went down with the sub because they had been told they would be tortured and killed. It gives some insight into the minds of the german command propaganda machine.

Lynda Busby



Stoker 1st class. Jack Samuel Mark Holloway HMS Sirius (d.17th Oct 1943)

My Uncle, Jack Samuel Mark Holloway, was a stoker on HMS Sirius. In October 1943, the ship was deployed from Alexandria to the Scarpanto Strait in the Aegean with HMS Destroyers Pathfinder, Eclipse and Beaufort. Reinforced by HMS Aurora and destroyers in support of military operations.

On the 17th October 1943, HMS Sirius was bombarding Cos harbour with HMS Aurora when they came under heavy and sustained air attack. Jack Holloway was not on duty in the boiler room at this time and was, therefore, manning an anti-aircraft gun. HMS Sirius was hit by a 250kg bomb on the quarterdeck and there were a further 4 near misses causing fires aft. 14 of ship's company were killed and 30 wounded. Unfortunately one of those killed was Jack Holloway. He was buried at sea. There was major damage to armament and radar aerials from splinters and the ship returned to Alexandria.

Jack Dobbie



Gilbert John William Neal HMS Sirius

My Dad's name is Gilbert John William Neal, aka Gilly from Marlow in Bucks, and the photo I have of him the Navy is dated 5th October 1944. He was 18 then. I am looking for anyone that knows anything about my Dad's service on the HMS Sirius in WW2, in particular about the girl he was engaged to in Sydney Australia, name unknown. I now live just outside Brisbane, QLD. Any anecdotes, stories and pictures from his Naval days would be much appreciated.

A



Stkr. Herbert Parks HMS Sirius (d.17th Oct 1943)

Herbert Parks served on HMS Sirius.

Christine Strutt



Marine Harry Bilton HMS Sirius

I first met Harry Bilton in training at Lympstone in Devon. After basic training we both went for further training at Chatham barracks, after which we both went to Malta. I went onto HMS Liverpool and Harry to HMS Sirius. When in port at Malta and if both ships were there, one would visit the other. Unfortunately we lost contact after demob. I am now 88 and living in France, and I wonder what became of him.

Roland Osborne



Mech.1 James Harfitt MiD. HMS Sturgeon

My Dad, James Harfitt (born Oct.3 1914,) went to school on the training ship HMS Indefatigable when he was 12. After leaving (with quite a good record) briefly joined Merchant Navy and then volunteered for the Royal Navy for 12 years on the 4th of September 1933. He retrained at HMS Victory as a Stoker 2nd class, at HMS Neptune as a Stoker 1st class. He volunteered for service in Submarines on the 8th of Dec. 1934. He went on to serve on the L69 and HMS Sturgeon (Titania flotilla). He was Mentioned in Despatches on the 13th of November 1940. He was promoted to Acting Ldg. Stoker on the 9th of April 1940, then Leading Stoker on the 9th of April 1941.

He was at HMS Victory from 2nd of May 1941, then HMS Drake as A/S PO, then Mech. 2nd class. He joined HMS Sirius on the 21st of Feb. 1943 and was promoted to Mech.1 on the 1 Jan.1944. serving onboard until 30 Aug. 1945. He returned to HMS Victory on the 31st of Aug. 1945 until 21st of Dec. 1945. His ashes were scattered at sea in June 1980.




Clifford Leslie Eveleigh HMS Sirius

My father served on HMS Sirius during WWII. I would like to make contact with anyone who remembers him.

Brian Eveleigh



Frank Carroll HMS Sirius

I served on HMS Sirius for most of the war and still have great memories of the convoys to Gibraltar, Malta, etc.

Frank Carroll



A/CPO Peter Barnard Lornie HMS Queen Elizabeth

Peter Lornie joined up in August 1940 as an assistant steward. Prior to the war he had been in the catering industry working in Newcastle upon Tyne. He joined the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth in January 1941 and on 11th February was promoted to leading steward. He was on board when HMS Queen Elizabeth was attacked by Italian frogmen on 19th December 1941. On 9th May 1942 he joined the cruiser HMS Sirius as a petty officer steward.

On 17th October 1943 Sirius was bombed while serving in the Mediterranean and Peter Lornie was injured by shrapnel. He was hospitalised.

On 5th January 1945 he joined W Force as an acting chief petty officer steward and was part of naval party 2420 serving in the Far East. He was discharged on 26th December 1945.

Richard Lornie



Len Stone HMS Sirius

My father, Len Stone, served on HMS Sirius from about 1943 to demobilisation in 1946. He was involved in radar.

Stewart Stone



Peter Deacon HMS Birdlip

I served aboard HMS Birdlip (A/S Trawler), RMS Sirius and HM S/M Sportsman.

Peter Deacon



CPO. Peter Barnard Lornie HMS Queen Elizabeth

Peter Lornie joined the Royal Navy on August 20 1940. His initial rank was that of Assistant Steward. He was promoted to Leading Steward in February 1941. In January 1943 he was posted to Petty Officer Steward and in January 1945 to a/COG Steward. He was discharged on 26th December 1945.

Peter was posted to the battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth in January 1941 and on 11 February was promoted to Leading Steward. Queen Elizabeth had been rebuilt twice between Wars. She re-joined the Fleet at Scapa Flow in February 1941 and served in the Atlantic and later in the Mediterranean. Peter was on board when HMS Queen Elizabeth was attacked and sunk at her moorings in Alexandria Harbour by Italian frogmen on 19 December 1941.

On 9 May 1942 he joined the cruiser HMS Sirius as a Petty Officer Steward. HMS Sirius was a Dido-class cruiser built in Portsmouth. Her keel was laid in April 1938 and she was launched on the 18 September 1940, and commissioned 6 May 1942. Peter served on HMS Sirius as Petty Officer (Steward) and one of his officers was Commander Richard Colville (later to become Press Secretary to the King and subsequently to Queen Elizabeth. (Peter would receive a Christmas Card from Colville postmarked Buckingham Palace well into the post war period). Peter served on board Sirius until she was bombed on 17th October 1943 and he was injured and hospitalised with multiple wounds to the right hip, thigh, shoulder and left ankle being closed up at his action station while the ship was engaging enemy aircraft. He was wounded as described consequent on the ship receiving a direct hit and several near misses. 14 men were killed and 30 wounded. Sirius returned to Alexandria and later sailed to Massama in Eritrea for repairs.

On 5 January 1945 he joined Force W as an acting Chief Petty Officer (Steward) and was part of Naval Party 2420 serving in the Far East. It has not been possible to determine which ship he served on at this time.

2420 Flag Officer Force W & Staff (attached to Admiralty 10.44 - 11.44/left UK for Delhi 20.11.44/to Chittagong area 12.44/ to Burma (Akyab) 02.45/ Force W to Delhi 05.45/ in India to 08.45/embarked BULOLO*) Chittagong 01.45/Akyab 02-03.45/Kyaukpyu, Ramree Is 04-05.45/Delhi 06-07.45/Bombay08-09.45/BULOLO 09-10.45/ Singapore 11.45 - 01.46/ title lapsed 02.46

Peter Lornie was discharged on 26 December 1945. Peter was awarded the Burma campaign medal along with 39 - 45 Star, Africa Star with North Africa Bar, France and Germany Star and War Medal.

Record of Service 1940 - 45

  • Royal Arthur 20 August 1940 Assistant Steward
  • Victory 2 27 September 1940 Assistant Steward
  • Queen Elizabeth 14 January 1941 Assistant Steward
  • Queen Elizabeth 11 February 1941 Leading Steward
  • Victory 15 January 1942 Leading Steward
  • Sirius 9 May 1942 Leading Steward
  • Sirius 27 January 1943 Petty Officer Steward 17 October 1943 - Injured in bombing attack
  • Victory 2 April 1944 Petty Officer Steward
  • Argus 8 August 1944 Petty Officer Steward
  • Victory 6 December 1944 Petty Officer Steward
  • Odyssey (Force W) 1 January 1945 5 January 1945 a/COG Steward
  • Braganza (NP.2420) 1 June 1945
  • Victory 7 September 1945
  • Victory 26 December 1945 Released Class A




Dennis Frederick "Simmo" Simpson

My grandfather Dennis Simpson served on HMS Sirius during the Malta missions. I'm not sure of his rank, or dates of service. I am hoping someone can help provide more information. He passed back in 2002 and I was never able to find out more about his time serving in the war.

Gillian Cunningham



Tommy Holmes HMS Sirius

Tommy Holmes served on HMS Sirius in 1943. He was wounded when the ship was bombed in October of that year. Prior to that he was on board when the Sirius went to Malta, and contacted our eldest brother who was serving with the Army there during the seige. He brought him back to the ship where his messmates really looked after him, and supplied him with plenty of supplies to take back for his mates in camp. Tom ended up in hospital in Alexandrea after the bombing of the Ship. I would be grateful if any old shipmates could get in touch.

Donald Holmes







Recomended Reading.

Available at discounted prices.







Links

















    The Wartime Memories Project is a non profit organisation run by volunteers.

    This website is paid for out of our own pockets, library subscriptions and from donations made by visitors. The popularity of the site means that it is far exceeding available resources.

    If you are enjoying the site, please consider making a donation, however small to help with the costs of keeping the site running.



    Hosted by:

    The Wartime Memories Project Website

    is archived for preservation by the British Library





    Website © Copyright MCMXCIX - MMXVII
    - All Rights Reserved