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Stalag 7B Memmingen in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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- Stalag 7B Memmingen during the Second World War -


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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

Stalag 7B Memmingen





    If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



    Those known to have been held in or employed at

    Stalag 7B Memmingen

    during the Second World War 1939-1945.

    The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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    Frank Rushton 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards

    My Granddad Frank Rushton, served with the 2nd battalion Coldstream Guards from 1938-1946. Anyone with information on Stalag 4B and 7B and Jacobstal would be very helpful

    Rebecca Rushton



    Eugeniusz Hull

    My father Eugeniusz Hull from Lwow in Poland (now in Ukraine) recently died and I found a picture of him with Stalag V11B below him. Does anyone know him or anything about his early life?

    Josephine Ford



    Joseph M "Fuzzy" Wise

    I was a young kid working for Mr. Wise, known locally as "Fuzzy", as a commercial crabber near the Chesapeake Bay for several summers and I thought of him as a grandfather. He was a lot of fun, but one day he told me of his experience as a POW. I'm paraphrasing what he told me over 20 years ago. He died in 1988.

    He was captured at Normandy, put on a train and transported to Germany, where he lost 65 pounds during the trip. He was placed in a POW camp in Memmingen, Bavaria, where he was forced to work in a cheese factory. When he was told the cheese was being sent to the front to feed the Nazis, he gathered mouse droppings and threw them in the bin. He claimed that he shivered all night the during the first cold snap and that a kind German guard gave him a long winter coat that he slept in every night. He said that he would have died without it. He made friends with several German civilian workers in the factory and even continued to exchange Christmas Cards into the 1970s. He remembers being liberated and the POWs were allowed to enter a cave that was apparently full of valuables put there by the townspeople to prevent looting. The POWs were allowed to take "anything they could carry". Fuzzy remembered carrying several pairs of binoculars and cameras around his neck, with fine shotguns under each arm. Understandably, he became inebriated during his first night of freedom and passed out, only to find that all of his new valuables were stolen from him. Hopefully, some of the items made their way back to their original owners.

    This was all that he told me. I would love to know if anyone remembered this gregarious, fun-loving fellow named "Fuzzy" from Maryland.

    George P Wigginton



    Cyril Thomas "Tommy" Curtis

    I am trying to find out about my grandfather Cyril Thomas Curtis (known as Tommy). He was captured at Crete in 1941 and sent to Stalag 7b at Memmingen, Germany. I do not know his number or Regiment. Is there any one who can help me?

    Stephen Curtis



    Earnest Cooper Leicestershire Regiment

    My late father; Earnest Cooper, 4868237, Leicestershire Regt was captured in North Africa after the Battle of Kasserine (1943) and was first imprisoned in PG66 at Capua, then transferred to Stalag XVIIB following the Italian armistice.

    Ian Cooper



    Edward Lesniewski

    My uncle, Edward Lesniewski, was captured in Anzio, Italy in February, 1944 and transferred to Stalag 7B. He arrived in Mooseburg, Germany on May 20, 1944 then to Ausburg and Rain, Germany and was finally sent to LeHavre, France before returning home on June 11, 1945. He would not share any memories with his family. He said it was bad enough living it at the time he did not want to discuss his experiences ever again.

    Any information or stories you may have from these places during this time will be most appreciated.

    Cheryl Herdina



    Pvt. Henry Huey "Cheif" Chavis

    We don't know too much, Dad was in the North African threat. He was wounded and captured on Anzio beach. Dad was shot in the right hand and he was taken to the German hospital where they removed his index finger on his right hand. He was held in Stalag 7b. We know he was in the Army, he was station at Fort Bragg N.C.

    Carolyn



    Norman Walter Matthews Gloucestershire Regiment

    I am trying to trace what happened to my Dad, Norman Matthews when he was a POW. I have found several photographs with the Stalag VIII B stamp on the back. I hope someone can remember my dad or fill in what happened to him. I believe he was in the Gloucester Regiment and I remember him talking about a long march from Poland.

    Sue Pattenden



    Pvt Issac Washakie

    My older brother, Issac Washakie, is listed as a POW at Stalag 7B Memmingen Bavaria and I'm trying to get info about him.

    John Washakie



    Thomas David Knowles

    We always knew that my wife's father, Thomas David Knowles, was a POW (he has now passed away) but we have just discovered some old photographs that were sent to him when he was a POW. Written on the back in his sisters handwriting is all the info we needed.

    Tony Stuchbury



    Herbert Ehrich

    A story that in the June 10, 1944 issue of The New Yorker Magazine titled "A Reporter At Large: Room 11, Stalag 7-B," pp. 48-59, by Daniel Long. concerns the experiences of Herbert Ehrich from Brooklyn, NY who was captured during the Sicily campaign and sent to Stalag 7-B. He was repatriated in late 1944 due to the severity of his wounds.

    Clyde Ellis



    Pte. Dominick A. Forchilli 79th Infantry Regiment

    My father, Dominick Forchilli never talked about his incarceration as I was growing up. I never knew where he was as POW. Before my mother passed she brought out a box of letters and post cards from my dad to her during that period. She wanted to trash them but I took them and saved them. It was then that I found that my dad was in Stalag 7b. I have been researching ever since. He was a private with the 79th Infantry. I don't where he was captured or the exact date of his incarceration. I am proud to submit this information as a veteran myself.

    James Forchelli



    Cecil Benson

    Held in Stalag VII B in Lamsdorf for several years and an actor by trade. My father did not speak too much about his experiences but told the more uplifting and funny stories. I am aware of the Gaeity Theatre and once saw a photo of him on line in the lead role in' Golden Boy'. The site with the photo has since disappeared.

    Pip Lake-Benson



    Robert Davis

    My father, Robert Davis served in WWII. He was a POW at Stalag VIIA and VIIB. He was only 18 years of age when he was captured. He wrote a short essay on his memories as a POW, which I found recently among my mother's effects.

    Pat LaRocca



    Frank Rushton Coldstream Guards

    Frank Rushton served from 1938 to 1946. Anyone with information on Stalag 4B and 7B and Jacobstal please get in touch.

    Rebecca Rushton



    Eric William Byles

    My father, Eric William Byles, was captured on Crete and spent a lot of time in Stalag 7B near Munich.

    Malcolm Byles



    Richard Rider

    My husband was a POW, captured an Anzio. His camp was 7B.

    Kaye Rider



    John Scarf

    My father, John Scarf, was an American Army POW in Germany, mostly confined in Stalag 7B. His POW Number was 12067. He was captured in Italy in 1944 and was a POW for 14 months.

    Mary Louise Scarf



    Wally Bohannan Royal Army Medical Corps

    My grandad died, aged 50, before I was born. He served in the Royal Army Medical Corps. He was captured at Dunkirk because he stayed behind with theinjured. He was then marched across Europe stopping at various Stalags: XXID and VIIB Lamsdorf. would be great to hear from someone who knew him.

    Andrew Swaine



    Pte. Henry Hubert Coggin Rifle Brigade

    This, unfortunately, is a story told totally from memory. It is my father's story and as he is now deceased I am unable to corroborate any of it.

    Having been captured somewhere in Italy after his unit had run out of ammunition in a fire fight with Germans. I believe that this was sometime in 1944. They were reluctantly forced to surrender. Subsequently taken back to Munich and interred at Stalag 7B.

    During his time there, my father and his comrades were used as working parties to carry out road repairs in the Munich area. On the return of such a working party one day, my father mentioned to the guards that they had no bread for the men and as there was a shop nearby could he go and buy some bread? It gives the impression that this camp was lightly guarded and the atmosphere must have been somewhat relaxed. The guards gave my father permission to go to the shop unattended. Suddenly, finding himself free from being in captivity he made the most of it and decided to keep going. An extremely risky decision one would imagine. However, not knowing what to do next he decided to try and hide somewhere for the night. This he did by climbing into a roadside salt bin, where he spent a cold and uncomfortable night. The following morning he peeped out of the bin lid and saw some people queuing for a bus. He took a chance and apparently unseen left the bin and joined the bus queue. He was of course immediately recognised as a British soldier, luckily for him it was by a woman who turned out to be French. She helped somehow to disguise him and took him back to her apartment. She at great risk to herself hid him there until the Americans arrived in Munich. I guess this was early 1945?

    He then surrendered himself to the Americans who helped him get onto a Dakota bound for England. He was then reunited with his regiment based in Winchester. Soon after this he was posted to Chichester Barracks where he worked in the stores.

    This is as much as I can tell you now but I am in possession of many of his letters dating from the time that have much more information. I will try to go through them asap, but I am very busy researching a WW1 project involving my wife's grandfather's war diaries.

    Raymond Coggin



    John B. Reed 85th Div. 339th Coy K

    John is my grandfather, who is deceased. He served, as far as I can tell, in the 339th Co K, 85th Div. He was captured in Italy on 5/13/44.(He may have been captured in Itri or Ninturnfront? unsure if this is correct.) He was placed in Stalag 7a and 7b on 10/28/44 to 1/11/45, according to him and freed, 5/1/45. He may have played a guitar. Looking for anyone who may have served or was imprisoned with him to complete his military history for our family.

    Mike Willemsen



    Gnr. William Gray 7th Medium Rgt Royal Artillery

    Gunner William Gray (893825), 7th Medium Rgt, Royal Artillery was a POW in Stalag 7B during 1941/2. Information would be gratefully received by his nephew (John Matheson). William was captured during the battle of Crete.

    John Matheson



    Edward G. Burn

    My wife's uncle was a POW No. 14658 and was interned in Stalag XXB, XXA and VIIB. Sadly, he is now deceased, his name was Edward G Burn. He was captured in or near Dunkirk. Does anyone have information on him, photos of the camps, how they got to these camps, how they were liberated, or information on anyone who might have known him?

    Andy Merrett







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