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No. 419 (Moose) Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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- No. 419 (Moose) Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War -


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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

No. 419 (Moose) Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force



   419 Squadron formed at Mildenhall, in December 1941, as the third RCAF bomber squadron overseas. Originally in No. 3 Group of Bomber Command, the squadron joined No. 6 (RCAF) Group when it was formed on the 1st of January 1943. From Mildenhall 419 sqd moved to Leeming, Topcliffe and Croft for short periods before settling down, in November 1942, at Middleton St George, where it remained based until the end of the European war. Beginning operations with the Wellington, they later converted to the Halifax and then to Lancaster Xs. 419 Squadron returned to Canada in June 1945 and are currently based at Cold Lake, Alberta.

The most famous squadron member is Pilot Officer Andrew Mynarski, who was awarded the Victoria cross for his efforts to save the life of his friend, rear gunner Pat Brophy. A statue was unvieled at Middleton St George in June 2005, and a squadron reunion and memorial weekend is held there every year in June.


The 2017 RAF Middleton St George Memorial Service will take place at memorial garden outside the St George Hotel at 10.30am on 11th November 2017 all are welcome, please arrive in good time. If you would like to lay a wreath please let us know before the service begins. Our memorial garden has recently been refurbished to remember those whose ashes lie in this place. If family members of those who served would like to have ashes placed in the garden, please get in touch so arrangements can be made.


The annual Middleton St George remembrance and reunion weekend will take place on the second weekend of June 2017 at the St George Hotel, Durham Tees Valley Airport. This event is open to all who wish to attend:

  • Memorial service, 10.30am on Saturday, please arrive in good time.
  • Three Course Dinner and Entertainment on Saturday evening, must be booked in advance.
  • Special offer on accommodation at the St George for those attending.
  • Raffle to support the Memorial Association, donation of prizes would be most welcome.
  • Come along for the whole weekend or just part of the celebrations.

Airfields at which No.419 Squadron were based:

  • Mildenhall. 15th Dec 1941 to 13th Aug 1942.
  • Leeming. 13th Aug 1942 to 18th Aug 1942
  • Topcliffe. 18th Aug 1942 to 30th Sept 1942
  • Croft. 30th Sept 1942 to 9th Nov 1942
  • Middleton St George. 9th Nov 1942 to 4 June 1945.


 

   The Canadian Warplane Heritage's fully restored Lancaster MkX is a proud flying tribute to all the young airmen who flew the aircraft in perilous times. One only two airworthy Lancasters, it is dedicated to the memory of Pilot Officer Andrew Mynarski, it now bears the markings of his Lancaster: VR-A # KB726 of the Royal Canadian Air Force 419 "Moose" Squadron, which flew from RAF Middleton St George.

Andrew Charles Mynarski was a quiet chap with a good sense of humour. He enjoyed woodwork and loved to design and build furniture. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force just before his 25th birthday. He trained as an Air Gunner and was posted to Number 9 Squadron in October, 1943. In March, 1944, after training with No 1664 HCU he was posted to 419 (Moose) Squadron to fly Lancasters from RAF Middleton St George.

The crew took off for their 13th mission together on the night of June 12, their target, the rail marshalling yards at Cambrai, France. It would be the crew's 13th sortie. They would be over the target on Friday the thirteenth. While waiting to go, the crew couldn't help but think of these omens. Andy found a four leaf clover in the grass by the planes. He insisted that his closest buddy in the crew, tail gunner Pat Brophy, should take it.

As they began descending for the bombing run, a Ju88 came in from astern, attacking the Lancaster with all its guns. The damage to the Lancaster was severe, both port engines were set alight, the hydraulic lines to the rear turret were severed and the fluid ignited, turning the rear of the fuselage into an inferno. The captain, Art de Bryne gave the order to bail out, a pre arranged signal of the letter P in morse, flashed on the intercom lights.

Warrant officer Mynarski left the mid upper turret and moved to the rear escape door. Through the fierce flames, he could see Rear Gunner Pat Brophy, desperately trying to escape. The rear turret had jammed in a position where the doors to escape didn't line up.

With complete disregard for his own safety, Andrew crawled through the flames to assist his fellow gunner. Not noticing that his own flight suit and parachute had caught fire, he tried to free the turret, with a escape axe and his bare hands, but it was an impossible task. Brophy signaled that there was nothing more he could do and that he should bail out and save himself. Reluctantly, Mynarski obeyed his friends wishes. He had to crawl backwards through the flames to the escape hatch, where he stood up and, before jumping, he saluted his doomed comrade. French witnesses saw him plunge earthward in flames but when they found him, he was so severely burned that he died within hours.

Miraculously, Pat Brophy survived, unhurt. When the Lancaster crashed at a shallow angle, two of its twenty bombs exploded, throwing the tail gunner clear. His watch stopped at 2:13 a.m. Friday, June 13, 1944. Pat made his way to London with the help of the French Resistance and was able to relate the story of how Andrew had tried to save him.

Posthumously, Andrew Charles Mynarski was awarded the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth's highest award for bravery.

Middleton St George's Local Newspaper, began an appeal in June 2004 to raise money to erect a statue of Andrew Mynarski at the Airport, as a tribute to him and all the airmen who gave their lives whilst flying from the airfield.

The appeal was a resounding sucess and on the 4th of June 2005 at a ceremony attended by the families of Mynarski's crew, the statue was unvieled.

  Read the incredibly moving story of one man's bravery and the long campaign to ensure that he will never be forgotten.  





 

15th Jan 1942 Aircraft Lost

9th Apr 1942 419 squadron Lancaster lost

3rd Feb 1943 Enemy Aircraft

12th May 1943 419 squadron Lancaster lost

30th May 1943 419 Squadron Halifax lost

25th Jun 1943 419 Squadron Halifax lost

1st Sep 1943 419 Squadron Halifax lost

5th Jan 1945 Night Ops

5th Jul 1944 419 Squadron Halifax lost

15th Jan 1945 419 squadron Lancaster lost

27th Feb 1945 Night Ops

2nd Mar 1945 Night Ops

3rd Mar 1945 Night Ops

8th Apr 1945 Night Ops

13th Apr 1945 Night Ops

16th April 1945 419 squadron Lancaster lost

22nd Apr 1945 Night Ops


If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Those known to have served with

No. 419 (Moose) Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

  • Adam Raymond Francis. P/O (d.29th Dec 1944)
  • Aikenhead D..
  • Aitken G.. Sgt
  • Alsop Norman Frederick. Sgt. (d.15th May 1944)
  • Alsop Norman F.. (d.16th May 1942)
  • Amlin Edsel Edward. LAC. (d.3rd May 1945)
  • Amlin James Gordon.
  • Anderson John Albert. F/Sgt. (d.4th Jul 1943)
  • Anderson John Alan. F/Lt.
  • Annable H. C.. F/Sgt.
  • Applin Donald John. P/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Applin Donald John. P/O. (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Aronson Kenneth. Flt.Sgt. (d.30th July 1942)
  • Arseneau Joseph Douglas Henry. Sgt.
  • Ashton . P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Atkinson J.. Sgt. (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Bailey William Alexander. P/O (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Bailie T.. (d.30 Aug 1944)
  • Bakewell L.. F/Lt
  • Baran Michael J.. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Barnes Robert. Flight Lieutenant
  • Bartlemay William Arthur. P/O (d.25th Oct 1944)
  • Beadie R. L.. (d.25th May 1944)
  • Bechett A. C.. W/O (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Beckett Arthur. WO 2Cl. (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Bees H..
  • Bell Angus Hugh. P/O
  • Belyk John.
  • Bennett J. A.. Sgt.
  • Berger Leonard.
  • Blain L..
  • Blaney L. A..
  • Bodie Robert. F/O
  • Bourasso P. E.. P/O
  • Brophy Pat. P/O
  • Brown D. W.. F/O (d.15th Aug 1944)
  • Brown H. T..
  • Bull R..
  • Bull. R.. Sgt
  • Byford A J.. Flt Lt
  • Callaghan F. J.. Sgt.
  • Cambell Russell Archibald. Sgt. (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Cameron R.. W/O
  • Campbell Robert Roy. F/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Campbell Russell Archibald. P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Campbell Russell Archibald. P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Carruthers C. W.. (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Carruthers John Robert. Sgt. (d.13th May 1944)
  • Carter J. L..
  • Case J.. F/Sgt.
  • Chalcraft W. R.. Flt Lt
  • Chapman L..
  • Chartland J. L.. (d.2nd May 1944)
  • Chatwin Fred.
  • Chawanski Adam Philip. F/Sgt. (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Christian C. D.. F/O
  • Christian. C. D.. F/O
  • Clark W. J.. WO2
  • Clarke R. F.. F/Sgt.
  • Cleaver John Barry. P/O (d.15th Aug 1944)
  • Cleaver Reginald.
  • Cleveland Vincent Alton Francis. Flt Sgt. (d.31st Aug 1943)
  • Cleveland Vincent Alton Francis. F/Sgt. (d.31st Aug 1944)
  • Cohen Ashton Irving. P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Cohen Ashton Irving. P/O (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Colum Gerard. Rev.
  • Cook D..
  • Corrie Jack.
  • Cottier Thomas George. P/O (d.16th January 1944)
  • Couper J. R..
  • Couper James Robert. F/Sgt. (d.5th March 1943)
  • Cowan T..
  • Cowlan T. H.. F/O
  • Cox A. E.. Sgt.
  • Cram H. E.. F/O
  • Crawford F..
  • Crawford S..
  • Daly R. V.. F/O
  • Davies James Kenyon. Cpl.
  • de Bryne Art.
  • Dennis Frederick Stanley. P/O
  • Derbyshire Donovan Emmerson. P/O (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Devine R.. F/Sgt.
  • Dewar Peter. P/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Dickson R.. Sgt.
  • Donaldson Gordon Edward. F/O (d.29th Sep 1943)
  • Drinka C.. Sgt.
  • Duggan Nathaniel William. Sgt
  • Duncan George Ross. F/O (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Durrant John Chetwynd. P/O (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Eddy J..
  • Edwards Burdel Frank. F/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Ellis Jack.
  • Elmer V..
  • Embley A. Sgt.
  • Emerson Robert Francis. P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Emerson Robert Francis. P/O (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Enever H..
  • English Peter Frederick. P/O (d.3rd Feb 1945)
  • Eratt Robert Edward. Sgt. (d.29th Dec 1944)
  • Fahy Edward. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Farthing D..
  • Finlayson W. R..
  • Fitchner J. R.. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Fitchner. J. R.. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Fleming Mervyn Mathew. Wing Cdr.
  • Fletcher Harold. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Flippant F. W. J..
  • Forbes John Gordon. F/Sgt. (d.30th May 1942)
  • Forbes R.. F/O
  • Fordham Ernest N.. 2nd Lt. (d.16th May 1944)
  • Forrest Fred. F/O (d.29th Jan 1944)
  • Forrest Fred. (d.29th Jan 1944)
  • Foster V..
  • Francis Richard William. P/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Fraser N. C.. Sgt.
  • Friday Jack. Sgt.
  • Gaddass A.. F/O
  • Gardiner Llewellyn Hugh Coverdale. F/O (d.30th Aug 1944)
  • Gardiner William Henry. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Garland D. H.A.. Sgt.
  • Garriock Henry Lloyd. (d.1945-03-15)
  • Gates Max Ennis. P/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Gauthier Joseph Paul Adelard. Sgt. (d.5th Jul 1944)
  • Gerard M. A..
  • Gibson Stanwell John. F/O (d.29th Jan 1944)
  • Gibson W.. Sgt.
  • Goldfinch John Henry Eaton. P/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Goldfinch John Henry Eaton. P/O (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Grabb B..
  • Graham J..
  • Gray D. L.. Sgt.
  • Gray D. L..
  • Gray J. D..
  • Gray R. S.W.. Sgt.
  • Greenhalgh Bruce Edward. F/Sgt. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Greenidge John Alexander. Pilot Officer (d.30th March 1944)
  • Grice Hubert G.. W/OII (d.16th May 1944)
  • Grimwade J. W.. (d.25th May 1944)
  • Gunn J. R..
  • Hackbart Alfred Harvey. Sgt (d.20th Feb 1944)
  • Hale Raymond Wallace. (d.24th Dec 1944)
  • Hall J. C..
  • Hall J. C.
  • Hall John William Frank. P/O (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Hall P..
  • Hamilton R. J.. Sgt.
  • Hanna C.. W/O
  • Harling Donald.
  • Harpin John.
  • Harris Ronald William George. Warrant Officer
  • Hawkes V. L.D..
  • Hawkins W. E.. Sgt. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Hayes H. B..
  • Head L.. W/O
  • Heard Stanley.
  • Hector . Sgt.
  • Herman William Henry. P/O (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Hetherington Lewis Wilfred. P/O (d.15th Aug1944)
  • Hewitt Vic. LAC.
  • High D..
  • Hoarty John. Sgt. (d.25th May 1944)
  • Hodgson Gordon Ross. F/O (d.5th Jul 1944)
  • Hodgson Richard William. F/O (d.2nd Feb 1945)
  • Holmes G..
  • Horwood J..
  • How Frederick Winston. F/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Hubley Cecil David Benjamin. F/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Humphreys Elmore Oliver Elvidge. Warrant Officer Class 1 (d.30th March 1944)
  • Hupman Arnold Freeman. F/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Hutt C. A..
  • Instone Stan. Sgt.
  • Jackson Thomas. P/O
  • Jakeman T. E.. W/O
  • James S. E..
  • Jarvis Bill.
  • Jaynes A..
  • Jewell B..
  • Jigursky B.. Sgt.
  • Johnston Clifford Stanley. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Jones Basil. Sgt. (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Jones Gwilyn T.. Sgt. (d.16th May 1944)
  • Jones Ogwen. F/Sgt. (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Jury E. Sgt
  • Jury E.. Sgt.
  • Kastens William. Sgt. (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Kearney B..
  • Kelly Jim. W/O
  • Kelly John. Sgt. (d.23rd Sep 1943)
  • Kent Roy.
  • Kenyon A. A..
  • Kenyon Bennett Ley. F/Lt.
  • Kerr J..
  • King R..
  • Kirkham B. D.. W/OII
  • Knight Ronald Charles. P/O (d.25th Oct 1944)
  • Krefting Raymond Marinus. P/O (d.6th Aug 1942)
  • Lacey William Morris. F/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Lamareau Fred.
  • Lanclot D. H.. F/Sgt.
  • Larkin Mark Richard. P/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Lauder Gordon Robert. F/O (d.25th May 1944)
  • Lauder Gordon Robert. F/O (d.25th May 1944)
  • Laying W. G.. F/O (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Lillico William Davidson. P/O (d.26th May 1944)
  • Little G.. Sgt.
  • Livingston S. G..
  • Llewellyn .
  • Logan Daniel. Sgt.
  • Lomas Clifford Herbert. P/O (d.16th January 1944)
  • London Dan.
  • Longmore William. (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Longmore William. (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Low E. R.. (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Lowe Thomas Bentley. Pilot Officer (d.30th March 1944)
  • Lucas J. A.. P/O
  • Lucas Len J..
  • Lunney Vernal Norwood. Pilot Officer (d.30th March 1944)
  • MacGregor John Alfred Stuart. P/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Mackay J. H.. F/O
  • Mackinnon . Sgt.
  • Maddock J..
  • Mallen N. D..
  • Mangione N..
  • Mann L..
  • Manning W..
  • Mansfield Lord Sandhurst.
  • Martin Bernhard William. F/O (d.3rd Feb 1945)
  • Marvel J. E.. F/O
  • Matheson John George.
  • Matheson John George. F/O
  • McAfee John. Sgt. (d.3rd Feb 1945)
  • McCallum K. F.. W/O
  • McCarter Bill.
  • McConnachie N..
  • McDonald B..
  • McDonald John Alexander Francis. F/O (d.3rd Feb 1945)
  • McDonald L. H..
  • McFerran G..
  • McGaughey Len.
  • McGrath E.. Sgt.
  • McIntosh J..
  • McKellar John H.. F/O
  • McKillop A. P..
  • McLachlan R..
  • McLeod W. R.. F/Sgt.
  • McManus Philip Joseph. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • McMaster James Gordon. P/O (d.17th May 1944)
  • McMullen Douglas James. P/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • McMurtri G..
  • McNary John Crawford. P/O (d.2nd May 1944)
  • McQueen J. E.. W/O
  • McQueen Jack.
  • McQueen Jack F.. F/Sgt.
  • McTaggart Don .
  • McTaggart W. J.. F/Sgt.
  • Merrick Peter William. F/Sgt. (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Miller J..
  • Mills James Albert. P/O
  • Mills James Albert. F/Lt.
  • Milne Frank Alexander. Sgt. (d.16th May 1944)
  • Milner W..
  • Mitchell William Wilkins. F/O (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Moon Forbes.
  • Moore J. L.. F/O
  • Moore M. R..
  • Morgan Bernard Reginald. Sgt. (d.25th May 1944)
  • Morgan Lee P.. F/O
  • Morrison Donald. F/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Murphy D. G..
  • Murphy Gerald William. F/O (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • Murphy Gerald William. F/O (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Murrell W. H. . F/Sgt.
  • Musto S. A.. Sgt.
  • Mynarski Andrew Charles. P/O
  • Neal Frederick Stephen. Sgt. (d.14th May 1943)
  • Neal J. L..
  • Neale G. V..
  • Nelligan A. N.. F/O (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Newbon John James. Sgt (d.18th Aug 1943)
  • Newton E..
  • Nickle Russell Karl. F/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Nisbet Robert Albert. P/O (d.3rd Feb 1945)
  • Nofziger J. A.. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Norman James. Sgt. (d.25th Jul 1944)
  • O'Connell J. C.. P/O
  • O'Hara Leo Francis. F/S (d.10th Oct 1944)
  • O'Hara Leo Francis. F/Sgt. (d.9th Oct 1944)
  • Oddan Harold Engman. F/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Olenake W.. F/O
  • Ormand C. R.. (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Parsons Ernest M.. P/O (d.16th May 1944)
  • Patterson Charles Edmund George. P/O (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Peck G..
  • Pett J..
  • Plunkett Leonard Stanley. F/O (d.30th Aug 1944)
  • Pole Ross Norman. F/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Poole N.. Sgt.
  • Porter R. E.. Sgt.
  • Poulin S..
  • Powell Lloyd Charles. Sgt. (d.16th January 1944)
  • Price W. W..
  • Prudham J.. F/O
  • Pugh Thomas Noel. Sgt. (d.16th Jan 1942)
  • Pugh Thomas Noel. Sgt. (d.16th January 1944)
  • Quaile .
  • Quaile Arthur Noel. F/Lt.
  • Quinn Gerald Edgar. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Raferty F. S.. F/O (d.25th Oct 1944)
  • Ranson J. V.. P/O
  • Reaume B. A.. Sgt.
  • Revell Philip Charles. P/O (d.15th Aug 1944)
  • Rhind John Campbell. P/O (d.29th Jan 1944)
  • Rigden Stanley. Sgt. (d.28th Apr 1944)
  • Roberts Frank.
  • Robertson W. H..
  • Robson Donald Matthews. P/O (d.25th May 1944)
  • Roche C. M.. Sgt.
  • Roe Arthur Emerson. P/O (d.5th Jul 1944)
  • Rogens R. G.. W/O
  • Sanders M. F..
  • Schryer J.. W/O (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Scowen D. D.. WO2
  • Searson John Ellard. P/O (d.25th Jul 1944)
  • Shackleton. H L .
  • Shakleton H. L..
  • Shirvell W..
  • Shirvell. W .
  • Shortt John Patrick. P/O (d.25th Jul 1944)
  • Simpson A.. Sgt.
  • Sinclair William Aeden. Seargeant (d.30th March 1944)
  • Smith Albert Edward. Cpl.
  • Smith Elliott Russell. F/Sgt. (d.28th Oct 1944)
  • Smith Ernest Sutton. Flt Lt (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Smith H. I.. P/O
  • Smith J.. F/O
  • Smith Roy Stanley. P/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Smith Thomas Harry James. Sgt. (d.25th May 1944)
  • Springstein Norman Ray. F/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Steepe G. A.D..
  • Stevenson J. M..
  • Stewart J. G..
  • Stewart R.. F/O
  • Strongitharm .
  • Surridge Ernest Gordon. Pilot Officer (d.30th March 1944)
  • Tait Cecil Ralph. P/O (d.28th Dec 1944)
  • Tarzwell H. C.. P/O (d.30th Dec 1944)
  • Tarzwell Herbert Chester. P/O (d.29th Dec 1944)
  • Taylor Glen William. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Taylor H. A.. Sgt.
  • Taylor J. E.. F/O
  • Taylor William Bryce. P/O (d.4th Jul 1943)
  • Tenny Harry R.. Sgt.
  • Tenny Harry. F/Sgt
  • Thompson G. W..
  • Thompson Thomas Bernard. Sgt. (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Thompson W. J.L..
  • Tiernry. Thomas Bernard . Sgt (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Tripp Herbert Andrew. W/O. (d.12th Jun 1943)
  • Trott Donald Alexander. Sgt. (d.4th Oct 1944)
  • Trussham J.. Sgt.
  • Trussham. J.. Sgt
  • Turner A. C..
  • Vigars Roy. Sgt.
  • Vinecombe F.. Sgt.
  • Volkes John.
  • Wakely L. P.. (d.30th Dec 1944)
  • Wakely Leo Paul. P/O (d.29th Dec 1944)
  • Walker Bruce Douglas. F/O (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Wallace A..
  • Warren-Darley H..
  • Watkins Dennis Arthur. F/Sgt.
  • Webber Joseph Alexander. F/O (d.13th May 1944)
  • Weight S.. Sgt.
  • Westerman . Sgt.
  • Weston Allen Clifford.
  • Wheeler Maurice William. Sergeant (d.30th March 1944)
  • White Captain Clayton. Sgt. (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Whittaker D. B.. Sgt.
  • Wickham Barney. Flt Lt
  • Williston R.. F/Sgt.
  • Wilson F. N.. F/O (d.13th Jun 1944)
  • Wilson Murray Gray. Flt Lt (d.8th Aug 1944)
  • Wilson Sidney Albert. P/O (d.17th Jun 1944)
  • Wilson-Law B. D..
  • Witwer H..
  • Wood R. E.N.. (d.23rd May 1944)
  • Wurrell W. H..
  • Wurrell. W. H.. Sgt
  • Zabarylo John William.

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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W/OII B. D. Kirkham 419 Sqd.

Sgt Kirkham was taken POW after Halifax DT616 VR-K was shot down on the 12th of June 1943. He was promoted to Warrant Officer2 whilst in captivity.

The crew were:

  • Sgt B.D.Kirkham
  • Sgt R.J.Hamilton
  • Sgt H.A.Taylor
  • Sgt D.B.Whittaker
  • Sgt F.J.Callaghan
  • Sgt J.A.Mills
  • Sgt D.L.Gray




P/O James Albert Mills wireless operator 419 Sqd.

From my recollection, my Dad, James Mills, was shot down on a bombing mission over the Ruhr Valley by two me109s. He said they riddled the aircraft from nose to tail, the cannon holes not an inch apart and yet not one of them was hit, after being ordered to bail, they stayed and got both meshersmits. He clipped his head on the tail wing as he bailed out and was unconsious when landing, and he lost a boot on the jump. He went to a farmhouse, the old german couple were quite alarmed until he produced a picture of jesus or mary and then it was all ....sit , eat .....relax until the Gestapo walked in a couple hours later with their lugers out, off to the stalag for 4 yrs.

He said the germans had civies on under their uniforms when they heard the barrage in the very near vicinity, they knew the war was done. He said most of the guards were pretty good blokes. Upon liberation, most of them just threw their flight jackets and what not into the ditch. Upon landing somewhere in England, a bbc reporter grabbed the first two guys and interviewed them, I remember, as a kid,listening to the old 78 over and over. It was James Albert Mills and Gus Morrison telling a 2 minute story of camplife. Does anyone have a copy? My sister lost that old record and his caterpiller pin. Dad went in to camp 6 foot 2 and 245 lbs, came out 6 foot and 100 pounds, They didnt eat well. he was diagnosed for a pension with anxiety neurosis and our govt gave him a really cheesey pittance of a pension, which he fought all his life to have increased. It didn't happen.

I would love to hear from any one who may have been in Stalag 357 or in 419 Moose Squadron that may have known him. Guess I should have done this 25 yrs ago. Its not until one reaches the age where one truly appreciates the caliber of men and women then and the guts they had to fight and give their life for the beauty and freedom we take for granted today.

Bill Mills



P/O Ashton Irving Cohen pilot 419 Sqd. (d.10th Oct 1944)

Lancaster KB754 VR-C was lost on operations to Bochum on the 10th of October 1944. The took off at 20:39 on the 9thof October 1944 from Middleton St.George. Shortly after completing the bombing run the Lancaster was attacked by a Ju88 and set on fire. An explosion then occurred which blew F/s McQueen from his turret. His six comrades are buried in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

The crew were:

  • P/O A.I.Cohen RCAF
  • Sgt R.A.Campbell RCAF
  • F/O G.W.Murphy RCAF
  • F/S J.H.E.Goldfinch RCAF
  • Sgt R.F.Emerson RCAF
  • F/S L.F.O'Hara RCAF
  • F/S J.F.Mcqueen RCAF




Jack McQueen 419 Squadron

I'm one of the daughters of Jack McQueen, Squadron 419, and we finally have his story down on paper. He was a rear gunner on the Lancaster and the only survivor of his crew. He was a POW. It took him all these years to be able to talk about the detail of his experience.

John F. McQueen, rear gunner, 419 Squadron

When he was 17 Dad wanted to enlist in the Navy but he couldnt gain enough weight to meet the requirements. He went many times to be weighed but finally decided to join the Air Force. He had to get his dad to sign for him since he was 17 and should have been 18 to join.

He started at the Brandon Manning Depot where all recruits began their first training. He went on to more specific training and when in training at Mt. Pleasant, P.E.I. he met Pat OHara who became dads best friend. He was with dad right through training including O.T.U., Operations Training Centre, and they ended up in the same squadron, 419. Dad became the rear gunner of the Lancaster.

The night dads Lancaster was shot down he remembers a small plane coming at them so fast. He called for evasive action but nothing seemed to be able to stop the small plane. He found out later it was an 18 year old pilot and the small plane had been upgraded to 50 calibre bullets and the Lancaster only had 30 calibre so the pilot was able to continually stay out of dads range. When dads plane was shot down, dad had his parachute on and ejected. His boot got stuck and it ripped right off. A week or so before being shot down dad had asked permission to put a seatpack (parachute) on for extra speed to avoid losing time instead of leaving it just inside the plane as standard procedure. It would save lost time in opening and closing the hatch door. He never would have been able to open the door and pull out the parachute in time.

Dad remembers landing in a tree and didnt know what he should do. He could hear dogs barking and a farmhouse was close by. His Lancaster was close enough to him that he could see it and knew no one else survived. He listened to kids getting closer so he stayed very quiet. He could see they had guns and they had gone over to look at the plane. In the morning he crawled down from the tree and over to a hedge row and tried to hide behind a bit of growth. A small dog started sniffing in the hedge and came across dad and started barking at him. Dad tried to coax it to stop barking but it wouldnt quit. A Russian prisoner, forced to work on the farm, went over with a pitch fork and found dad and motioned for him to stand up. Then a German farmer came over and yelled at the Russian who was only there to help with chores. The farmer helped dad over the fence and said hed like to let dad go free but couldnt. It would have been too risky for him and his family. He brought dad into his house and he met his wife and 12 year old daughter. She could speak some English and went right away for a map to see where dad lived. He showed her Winnipeg and the daughter showed her father where dad lived and the farmer said do you know my brother?, as he measured with his finger on the map from Manitoba to Illinois. Dad, of course, said no he didnt know him. The farmer said he wished he could hide dad but said it would be too dangerous. He didnt want the kids getting dad and said not to say anything bad to them or they would instantly kill him. He told dad he would call his friend who was the mayor of Hosfeld, the town nearby. The mayor went out to their home the next morning on his bicycle and brought a rope. He tied dad to the rope and dad walked behind him into town. He was missing a boot but the farmer had given him a pair of wooden shoes to wear. He tied dad to the rope so that the kids wouldnt shoot him. When they got into town the mayor tried to make arrangements for an army group to guard dad but then the commander of the kids got hold of dad and tore his cigarettes out of his pocket and then put dad into a cell. The kids took everything they could from him. Then they got a Homeguard fellow to come and guard.

In the morning a young pilot came in and he told dad he was the one who shot dads plane down. Thats when he explained the 50 calibre bullets. He took dad to a train and sat beside him the entire time. They went to a building in Frankfurt where the interrogation area was. They kept dad there for 3 weeks. He was in a boarded up room with a hanging light that never went out. The same fellow came to him each morning and yelled at him and got very mad. He was trying to break him down. Dad said he felt very numb.

After 3 weeks of interrogation he was sent to the distribution point where he was given shoes and clothing. Most everything had U.S. Army written on them. They were the belongings from the dead U.S. soldiers. Then they went on a train and everyone was jammed in and standing up and traveled to the first concentration camp called Stalagluft 7 at Bankau. Dad was a prisoner from October 1944 to June 1945.

When the Germans were being pushed out by the Russians and Allies they had to take the prisoners on the forced torture walk to get to the next POW camp. Dad has the original newspaper articles written in August 1945 by Joseph John Walkty who wrote from his diaries of the torture walk dad was on. Sgt. Walkty was the commander of dads POW group. He was the one who negotiated the things they needed from the Germans. Dad said his account of the march is exactly what they all went through.

After the walk they ended up at Luckenwalde POW camp and stayed there until they were finally freed by the Russians. When the Russians were closing in, the German guards threw their guns to the prisoners so it would look like the Germans were the prisoners. When the tanks came in to free the prisoners they started tearing down the fencing and dads group just started walking and in a few days were picked up by the Americans who were there to take them back. On the march the Germans had blown up every bridge they crossed so when they were walking with the Americans and came upon a blown up bridge the Americans put a cable across and everyone had to hold on tight to make it across. A few fell off and were washed away in the current never to be seen again.

They were taken to Brussels and were washed thoroughly with brushes and then sprayed and then after they had a nice shower. All of their clothes were washed and dried for them. Then they were taken to a big room for a feast and they couldnt believe how good the food smelled. When they saw so much food they started filling their plates and the women serving them said they could eat as much as they wanted but should only take small portions to begin with. Afterwards they knew why. Their stomachs had shrunk and they couldnt eat what they had hoped they could.

Dad arrived back in Winnipeg and was so happy to be home at last. He still has the original copy of the newspaper clipping saying he was missing in action, his squadron crest from his hat, his wings, a German label with a swastika emblem that a guard had given him in the POW camp, as well as pictures and original news clippings of the torture march. Kathleen McQueen had sent away for the pictures that were taken in the POW camp, which were taken at dads camp.

Two days after arriving home he went to a dance and met momand they lived happily ever after!

Dad never talked about his experience all of those years because he not only wanted to leave the memories of terror behind, but he had always blamed himself for being shot down and felt guilty being the only crew member to survive.

The crew were:

  • P/O A.I.Cohen RCAF
  • Sgt R.A.Campbell RCAF
  • F/O G.W.Murphy RCAF
  • F/S J.H.E.Goldfinch RCAF
  • Sgt R.F.Emerson RCAF
  • F/S L.F.O'Hara RCAF
  • F/S J.F.Mcqueen RCAF

Debby Saarits



Warrant Officer Ronald William George Harris 419 Squadron

My father, Ronald William George Harris, was stationed at Middleton St George during the second world war. He was a rear gunner in 419 Squadron. His service number was 651746. He was discharged as a Warrant Officer at the end of the war, 16 July 1946. I have a list of some of his crew and some of the missions he flew.

Shirley Ann Slater



Henry Lloyd Garriock 419 Squadron (d.1945-03-15)

In front of me is my uncle's log book. He was Henry Lloyd Garriock and was in the 419 Squadron as a navigator. He was killed in action on March 15th, 1945. He seemed to do a lot of flying with a pilot named Sgt Davies. They were shot down together over Sweden on 16/12/43. He then changed over to a pilot named F/Lt McLaughlin.

Mike Garriock



Pilot Officer Thomas Bentley Lowe 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF, Registered on the Runnymede Memorial.
  • P/O V. Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 E. Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O E. Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Pilot Officer Vernal Norwood Lunney 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF, panel 251 Runnymede Memorial.
  • W/O1 E. Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O E. Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Warrant Officer Class 1 Elmore Oliver Elvidge Humphreys 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 Elmore Humphreys RCAF, panel 253 Runnymede Memorial.
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O E. Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Sergeant Maurice William Wheeler 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 Elmore Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF, panel 256 Runnymede Memorial.
  • P/O E. Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Pilot Officer Ernest Gordon Surridge 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 Elmore Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O Ernest Surridge RCAF, panel 253 Runnymede Memorial.

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Pilot Officer John Alexander Greenidge 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O John Greenidge RCAF, panel 25o Runnymede Memorial.
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 Elmore Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O Ernest Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Seargeant William Aeden Sinclair 419 Squadron (d.30th March 1944)

    March 29/30, 1944 - 49 Halifaxes from 419, 427, 428, 431, and 434 squadrons were ordered on an attack of the rail yards at Vaires. The crews were over the target at between 12,000 and 13,000 feet, releasing 470,000 lbs of high explosives. According to reports, this attack took place in a bright moonlight and severe damage was caused. Two ammunition trains blew up with great force.

    P/O J. Greenidge RCAF and crew from 419 squadron, flying Halifax II HR-912 coded VR-F, failed to return from this operation.

  • F/L William Sinclair RAF, panel 237 Runnymede Memorial.
  • P/O Thomas Bentley Lowe RCAF
  • P/O John Greenidge RCAF
  • P/O Vernal Lunney RCAF
  • W/O1 Elmore Humphreys RCAF
  • Sgt. M. Wheeler RCAF
  • P/O Ernest Surridge RCAF

    All were lost.

    I hope to get further details in due course.

  • Patrick Greenidge



    Flight Lieutenant Robert Barnes pilot 419 Moose Squadron

    I am looking for anyone who may have known or served with my Dad, Robert (Bob) Barnes. He flew Lancasters with the 419 Moose Squadron. Dad survived the War, although he was wounded. He never talked much about the war and passed away in 2002.

    Judy Wilson



    Flt Sgt. Vincent Alton Francis Cleveland Bomb Aimer 419 Squadron (d.31st Aug 1943)

    My great uncle, Vincent Cleveland, was just a kid of 22 when his Halifax #JD 464 was shot down on August 31st 1943 over the Black Forest near Weisenburg, with his pal - the same guy who had just been best man at his wedding, Sgt R Stewart and who was piloting the plane to its final resting place. Together forever....

    The crew bailed out safely from their big kite after being shot at and down by a few ju.88's, except for a head-wounded Sgt D H Garland who fell off the back of his mate Sgt A Embley at about 2000 ft, when he tried in vain to save his life. The crew were taken prisoner and were later released & repatriated after the end of the war.

    My question is does anyone know if any of this crew is still alive? They are Sgt H R Tenny, P/O S E James, Sgt A Embley and Sgt L Northcliffe. I am trying to put the pieces together for a family project.

    Dan



    John George Matheson 419 Sqd.

    My father John George Matheson was a member of 419 Squadron stationed in England in WW2. I have photos of him over there. I would like to get in touch with someone who might like to share the stories and photos

    Rob Matheson



    Sgt. Stanley Rigden 419 Sqd. (d.28th Apr 1944)

    My uncle flew from Teeside with the 419th RCAF Sqdn, and was killed on 28th April 1944. His name was Stanley Rigden a Sgt (Flt Eng). He was married to my mother's sister and had a son who he never saw.

    Andrew Cadman



    Sgt. Joseph Douglas Henry "Doug" Arseneau 419 Sqd.

    My father was a member of the 419 Squadron. His name was Joseph Douglas Henry Arseneau, but he went by Doug. He was a Wireless Operator with the rank of Sergeant. His plane was the Halifax JD 159. He was shot down on July 3/4, 1943 over Belgium. Do you have any information about his crew? His P/O was a man that he knew as Bob Bell. We later found out his real first name was Angus. Any help would be most welcome.

    UPDATE: The information on the crew is as follows:

    On the 3/4 July 1943 Halifax II JD-159 coded VR-Y, was shot down by a nightfighter. The crew were:

    • P/O A. Bell RCAF (Killed)
    • F/Sgt J. Anderson RCAF (Killed)
    • P/O W. Taylor RCAF (Killed)
    • Sgt A. Simpson RAF (taken POW)
    • F/Sgt R. Williston RCAF (taken POW)
    • Sgt J. Arseneau RCAF (taken POW)
    • Sgt J. Graham RAF (taken POW)
    • Sgt G. Aitken RCAF (taken POW)

    Marianne Abeare



    L. Blain 419 Sqd.

    L. Blain was a flight engineer with 419 Squadron




    Flt Lt A J. "Biff" Byford 419 Sqd.

    This is a photo of the hut used by "D" crew at Middleton St George. Names as far as I know are from L to R: F/O RV Daly, LAC Jerry Greeves, AC Frank Beaves, LAC Vic Hewitt, Sgt. N C Fraser, Corp. Don Mersereau, F/L AJ ByFord, Sgt. Danny Logan & Ken Barter.

    Dan Logan



    F/Sgt. R. F. Clarke w/op 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    Mark McKellar



    Reginald Cleaver flight eng. 419 Sqd.

    When the war began in 1939, I was an apprentice toolmaker at Armstrong Siddeley Motors in Coventry. My name is Reg Cleaver and I was 17 years old. I joined the Air Raid Precautions system and became an ambulance driver attached to No 3 First Aid Post in Livingstone Rd. The building had been the swimming baths. One pool was still open for swimming the other pool had been boarded over and became a reception centre for people injured in the air raids. After work at ASM, I spent most of my time waiting for the call to pick up the next load of dead and injured people from where the bombs had landed. This became very difficult at times as whole buildings were spread all over the roads, enormous bomb craters blocked roads with destroyed buses and trams everywhere. We could be driving along with whole rows of burning buildings each side. The ambulances had canvas sides and at times got badly scorched.

    In November 1940, a large bomb exploded in the swimming pool next door destroying the whole building and drenching all of us and the seriously injured people in what had been our First Aid Post. Outside, several of our ambulances had been badly damaged. My own vehicle had been flattened by a huge steel roof truss that had landed on it.

    Next morning being very concerned what may have happened to my home and parents, I arrived home: 159 Churchill Ave, Foleshill. My mother kept a small general store opposite to the Riley Motor Works. Fortunately, my parents escaped injury being in the air raid shelter. The house roof had gone and the shop destroyed. A very sad sight - all the stock and provisions, etc all over the pavement and road and mother very shocked.

    This became a turning point in my life. A burning hatred of Germans and a determination to hit back. As an apprentice we were considered to be in a reserved occupation and could not be called up into the Forces. The only way into the R.A.F. was to volunteer for air crew. I joined the R.A.F. in early 1941 as a pilot. Strange as it may seem the R.A.F. told me they didnt need pilots. As I had been an apprentice engineer, I should train as a flight mechanic and engine fitter and transfer to a pilots course which I did. The rest of 1941, I was on a Spitfire squadron servicing Merlin engines, etc. I was still awaiting a pilots course but was overtaken by events. In 1942, four engine bombers began to arrive in the R.A.F. These needed flight engineers in the crew desperately. Notices on squadron notice boards appeared, asking for skilled ground engineers to volunteer for flight engineer aircrew. After a very short course of a week or two at St Athan in Wales and four or five weeks at English Electric Speke crawling all over Halifax bombers learning all the systems etc. I then found myself as a Sergeant Flight engineer with a crew flying Halifax on an Operational Training Unit, 1659 Heavy Conversion Unit at Topcliffe Yorkshire, becoming second pilot.

    From there I was posted to the Royal Canadian Air Force, 419 Squadron at Middleton St George, Durham. From there with an all Canadian crew, I flew a number of bombing operations against German cities during this time, we had some desperate times. On the night of 24-25th June 1943, during an attack on Wuppertal in the Ruhr Valley, nemesis caught up with us. We were attacked by 3 Focke Wulf 190 night fighters and shot down in flames and the aircraft falling to pieces around us in a dive. With the aircraft still in flames, the pilot recovered some control near the ground and we crashed through some trees. This removed the wings and fuel tanks and the fire. The fuselage hit the ground and miraculously we fell out.

    This part of my life is a long story which I cannot include now. The rest of the war until April 1945, I suffered as a prisoner of war in various prison and concentration camps.

    After liberation and hospital treatment I was flown back to England. After such an upheaval in my life I found it very difficult to settle down to a more normal type of life. In 1948, I found my soulmate and married Betty. I went back to Armstrong Siddeley Motors and helped found the rocket research department in a very interesting and rewarding job. We are still married after 57 years. I consider myself extremely lucky to survive the war as 50% of the Bomber Command aircrew were killed. I think people today would find it difficult to understand what a strange life we aircrew led in those days. In the afternoon we could be at a dance or cinema with girlfriends. That night we could be over Germany with everyone trying to kill us. If we got back the same cycle could be repeated weeks on end. It now seems very unreal.

    Reg Cleaver



    P/O John Chetwynd Durrant nav. 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    John Durrant flew with my uncle William Longmore, and I would like to contact any relatives of the crew members. The aircraft Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-F and the entire crew were lost on the 8th August 1944 on a mission near Caen

    The crew were:

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    Bill Longmore



    Jack Ellis flight eng. 419 Sqd.

    On April 23, 2005 a small reunion was held by the surviving all Canadian crew of a Lancaster of 419 Sqd. In attendance were: Roy Kent, pilot; Lee P Morgan, Rear Gunner DFC; Fred Lamareau, bomb aimer; Jack Corrie, Wireless Operator 419 Sqd.; The other crew members were Bill Jarvis (deceased) his sons were in attendance Forbes Moon (deceased) and Jack Ellis.

    The surviving crew members for many years have been trying to find out what happened to Jack Ellis flt eng. 419 Sqd. Jack Ellis was not Canadian and their last known contact with Jack was that he was living in England. They would very much like to hear from someone within Jack's family. If you know of any information about Jack Ellis it would be greatly appreciated.

    Murray Morgan



    Wing Cdr. Mervyn Mathew Fleming DSO, DFC. 419 Sqd.

    My father Merv Fleming served at Middleton. He was wing commander in 419 squadron. I'd like to hear from anyone who flew with him.

    Sean Fleming



    F/O Fred Forrest nav. 419 Sqd. (d.29th Jan 1944)

    Fred Forrest

    My uncle Fred Forrest was an observer on a Halifax that was shot down over Zuhlen, Germany on January 29, 1944. He was with 419 sqdn.
    W-wille

    The crew of Halifax II serial number JD-468 coded VR-W (Willie) taken on October 4, 1943.

    Here are the names on the back of the photo of the crew. Left to right: Fred Forrest - Navigator, Brantford, Ontario; Sgt. Parrot - Flight Engineer, Cambridge, England; Sgt. Tarbet - Mid Under Gunner, Toronto, Ontario; Sgt. Palmer - Pilot, Buffalo, USA; Sgt. Reilly - Wireless Operator, London, England; Sgt. Milner - Rear Gunner, Edmonton, Alberta ; P/O Lemerick - Bomb Aimer, Winnipeg, Mantioba. Fred also wrote "In front of our Kite, 'W' Willie"
    P/O F. Palmer RCAF and crew, flying Halifax II JP-119 coded VR-O, lost their lives on the night of January 29, 1944, during a mission over Berlin.

    The crew that night were:

    F/O S. Gibson RCAF,

    Sgt J. Parrott RAF,

    F/O F. Forrest RCAF,

    F/O G. Lemerick RCAF,

    F/Sgt F. Reilly RAF,

    P/O E. Milner RCAF,

    P/O R. Tarbet RCAF,

    All were killed.

    Marny Forrest



    Sgt. N. C. Fraser 419 Sqd.

    Names as far as I know are from L to R: F/O RV Daly, LAC Jerry Greeves, AC Frank Beaves, LAC Vic Hewitt, Sgt. N C Fraser, Corp. Don Mersereau, F/L AJ ByFord, Sgt. Danny Logan & Ken Barter

    Dan Logan



    Raymond Wallace Hale w/op 419 Sqd. (d.24th Dec 1944)

    Raymond Hale bailed out of Lancaster KB715 piloted by F/O T.H.Cowlan on a daylight raid on the airfield at Lohausen (Dusseldorf)on Christmas Eve 1944, the bombing raid was aimed at hindering enemy support for the Ardennes campaign. Raymond Hale was captured and executed by the Gestapo, he was 21 years old and is buried in the Rheinburg War Cemetery.




    Donald Harling 419 Sqd.

    This is a photo that my mother left me of my dad, Donald Harling and others, her notes show that it was taken at Middleton St. George in 1942. He was a radar technician and worked on the radar sets in the bombers. He is the one in the back row under the arrow. I do not know the names of any of the others.

    He mentioned, many years ago, that he had been in the Moose (419) and Ghost (428) squadrons. He worked on the radar sets in the bombers and remembers touching the high voltage wires more than once. He said it would straighten out his arm so fast, the screw driver would sometimes punch a hole in the side of the plane. On a sadder note, he occasionally had to clean out a gunners position for those who didn't make it.

    If you have any information about others, please feel free to e-mail me.

    John Harling



    LAC. Vic Hewitt 419 Sqd.

    Names as far as I know are from L to R: F/O RV Daly, LAC Jerry Greeves, AC Frank Beaves, LAC Vic Hewitt, Sgt. N C Fraser, Corp. Don Mersereau, F/L AJ ByFord, Sgt. Danny Logan, Ken Barter

    Dan Logan



    Sgt. Basil Jones flt eng. 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    Basil Jones flew with my uncle, William Longmore. The aircraft Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-F and entire crew were lost on the 8th Aug.1944 on a mission near Caen

    The crew were:

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    I am trying to trace a photograph of F/Sgt William Longmore the mid upper Gunner. Any and all info will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Bill Longmore



    Sgt. Daniel Logan 419 Sqd.

    This is a photo of the hut used by "D" crew. The photo is one my dad, Daniel Logan has, but was also printed in a book about 30 years ago. Names as far as I know are from L to R: F/O RV Daly, LAC Jerry Greeves, AC Frank Beaves, LAC Vic Hewitt, Sgt. N C Fraser, Corp. Don Mersereau, F/L AJ ByFord, Sgt. Danny Logan, Ken Barter (no rank noted)

    This one with Dad in the ground crew with some flight crew behind was on F/O Calders crew, I only have the names of 2 of the ground crew, front row third from left Cpl. Don Mersereau and Sgt Danny Logan , for some reason the rest of the ground crew are unnamed. My Dad had a supersition about putting flight crew names on photos so they are not mentioned on this one. In fact they were not listed on the photo of the hut, the names came from the book. This Lancaster was lost sometime in late 1944 with a different crew on board or so I think?

    Dan Logan



    Dan London air gunner. 419 Sqd.

    Dan London was shot down on the 27th of March 1943 and taken Prisoner of War




    William Longmore mid upper gunner 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    I would like to contact any relatives of the crew members who flew with my uncle William Longmore. The aircraft Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-F and entire crew were lost on the 8th Aug.1944 on a mission near Caen

    The crew were:

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    I am trying to trace a photograph of F/Sgt William Longmore the mid upper Gunner. Any and all info will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Bill Longmore



    F/O J. H. Mackay bomb aimer 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    J McKay was a bomb aimer who flew with my Grandfather, John McKellar,navigator on Allen Weston's crew, on VR-W, KB-707 with 419 Squadron RCAF.

    Mark McKellar



    F/O John George Matheson 419 Sqd.

    My father John George Matheson was a member of 419 Squadron stationed in England in WW2. I have photos of him over there. I would like to get in touch with someone who might like to share the stories and photos.

    Rob Matheson



    W/O K. F. McCallum air gunner. 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    W/O McCallum was an air gunner on Lancaster VR-W, KB-707 with 419 Squadron RCAF with Allen Weston's crew, my Grandfather John McKellar was the navigator.

    The crew were:

    • P/O A.C.Weston, pilot
    • F/O J.H.McKellar, nav
    • F/O J.H.Mackay, bomb aimer
    • FS R.F.Clarke, W/Op
    • Sgt S.A.MUSTO, flight eng
    • WO K.F.McCallum, air gunner
    • FS W.H.Murrell, air gunner

    Mark McKellar



    F/O John H. McKellar nav. 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    Sadly this is the only picture I have of my Grandfather John McKellar, he was the navigator in VR-W, KB-707 with 419 Squadron RCAF. His pilot was Allen Weston. In the background is VR-W which I believe was written off after the crash on September 20 1944. I have read VR-W was out on the night of September 18 bombing the coastal guns at Domberg. The plane received some damage as there were reports of wing problems. Upon return the weather over Middleton St. George was poor so they diverted to East Moor or Linton (Conflicting reports) for landing. The next day the plane went up on a practice flight, however on landing the gear collapsed and from when I can find out the plane was put out of service. No injuries were reported.

    The crew were:

    • P/O A.C.Weston, pilot
    • F/O J.H.McKellar, nav
    • F/O J.H.Mackay, bomb aimer
    • FS R.F.Clarke, W/Op
    • Sgt S.A.MUSTO, flight eng
    • WO K.F.McCallum, air gunner
    • FS W.H.Murrell, air gunner

    I would love to get in touch with George Weston who has submitted his father's details to this page. If anyone has George's current email address please get in touch.

    Mark McKellar



    F/Sgt. Peter William Merrick bomb aimer 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    Peter Merrick flew with my uncle William Longmore. The aircraft, Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-F and entire crew were lost on the 8th Aug.1944 on a mission near Caen

    The crew were:

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    I would like to contact any relatives of the crew members, any and all info will be greatly appreciated.

    Bill Longmore



    F/O Lee P. Morgan DFC. rear gunner 419 Sqd.

    On April 23, 2005 a small reunion was held by all the surviving Canadian crew of a Lancaster of 419 Sqd. In attendance were: Roy Kent, pilot; Lee P Morgan, Rear Gunner DFC; Fred Lamareau, bomb aimer; Jack Corrie, Wireless Operator 419 Sqd.; The other crew members were Bill Jarvis (deceased) Sons were in attendance Forbes Moon (deceased) and Jack Ellis.

    The surviving crew members for many years have been trying to find out what happened to Jack Ellis flt eng. 419 Sqd. Jack Ellis was not Canadian and their last known contact with Jack was that he was living in England. They would very much like to hear from someone within Jack's family. If you know of any information about Jack Ellis it would be greatly appreciated.

    Murray Morgan



    F/Sgt. W. H. Murrell air gunner. 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    W.H.Murrell was an air gunner who flew with my Grandfather, John McKellar on Allen Weston's crew. The crew were:
    • P/O A.C.Weston, pilot
    • F/O J.H.McKellar, nav
    • F/O J.H.Mackay, bomb aimer
    • FS R.F.Clarke, W/Op
    • Sgt S.A.MUSTO, flight eng
    • WO K.F.McCallum, air gunner
    • FS W.H.Murrell, air gunner

    Mark McKellar



    Sgt. S. A. Musto flt eng. 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    S.A.Musto was a flight engineer who flew with my Grandfather, John McKellar on Allen Weston's crew. The crew were:
    • P/O A.C.Weston, pilot
    • F/O J.H.McKellar, nav
    • F/O J.H.Mackay, bomb aimer
    • FS R.F.Clarke, W/Op
    • Sgt S.A.Musto, flight eng
    • WO K.F.McCallum, air gunner
    • FS W.H.Murrell, air gunner

    Mark McKellar



    W/O J. Schryer 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    J Schryer flew with my Uncle William Longmore on Allen Weston's crew. The aircraft Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-Fand entire crew were lost on the 8th Aug.1944 on a mission near Caen

    The crew were:

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    I am trying to trace a photograph of F/Sgt William Longmore the mid upper Gunner. Any and all info will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Bill Longmore



    Sgt. Harry R. Tenny 419 Sqd.

    They were laughing and scratching at about twenty thousand feet along with another eight hundred crews from the combined crews of Bomber Command consisting of Lancaster, Halifax and Stirling. Each aircraft had four engines and a crew of seven men. Sometimes a second pilot was added to the crew, this would be a budding pilot and at twenty years old this first experience was often referred to later (if he was lucky) as weird.Aircraft were sometimes referred to as, "Kites". All of my crew were under twenty five. The skipper was twenty and I was eighteen, the rest were in between and were a bit more experienced than me as they had been flying other aircraft before I joined them. They had experience with two engine aircraft such as Wellingtons, Hamdens and Whitleys, that up to this time had been the backbone of Bomber Command. All around us were the hundreds of aircraft, each all tensed up as we were and each member of the crews alone with his own thoughts, wondering and hoping that they would be one of the lucky ones to reach the target which was the big city of Berlin and then get back to their base safely and the welcome from their respective ground crews and comradeship of the mess when a toll was taken of the nights success or a silence which meant only one thing, that the nights losses were either very heavy or of a personal nature to certain members of the squadron. This was always the time to reflect before the line shooting began or to use an American term, "shooting the breeze" To survive, a pilot would try to dodge the flack, hence the saying, "close the hanger doors". This is perhaps an odd thing to say, but I never did feel frightened nor did I ever hear anyone else say they were. Perhaps we were all so keyed up and enthralled by the beauty of the night with it's so many colours that fear had to take a back seat. Some colours meant death for someone. Our bullets, perhaps one in three were tracer, seemed to race away like aburning string of beads. Any that hit would kill or ignite a fuel tank. Our attention was taken by an aircraft ahead of us with two engines on fire, it was taking evasive action when it suddenly exploded. Suddenly we were flying through burning debris. Before we could collect our thoughts yet another bomber was in trouble and taking evasive action with all it's guns blazing. Then it began to lose height and the nose dipped and it took a downward path. As it disappeared from our view we saw a couple of F.W.190 German fighter planes following it down. We had a healthy respect for these German fighters. We soon discovered we had troubles of our own as the rear gunner suddenly opened upwith his guns while screaming to the Skipper to take evasive action as quick as he could. But sadly the Skipper was too late and we now had three of our engines blazing. Carrying a full load of bombs in the bomb bay, the last thing we needed exploding around us was shrapnel. I suggested to the Skipper it would be prudent to part company with ourfaithful kite and he gave the order to bale out. Alas, only four of us were able to comply with the order, and we lost three brave crew members who will forever be in our hearts. We quickly donned parachutes and opening the escape hatch left the burning aircraft. Royal Air ForceBOMBER COMMAND LOSSESof the Second World WarVolume 4Aircraft and Crew Losses1943 419 Sqn Halifax II Jd464 VR-N Op:Berlin F/O R Stewart RCAF + T/o 1952 Middleton St. George. Homebound, shot down from 18,000 feet by a night-fighter and crashed in the vicinity of the Black Forest. Those who died have no know graves.

    The crew were:

    • Sgt H R Tenny
    • P/O S E James RCAF
    • Sgt V A F Cleveland
    • Sgt A Embley
    • Sgt L Northcliffe RCAF
    • Sgt D H A Garland RCAF
    The name "Dulag Luft" was well known to most of the aircrews in the interrogation camp of the Lufftwaffe and was a little feared at home. But as we arrived at the Camp we got a noisy reception by what looked like a hundred different Allied aircrews. We were distributed amongst the various cells that contained six or more of air-crews that had been shot down these last few days. At this time we were losing about thirty aircraft a day. Many swapped yarns about their exploits but the main thread of the conversation was, "Stick to the Geneva Convention Code and only spout your Name Rank and Number". Harry Mott was one chap in my cell and I asked him how he got on when he was questioned, and he told me that when asked what happened what happened when the gallant Luftwaffe had shot him down. And Harry said, "Three things happened", the Interrogator got his pen out at the double and asked, "Yes, yes, what three things?" Harry said after a moment of dramatic pause, "FLARES GONE, BOMBS GONE, MOTT GONE" And that was all they could get out of Sgt Harry Mott. Yet another wise guy told them he had been flying a new type of aircraft and after being plied with John Player cigarettes he told them it was a Huntley and Palmer with Peak Frean engines. I don't know for how long it threw them, but it lightened our day, as we were all getting a bit despondent by this time. We had no idea what the future held for us.

    After three days we were assembled outside and taken to the local Railway siding and put into cattle wagons where we stayed a further three days. We were allowed out at intervals to obey the call of bodily functions. Then at last we moved and ended up in a huge camp called Stalag 4B between Dresden and Leipzig in lower Saxony. At that time it held about twenty thousand Allied POW, eventually however it was to hold forty thousand of every nationality but mostly British and Russian. The Russians, poor devils, had a rough time of it, and since were not a member of the Geneva Code the Germans took advantage of this and took it out on any individual and indeed the nation as a whole and we saw lots of evidence of how they engineered some atrocities that were not necessary to advance their war effort.

    Whilst being held prisoner, Sgt Tenny exchanged identity with Pte T. Barker of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and escaped from Stalag 4b.




    Allen Clifford Weston pilot 419 Sqd.

    2nd from left K F McCallum, 3rd from left J H MacKay, 4th: A C Weston, 5th: John McKellar, with R F Clark, S A Musto and W H Murrell. Behind them is VR-W, KB-707.

    My father's name is Allen Clifford Weston and he served at Middleton St. George from July 24 to November 28, 1944. He successfully completed 32 bombing missions over France and Germany during his service as Pilot of a Lancaster Bomber. He was in the 419 squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force and was a Lancaster Bomber Pilot. My father made 32 bombing missions over France and Germany and I have his log book and medals all in good shape. I remember my father telling me stories about his second world war exploits which was unusual because he hardly ever talked about the war. He met my mother, who was in the Royal Air Force and brought her home to Canada after the war. My father is dead now but my mother is still alive at 86 years young. I often consider my father a war hero and infact he was nominated for the distinguished flying cross by his crew but never received it. By reading his log book it seems to me he deserved the medal

    George Weston



    P/O Thomas Jackson 419 Sqd.

    My great uncle Tom was a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force and flew a Halifax bomber that was shot down around April 21, 1943. He was sent to Stalag Luft 3 where he played a role in the Great Escape. I am looking for any further information anyone can give me in regards to his military history.

    Editors Note: Tom Jackson was the pilot of Halifax JB912 VR-B with 419 Squadron flying from Middleton St George. They took off at 21:14 on the 20th of April 1943 and were shot down from 16,000 feet by a night-fighter, crashing an estimated 47 km NW of Stettin.

    The crew were:

    • P/O T.E.Jackson
    • Sgt J.F.Westerman
    • Sgt C.J.Sebastian
    • F/S J.M.Carlton
    • P/O J.R.Fry
    • Sgt T.M.Crandell
    • F/S D.A.Watkins DFM
    • Sgt E.Jury

    Flight Sgt Watkins was killed and the others were all held as Prisoners of War.

    Evelyn Geringswald



    Sgt. Thomas Noel Pugh 419 Sqdn. (d.16th Jan 1942)

    I have only been able to find details of my Uncle Tom on the CWGC website, I would love to learn more if anyone can help. He had only been married a short time and had no children, his wife Olive died 6 months after learning of his death.

    Editor's Note: Tom was flying in Wellington Z1145 VR-A which took off from RAF Mildenhall at 18:10 on the 15th of Januray 1942. The Aircraft was severely battle damaged during the raid on Hamburg and was returning to base when both engines failed due to lack of fuel. The Wellington ditched at 02:10 on the 16th of Jan 1942 in the sea off Spurn Head. Two survivors, Sgt Cox and Sgt Lucas were picked up two hours later and taken to Grimsby Naval Hospital suffering from minor cuts and abrasions. The rest of the crew were lost at sea and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

    The crew were:

    • P/O T.G.Cottier RCAF
    • Sgt L.C.Powell RCAF
    • Sgt A.E.Cox RAF
    • Sgt T.N.Pugh RCAF
    • P/O C.H.Lomas RCAF
    • Sgt J.A.H.Lucas RAF

    Angela Dauria



    J. C. Hall DFC & Bar. 419 Squadron

    Chris Roberts



    W/O. Herbert Andrew Tripp 419 Squadron (d.12th Jun 1943)

    My uncle Herbert Tripp was shot down over Germany on raid on Dusseldorf. He is buried in Reichwald Forest Cemetary Germany.

    David Tripp



    F/Lt. Bennett Ley Kenyon 419 Squadron

    I met Ley Kenyon in the Chelsea Arts club in the 1970s when researching images for a book on WWII escapes. He was an artist, and was ordered to record the building of Harry. The drawings were hidden in Tom Tunnel at the forced evacuation but were returned to Ley after the war; the whole experience was so traumatic for him however, that he had barely looked at them since until I came along. He expressed some annoyance that the character in 'The Great Escape' mainly based on himself was depicted as showing fear and even cowardice while carrying out the task of recording the tunnel, which he vehemently denied.

    A number of the drawings Ley Kenyon made of Harry Tunnel can be found online at The Great Escape

    S L Waterson



    Sgt Nathaniel William Duggan No.419 'Moose' Squadron

    My dad, Nat Duggan, was shot down over Holland in May 1943. He was in hiding with the Dutch Resistance and then made his way to Brussels. He traveled by train to Paris and was captured at the Bristol Hotel fifteen minutes after his arrival. He was put in a prison cell and on Aug 9 1943 met American Air Gunner, Hank Palaski. After Gestapo interrogation and being beaten up, he eventually was sent to Stalag 4b in Germany. He was there Nov 4th, 43 to April 22nd, 1945. His note in his war log states: Apr 23rd, 1945 three Russian soldiers rode into camp on horseback 8.00 am officially released.

    William Duggan



    F/O Gordon Robert "Gordie" Lauder 419 Squadron (d.25th May 1944)

    My father was Flying Officer Gordon Robert Lauder. I was five weeks old when he lost his life in battle and I grew up in a world as a young child where his name was only mentioned in a whisper. It seemed too painful a subject for my family to discuss. My father's only brother was the one to fill in the blanks for me when I was an inquisitive teenager. I was fortunate to know he was one of the finest men to walk this earth. I have read many times the letter my Mother received after my Father learned of my birth. He wanted me and he was delighted that I was a girl. I am one of so many to grow up and now be a senior not ever knowing my real Father. I often think how different it all would have been had my Father returned home. When I was twenty-one my Mother and Step-Father gave me a special gift. I travelled with a group of wonderful people to Holland and witnessed how they were so truly grateful for men like my Father. It was the celebration of twenty years of liberation. It took this experience for the young me to completely understand all that had happened during World War Two. I realized who I was when I knelt before his grave in Tilburg, Holland and cried the first ever tears for my Father and began the journey of grief. I don't have any stories to tell about my Dad and so wish that I did. But he is not completely gone because I have four daughters who grew up proudly telling the story of their Brave Grandfather on Remembrance Day at school. Now it is my Grandchildren taking the medals to school and telling the same story. So Gordon Robert Lauder lives on in our family and will be mentioned and never will his name be a whisper.

    Natalie Affolter



    Sgt Alfred Harvey Hackbart 419 Moose Squadron (d.20th Feb 1944)

    February 19/20, 1944 31 Lancaster from 408 and 426 Squadrons were joined by 98 Halifaxes from 419, 420, 424, 425, 427, 428, 429, 431, 433, and 434 Squadrons on an attack at Leipzig. The crews were over the target at between 19,000 and 25,000 feet, releasing 112,000 lbs of high explosives and 422,000 lbs of incendiaries. According to reports, the target was cloud covered and the attack was scattered. The crews were met by strong winds and fierce fighter attacks. 18 crews, or 128 men failed to return from operations. P/O D. MacLeod, RCAF and crew, flying Halifax II JD-114 coded VR-V, failed to return from this operation. Sgt. M. Leboldus, RCAF F/O J. Piper, RCAF W/O2 J. Beattie, RCAF Sgt. T. Gettings, RAF P/O D. Lewthwaite, RCAF Sgt. A. Hackbart, RCAF All were killed.

    Ryan Kroetsch



    William Longmore 419 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1944)

    I would like to contact any relatives of the crew members who flew with my uncle William Longmore. The aircraft and entire crew were lost on the 8th Aug.1944 on a mission near Caen

    The aircraft Lancaster X KB-755 coded VR-F The crew

    • F/O B. Walker RCAF
    • Sgt. B. Jones RAF
    • P/O J. Durrant RCAF
    • F/O P. Merrick RCAF
    • W/O1 J. Schryer RCAF
    • F/Sgt. W. Longmore RAF
    • F/Lt M. Wilson RCAF

    I am trying to trace a photograph of F/Sgt William Longmore the mid upper Gunner. Any and all info will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

    Bill Longmore.



    Fred Forrest 419 Sqd. (d.29th Jan 1944)

    Fred ForrestMy uncle Fred Forrest was an observer on a Halifax that was shot down over Zuhlen, Germany on January 29, 1944. He was with 419 sqdn.
    W-wille

    The crew of Halifax II serial number JD-468 coded VR-W (Willie) taken on October 4, 1943.

    Here are the names on the back of the photo of the crew. Left to right:

    Fred Forrest - Navigator, Brantford, Ontario

    Sgt. Parrot - Flight Engineer, Cambridge, England

    Sgt. Tarbet - Mid Under Gunner, Toronto, Ontario

    Sgt. Palmer - Pilot, Buffalo, USA

    Sgt. Reilly - Wireless Operator, London, England

    Sgt. Milner - Rear Gunner, Edmonton, Alberta

    P/O Lemerick - Bomb Aimer, Winnipeg, Mantioba

    Fred also wrote "In front of our Kite, W Willie"

    P/O F. Palmer RCAF and crew, flying Halifax II JP-119 coded VR-O, lost their lives on the night of January 29, 1944, during a mission over Berlin.

    The crew that night were:

    F/O S. Gibson RCAF,

    Sgt J. Parrott RAF,

    F/O F. Forrest RCAF,

    F/O G. Lemerick RCAF,

    F/Sgt F. Reilly RAF,

    P/O E. Milner RCAF,

    P/O R. Tarbet RCAF,

    All were killed.

    Marny Forrest



    P/O. Donald John Applin 419 Squadron (d.13th Jun 1944)

    Donny Applin was my auntie's fiance from Montreal Canada. All we knew was he was shot down over Cambrai and missing believed dead. My aunt and her brother, my father never knew what happened to him and now they are also dead. I have a locket with a picture of Donny in it and for the last 40 years I have been looking at every monument in hopes of some idea to put a story to the locket My eldest brother was named after him and I needed to find something out.

    I have just returned from a holiday to York and was surprised to discover an astronomical clock beautiful as a memorial to British and allied airmen killed during the war given with gratitude by the people of York. There was also a book of remembrance with the names and there he was including squadron number and the rest was easy. My mistake was to look under Aplin but not Applin. So I found where he was stationed, where he is buried with 4 others of his crew,that he was a wireless operator that 2 escaped and made it back to England.

    I just felt so sorry that mine and his family never knew. It was such a huge tragedy to them. My aunt never believed he was dead and that he would come back. She eventually after 10 years married. If any Applin family are looking for Donny I hope they will read this Thank you

    Alison Butler Zagni



    Cpl. James Kenyon Davies 419 Sqd.

    Unfortunately, I know very little about my dad Jim Davies' service during the war but would love to find out more. I do know that he made some good Canadian friends and that he was given the opportunity to emigrate to Canada after the war but turned it down because of family commitments. I would love to hear from anyone who knew or worked with Jim or from any relatives of those who worked with him. Thank you for taking the time to read this and for any information that you are able to provide.

    Andrew Davies



    F/O Gordon Edward Donaldson 419 Squadron (d.29th Sep 1943)

    My husband's father, Flying Officer Gordon Edward Donaldson, served in 419 Sqdn., RCAF. He was killed in action on 29th September 1943 aged 22. His parents were John and Irene Donaldson of Toronto, Ontario but unfortunately we have no other information and would dearly love to contact someone who may remember him, or have any information regardless how little.

    Marie McColl



    J. C Hall DFC 419 Squadron

    My uncle J C Hall, DFC and bar, served in 419 Squadron.

    Chris Roberts



    F/Lt. James Albert Mills 419 Sqd.

    My father, Al Mills was shot down over the Ruhr Valley on the 13th of June 1943 and spent the rest of the war in a German POW camp. He suffered greatly as did we this family of 8. After the war he suffered from what the doctors termed anxiety neurosis. Today they call it PTSD.

    If only the young generation of today 2015 knew the degree of this honor and sacrifice it would be a different world. His name was James Albert Mills from Toronto, Ontario.

    Bill Mills



    Cpl. Albert Edward Smith 419 Squadron

    I joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in 1940 age 18. I first trained as a Fitter IIE and was promoted to Corporal in April 1941. In December 1941 I was posted to RAF Mildenhall, Suffolk to work with the Royal Canadian Air Force, Squadron 419. I took charge of Wellington “H Harry” and its ground crew early in January 1942.

    The foundation of 419 was set up by British ground staff but all aircrew were RCAF. Over the first few months of 1942 the British members were gradually replaced by Canadian ground crew and so I was posted on in June 1942. During my 6 months of service in charge of “H Harry” the aircraft was never lost. The last ops in which I was involved, and in which 419 fully participated, were the first two “1000 bomber” mass attacks. These occurred between May and early June 1942 with the first target being Cologne.

    I took every opportunity to fly with the aircraft on air tests, cross-country practice flights etc. I kept a logbook which recorded some 40 hours and was signed by Squadron Leader Turner (I/C “A” flight). Unfortunately the log book was lost in the East Coast Flood of January 1953, I can no longer at 91 years of age recall the names of ‘H Harry’ air crews. However I do recall and remember well Wing Commander “Moose “ Fulton and Squadron Leader Turner, both of whom I flew with. Looking back on those days when I was quite prepared to join the aircraft on air tests etc (minus parachute!), I realise now that I must have convinced the ‘ops’ aircrew that their aircraft was well maintained and thoroughly reliable.

    Because of snowfall in early ’42, air craft and ground crews were moved temporarily to the satellite airfield with concrete runway at Lakenheath. Our accommodation was primitive. Water supply to our huts was frozen, hence we collected snow and melted it for drinking and washing.

    Some events recalled... One night on return from an operation the rear gunner failed to come out of ‘H Harry’. His turret was facing sideways with the doors open. A search was made in case he had fallen out on landing but there was no sign. He turned up later in the morning. Apparently as they crossed the British coast the skipper had said something like ‘Thank God we are safe if we have to bale out’. All the gunner heard was ‘bale out’ and he did. Landing in East Anglia he eventually located a farmhouse, was given a good breakfast and returned to base. Unfortunately I no longer remember his name.

    One morning at Lakenheath, ‘H Harry’ having just been serviced, I was sitting in the pilot’s seat when a Wellington came over low and landed. As it did something hit and smashed the cockpit Perspex close to my head. I realised the damage was caused by the lead weight on the end of the trailing aerial which was normally wound in before landing. It turned out that the Wellington crew had made an emergency landing because their tail gunner was badly wounded and unconscious. Under the circumstances the damage to ‘H Harry’ was not mentioned.

    One of the ground crew was replaced by a Canadian rigger. One morning in the aircraft he had idly fiddled with the ‘Very’ signal-pistol. Unaware that it was loaded he discharged it and set fire to the front of ‘H Harry’. Fortunately the burning fabric was rapidly dealt with but the damage took several days to repair.

    Photos of ‘Q Queenie’ appeared to the war time public and in many books, then and since, about wartime aircraft. The series of photos of ‘Q Queenie’ in flight were taken by Charles Brown, an official photographer, who was on board ‘H Harry’ at the time. I accompanied Mr Brown that day and helped steady him and the bulky camera as he took the shots. The skipper’s manoeuvres around ‘Q Queenie’ resulted in some excellent images. Incidentally, in one of the books on wartime aircraft there is a photo of Squadron Leader Turner and the aircrew lined up in front of ‘H Harry’. One of my flight mechanics also appears on the port wing. The photo is referenced as courtesy of Public Archives of Canada.

    The Mark 1c Wellingtons were replaced in early Spring ’42 by the Mark 3. The first replacement Mark 3 was collected from a maintenance Unit in SW Scotland by Squadron Leader Turner. Because I had completed a two week course at Bristol on the Hercules engine and the Rotol electric propeller, Squadron Leader Turner took me with him and we were dropped off at the M.U. by one of our aircraft. I was wearing a Canadian overall (which I still have) and he told me to pocket my forage cap and we will all have lunch together in the M.U. Officers’ Mess. We then flew the Mark 3 back to Mildenhall.

    One night I was knocked down by ‘H Harry’. I was leading the aircraft to its parking place after it landed from an op. The method was to lead in front with a torch in each hand, pointing back to the aircraft. Both the pilot and I were blinded by a sudden brilliant light aimed at us. I stopped quicker than the aircraft hence was knocked down under the fuselage rather than decapitated by one of the propellers. The pilot was Wing Commander Fulton in charge of ‘H Harry’ to lead that night’s 419 operation. In the morning he dealt with the fire crew who had stupidly operated their search light from their vehicle.

    Early in ’42 the second pilot was withdrawn from the aircrews with the result that many skippers made sure that at least one of his crew was capable of taking over if vital. Practice was carried out by the aircrew during air-tests. On several occasions I too was allowed to take over the controls and on another occasion I was instructed and allowed (unofficially) by the skipper to taxi the aircraft.

    As it is now 2015 there are probably records already of some of the events I have mentioned but whatever is known about the early years of 419, it is a pleasure to share my memories with you.

    Brief wartime career info: in 1942 I was posted from Mildenhall to RAF Orfordness, working as a technician for Civil Servant Scientific Officers (Bomb Ballistics & Firing Trails) at Orfordness Research Station. In 1944 commissioned and served in Italy and the Middle East. Commanding Officer of a unit in Palestine. In 1946 I was released from RAF, joined Orfordness Research Station. Also joined RAFVR (T) as Flight Luitenant officer and glider pilot instructor for ATC cadets (Air Training Corp, Cadets).

    Anne Smith



    F/Lt. Arthur Noel "Butch" Quaile 419 Sqdn.

    My father was Flight Lieutenant Butch Quaile, RAF, attached to to 419 Moose Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. He had enlisted on the 10th of September 1939. He was the pilot of Handley Page Halifax VR-S, Happy Valley Sally, which was shot down whilst returning from bombing Modane on the night of 16th/17th of September 1943. He ended up in Stalag Luft III, North Compound, in Sagan, Silesia, now part of Poland but then in Germany. The crew were as follows:
    • Pilot F/Lt Butch Quaile, 27 missions, POW RAF
    • 2nd Pilot Sgt Bowden, 1 mission, POW RCAF
    • Navigator P/O Aspinall, 24 missions, POW RCAF
    • Bomb Aimer P/O Graham, 23 missions, Evaded RCAF
    • Flight Engineer Sgt. Martin, 24 missions, Evaded RCAF
    • Wireless Operator F/S Bright, 2 missions, Evaded RCAF
    • Mid Lower Gunner F/O Smith, 15 missions, Evaded RCAF
    • Rear Gunner F/Lt Kenyon, 44 missions, POW RAF

    This is an extract from his account of his last mission:

    There were only two aircraft from 419 on the Modane raid. The main raid was to the railway yards at Modane and our mission was to close or damage the nearby railway tunnel and the pass from Italy to prevent or hinder the German forces withdrawal. Our raid was in conjunction with some aircraft from 617 Squadron, the Dambusters. It should have been a nine hour flight but there was bad icing in cloud at about 11,000 feet (the operation height en route should have been 15,000 ft. + ). We were carrying 2 x 1,000lb and 6 x 500lb high explosive bombs. Over the target area the weather was clear moon light and we attacked at low level. I recollect that we could see the shine of the railway lines. The green target markers were well concentrated and many explosions were seen around these. Once our bombs were released we had to do a steep climbing turn in order to avoid the mountains that were on three sides of the target. I found out later that 617 had spent a week training for this raid in North Wales, we only had 6 hours’ notice prior to take off with 617. 617 had another raid that night in conjunction with 619 Squadron. On the way back near Lisieux, France we were picked up by fighters. Smithy opened fire from the mid lower turret before Ley Kenyon joined in. The usual method of fighter attack was to fly below the bomber and attack the underside or the wings by climbing up and stalling away. Ley claimed that one fighter was shot down but this was not confirmed. As soon as the firing commenced I started violent evasive action (corkscrewing) but the two port engines were on fire; we tried to extinguish the fires unsuccessfully. We found that with no thrust on the port engines the aircraft was turning to port, by throttling back on the starboard engines and applying the rudder we just sank steadily. So there was nowt to do but to abandon at 10,000 feet. Fortunately everyone got out, although my ‘chute opened in the plane after the ripchord caught on the throttle lever. I got out eventually and landed in a tree.

    My father ended up in Stalag Luft III. In the early days of 1945 the Russian Forces were advancing rapidly and Hitler ordered that the Prisoners of War Camps in the East of the Nazi occupied territories should be evacuated and the prisoners moved westwards. This was known as the long march. He was lucky enough to survive and he was freed on 2nd May 1945.

    Cheryl Fitchew



    Norman F. Alsop 419 Squadron (d.16th May 1942)

    Does anyone know anything about Norman F. Alsop? He was in 419 Squadron and was killed on Hemsley Moor on 16th May 1942 on a training mission.

    Jonathan Robson



    Flt.Sgt. Kenneth Aronson 419 Squadron (d.30th July 1942)

    My uncle, Flt Sgt Kenneth Aronson, served with the 419th RCAF and was killed in action on 30th July 1942. He was shot down over Belgium. Does anyone have information about him or his squadron?

    Kris Murphy



    P/O Thomas George Cottier 419 Sqdn. (d.16th January 1944)

    P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF was the pilot of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.

  • Malcolm Gibson



    Sgt. Lloyd Charles Powell 419 Sqdn. (d.16th January 1944)

    Sgt Powell, RCAF was the pilot of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.




  • Sgt. A. E. Cox 419 Sqdn.

    Sgt Cox was a member of the crew of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.




  • Sgt. Thomas Noel Pugh 419 Sqdn. (d.16th January 1944)

    Sgt Pugh was part of the crew of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing (assumed killed)
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.




  • P/O J. A. Lucas 419 Sqdn.

    P/O Lucas was a member of the crew of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.




  • P/O Clifford Herbert Lomas 419 Sqdn. (d.16th January 1944)

    P/O Lomas was part of the crew of a 419 Sqdn Wellington which was damaged by enemy action whilst on operations to Hamburg on the night of 15/16th January 1942. While returning to base (Mildenhall) both engines failed and the aircraft crashed in the sea off Spurn Head. Of the six crew on board, only two were picked up uninjured, the other four were killed and two of these were not found. The crew were:
  • P/O T.G. Cottier, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt L.C. Powell, RCAF, killed
  • Sgt A.E. Cox, injured
  • Sgt. T.N. Pugh, RCAF, missing
  • P/O C.H. Lomas, RCAF, missing (believed killed)
  • Sgt. J.A.H. Lucas, injured.




  • WO 2Cl. Arthur Beckett 419 Sqdn. (d.23rd May 1944)

    My uncle was a tail gunner with 419 Sqdn. He was killed in action over Munchen Gladbach when his Lancaster KB717 code VR E was attacked by a German nightfighter on the night of 22nd/23rd May 1944. The entire crew was lost and are buried in Rheinberg War Cemetery, Coll. Grave 3H.18-22.

    Ross Beckett



    F/Sgt. John Gordon Forbes 419 Sqdn. (d.30th May 1942)

    My uncle F/Sgt Forbes and the crew of Wellington VR-G of 419 Sqdn were lost of the night of 29th/30th May 1942 on a low-level mission to the Gnone Rhone Factory. All were lost and are buried at Viroflay New Communal Cemetery, Row A. Coll. Grave 19-20.

    Mike Forbes



    Sgt John James Newbon 419 Squadron (d.18th Aug 1943)

    From July through to August 12th the Halifax with the triple headed dragon was flown by S/L McMurdy and his crew.

    Halifax JD158 was the sixteenth of a series of thirty-eight Halifax Mk. II aircraft of the JD series to be manufactured by English Electric Company (Salmesbury & Preston) between May 7th and June 28th of 1943. It first shows on the Operations Record Book on May 23rd. of that year and designated as VR-D.

    From that date until July 13th VR-D was the aircraft normally flown by F/O Chick McIntosh and his crew, who had several encounters with night fighters during that time. McIntosh flew ten operations on JD158 before completing his Tour. From July through to August 12th the Halifax with the triple headed dragon was flown by S/L McMurdy and his crew.

    On the night of August 17/18th 1943 the captain of JD158 was F/L Stanley Heard who normally flew JB859 "Thundering Heard", but the aircraft was not available that night. (It has been mentioned in some sources that JD158 may have also been VR-H "Have Another" at some point in the time this Halifax was at 419 Squadron. Log Books and ORB for May through August 1943 show JD158 to be on strength with the squadron throughout that period. There is no gap found where it may have been removed from service, which is the only way that any other squadron code would be changed to another letter. From May 23rd to it's loss on August 17/18th records show JD158 was always VR-D.) Also the art work for "Have Another" shows a Kangaroo and a Joey riding a bomb, the explanation given for the use of these animals was that one of F/L Heard's men was Australian. Except for Sgt.Blyth and Sgt. Newborn, who both were RAF, all others of the Heard crew were Canadian. (There was an Australian pilot performing his second 2nd. pilot sortie with F/L Heard when the crew was lost which may have provided some confusion.) So from this information it looks like "Have Another" was not JD158 but another Halifax -H, most likely not 419 Squadron that I can find.

    Gary Newbon



    John William Zabarylo 419 Sqdn.

    My father, John William Zabarylo was an airframe mechanic from Canada. I am sure he served with 419 Squadron, but was told that mechanics were shuffled around in the Command and sent to where they were needed most.

    John M Zabarylo



    F/Sgt. James Robert Couper 419 Sqdn. (d.5th March 1943)

    My cousin was F/Sgt JR Couper. He was a member of 419 Squadron RCAF and was shot down over Holland in 1943. Does anyone know anything about the rest of the crew members:
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded
  • WO2. D D Scowen RCAF, POW
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW

    Where are they now or what happened to them? Does anyone have any information please. I have managed to find a photo of their crashed plane and one of the German who shot them down.

    Update: Halifax ll DT646 VR C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. Taking off from Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37. Of the crew, Flt/Lt L. Bakewell was a POW in Stalag Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630. Sgt A.C. Turner, evaded. WO2 D.D. Scowen, (RCAF) was also held in Lamsdorf POW No. 27657. F/O J.E. Marvel in Stalag Luft 3 POW No. 27751 and WO2 W.J. Clark, in Lamsdorf POW No. 27703.

  • Stewart Coupar



    F/Lt L. Bakewell 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • A. C. Turner 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • WO2 D. D. Scowen 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • F/O J. E. Marvel 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • Sgt. J. A. Bennett 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • WO2 W. J. Clark 419 Sqdn.

    Halifax ll DT646 VR-C was shot down during a raid to Essen 5th March 1943. T/O Middleton St. George 18.57, hit by flak over target and also attacked by nightfighter, aircraft crashed near Elst Holland at 21.37.
  • F/S J.R. Couper RCAF, KIA (commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial).
  • F/Lt. L. Bakewell RAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 37630.
  • Sgt. A.C. Turner RCAF, Evaded.
  • WO2 D.D. Scowen RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27657.
  • F/O J.E. Marvel RCAF, POW in Stalag Luft 3, POW No. 27751.
  • Sgt. J.A. Bennett RCAF, POW.
  • WO W.J. Clark RCAF, POW in Lamsdorf, POW No. 27703.




  • Sgt. John Kelly 419 (Moose) Squadron (d.23rd Sep 1943)

    John Kelly was my uncle-in-law. He was shot down and killed in a raid over Mannheim, Germany. He joined the RCAF and did all of his training in Canada. His brother, Laurence and his wife have been living in Sunderland for many years. A few weeks ago Laurence died. His wife is still living in High , Sunderland who we visit every week. His wife has John's medals. John came from a large family, about 8 or 9. They live all over the place, a sister married a US airman from Burtonwood Airfield during the war and is living in the States.

    Hilton Stanness







    Recomended Reading.

    Available at discounted prices.



    Goosepool.

    Stan Howes


    The History of RAF and RCAF Middleton St George and Teesside Airport
    More information on:

    Goosepool.




    Into the Night Sky: RAF Middleton St George: A Bomber Airfield at War

    Paul Tweddle











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