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No. 166 Squadron Royal Air Force in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

No. 166 Squadron Royal Air Force



   No.166 Squadron was first formed in 1918. The Squadron was reformed in 1936 as a heavy-bomber squadron. Just after the outbreak of war 166 became a No. 6 Group training squadron, merging with No. 97 Squadron and SHQ Abingdon to form No. 10 OTU in April 1940.

No. 166 Squadron re-formed in January 1943, at Kirmington, Lincolnshire as a bomber squadron flying Wellingtons and from September 1943, Lancasters.

Airfields at which No. 166 Squadron were based:

  • Leconfield. Jan 1937 to Sept 1939
  • Abingdon Sept 1939 to Apr 1940
  • Jurby. detachment from Feb 1940 to Apr 1940
  • Kirmington. from Jan 1943


 

15th Jan 1944 166 Squadron Lancaster lost

30th Mar 1944 Aircraft Lost

4th May 1944 166 Squadron Lancaster lost


If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Those known to have served with

No. 166 Squadron Royal Air Force

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

  • Aldritt J. Sgt
  • Ballantine. Gordon . F/Sgt.
  • Bayliss Jack Bernard. Flt.Sgt. (d.30th Mar 1943)
  • Booth Norman Robert. F/Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Bowring Eric. F/Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Bows Ronald. Squadron Leader (d.20th February 1944)
  • Box Charles Leslie.
  • Bracey Jake . Sgt
  • Bull Kenneth Frederick. F/Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Butler Lionel Wembley Henry. Sgt. (d.27th Sep 1943)
  • Carney. Iorwerth Francis. Sgt
  • Chapman David. Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Clark J. F. . F/O.
  • Clarke Philip. Gnr. (d.24th December 1944)
  • Copping. I J. Sgt
  • Cridge Francis William.
  • Crooks John Hodgson. Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Cullen Peter Guthrie. Flt.Sgt. (d.24th Dec 1944)
  • Davidson. L. Sgt
  • Davies. Ronald. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Dodds Joseph Alan. Sgt
  • Eaves . Sgt
  • Fenton John Alan. Sgt. (d.5th November 1944)
  • Findlayson R. C.. Sgt.
  • Flutter Robert Cyril. F/O (d.1st February 1945)
  • Gratwick. Ronald Ernest. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Harvey Douglas Venning. Flt.Sgt. (d.31st March 1944)
  • Jones John.
  • Jupp Harold Edward. (d.26th Feb 1944)
  • Kerns Robert.
  • Kerns Robert. Flight Sergeant
  • Kirk Ronald George Henry. Sgt (d.28th June 1944)
  • Leigh Robert. Sgt. (d.24th Sep 1944)
  • Martin. Charles W. . F/O
  • McCormack R. Sgt
  • Moore John Francis. Flight Sargeant (d.20th Dec 1943)
  • OReilly. James. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Patterson. W . W/O
  • Peters Edward Thomas. W/O.
  • Petersen Andreas. F/Sgt.
  • Powley Francis Sidney. Wing Commander (d.5th April, 1945)
  • Rabett Reginald Paul. W/O. (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Rabett. Reginald Paul. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Rees David Gareth. (d.23rd Oct 1943)
  • Reeves Raymond Algernon . F/Sgt. (d.15th Feb 1944)
  • Roberts. Trevor. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Scargill Raymond. Sgt.
  • Seaton. James Arhibald McNair. W/O
  • Short. . Sgt.
  • Short. Samuel George. Sgt (d.9th Oct 1943)
  • Skeel John. WO (d.25th March 1944)
  • Smith Raymond Algernon Reeves. F/Sgt. (d.15th Feb 1944)
  • Soo Ronald R.. (d.14th Jan 1944)
  • Stratford John. F/Lt
  • Teasdel Arthur John. PO (d.27th February 1943)
  • Terry Dennis. Corporal
  • Thomas Meirion.
  • Warmington W. I. . F/O.
  • Webb Charles. Sgt.
  • Wilkins John Ambrose. P/O.
  • Willbie Ronald. F/Sgt.
  • Wilson Joseph Raymond. F/O (d.5th November 1944)
  • Wright Jim . Sgt

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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Robert Kerns 166 Squadron

My father, Robert Kerns, a Canadian from Alberta served with 166 Squadron from 1943 to 1945. Dad was a navigator, did his 'tour of ops'and then was promoted to flight sargent with Jim Dunlop's crew. Dad is almost 97 years old and we think the last surviving member of his crew. In south central Alberta, in a ranching town called Nanton, some people hauled an old Lancaster built in Alberta into town in 1985. Since then, the Nanton Lancaster Museum of which we belong, has grown into a world class museum dedicated to Lancasters. We dedicated a plague with a photo of Dad's crew to Nanton. A replica of the noseart from "Beer Barrel," the plane they flew and in which did 118 ops, was painted on a six foot piece of Lancaster 'skin.' When the new wing of the museum is built, this noseart will be hung along with the plagues we gave Nanton. We are endeavouring to preserve the memory of those who flew for the 'freedom' we so casually enjoy today. Thanks for listening. Rose Balcom

Rose Balcom



Flight Sergeant Robert Kerns navigator 166 Squadron

My father, Robert Kerns, a Canadian from Alberta, Canada served with 166 Squadron from 1943 to 1945. Dad was a navigator and did his 'tour of ops' then promoted to flight sergeant with Jim Dunlop's crew. Dad is almost 97 years old and we think the last surviving member of his crew. In south/central Alberta, in a ranching town called Nanton, some people hauled an old Lancaster built in Alberta, into town in 1985. Since then, the Nanton Lancaster Museum to which we belong, has grown into a world class museum dedicated to Lancasters. We dedicated a plaque with photo of dad's crew to Nanton. When a new wing is built, replica nose art from "Beer Barrel" the plane they flew in which did 118 ops, painted on a six foot piece of Lancaster 'skin' will be hung along with the plaques we gave Nanton. We are endeavouring to preserve the memory of those who flew for the 'freedom' we so casually enjoy today. Thanks for listening

Rose Balcom



Squadron Leader Ronald Bows 166 Squadron (d.20th February 1944)

I have just started looking into my uncle's history and have come upon your website. He was Squadron Leader Ronald Bows, Squadron 166 at Kirmington. He died on 20th February 1944. He never returned from his mission and was never found.

If anyone knows any details or photos of him I would be delighted to receive them. His widow Thelma Bows never remarried and died several years ago. He lived at Chapel Lane, Nettleham, near Lincoln. He flew Lancasters I believe.

Karen Smith



Meirion "Tommy" Thomas 166 Squadron

My Grandfather, Meirion Thomas, served at Kirmington during the war with 166 Squadron and flew in Lancasters. he was also in Number 1 Squadron at Tangmere at the start of the war. This is a long shot but if there is any one with information on him or knew of him or has any photos, please get in touch.

Duncan



Wing Commander Francis Sidney "Logger" Powley DFC, AFC B flight 166 Squadron (d.5th April, 1945)

photo taken sometime in 1945 of my namesake uncle W/C Francis (Frank) Powley (centre) along with S/L Gee (second from right) and other officers of #153 squadron at Scampton. Both Powley and his friend and colleague Gee, who survived the war, were earlier with #166 squadron at Kirmington.

My namesake Canadian uncle, W/C Francis (Frank) Sidney Powley, was posted CO of "B" Flight 166 squadron based at Kirmington in July 1943. He flew missions from Kirmington until Sept-Oct 1944 when he was promoted to W/C of the re-formed 153 squadron, which was moved to Scampton for the duration of the war. Many of the 166 crews and aircraft were attached to 153. Following his initial flight training at RAF Depot Uxbridge in 1937, Powley was posted first to #4 Flying Training School at Abu Sueir in Egypt and later to 27 squadron in Kohat and other bases in the Northwest Frontier Province of British India. He also served as CO of the Advanced Training School of #1 Flying Training School at Ambala. Powley was listed as missing on the night of 4-5 April 1945 when the Lancaster RA 544 he was piloting on a mine-laying mission off the coast of occupied Denmark was shot down by a German night-fighter. As it happens, I have been living and working as a news journalist in Denmark for the past 30 years. My recent research into the uncle I never knew has turned up some interesting facts and anecdotes both from his time in India and later in Bomber Command in England. Naturally, I would very much appreciate any information, pictures or other material people might have about Powley and his activities at Kirmington.

Frank L. Powley



Flight Sargeant John Francis Moore 166 squadron (d.20th Dec 1943)

Just wanted to add a brief story about my uncle John Francis Moore. He joined the air force in Australia in 1941 and later went to England with the RAF. He was with the 166 squadron and was a wireless operator/gunner on a Lancaster. His crew were part of the massive strike on Frankfurt on 20/12/43. His plane was hit, probably on the flight back by ground fire. The plane crashed in Holland, not far from the coast, on their way back to base, all were killed. He was 20 years old. His mother got the telegram 2 days before Xmas saying he was missing in action. It took 6 months for confirmation that he had died that day. My mother never spoke much about her brother who was only 6 years older than she was, I think it was too painful to think of the waste of all those young lives. The seven man crew are buried together in Middelharnis, in Holland. One sister went there many years ago to visit the gravesite. I recently was able to view his service file and it has the description of a witness who heard the plane circling which obviously didn't sound right. I guess the pilot knew he wouldn't make it across the channel and tried to land. They crashed near a farmhouse and from what I understand the locals buried them with great care and respect.

I wish that I had tried to find out years ago more about him and his life in UK for that short time he was there. We have a picture of his crew all young men laughing and smiling. Its hard to imagine what it was like for them at that time.

Kathleen Roper



F/Sgt. Raymond Algernon "Pickle" Reeves 166 Squadron (d.15th Feb 1944)

Sorry I don't have any stories to relate about the chap listed He was a relation of mine. Unfortunatley, he was killed 6 months before I was born. My family would like to know all about *Raymond Algernon Reeves Smith.

He came from Maidstone where I believe his parents ran a pub in Melville Road. (I would imagine that he would have been a popular lad because of that).

We do know that he flew in a Lancaster and that he and his crew

    F/O R J Robinson,
  • Sgt H K Harrison,
  • Sgt G F Clark,
  • F/S *R A R Smith,
  • F/S D J Stokes,
  • Sgt N O Jones &
  • F/O B O Wright
(all RAF VR)took off at 17.30 from Kirmington & were shot down by a night fighter & the aircraft crashed at 20.30 into a forest 2 km from Freudenburg & 4Km SE of Ribnitz - Damgaretn.

The crew rest in the Berlin 1939 - 45 Cemetery, F/O Wright is named on panel 210 of the Runnymeade memorial.

We know that Raymond was married to a lady called Elsie Agnes (we don't know what her maiden name was, or anything else about her or if there were any children).

If any one knows anything about the crew mentioned above and Elsie Agnes my family and I would be very happy to hear about it, as Raymond is a missing link in our family tree. You might think that Algernon is an unusual name but it appears it was a family name, my Grand Father was called Algernon Smith he was a photographer (had his own business) in Wrexham, North Wales. If anybody out there has any photos or memories of either people mentioned please let me know. My Grandfather took photos of staff at a munitions factory near Chester, he may have taken photos of other places during the war. Yours sincerely

Richard Smith



Sgt. Robert Leigh 166 Sqdn (d.24th Sep 1944)

I am seeking any information on my lost relative. His name was Bob Leigh and was at Kirmington with Lancaster Bomber Sqdn 166, as a rear gunner. He died when his plane was shot down over Germany. He was 19 years old. I would really appreciate any info. His name is on the Memorial at Runnymede.

Jaime Leigh



Francis William Cridge CGM. 166 Squadron RAF

My Dad, Frankie Cridge was a Navigator with 166 Squadron Bomber Command. He served alongside Cliff Edwards and Roy Taylor, Roy was the wireless operator.

My dad's Lancaster was shot up on a raid on Germany, they flew back and when they landed the officer in charge said "only God could have guided this plane back" as it was shot to pieces and should never have got back. My Dad was operated on but they did not have to use the operation room lights as he was covered in phosphorous and this lit his body up. He was awarded an immediate C.G.M from Rippingale and the telegram from Buckingham Palace to receive his medal by King George the Sixth. My father told me that before the raid that day on September 23rd, he was chopping firewood at the RAF base and suddenly he put the axe down as he instantly knew he would not need the wood, he knew at that moment he would not be returning to that base. How he knew we don't know. There are still flight plans and all the war memorabilia to read. A lawyer from London wrote to dad for information as the book The Lancaster at War was about to be written and contains, I believe my dad's name and information given by him about the raids they made on Germany

J.Cridge



Ronald R. Soo 166 Squadron (d.14th Jan 1944)

Ronnie Soo was my great uncle who was unfortunately killed at 23, whilst serving in the RAF over Hanover, Germany.

I recently had a baby boy and named him Ronnie and was keen to do some family history. Ronnie's elder brother Frank Soo was the first man of ethnic origin to play for England football team but as it was during the war he did not get any official caps.

Rachael Soo



Charles Leslie Box Distinguished Flying Medal 166 Sqd.

My granddad, Charles Leslie Box flew as a wireless operator at Kirmington from October to December 1943, on B flight. I have his flying log but don't understand what a lot of his log says, but they were almost shot down on a bombing raid to Leipzig and he was awarded the DFM. His pilot was Flight Sergeant Foran and the the aircraft were either written down as B, D or H (JB 151).

Lorna Spacey



Sgt. Raymond Scargill DFM. 166 Sqd.

I am trying to do some research in to my great uncle, Raymond Scargill. He was a mid upper gunner on Lancasters at Kirmington 1943-44.

    The crew;
  • pilot; F/SGT S.G Coole.
  • Flt.Eng. Sgt A.W.Downs.
  • B.A. Sgt R.S.Rennie {Canadian}.
  • Nav. F/Sgt C.L.Burthwhistle
  • W.OP. Sgt F Hollyoak
  • Mug. Sgt Raymond Scargill
  • R.G.Sgt A.B.Ashworth.166 Sqd.
The aircraft they flew was named Fairfighter's Revenge due to their earlier one name Fairfighter having crashed. My uncle was awarded the DFM for his efforts in rescuing the rear gunner. I would like to know if any of the others were awarded the same

Dean Mooring



Corporal Dennis Terry 166 Squadron

R2 receiving the Distinguished Service Order (Cpl D Terry holding the ground crew side)

My grandfather is pictured in two of these photos with Lancaster ME746 - R2. His name is Cpl Dennis Terry and he was a Fitter 2A with 166 Squadron. Each bomb was hand painted by himself onto R2.

Photo 2 is the official letter of completion of 100 operations.

Photo 3 is R2 at the end of its ops (124). Dennis_Terry_2.jpg Dennis_Terry_3.jpg

Rob Terry



W/O. Reginald Paul Rabett DFC. 166 Squadron (d.9th Oct 1943)

My grandfather's brother, W/O Reginald Rabett flew from RAf Wickenby. On th e8th of October 1943 he took off for Ludwigshaven, Germany in a Lancaster BII, marked ED993 of 166 SQ. The aircraft which had been recently mended due to engine trouble, was scheduled for Reg Rabett as the pilot to fly out and bomb his destination. On the way more trouble had occured and there were notes of cabin or engine fire on the way. With determination and great bravery he carried on to the target and succesfully bombed the location. On return with problems on the way, the plane crashed landed. The crash broke off the tail setting the rear gunner free from the craft and a crew man in the centre turret was also thrown free from the Lancaster, both of whom survived. Unfortunatly the remaining crew, W/O Rabett included, all died in the aircraft which broke into fire after the crash landing. Due to his bravery, after the mission, my Great Grandparents recived the DFC medal in honour of their son Reginald Paul Rabett.

The men flying in the Lancaster which crashed during the emergency landing on 9th of October 1943 were: Sgt James O'Reilly (Nav.)1549441, Ronald Davies, (W/T) 1032360 Age: 23, Sgt Ronald Ernest Gratwick (B/A) 1324750 Age: 20 and Trevor Roberts (F/E) 1413356. Sgt E Croxon (M/U) and Sgt L. Davidson (R/G) both survived the landing.

David Rabett



Harold Edward Jupp 166 Squadron (d.26th Feb 1944)

Flying Officer Harold Edward Jupp No: 171626, flew with 166 Squadron. He was based at Kiirmington, he flew a Lancaster and did his training in the USA. He was my mother's uncle. Unfortunately he was shot down on the night of the 26th February 1944 we think over Augsburg, we also think that he was shot down by a German night fighter flown by a Major Heinrich Wohlers - NJG6.

Four of the crew were captured, Harold and two others were killed and one escaped back to England via Gibraltar. I am trying to locate some further photos and information.

Steve Brown



Flt.Sgt. Jack Bernard Bayliss 166 Sqd. (d.30th Mar 1943)

We just had 2 mins silence here on Nov 11, Remembrance Day. I couldn't help thinking about an uncle, Jack Bayliss who was killed over Bremen. He was an Aussie like me. I would love to find out more about him.

Peter Lacy



Sgt. Lionel Wembley Henry Butler 166 Squadron (d.27th Sep 1943)

My great uncle, Lionel Butler, was an air gunner with 166 Squadron according to the Commonwealth War Graves. He died aged 19 in 1943 and I am looking for some more information on his brief time served during the war.

Joey Prentice



Sgt Ronald George Henry Kirk 166 squadron (d.28th June 1944)

Ronald Kirk was killed in action on the 28th of June 1944, he was my husband's uncle and we are trying to get any photos or information of him. I know he is buried at Belleville-sur-mer, France but am desperate to find out much more about him and especially to receive any photos of him if possible.

kaz



David Gareth "Dewi" Rees 166 Squadron (d.23rd Oct 1943)

My mother died when I was little but when she was alive she always told me of her favorite cousin Dewi Rees, and how awful it was that he died at the age of 19. He was a Flight Engineer with 166 Squadron and died on 23/10/1943 while Bombing Kassel. The plane was shot down and crashed in a village called Obermeiser just outside Kassel. He is buried now at Hanover War Cemetary. I am taking my son there in the summer. Through chance I have managed to find the last photo of him as he leaves with 166 Squadron for his Avro Lancaster ED 366. These boys where so young so brave fighting for King and country.

Eirwen Clement Wesley



Sgt. Charles Webb 166 Squadron

Lancaster LL-954 166 Squadron, crashed on 23-05-1944 at Birgelen-Wassenberg Germany, after a raid to Dortmund/Germany. RB Shepherd was POW
  • C Webb KIA
  • G Green POW
  • LC Harvey POW
  • DV Parker POW
  • AC Richelet KIA
  • JE Courtois KIA
I'm looking for info and pictures

Michel Beckers



Flt.Sgt. Peter Guthrie Cullen 166 Squadron (d.24th Dec 1944)

Peter Cullen was my uncle. Sadly I never knew him as I wasn't born until a few years after the war ended. Peter and his fellow crew members were shot down and killed on Christmas Eve 1944. He was 23 years old and had just spent some leave at home where he persuaded my grandparents to allow him to have a huge party; a premonition perhaps that this would be the last time that he would be home.

He is buried in Rhineberg Cemetery in Germany. I know very little about his service except that he was based at RAF Kirmington.

Rona Thomson



F/Sgt. Ronald Willbie 166 Sqd.

I volunteered for Aircrew just before my eighteenth birthday in 1942. I was placed on reserve and called up almost a year later. After initial training wing in St. Andrews, Scotland, on passing out I was posted to Grading School at Perth. After this to the holding unit at Heaton Park, Manchester. I was graded for pilot instruction and began a prolonged wait for posting. All the cadets thought it was worse than being in the trenches, no heating, paddling around in 6 inches of water surrounding the billets, bullied by NCOs, sleeping with all one's clothes on top of the bed covered by the greatcoat to keep them dry. The authorities were no doubt worried as they decided to send large groups of cadets on temporary postings. One was to Scarborough for a second initial training course and this was followed by postings to various Bomber stations as dogsbodies. In my case this was to 166 Squadron at Kirmington in Lincolnshire working in the bomb dump. At the end of this time we went on leave but on returning found an almost empty camp at Heaton Park, due to an epidemic of Scarlet Fever. Postings were delayed until this cleared and finally in February 1944 we embarked on the Queen Mary for the States.

Great jubilation, but just before arrival two cases of the dreaded fever and the US Immigration authorities refused entry but allowed transshipment to Canada. More delay but in jollier surroundings of the bull pens in Toronto's fairground. Finally I was posted to 3BFTS in Miami,Oklahoma. At the end of the pilot's course, not without its trials and tribulations, I passed out as a Sergeant pilot in November.

We spent a happy two weeks in an American transit camp in New York, mostly spent with families in New England and we embarked on the Ile de France for England. There was only a small group of RAF personnel,99, amongst a large contingent of American Army personnel, who were not seen for about three days as about 99 per cent were sea sick in their bunks down in the bowels of the ship. We were told that the pumps were running all the way to Europe and on arrival constant announcements were made over the Tannoy not to congregate on the port side. On arrival at the reception centre at Harrogate all pilots, several hundred, were all made redundant unless they possessed certain qualifications, had flown twins, done an advanced course and most stupid of all, were 5ft6in or under or over 6ft. Alternative trades were offered, Fleet Air Arm, Glider pilot, Flight Engineer, with one or two stipulations. The form I handed in to the adjudicating officer had a selection for Single Engine Ground Attack (70% casualties at that time) and on being asked if I was over 6ft, obviously not, was threatened with court martial unless I completed the form was correctly.

The quickest way to action seemed to be Flight Engineer - 6 week course - so that was my choice. Again long delays and finally to St Athans, near Cardiff for the course in February. After a few delays I passed out in June, war over but the Japanese to be dealt with. Sent to 1654 Heavy Conversion Unit, Wigsley, Lincolnshire and joined a second tour crew for conversion on Lancasters. at the end of the course we were posted to Tiger Force and sent on embarkation leave. The war ended finally whilst we were on leave and I received a notice to report to 242 Squadron, Stoney Cross in the New Forest. Arrived to find that the Squadron was equipped with Stirlings, consequently more crew training to learn a lot of new information.

Thus ended one individual's war effort. I continued in the RAF, was made redundant again in 1948, became a Meteorological Air Observer, but finally finished flying as a pilot over the last few years of service

R.T.Willbie



F/Lt John Stratford 166 Squadron

I was in touch with John Stratford a few years ago because he had been a friend of the pilot of the Lancaster (PB304 106 Sqn) that crashed in Salford. I was interested to read Alan Peters' account about his father Ted in John Stratford's crew. I would like to get in touch with Alan.

Joe Bamford



F/Sgt. Andreas Petersen DFM. 166 Sqd.

Danish air gunner Andreas Petersen, RCAF, served with 166th squadron in 1944. He was rear gunner on I. Item, and in 1985 he published a book -in danish - about his time in the RCAF, (Natbomber - ISBN 87-00-85782-3). Here's the list of the crew as taken from his book. (surnames missing for those of the crew he was no longer in touch with in 1985) Pilot, Flying Officer W.I. Warmington, RAF; Navigator, Flying Officer J.F. Clark, RAF; Bomb aimer, Flight Sergeant Jack, RAAF; Wireless operator, Sergeant Don, RAF; Flight engineer, Eric, RAF; Mid upper gunner, Bill, RAF; Rear gunner, Flight Sergeant Andreas Petersen, RCAF

In 1985, W.I. Warmington was a flight instructor in Wanganui New Zealand, and John F. Clark a retired bank manager, (Midland bank) somewhere in Yorkshire.

Arrival date is listed as April 27th 1944. On June 7th, Andreas Petersen had one confirmed kill, an ME410 night fighter shot down on an operation against the German supply lines near Versailles. On August 1st, 1944, the crew finished their tour of operations, having narrowly avoided being transferred to a Pathfinder squadron. In November, 1944, the following medals were awarded to members of the crew:- W.I. Warmington - DFC; Jack F. Clark - DFC; Andreas Petersen - DFM.

After the tour ended, Andreas Petersen was transferred to RCAF Mountain View, where he served as an instructor for the air gunners who were to go on in the post-war permanent RCAF staff. During his time there he was promoted to Pilot Officer.

Thomas A. Frederiksen



Sgt L Davidson. 166Sqd.

Rear Gnr. Sgt Davidson flew with Lancaster ED993 of 166 Sqn




Sgt Ronald Davies. 166Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

W/Op. Ronald Davies was killed on 9th Oct 1943, he was crew onboard Lancaster ED993 of 166 Sqn




Sgt Ronald Ernest Gratwick. 166Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

Ronald Gratwick was the Bomb Aimer of Lancaster ED993, 166 Sqn




Sgt James OReilly. 166Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

Nav. James OReilly was killed on 9th Oct 1943 in Lancaster ED993 of 166 Sqn




Sgt Reginald Paul Rabett. DFC 166Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

Nav. Regimald Rabett was killed on 9th Oct 1943 in Lancaster ED993 of 166 Sqn




Sgt Trevor Roberts. 166Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

Flt Eng. Trevor roberts was killed on 9th Oct 1943 in Lancaster ED993 of 166 Sqn.




Sgt Samuel George Short. 12Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

Rear Gnr. Samuel Short died on 9th Oct 1943.




P/O. John Ambrose Wilkins 166 Squadron

John Ambrose Wilkins was a Western Australian who joined the RAAF in Pearce, Western Australia. He was posted to RAF squadron 166 as a pilot, based in Kirmington. His crew was mostly Australian and included Garth Munro, Burness and Hutchison. He flew Wellingtons. John and his crew used to drink at the Marrowbone and Cleaver in Kirmington, which still contains memorabilia from that time.

Bill Wilkins



Flt.Sgt. Douglas Venning Harvey 166 Squadron (d.31st March 1944)

Douglas Harvey was the youngest of 7 boys born in Oberon, NSW, 6 of whom enlisted. Doug was one of two who died as a result of the War. His plane went down near Geissen Airfield in Germany on 31/3/44 during the raid on Nuremburg. His body was never found. A few years ago, Australian War Graves issued a brass plaque which was affixed to his brother Jack's grave (Jack died shortly after returning from the Middle East - 7th Div Signals).

Family members attended a small ceremony conducted by the local RSL to commemorate the plaque. Doug was 27.

Jan Corrigan



W/O. Edward Thomas Peters Kirmington 166th Squadron

This is a poem my dad, Ted Peters wrote for all flight engineers it has been seen all over the world.

Alan Peters



Sgt. R. C. Findlayson 166 Squadron

Because of a soldier's bible, I am involved with Tain Museum in the north of Scotland and have become involved in researching a Roderick Finlayson who was a piper in the First World War. Members of his family moved to Aberdeen-shire and I have established that a Rory Finlayson (possibly a nephew) left the area about 1939 to join the RAF to be a pilot. (Rory may be a family name for Roderick)

I have received a copy extract from Bomber Command Losses 1945. On page 93 it relates that Lancaster 111 from 166 Squadron, operating out of RAF Kirmington was shot down over Pforzheim; two of the crew survived; one being a Sgt. R. C. Finlayson who became a POW. On page 206 listing POW's Jan - May 1945 and under Squadron 166 Sgt. R.C. Finlayson is also listed there. I am trying to confirm if Sgt. Finlayson is a a member of the family I am researching. Can anyone help?

John A. Gordon



WO John Skeel 166 Sqdn. (d.25th March 1944)

My great uncle, John Skeel, was an air gunner based at Kirmington with 166 Squadron. He was killed in action on 25th March 1944 and is buried in Reichswald war cemetery. Does anyone remember him or have photos?

Jackie Heale



PO Arthur John Teasdel 166 Squadron (d.27th February 1943)

Arthur was my mother's cousin. The family could never find out any details of the mission on which he died, so have always assumed the information was classified for some reason.




F/O Robert Cyril Flutter 166 Sqdn. (d.1st February 1945)

Does anyone remember rear gunner Cyril Flutter of No 1 Bommber Command, 166 Squadron? He was shot down over Ludwigschaden on 1st February 1945. Cyril was my mother's cousin and she was very fond of him and often went to stay with him and his parents (who lived in Brentwood, Essex) when she was young. I know he is mentioned in a book of remembrance in Lincoln Cathedral but if anyone remembers anything about Cyril I would like to hear from them.

Kate Hill



F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

  • Chris



    Sgt. John Alan Fenton 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • F/Sgt. Norman Robert Booth 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • F/Sgt. Kenneth Frederick Bull 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • F/Sgt. Eric Bowring 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • Sgt. John Hodgson Crooks 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • Sgt. David Chapman 166 Sqdn. (d.5th November 1944)

    Lancaster AS-T ME835 was lost without trace on a raid to Bochum on 5th November 1944. The crew members were:
  • F/O Joseph Raymond Wilson
  • Sgt John Alan Fenton
  • F/Sgt Norman Robert Booth
  • F/Sgt Kenneth Frederick Bull
  • F/Sgt Eric Bowring
  • Sgt John Hodgson Crooks
  • Sgt David Chapman

    All served in the RAFVR and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.




  • John Jones 166 Sqdn.

    My father, John Jones, was a wireless operator during the war. He flew with 166 Squadron at Kirmington. He flew on an aircraft coded AS-T, through he never mentioned the T2 part in April 1945. The nickname he used for the aircraft was "Tear Arse". Does anyone remember him?

    Richard







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