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Stalag9c in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

Stalag9c




    9th Jul 1941 35 Squadron Halifax lost

    15th Aug 1941 102 Squadron Whitley lost

    14th Oct 1941 207 Squadron Manchester lost

    8th Dec 1941 83 Squadron Hampton lost

    26th Jul 1942 15 Squadron Stirling lost

    3rd May 1943 Ventura of 487 Squadron lost

    13th Aug 1940 83 Squadron Blenheim lost

    31st Jan 1944 550 Squadron Lancaster lost

    29th Jun 1944 12 Squadron Lancaster lost


    If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



    Those known to have been held in or employed at

    Stalag9c

    during the Second World War 1939-1945.

    The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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    Pte. Marshall Pizzey Royal Hamilton Light Infantry

    Marshal Pezzey in August 1942

    These two photos taken at Stalag IX C where my Uncle Pte. Marshal Pizzey was held as a POW from 1942 to 1945

    This was photo taken in Hastings, England 1942 just before the Dieppe raid. The sailor is named Bob, he was Ann's foster brother.

    Marshal was with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry at the Dieppe Raid August 19, 1942. He was wounded by shrapnel on the beach. There is German film footage (available through the War Amps of Canada called "Dieppe Don't Call It a Failure") of him being helped off the beach by two other soldiers. He was sent to the Dieppe hospital where he received initial treatment by the French nuns there. He was then transfered by train to the hospital in Rouen, France for further treatment (the shrapnel hit him in the head, places about his body and a bad wound to his left ankle). From Rouen he was sent to Stalag IX C to work in the salt mines there. He along with his fellow POW's were marched out of the camp heading for Checoslovakia. His ankle injury flaired up and at first they put him on a cart but later left him in a barn to be found by the US Army.

    Rick Maxted



    Pte. Robert Dalrymple 7th Btn. Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

    Robert Dalrymple was captured near Dunkirk in 1940, along with Bobby Morris and spent the rest of the war as a POW in Stalag XXID and Stalag IXc, his POW number was 648.

    Jim Jamieson



    Pte. William Cassey Durham Light Infantry

    William Cassey

    William is Second from the right on the back row

    Pte William Cassey of the Durham Light Infantry captured just outside Dunkirk and held in Stalag IX C 43B. He was born in 1916 and survived the war, living until 1994.

    John R. Heron



    Flt. Sgt. J. P. McMaster 428 Sqd

    Flt Sgt McMaster flew with My uncle, F/S Paul Barske a Canadian, in 428 Squadron "B" RCAF. His partial diary was handed down to me from my grandmother.

    The crew were:

    • S/L J.R.Beggs RCAF
    • Sgt T.C.Qualey
    • F/S J.P.McMaster RCAF
    • Sgt P.J.Barske RCAF
    • F/O G.M.Ruff RCAF
    • Sgt F.Moore RCAF
    • Sgt G.W.Redwood

    Halifax NA-G, Serial Number LK969, took off from Middleton St.George on the 25th of November 1943 at 23:33. The aircraft was shot down at 19,000 feet over Frankfurt by a night-fighter. The opening burst set the starboard inner engine on fire and its second pass killed Sgt Barske as well as setting light to the outer starboard engine. The rest of the crew survived but were all captured and taken prisoners of war; S/L J.R.Beggs was held in Stalag 9C with F/S J.P.McMaster who also spent time in Stalag 357. Sgt F.Moore was held in Stalag 4B, with Sgt T.C.Qualey and Sgt G.W.Redwood, the later also spent time at Stalag Luft 3. F/O G.M.Ruff was held at Stalag Luft 1. Sgt Barske was buried in the Durnbach War Cemetery.

    Can anyone tell me more?

    Linda Gillis



    Sapper Rapley Harry Hamilton Royal Hamilton Light Infantry

    My Dad was a prisoner of war in Stalag 9C. He was sent there from the Battle of Dieppe. He had a knee injury that kept him out of the mines for a little while. His name was Rapley Harry Hamilton attached to the Essex and Kent Scottish, and was a Sapper with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

    If anybody has any info about him that they would like to share, please pass it on. My Dad passed away and I am just trying to find out more about when he was a prisoner of war.

    Robert Hamilton



    Sapper Rapley Harry Hamilton Royal Hamilton Light Infantry

    My Dad was a prisoner of war in Stalag 9C. He was sent there from the Battle of Dieppe. He had a knee injury that kept him out of the mines for a little while. His name was Rapley Harry Hamilton attached to the Essex and Kent Scottish, and was a Sapper with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry.

    If anybody has any info about him that they would like to share, please pass it on. My Dad passed away and I am just trying to find out more about when he was a prisoner of war.

    Robert Hamilton



    Francois Dejardins

    My father was a French POW at Stalag 9C, liberated on April 16, 1945. His name was Francois Desjardins.

    Jacqueline Heffern



    Simon Maclennan Seaforth Highlanders

    Simon Maclennan of the Seaforth Highlanders was a prisoner at Stalag 9c.

    Simon was my uncle, my father's brother; I would be interested in any info or pictures that might be available about him. Our family know very little about the time he spent as a POW, as understandably he would not talk about it. Any help would be much appreciated.

    George Maclennan



    Roland Ambiel

    Stalag 9C also had a section for French prisoners of war. My father Roland Ambiel spend time in the place. He was made prisoner in the North of France in May/June 1940, and walked on foot to the North Sea with many other nationalities, English included. It was his first encounter with English soldiers prisoners of war.

    I know for certain of Stalag IX C, as all personal documents or photos of prisoners had to be stamped in the famous purple ink with the name of the camp. I have today photos of my family taken in the 30's, stamped with the camp' - ( copies available ). I am aware that he walked from France to an unknown Holland sea port to arrive by boat near/or at Hamburg, where he was send to this camp. He was freed in 1945 by the Russian Army but had to wait for the American Army to arrive in East Prussia /Thuringen when they were placed in trains and transported back to Paris.

    I am aware that he encountered some English inmates. He never learnt English, but had a good grasp of the local dialect, as he was forced into working groups in local farms. After a while, transportation to the farms and back to camp was taking so much time out of the day that it was decided that he would have to stay with the farmers, which he did. He recalled the night raids with incendiary bomb drops.

    My father was born near Paris in 1913, signed on for the war in late 1939, taken by the Wermart late spring 1940, arrived in Germany early summer 1940. He was with other prisoners in the fields planting potatoes for the next harvest when he saw the tanks of the Red Amy. He was told to stay put until further orders.

    I miss my father, he was a good man, he suffered stoically. We talked about his period in Germany. I was young and information technology was just a glimmer in someone's brain. I heard so much and saw the consequences of the war as I was born in 1946, went to school with some of the escaped children of the war from a displaced persons camp which was established in the ancient park of the Convent des Oblats in Saint Ouen, where I lived. I want to know more about my father's time in Germany.

    Rolande Ambiel



    Roland Ambiel

    Stalag 9C also had a section for French prisoners of war. My father Roland Ambiel spent time there. He was taken prisoner in the north of France in May/June 1940, and walked on foot to the North Sea with many other nationalities, English included. It was his first encounter with English soldier prisoners of war.

    I know for certain it was Stalag IX C, as all personal documents or photos of prisoners had to be stamped in the famous purple ink with the name of the camp. I have today photos of my family taken in the 30's, stamped with the camp' - ( copies available ). I am aware that he walked from France to an unknown Holland sea port to arrive by boat near/or at Hamburg, where he was send to this camp. He was freed in 1945 by the Russian Army but had to wait for the American Army to arrive in East Prussia /Thuringen when they were placed in trains and transported back to Paris.

    I am aware that he encountered some English inmates. He never learnt English, but had a good grasp of the local dialect, as he was forced into working groups in local farms. After a while, transportation to the farms and back to camp was taking so much time out of the day that it was decided that he would have to stay with the farmers, which he did. He recalled the night raids with incendiary bomb drops.

    My father was born near Paris in 1913, signed on for the war in late 1939, taken by the Wermart late spring 1940, arrived in Germany early summer 1940. He was with other prisoners in the fields planting potatoes for the next harvest when he saw the tanks of the Red Amy. He was told to stay put until further orders.

    I miss my father, he was a good man, he suffered stoically. We talked about his period in Germany. I was young and information technology was just a glimmer in someone's brain. I heard so much and saw the consequences of the war as I was born in 1946, went to school with some of the escaped children of the war from a displaced persons camp which was established in the ancient park of the Convent des Oblats in Saint Ouen, where I lived. I want to know more about my father's time in Germany.

    Rolande Ambiel



    Frank George Webster Adams 420 Squadron

    I am trying to learn about the incarceration of RCAF Sergeant Frank George Webster Adams, who was the only survivor of the crash of Hampden P5330 in Denmark on April 25, 1942 after his bomber was attacked by a German night fighter near the Dutch island of Ameland. He flew with RCAF Squadron 420, and it is believed that the POW camps he was interned in were Stalag 9C, Stalag Luft 6 and Stalag 357.

    I would be most appreciative to learn of the whereabouts of Sgt Adams today.

    Bob Ingraham



    Driver Robert Battye BEM (Military Division)

    Brockholes Man’s Escape From Germans (Huddersfield Examiner May 1947)

    A story of prisoner-of-war in Germany, seven amazing escapes, hard-labour gangs and solitary confinement cells, more thrilling than many novel, were told to an Examiner reporter this morning by Brockholes man, Mr Robert Battye who has been notified that he has been awarded the B.E.M. (Military Division) ‘in recognition of gallant and distinguished service in the field”.

    As Mr Battye, the son of Mr and Mrs Herman Battye, of the Rock Inn, recounted his adventures, one was reminded of the lurid and stirring tales which are usually to be found in a school boy’s weekly magazine, and yet they were everyday experiences of this Brockholes soldier who spent five years of the war as a prisoner in Germany.

    Mr. Battye’s story begins in December 1939, when he became Driver R Battye R.A.S.C. He went to France in February 1940 and when the Germans were over-running France Driver Battye and his comrades were attempting to transfer patients from a hospital near Boulogne. Unfortunately the enemy moved too quickly for them, and so on May 23, 1940, Driver Battye, together with fifteen of his comrades was taken prisoner by the Germans.

    "Jumped Goods Train”

    “For a time we were kept in France” said Mr Battye “and then we were marched north through Lille into Holland, and eventually we were transferred to barges and taken into the heart of Germany.” During the march, which lasted about six weeks, Mr Battye said that the guards took no chances of their escaping, “They were pretty rough at times” he declared.

    The prisoners were at last confined in a camp in Weimar district, and, according to Mr Battye, conditions in the early prison camps were very poor. Whenever they travelled by train the prisoners took maps, which were displayed at the stations, in preparation for their intended escapes. “We made our own compasses,” said Mr Battye “from the magnetic type of razor blade, and if the Germans found them we simply made new ones by heating a blade in a fire and shaping a crude needle.”

    Mr Battye told how in 1941, he made his first escape attempt by ‘jumping goods trains.” He and five more men cut the barbed wire surrounding their camp during the night and then split up, each making his own way towards freedom.

    “We had chocolate from Red Cross parcels which were just beginning to come though, and we timed our escape so that we shouldn’t be missed until roll-call the following morning,” said Mr Battye, who was recaptured at Mannheim. For that escapade he was given three months hard labour which consisted of breaking stones from 7am to 5pm and sawing wood from 6pm to 10pm.

    Mr Battye’s next escape was extremely short-lived. During transportation to another camp in 1942, he and eleven more prisoners climbed out of their cattle truck conveyances and worked their way along the footboards of the train, dropped off the buffers of the last truck as the train slowed down.

    Escape number three was more elaborate and better planned. “We dyed our battle dress trousers black and acquired civilian coats and civilian money. That time I got as far as Holland before being recaptured. I was making for Antwerp, and on this occasion I travelled as a passenger on the trains.” Mr. Battye told how it was necessary to make short journeys so as not to arouse suspicion. He was able to buy tickets, using the small amount of German that he had picked up during his captivity.

    While he and his friends were waiting their punishment sentences for their escape, Mr Battye again cut through the barbed wire outside his camp, and defying the German sentries’ dogs, which he declared “weren’t much good anyway” he made his way to Hanover. That was in 1943, and again the same year Mr Battye made another break. As soon as he got back to his normal camp after serving another period of solitary and hard labour, Mr Battye found a tunnel almost completed.

    The tunnel was about eighty yards long but only about eighteen inches high. Through it, he and several more prisoners regained freedom one night in 1943. Again they were captured, this time as they were drying their rain-sodden clothes in a hut in a field. Back they went to hard labour and solitary for nine months.

    Seventh Time Lucky!

    Mr Battye's sixth escape was from the salt mines. However, he was again unlucky and apprehended near Frankfurt. After another year’s hard labour he and his friends were told to fall in and march eastwards due to the closeness of the American Army. Nothing daunted, they broke ranks, and this time they were not caught again. They reached the American front line safely and were soon having the best that the Americans could give.

    Now Mr Battye is back at work at Messrs Taylor and Jones, Engineers, Honley. During his captivity he lost three stone which he is still trying to make up. He rarely speaks about his adventures in Germany and since the award of his medal he has become probably the shyest man in the district.

    Bob Battye



    Rapley "Bud" Hamilton Royal Hamilton LIght Infantry Royal Canadian Engineers

    My dad, Rapley (Bud) Hamilton was a prisoner of war in Stalag 9c. He arrived there from Dieppe. He was wounded and spent time in the hospital nearby for his leg wound. He was a member of the Royal Canadian Engineers, was attached to the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry, the Essex and Kent Scottish.

    If anybody has info about him please send it along.

    Robert Hamilton



    Pte. Robert Peacock Cameron Highlanders

    Robert Peacock was my Great Uncle and was part of the sacrificial rearguard action at Dunkirk by the 51st Highland Division. He was captured and became a POW. According to his own testimony he escaped 6 times but was caught. Having known this man I have no reasons to doubt his evidence. All I know is that he was imprisoned in Stalag IXc but ended in the salt mines of Silesia. It is important to me personally to trace his war history as he never talked about it much. Any help would be much appreciated.

    Kenneth Peacock



    2nd Lt. John Benjamin Downey Purple heart

    My Dad, Jack Downey passed away 2.5 years ago, after living a long full life. He was a navigator on a B24 liberator that was shot down over France. All the crew parachuted out successfully, except for one young man who stayed with the falling plane. My Dad was captured soon after landing in a tree. With a broken hip, he had to march many miles in the snow, to Stalag 9c, located in Bad Sulza. He was treated fairly, in accordance with the Geneva Convention guidelines. He did lose some weight, He talked about the Germans liking burnt toast, and how good German boots were. He did not talk very much about the War. He was proud to have served, and very modest about his heroic efforts.

    Billy Downey



    Edward Paul Kirschstein 335th Regiment, Company K.

    My Dad, Edward Kirschstein was 18 yrs old when he was drafted in August of 1943 into the 'Friends & Neighbors' draft. He was sent to Camp Fanning in Tyler,Tx for his basic training and also to Camp Claiborne in La and Camp Van0Borhn in Ms. He was trained in Infantry Mortar Gunman, Rifle Marksman and foot soldier. He was sent to Camp Kilmor, NJ and this is where he was hooked up with the 84th Division called the Railsplitters. His company was Company k 335th 84th division. He left NJ on Sept.29th,1944 on a British ship. Shortly after taking off a freighter ran into them and they had to return to Camp Kilmor for a week or so to patch the hole in the ship.

    He went to England first and than onto France. They were replacements for ones already there toward the end of the war. From France they went onto Germany on Oct 10th 1944 as a 'push' towards the end of the war and served in the Battle of the Bulge. Once they hit the shore line they were on foot for awhile and took over some small towns. One town that they were in they were put up in a motel to rest up. As they were looking for snipers they came across a chicken coup so they looked for some eggs to fix for breakfast and they found about 6 of them. Dad put them under his helmet for safe keeping to eat the next morning. But these ended up being decors, glass eggs.)

    One morning while walking around they saw some tanks coming into town. Not thinking too much of it since they were American tanks until someone yelled and said the Germans were in the tanks and they started spraying everyone and killing many. Dad's sargent handed him a mortar gun and told him to go get them. He went to fire the gun but his partner didn't pull the pin and it blew up in his face. He had shrapnel in both eyes and his hand. A medic took him to a motel with several others wounded. He was in a coma for 3 days. When he woke up he couldn't see at all and ask for some water but there was none to give him since the water wasn't sanitized for drinking.

    The Germans took over the motel. Those that were in 'ok' shape went out a window to escape before the Germans took over. There was 4 of them left in the motel and they were taken to an air raid shelter. If they heard planes flying over they would take them deeper into the shelter and once the planes stopped they took him back to the top again. Because he was wounded and was on a stretcher he had to have someone move him each time. From there he was taken to a train station on a horse and buggy sleigh to go to the first Prison camp. It was in winter and very cold with just one blanket to cover him. One guard took him but when the train stopped because it was being shot at from the planes the guard left Dad in the train and left for the woods until the planes stopped firing. Dad couldn't see so all he could do is lay there and listen to what was going on and hearing the bullets hit the trains roof.

    The prison camp they took him to was a famous camp where they burned alot of the people. He figures they thought he was going to die too. He can't recall how long he was there but he was at 3 different prisons all together. The second prison he was at they took him to a doctor in town to look at his eye. He said his right eye would have to be removed or he wouldn't see again. So they took him to Heildburg Hospital for the surgery. They took him up a spiral stair case, cleaned him up for the first time since he got hurt and gave him clean clothes to wear. Then they realized he was in the wrong area of hospital and took him all the way down the staircase again on the stretcher to the basement where the surgery was to take place. They didn't have any anesthic so they strapped him on the table and told him to start counting. He remembers he got to 19 and passed out. They removed his right eye and 3rd right finger.

    After recovering from this hospital they took him to Stalag 9C prison camp; #67. It was situatated in Bad Sulza Germany. He had mastoid surgery, had his jaw broken and wired and a fractured skull. I believe this is from all the abuse he went through while there. He didn't talk about this so I am assuming it to be the case.

    One of the funny things he remembers being in prison. Each barracks had one night a week to get seconds from any left over IF there was any. One time the left overs were prunes. Dad ate 32 of them, not thinking of the effects it would have on him later on. There were 30 men to a barracks and only one toilet. He was on the toilet most of the night so there was always someone standing in line to use it.)

    He was liberated on May 11th 1945 (Mothers day) by Gen. George S. Patton's 9th Armored Div. He was given a bottle of Cognac, Spaghetti dinner with Chocolate cake for dessert. From here he was sent to Cryle Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio and had several surgeries there. Than sent onto Battle Creek Hospital in Michigan but it was for arm & leg amputees so they sent him to Valley Forge Hospital in PA. He was awarded several medals along with the Purple Heart.

    Sarah DeBold



    Gnr. Hugh Beattie 23rd Field Regt Royal Artillery

    Uncle Hughie was captured at St valery and ended up in Stalag 9c POW Camp. He was also in Obermassfield Lazarette and had his legs operated on. He died from thrombosis shortly after the war due to this surgery. "God Rest his soul"

    Ian S. Martin



    Krstivoj Èeki�

    Krstivoj Èekiæ was in Stalag 9C in Bad Sulza?

    Nikola Èeki�



    Paddy McQueen Gordon Highlanders

    My Grandad, Paddy McQueen, who I never met was held in Stalag 9c. He died before I was born and I just recently really found out about his war history, does anyone remember him?

    Garry McQueen



    W/Sgt. Sidney Green Northants Regt.

    Dad was taken prisoner in North Africa on 24 Dec 1942 and went to Stalag 9c. On the page for the camp I came across his name in a photo of a book on the web site. He was at the camp until April 1944.

    Alan Green



    Pte. John Mullin Brannan Cameron Highlanders

    My late Father John Mullin Brannan was a POW for 5 years in Stalag IXC, Bad Sulza. I have a lot of postcards that my father sent from Germany to many different relations, photographs. I don't have a lot of stories, my father never talked much about it, the only thing he used to say to us, when we would complain about being hungry, he would say you don't know what hunger is.

    I would love to hear from anyone who knew my father, possible too late as he would be be 92 years old now, but perhaps family of other soldiers who served with my father may have heard him mentioned?

    Mary Boyle



    John Miller

    I have found a book with the name John Miller, Sanitator, Gefangenenummer 30747. Lager Bezeichnung, Stalag IX C Kommando Nr 1249 Deutschland, faintly pencilled on the front inside cover. The book is "Practical Gardening and Food Production in Pictures". I was wondering about John Miller and whether or not he had grown produce in the camp and if there was any information on him.

    I would be very pleased for any information anyone can give me.

    Alison Davies



    Richard Lawson Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

    My dad, Dick Lawson was prisoner at Stalag 9c Bad Sulza. He worked in the Salt mines at minegan and was released by the Americans in 1945. He served with the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry and is still alive, living near Croydon and going strong. We are looking to contact anyone who was in Stalag 9c after the Anzio Landings in 1944.

    Paul Lawson



    F/Lt. Alan Birley Bateman 15 Squadron

    Justine Hadden



    Zarko Vrbajac

    My father, Vrbajac Zarko, born on 1908, in Krusedol, Banat, Srbija (Krušedol Selo, Âî¼âîäèíà Banat, Serbia) had been imprisoned as soldier of Serbian army on 15.04.1941., and taken as prizoner in prizoner camp 9c Stalag, where he was held until 10.03.1945. His prizoner number was 35185.

    Can anyone please help me in finding anyone who has been with him and where I could ask for reparation for the time which my father spent in prizon camp in Germany. Thanks in advance. His daughter.

    Jelena



    Pte. William Grant Cameron 4th Btn. Queens Own Cameron Highlanders

    My grandfather's name wass William Grant Cameron but was mainly known as "Willie Cameron" to those who knew him. He was born and raised in Dalwhinnie, Scotland. After the war when he married, he lived and raised his family in Ballinluig, Scotland.

    During the war he served as a part of the 4th Battalion Queens Own Cameron Highlanders, 152 Brigade, 51st Division. He was a POW in the Stalag IXC camp but was also a part of various work parties, so I don't think he spent most off his time in stalag IXC. He does mention in his diary that after being caught after escaping he spent 17 days in Stalag XIII C, then briefly retured to IXC before being sent to a punishment camp for 10 weeks. He had 3 escape attempts and had a mention in dispatches in the London Gazette for these attempts.

    In his diary he does have various names and addresses of other prisoners:

    • Fred Larter (Sydney, Australia)
    • Ronald K Kentwell (Sydney Australia)
    • Jack Banks (Australia)
    • Keith H Hooper (Victoria, Australia)
    • Tom H Bennett (XIII C} (POW No: 10495) (Helensburgh, Australia)
    • Frank Connery (Sydney Australia)
    • Johnstone B Miller (POW No: 5226) (Lochgelly, Fife, Scotland)
    • William Wilson (POW No:30508) (Glasgow, Scotland)
    • George D Fowler (POW No: 763) (Falkirk, Scotland)

    There are some other names but it's hard to make them out. If anyones knows anything about William Grant Cameron (Willie) or know of any possible cross references of his name in other POW diaries then I'd love to hear from you.

    Steph



    Pte. Sydney James Morley Royal Sussex Regiment

    I have just found out my great uncle Sydney Morley was a Prisoner of War All the information I have is his rank, army number and his POW number was 1505. He was at 9c Stalag Muhlhausen. Any information or photos would be greatly appreciated and I would like to learn more about his life during the War.

    Karen Morley



    Pte. William Robert Edward Plane Royal Norfolk Regiment

    William Robert Edward Plane was my dad. He was born & bred in Norwich, Norfolk. I knew he was in a prisoner of war camp, Stalag IX-C in Germany & he was made to work down a salt mine. I also knew the camp was next door to a concentration camp & dad felt so sorry for them, even though he was having a hard time himself. He told me how he was captured & how lucky he was to be alive as so many of them were never taken prisoner.

    Unfortuantly, I was younger then & didn't take as much notice of his stories as I should have & wish I had now that he has gone. Dad died in 1999 & since then I have been researching our family tree.

    Janice



    Cpl. Reginald Henry "Bob" Tanner Gloucestershire Regiment

    My father, Corporal Reginald Henry Tanner, Gloucestershire Regiment, was POW number 1950. I have located a picture of him in the Stalag 9C collection, Photo number 1512. My father is second row from the front 4th from the right. Although he was in this photo I believe he was also held in Stalag 383. I would really like to meet anyone who served with him. I believe his best mate was a chap called Zazoo Pitt or Pitts

    Richard Tanner



    Joseph Alfred New Seaforth Highlanders

    I've just been given this photograph of my Grandad, Joseph Alfred New, who was a POW in Stalag IXC. From what I can gather from family stories he worked in the Saltmines and attempted escape on numerous occasions. He was from Dudley in the West Midlands and was captured in St Valéry in 1940. He is the gentleman bottom center of the picture. Unfortunately, due to the age of the picture and creases we have had to have the picture repaired, and as a result he may look slightly different.

    He has passed on now, but I would love to hear from anyone who recognises any relatives or friends in the picture and has any interesting tales to tell which may have involved my Grandad. Please get in touch if you know anything which may be of interest to myself and my family.

    Stephanie New



    Pte. William James Duffy Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

    In my research, I found that my father Wullie Duffy was a Prisoner of War in Stalag 9C at Muhlhausen and his POW Number was 679. My father never spoke about his war history, nor that he had been in a prisoner of war. Can anyone shed any light on his Service or POW life? My Father died in 1973 and I have only just discovered this POW information.

    William James Duffy



    P/O. Lloyd George Hahn

    My Dad, Lloyd Hahn was a POW at Stalag 9C after being shot down in his Lancaster bomber. He was unable to jump as he had been shot through his right arm causing an amputation. They landed in water and the cold water saved him from bleeding out. He relayed a few stories: While in hospital with a name of Hahn they kept asking him to change sides. Of course it was a no. After leaving hospital he was being moved on a bus and he felt someone touch his hand and place something there. When he looked later after quietly putting it in his pocket he found it was a pack of Canadian cigarettes. He had been spotted. When they were liberated from the POW camp the first place they went was the brewery nearby. Being severely underweight it took no time to get inebriated but they were so happy to be free.

    Helene Hahn



    Lt. Peter vanVlerk 34 Squadron

    This item is the ID neck badge for a Prisoner of War of the Germans. Peter van Vlerk used to wear the POW ID around his neck - suspended from his uniform lanyard. The purpose of the perforations and the double set of numbers, is that in case of death it is broken in half and one side went to the Red Cross to advise family and the other half to German authorities. In this case you can clearly see his internment number - and that he was in Stalag 9C (1X9C) and POW number 53696. With so many of our chaps being taken prisoner there must be a large number around, however that being the case, I suspect once freed a large number of our chaps would have used these as Frisbees. There were different types, later in the war when the Germans were running short on metal, they even produced wooden ones.

    At the time of his capture Peter van Vlerk was a Lieutenant with the South African Air Force - serving with the Squadron 34. They and one other Sq. were flying Liberators - an American Bomber that carried a crew of 8. They were flying ops into Hungary and were on their way to attack the Marshalling Yards at Zumbethly (spelling may need correction) When nearly over the target a German plane flying above them, illuminated flares above them. This was sufficient for ground anti-aircraft to hit them. Out of the 8 crew, all were killed – except Lt. van Vlerk - who was a gunner. He was badly wounded and was taken to hospital (another dodgy spelling - neither of us was sure ) at a place called Uburmarsfeld. When he had recovered sufficiently he was taken to Stalag 9C - which was at Zumbethly.

    His medals are with his Grandchildren - which is where they should be. They didn't need his ID and WW2 Sam Browne cross belt - with date 1942 - and he wanted them to go to a collector, someone that could fully appreciate it. I wish more people were as sensible. It is now in my possession. I met him in Oct 2012 - he is now 93 years of age and living in sheltered housing in Durban South Africa. It was a pleasure to meet him and to listen to his WW2 experiences.

    Louis Scheepers



    Cpl. Edward Paul Kirschstein 335th Company K

    Edward Kirschstein US Army

    Edward Kirschstein was my father. He recently passed away one day after turning 88. He told the family his ordeal of being in prison at Stalag 9C at Bad Sulza. Of course he probably didn't tell us 'everything' since some things he didn't like to talk about. I can't imagine what he went through. He was captured by the Germans after being wounded in the face and lost one eye and a finger. The German doctors did not use any anaesthetic on the prisoners since they left it for their own men so Dad was told to start counting. He remembers getting to #19 before passing out.

    Dad was in the Battle of the Bulge that so many of us remember reading about in the History books. He was captured on Dec 21, 1945 along with Jim Harris who also had a face wound. They were liberated by General Patton's Army on May 11, 1945. Dad remembers it well since it was Mother's Day. There was a book that was written about his company and his name is mentioned several times in the book. It is called 'Dear Captain, el,al' by Allan Howerton. The author was also there during the Battle of the Bulge but wasn't in action so he sent inquiries to my dad and Jim Harris and several others so he could write a book about what they went through. He told my dad that the book was written around what he told him. There is another book called 'A Lifetime in Every Moment' by Joseph F. Littell that tells more in debt of what Stalag 9C was like. So much that was told in this book I remember my dad telling about it. It was a very bad place to be at that time. He received the Purple Heart.

    It's wonderful to hear from so many other ones that were in this Prison camp. Thank God this prison camp is no longer there since it has been replaced by something else. Anyone that reads this may contact me.

    Sarah DeBold



    Cecil Charles Fogell 145 Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps  

    My Grandfather, Cecil Charles Fogell, was in the 145 Field Ambulance (R.A.M.C) and was captured at Dunkirk, on the 28th May. He was taken to Stalag VIII B Lamsdorf. We have his German POW identification card which shows he entered the camp on 14.06.40. He was prisoner number 12440. He was then transferred to Stalag VIII D on the 1.9.41. It then seems he was transferred to Stalag IX-C between 26.9.41 to 1.12.43. He then was moved again in April 1943 to Stalag XXID. If anyone knew him during this time, we would welcome any memories.

    John Smithson



    Gnr. William Bennett Royal Artillery

    My Dad, Bill Bennett was at Stalag 9C from 1939 to 1945.

    Muriel Flitcroft



    Pte. Pius Steele North Nova Scotia Highlanders

    My father Pius Steele joined the Canadian Army on September 1st, 1939 and served with the North Nova Scotia Highlanders. He was assigned to Newfoundland for a year, then Sussex, NB, Canada for six months and then left for overseas to Europe on 6th May 1944. He landed on Normandy beach facing the German guns on the cliffs. Some of the men lost it and swam back to the landing craft. He was captured at the Falaise Gap in France. He was accompanying another soldier in an ambulance which was taking severely wounded German POW's to a better equipped field hospital and the driver drove right into enemy lines. The POWs walked day after day to the prison camp, Stalag 9C. He worked in the salt mine while at the camp. Some of the men committed suicide. What helped my Dad was the dream of getting back to Canada and to be with his young wife and daughter. I was three years old when Dad returned but I remember his return vividly.

    Bernice Steele



    L/Cpl. John Conway 7th Btn Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

    My great grandfather John Conway served in the 7th Battalion, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. The pictures I have included are from a scrapbook he kept whilst he was a POW. It is currently held by the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders museum in Stirling Castle who were nice enough to send me the photos when I contacted them about the book. My mum always told me that John had been Douglas Bader's batman while he was a POW and looking at the dates and camps listed in the book it certainly seems possible as they were both in some of the same camps at the same time. I'm not sure when he was captured. I think he took part in the desert campaign and the song in his book seems to support this.
      From his book John appears to have been in the following camps:
    • Stalag IX-C in Bad Sulza in 1941
    • Oflag VI-B in Dossel, Warburg in 1942 where it is possible he came into contact with Douglas Bader
    • Stalag Luft III in Sagan between 1943-44
    • Stalag VIII-A Gorlitz (and possibly also C) from 1944
    • Stalag XI-B Falinbostel presumably up to the end of the war
    While he was a POW, John's brother Michael was serving with the 74th Field Company Royal Engineers. He was wounded in Normandy just after D-Day and died of his wounds 14th June 1944.

    John's father and one of his older brothers, James had both joined the Argyll's in September 1914. John Snr was in his fifties but lied about his age while James had been a Territorial before the war. Inevitably John Snr was invalided out due to poor health but James was posted to France and was killed in action 6th March 1917.

    Bill Robertson



    Spr. Reginald Frank Latreille Royal Engineers

    Programme of show

    cast and autographs

    cast of show

    signatures

    My dear Dad Reginald Latreille used to tell so many stories about being in the prison camp, which he said was the best days because of the comrades. He use to put shows on for the men and make the actors up, including making the actors to look disfigured. He was sent a box of make-up from Max Factor and at the end of the war carried the box until he had to abandon it. Dad was very proud of making his mates up to look like woman and giving them a peg leg, he would talk about the long hours in the salt mines but would say the friendship he had in the camp was second to none. I have put on the sight some of the programmes produced by my Dad’s friend John Foy and the comrades that played some of the characters.

    My Dad met up with John in 1995 in Florida and it was a lovely reunion, Dad would often say he would like to meet up again with others and to return to Germany, sadly he died before I could take him back to Germany and Belgium where he spent a year in hospital. He has many programmes and letters thanking him for the shows he helped to put on that made the time in Stalag 9c hopefully pass and shine a little light on the situation the men found themselves in.

    For anyone who knew my Dad or anyone whose relatives heard the stories of him, I would love to hear from you.

    Denise Latreille



    Stanley Alexander Quarterman Queens Royal Surrey Regiment

    Stanley Alexander Quarterman, POW Easter Monday 1944

    My father, Stanley Alexander Quarterman was a prisoner at Stalag 9c He belonged to the Queens Royal Surrey Regiment. He was captured in Belgium in 1940 & spent time in a Belgium hospital at first. I do not know much about his time in the POW camp, but he did work in the salt mines. In photo which had written Easter Monday 1944 on the back of it, my father is on the top row extreme right.

    I would be interested in any information about my father as he died in 1973 & did not tell me much about his time in Stalag 9c.

    Alec Quarterman



    Leslie Patrick Burton 106 Sqdn.

    Leslie Burton of 106 Sqdn RAF was a POW in Stalag 9c, sometime after December 1944. His plane was lost over the Dark [Black?] Forest on 4th of December 1944 on a flight from Heilbronn, Germany. He was a rear gunner on a Lancaster bomber and the sole survivor of the crew. My husband's uncle was one of the crew who didn't make it. If anyone has any information I would love to hear from them.

    Genelle Griffin



    Sidney "Titch" Fleming

    Does anybody remember my dad, Sid `Titch' Fleming who was a POW in Stalag 9c? If anyone does, I would love to hear from them.

    Sid Fleming



    George W. Foster

    My father, George W. Foster was a POW at Stalag IXC. I have photos to share.

    Tony Foster



    Gnr. Edwin Harold Smith 16th Lt. AA Bty 3rd Lt. AA Regiment

    My dad Ted Smith, originally signed up in 1940 with the Grey and Simcoe Foresters. At some point in his training he transfered to the 3rd Light Anti-Aircraft regiment. My dad, along with 2 officers and 23 other ranks, was attached to the Royal Regiment of Canada for a special task on August 18th, 1942. He and the others in his party were to capture an anti-aircraft gun in order to check out the new type of gun sight being used by the Germans. Unfortunately when his group landed on Blue Beach at Dieppe only 7 other ranks returned in the action. He was wounded and taken prisoner. Initially he was in hospital, possibly at Rouen and in early January of 1943 he was located to Stalag 9C. He did not talk much about his experiences although I do recall him referring to salt mines. He did chuckle when he watched the old TV series Hogan's Heroes and commented that they (he and fellow POWs) were always planning escapes.

    He passed away in 1988 but I will always remember his calm patient manner. His ability to tease and a delightful sense of humour have been passed on to his grandsons.

    Deborah Watson



    Hugo J. Bock

    My grandfather, Hugo J Bock, was a POW in Stalag 9c after he was shot down in 1944.

    Jon R Schmunk



    Pte. J. M. Cooper 51st Highland Div. Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

    My father, Pte. J.M. Cooper, POW No. 107, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders (51st Highland Division) was captured near St Valery, Sargneville on 5th June 1940. He spent nearly five years in Stalag IXc. I have his wartime log and he gives a short description of the march and places marched through.

    William Cooper



    George Jackson 7th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers

    My grandfather, George Jackson, appears on a photo with about ten other POWs that was posted home to my gran in March 1942 from Stammlager IX-C before he was transferred to Stalag 383. I also have a photo of my grandad and his brother Ralph taken at the annual camp in 1954 with about 30 other officers and sergeants.

    Keith Jackson



    A. A. Fuller

    A. A. Fuller an RAF Observer was in Stalag IXc (Bad Sulza 10th July 1941-29th April 1942; Stalag Luft III (Sagan) 1st May 1942-18th June 1943; VI (Heydekrug) 20th June 1943-18th July 1944; Stalag 357 (Thorn, Poland) 19th July 1944-8th August 1944 and Falingbostel August 1944-7th April 1945.




    R. W. McDonald

    R. W. McDonald (WOP/AG) was in Stalag IXc (Bad Sulza 10th July 1941-29th April 1942; Stalag Luft III (Sagan) 1st May 1942-18th June 1943; VI (Heydekrug) 20th June 1943-18th July 1944; Stalag 357 (Thorn, Poland) 19th July 1944-8th August 1944 and Falingbostel August 1944-7th April 1945.




    Sgt. John Stewart

    I'm looking for further information about my grandfather who was a POW in Stalag IXC, Sgt John Stewart, 1049. He was taken around 1940 and released in 1945.

    C Lightbody



    WO/Sgt Ken Fenton

    My father, Warrant Officer/Sgt Ken Fenton - POW No. 39204 was a POW with A.A. Fuller (observer) and R.W. McDonald (WOP/AG). They ended up in:
  • Stalag IXC (Bad Sulza) from 10 July 1941 to 29th April 1942.
  • Stalag Luft III (Sagan) from 1 May 1942 to 18 June 1943
  • Stalag VI (Heydekrug) from 20 June 1943 to 18 July 1944
  • Stalag 357 (Thorn, Poland) from 19 July 1944 until 8 August 1944
  • Fallingbostel from August 1944 to 7 April 1945.

    The crew of the HSL that was sent to rescue them followed a simiilar route, but remained in Sagan, Stalag Luft III, North Camp. Other names listed in a log book are:

  • McCairns
  • J. Jones
  • S.F. Roughthon
  • Harry Mahoney
  • Lional Raymond Silver
  • Stan Pannis
  • W.W. Hall
  • R. Evans
  • W.H.E. Harwood
  • P. Balson
  • Walter Kershaw
  • Gordon Bottomley
  • A. Bonyle
  • Joe Walker
  • Norman J. Smith
  • R. Duffield
  • R. MacDonald
  • John Woolston
  • Arthur Thomson
  • D.A. MacLeod
  • N.M.Campbell
  • Harold E. Bennett
  • Malcolm Gillies
  • W.M. Hard (Al's brother)
  • E.G. Caban
  • H.A. Hard
  • E.G.R. Daggett

  • Nick Fenton



    Cornelius "Taffy" Garvin 2nd Btn. Welsh Guards

    My father, Cornelius Garvin (also kown as Taffy or Con), was a member of the 2nd Btn Welsh Guards. He was captured on 10th June 1940 and was taken to Stalag IXC. I have numerous photographs and programmes from 1943 and 1944 relating to the Christmas pantomimes held in the camp. I also have my father's diary in which there are many names and messages from other prisoners.

    Peter



    2/Lt. Jack Webber 8th Btn. Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

    My father was wounded and captured in June 1940. He spent some time in Stalag IXC and Oflag IX A/Z before being repatriated in October 1943.

    Mike Webber



    L/Cpl. Jimmy Kelly 8th Btn. C Coy. Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders

    My grandfather, L/Cpl Jimmy Kelly, was in the 8th Btn Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, `C' Coy and was taken prisoner at St Valery in France. He was taken to Stalag IXc and spent some time in the salt mines.

    Graham Kelly



    Pte. Cornelius Boyle "Neil" McCafferty 51st Highland Div.

    My dad, Pte Cafferty, served with the 51st Highland Division and was captured at Dunkirk. He was marched across Europe to Stalag 9c. He mentioned that it was close to the city/town of Erfurt which, after the partition, was in East Germany. He escaped at least twice and was recaptured both times. He worked on a farm much of the time.

    Neil McCafferty



    Henry Harper 7th Btn. Argyle & Sutherland Highlanders

    My father-in-law Henry Harper served with the 7th Btn Argyle & Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured at Dunkirk and sent to Stalag 9c. He was prisoner 431 and spent the war there until 16th September 1944 when he was repatriated to the UK on health grounds.

    David Coyle



    Pte. Roderick MacPherson Seaforth Highlanders

    My father, Roderick MacPherson, was a private in the Seaforth Highlanders. He was taken prisoner at Abbeville in May 1940 and was a POW in Stalag 9c for five years.

    Margaret MacPherson



    Harold Jackson 365 Squadron 305th Bomb Group

    My dad, Harold Jackson, was with the 8th Air Force, 305th Bomb Group 365 Squadron. He was shot down on his second Schweinfurt Raid on 14th October 1943. He was injured when he bailed out and, after the treatment in hospital, was in Stalag 9c for a brief time. He then went to Stalag 17b until the march and literation. Does anyone remember him?




    WO/Sgt. K. Fenton 139 Sqdn.

    My father was born in Drax, Yorkshire. He was Warrant Officer (Sgt) K. Fenton, No. 1053472 and was shot down on 1st July 1941 in Blenheim IV V6258 XD of 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, from Horsham St. Faith. His aircraft was shot down by Bf109F of Fw. Fredrich Karl Bachmann (3/JG 52, Leeuwarden) and ditched 60Kms NW of Vlieland. Other crew were Sgt A.A. Fuller (observer) and R.W. McDonald (wireless operator and air gunner). All became POWs in Stalag Luft III, Sagan. Also a note of Stalag IXc. Prisoner No. 39204. Noted in Blenheim Strike by Theo Boiten as Stalag 357, Kopernikus and 'among one of very few crews to survive a Blenheim crash in 1941'. I have his log book and a number of photos and would love to talk or correspond with anyone who might have known him or whose father was there also. Names listed in his log book include:
    • Harry Mahoney
    • Lioniel Raymond Silver
    • Balson
    • W W Hall
    • A A Fuller
    • W H E Harwood
    • R Evans
    • Joe Walker
    • Gordon Bottomley
    • Walter Kershaw
    • D A MacLeod
    • J Jones
    • N M Campbell
    • R MacDonald
    • R Duffield
    • Norman J Smith
    • Arthur Thomson
    • Harold E Bennett
    • Malcolm Gillies
    • W H Hard
    • E G Caban
    • Al Hard
    • E G R Daggett
    • Irena Spring
    • Ann Hemmingway

    Not suggesting that the ladies were there but their names are.

    Nick Fenton



    Leslie Patrick Burton 106 Sqdn.

    Does anyone know where I could find Leslie Patrick Burton of the 106 Squadron RAF? He was a prisoner in Stalag 9c after December 1944. His plane was lost over the Dark Forest on the 4-12-1944. He is an Australian citizen and was a rear gunner on the Lancaster bomber. He was on a flight to Heilbronn, Germany when the aircraft went missing and crashed somewhere near the Dark Forest, Germany. He was the sole survivor of the Lancaster Bomber crew. My husband's uncle was one of the crew who didn't make it. We would love to speak with him, a near relative or someone who may have known him in Stalag 9c.

    Genelle Griffin



    James Hart

    James Hart POW No. 42653 was in Stalag 9C with Arthur Avey POW No. 13261.




    Arthur Avey

    Arthur Avey (POW No. 13261) was in Stalag 9C with his friend James Hart (POW No. 42653).




    Pte. Simon Maclennan Seaforth Highlanders

    Does anyone have info on my uncle Simon Maclennan (Seaforth Highlanders) who was at Stalag 9c for most of the war? Or can anyone find a photo of the prisoners? He was known as Sammy for most of his life.

    George Maclennan



    Lt. Reba Whittle Army Nurse Corps

    Lt Reba Whitttle was a flight nurse who became a POW at Stalag 9C from 27th September 1944 until January 1945. Her plane was shot down over France.




    PFC. Harold Francis "Red" Fagan

    My father, Harold F. Fagan, was a PFC in the U.S. Army. He saw combat in Europe, where he marched through Paris with American troops when the city was liberated. Later, while in Luxembourg on a short leave, he was captured by German troops and transferred to Stalag 9C. He was imprisoned until the end of the war. While he did not give a lot of detail about his experiences in the camp, he did say that they were starving and had to steal garbage to survive. It is my understanding that he spent about nine months there before they were liberated. As he was unable to shave and did not have access to a mirror, he did not know that he had a red beard until people started referring to him as "Red".

    Susan Fagan



    Pte. Harold Francis Fagan

    My father, Harold F. Fagan, was a P.O.W. in Stalag 9c from 1944-1945. He was a private, first class with the US Army. Captured in Luxembourg, he was brought to Germany sometime after the liberation of Paris. He was imprisoned at Stalag 9C until the camp was liberated in 1945. Anyone having information concerning his time in 9c, please feel free to contact me. Thank you.

    Susan Fagan



    Gnr. Edwin H. Smith 16th Battery 3rd Canadian Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment

    Operation Jubilee - Blue Beach, Dieppe. The following describes the role of the 3rd LAA group of which my dad was a member during the events of August 19, 1942. The troop was attached to the Royal Regiment of Canada for a specific assignment during the operation. It comes from the History of the 3rd LAA Regiment. The 3rd was a regiment in the Royal Canadian Artillery.

    The 3rd Canadian Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment sent 10 Officers and 236 other ranks, who were allotted different tasks, in support of Infantry battalions. For this operation the personnel were divided into five parties.

    The second party's task was to capture an anti-aircraft gun in order to investigate a new type of gun sight that the Germans were using. This party was composed of 2 Officers and 24 Other Ranks from the 16th Battery. They embarked with the Royal Regiment of Canada, to whom they were attached. When the craft landed, the beach was strewn with bodies in and out of the water and up the seawall. It was continuously swept by machine gun as well as sniper fire and the men that reached the wall were treated with hand grenades dropped from the cliff above and with mortar fire. At approximately 1100 hours the craft was ordered to return. Of this party only seven Other Ranks returned -

    • Lieutenant F.B. Carpenter,
    • Lieutenant J.D. McFetridge
    • and the seventeen Other Ranks were reported missing.

    Casualties

    • Lieutenant Frank B. Carpenter Killed Prev reported missing - buried Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery (Hautot-Sur-Mer) Seine-Maritime France Grave Reference E. 75 - Son of Frank and E.S. Carpenter of Winnipeg, Manitoba
    • A/BDR James Charters Presumed Killed Prev reported missing - commemorated Brookwood Memorial Panel 23, Column 2 at Brookwood Military Cemetery; Age 22, Son of James and Isabel Charters, of Vancouver, British Columbia. His brother Ralph David also died on active service with RCAF.
    • GNR J.E. Dessureault Killed Prev reported missing - buried Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery, Grave Reference G. 57
    • L/BDR Lucien J. Fournier Killed Prev reported missing - buried Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery, Grave Reference E 77
    • GNR Percy S. Fox Wounded
    • GNR Isaac Hartlin Killed Prev reported missing - commemorated Brookwood Memorial Panel 23, Column 2; Son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Hartlin of Spryfield, Halifax Co., Nova Scotia.
    • GNR William J. McMullen Presumed Killed Prev reported missing - commemorated Brookwood Memorial Panel 23, Column 2; Age 38, Son of Archibald adn Mary McMullen, of Benburb, Co. Tyrone, Northern Ireland
    • A/BDR G.A. Northgraves Killed Prev reported missing - commemorated on Brookwood Memorial Panel 23, Column 2; Age 22; full name George Allen Northgraves; A/BDR Northgraves original unit of service 11th Anti-Aircraft Battery; joined the 16th Battery in June 1940. On September 14, 1942, his father Denton Northgraves of McConnell Road, Chilliwack, British Columbia received a cablegram informing him of his son's death.
    • GNR Henry John Rowe Wounded
    • SGT Mark R Rushton Wounded
    • GNR Kenneth M. Stuart Killed Prev reported missing - buried Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery, Grave Reference G 4; full name Kenneth MacDonald Stuart; Age 19; Son of Cyrus and Laura Stuart, of Hall's Harbour, King's Co, Nova Scotia
    • GNR Morris Robert Vick Killed Prev reported missing - buried Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery, Grave Reference E 23; age 26; Son of James Herbert and Annie Louise Vick, of Listowel, Ontario.

    The following were captured at Dieppe and sent to various POW Camps

    • Lieutenant John D McFetridge Released POW Wounded 19 May 1945 OFLAG 07B
    • GNR Earl K. Davis Released POW Wounded 21 Apr 1945 Stalag 357
    • GNR Lorne V Davis Released POW Wounded 25 Apr 1945 Stalag IXC
    • GNR Jack H. France Released POW 19 Apr 1945 Stalag 344
    • GNR Nelson E Longeuay Released POW 21 Apr 1945 Stalag Luft L6
    • A/BDR H.A. Slader (Slater) Released POW 27 May 1945 Stalag 344
    • GNR E.H. Smith Released POW Wounded 19 Apr 1945 Stalag IXC
    • GNR E.A. Underwood Released POW Wounded 11 May 1945 Stalag 357
    • GNR R.V. Waddy Released POW 16 May 1945 - deceased July 1, 2004 at age 83; Legion member Cowichan, British Columbia. "Horror Beyond Dieppe" Legion Magazine describes his story. Stalag 344
    • GNR G.A. Williams Released POW Wounded 20 Apr 1945 Stalag IXC

    Along with the 3 wounded who made it back to England there were 4 others from the 16th Bty. Although the 16th Battery originated in Vancouver, Canada additions to its ranks were made during the preparations for Operation Jubilee. My dad, Ted Smith, was originally with the Grey & Simcoe Foresters from Ontario but at some point was moved to the 3rd LAA. He was wounded at Dieppe and after some time in hospital, spent the remainder of the war in Stalag 9C as a POW. Following his release he returned to Canada, married, had 3 children and 2 grandsons. He spoke very little about his experiences. An amazing role model, his patient, calm manner is something to which we can all aspire.

    Deborah Watson



    Pte. Wilfred Deans Leith

    Wilfred Leith served in Egypt and North Africa and was sent to Crete where he was wounded in conflict with German parachutists and taken prisoner. He was sent to Germany and held in Stalag IXc.

    Alastair Leith



    Sgt. Charles Gillan Nicholson "Jock" Taylor 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders

    My father, Charles Taylor, joined the Army in 1936 as a boy soldier with the 1st Bn North Staffordshire Regiment and served in India and Palestine until 1939.

    On the out break of the War he joined part of the newly formed 59th Staffordshire Division and arrived in Normandy on the 26th June 1944 as part of the follow up to the D-Day landings. At the end of July 1944 after heavy fighting and suffering heavy casualties around Caen and the Orne river the 59th was disbanded and the remaining troops dispersed to other units/divisions.

    My father was sent to the 2nd Bn Gordon Highlanders and continued the advance through France and Belgium to Holland. On the 31st October 1944 near Asten in Holland he was wounded whilst attacking a farmhouse and woke up in a German Field Hospital flash blinded and with shrapnel wounds. When he recovered his sight and was well enough he was moved initially to Stalag 9C and then to Stalag Luft XIB where he spent the remainder of the war until liberated in April 1945.

    He said conditions were harsh and food was scarce but towards the end of the war they were able to trade with the locals and some guards which helped. He even managed to obtain a camera and took some of the attached pictures for posterity. He told few stories of his time as a prisoner but he did appear in the newsreel at the gate of the camp when it was liberated which gave much relief to his family at home when they saw him.

    Charles returned to the army when he recovered from the months of malnourishment and served until 1948 before being demobbed. He served in Germany as part of the British occupation and bore no grudge against the ordinary German people who he became quite fond of after the war.

    Colin Taylor







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