The Wartime Memories Project - No. 106 Squadron



This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to accept cookies.


If you enjoy this site

please consider making a donation.




    Home

    Add Stories & Photos

    Events

 Features

    Airfields of WW2

    Allied Forces

    British Army

    Royal Air Force

    Royal Navy

    Axis Forces

    Home Front

    Prisoners of War

    Secrets of WWII

    Ships of WWII

    Women at War

    Those Who Served

    Day-by-Day



    The Great War

 Submissions

    How to add Memories

    Add Your Memories

    TWMP on Facebook

    Can you Answer?

    Printable Form



    Children's Bookshop

 FAQ's

    Your Family History

    Volunteering

    Contact us

    News

    Bookshop

    About

    Links









British Newspaper Archive

Find My Past - UK, IE & AU

World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

Information.

No. 106 Squadron RFC, was formed in 1917 and was disbanded in 1919. 106 Squadron was re-formed in 1938 flying Hampdens with No. 5 Group as a training squadron. In 1941 106 squadron began night bombing operations over Europe. The Squadron was re-equipped with Manchesters then converted to Lancasters in the early summer of 1942.

During the Second World War No 106 Squadron flew 5,834 operational sorties with the loss of 187 aircraft.

Airfields at which No. 106 Squadron were based:

  • Thornaby. Oct 1938 to Sep 1939
  • Cottesmore Sept 1939 to 6 Oct 1939
  • Finningley 6 Oct 1939 to 23 Feb 1941
  • Coningsby. 23 Feb 1941 to 1 Oct 1942
  • Syerston 1 Oct 1942 to 11 Nov 1943
  • Metheringham. from 11 Nov 1943

List of those who served with No. 106 Squadron during The Second World War



F/O Leslie Claude William Boivin pilot 106 Sqd. (d.30th Aug 1944)

F/O Boivin lost his life on the 30th of August 1944 when his Lancaster ND331 was lost on ops.

The crew were:

  • F/O L.C.W.Boivin
  • Sgt S.Bell
  • Sgt W.S.Bryson
  • F/S J.P.Nicol
  • F/S R.H.McLean
  • Sgt E.G.L.Parker
  • Sgt H.Hargill



Sgt. Sidney Bell flight eng. 106 Sqd.

Sidney was taken as a Prisoner of War on the 30th of August 1944 and was held in Stalag Luft 7.



Sgt. John Frederick Wallace Emerson flt eng. 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Avro Lancaster ND682 of 106 Sqn. coded ZN-K, took off at 00:45 15th Dec 1944 from Metheringham. OP: Gardening and was shot down by a night fighter.

The remains of Flt. Engr. Sgt John F. W. Emerson were retrieved from the sea 8 miles south of Anholt harbour on 6/3-1945. He was laid to rest by the Wehrmacht in Anholt cemetery on 7/3 1945, he was 24 years old.



F/O Elgar Barratt pilot 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Avro Lancaster ND682 was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours while flying at 2300 metres in the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. The JU 88 was piloted by Hauptmann Eduard Schröder with the crew of Hessenmüller, Zeinert and Brunsendorf.

The body of Pilot F/O Elgar Barratt was found washed ashore at Kulla Gunnarstorp north of the Swedish town Hälsingborg and was laid to rest in Hälsingborg Municipal Cemetery.



Sgt. Raymond Edward Buckenham Day mid upper guner 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Raymond Day was the Mid Upper Gunner of Avro Lancaster ND682 and lost his life when it was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours on the 16th of December 1944 over the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. He has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. He was 34 years old and was married. His brother Norman also lost his life whilst serving with 114 Squadron.



Sgt. Raymond Edward Buckenham Day mid upper guner 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Raymond Day was the Mid Upper Gunner of Avro Lancaster ND682 and lost his life when it was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours on the 16th of December 1944 over the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. He has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. He was 34 years old and was married. His brother Norman also lost his life whilst serving with 114 Squadron.



Sgt. Percy Edward Green rear gunner 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Percy Green was the Rear Gunner of Avro Lancaster ND682 and lost his life when it was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours on the 16th of December 1944 over the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. He has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. He was 39 years old and was married.



Flt. Sgt. Berry Arnold Green navigator 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Arnold Berry was the Navigator of Avro Lancaster ND682 and lost his life when it was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours on the 16th of December 1944 over the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. He has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.



Flt. Sgt. Edward George Towle bomb aimer 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

Edward Towle was the Bomb Aimer of Avro Lancaster ND682 and lost his life when it was shot down by a night fighter at 03:54 hours on the 16th of December 1944 over the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. He has no known grave and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.



Flt. Sgt. John Potter Nichol bomb aimer 106 Sqd.

John Nichol was taken prisoner of War after his Lancaster was lost on the 30th of Aug 1944. He was held in Stalag Luft 7 along with his flight engineer Sidney Bell.



Sgt. Robin 106 Sqd.

I have in my possession a photocopied log book of Australian Sgt Robin, Air Gunner dated from the 1st August 1941 to 3rd September 1945. I also have one squadron photograph dated approx 1942/3. I gather that the Mr Robin started his career as Sgt Wireless operator / AG and ended as OC Gunnery School Point Cook Victoria. His tunic bears the ribbon (diagional slanting purple strips on white back ground) DFC?



Flt. Sgt. Clive Percival Calvert w/op 106 Sqd (d.16th Dec 1944)

My Great Uncle, Flt Sgt Clive Percival Calvert (RAAF)flew with 106 Squadron as Wireless operator of ND682 Avro Lancaster. Below is some information I found on a Danish website

The aircraft belonged to RAF 106 Sqn. Bomber Command and was coded ZN-K. T/o 00:45 15th Dec 1944 from Metheringham. OP: Gardening

The Lancaster is believed to have been claimed at 03:54 hours while flying at 2300 metres in the southeast part of the sea of Kattegat by a German JU 88 night fighter of 3./NJG 3. The JU 88 was piloted by Hauptmann Eduard Schröder with the crew of Hessenmüller, Zeinert and Brunsendorf.

The body of Pilot F/O Elgar Barratt was found washed ashore at Kulla Gunnarstorp north of the Swedish town Hälsingborg and was laid to rest in Hälsingborg Municipal Cemetery.

The remains of Flt. Engr. Sgt John F. W. Emerson were retrieved from the sea 8 miles south of Anholt harbour on 6/3-1945. He was laid to rest by the Wehrmacht in Anholt cemetery on 7/3 1945.

W/Op F/S Clive P. Calvert RAAF, Mid Upper Gunner Sgt Raymond E.B. Day, Tail Gunner Sgt Percy E. Green, Navigator F/S Arnold Berry and Bomb Aimer F/S Edward G. Towle have no known grave and are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.



Flt Sgt Alexander "Allie" Dunbar 106 Sqn (d.13 Jan 1943)

My uncle Allie was a flight engineer on a Lancaster durign a raid on Essen. According to the letters I found in my mothers papers, he was caught by a night fighter on the return leg of the raid and was shot down over Appledoorn in Holland. He is buried along with the remainder of the crew, in the town cemetary in Appledoorn.

The crew were:

  • F/L E.F.G.Healey DFC DFM
  • Sgt A.Dunbar
  • F/O J.R.Pennington DFC
  • P/O D.MacL Crozier DFM RCAF
  • P/O M.H.Lumley
  • Sgt C.H.Jurgensen
  • Sgt F.J.Edwards



Flight Sargeant Norman Leslie Ernest Gale DFM 57 Squadron (d.19th July 1944)

My great uncle flew (and died) with 57 Sqd in WW2: Flt Sgt Norman Leslie Ernest Gale DFM, No 1297387 Flight Engineer from Sway, Hampshire. Died 19/7/44 over France - buried with 3 other members of crew in Bassevelle (East of Paris) They are the pilot, Flt Lt John Alec Bulcraig DFM, wireless operator Sgt Thomas Loughlin from Liverpool, and bomb aimer F/O Edward Chatterton Robson who was from Blackpool. The surviving crew members were, Sgt L.E.S.Manning and Sgt F.J.D.Taylor who both evaded capture and F/O E.H.Ruston who was taken POW and held in Stalag Luft 1.

I'm trying to find out circumstances of both raid my great uncle died on and his DFM

UPDATE:

The Lancaster, DX-L took off at 22:56 on the 18th of July 1944 from East Kirkby to bomb the key railway junction at Revigny. It was coned by searchlights soon after crossing the French coast and while escaping the beams wandered off course. The aircraft was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed at Bassevelle (Seine-et-Marne)

Sgt Gale had gained his award in the most hazardous circumstances while serving with No.106 Sqdn, his DFM Citation was Gazetted 28th Sep 1943. His Lancaster, JB146 had taken off at 20:10 on the 31st of Aug 1943 from Syerston and was hit by Flak over Berlin. The pilot F/O Harry Ham and w/op Sgt James Weight were wounded when the Flak struck their aircraft and both later died as a result of their injuries. The crew managed to get the aircraft home but crash-landed at 03:00 on the 1st of Sept on the Romney Marshes in Kent.

The crew were:

  • F/O H.D.Ham
  • Sgt N.Gale
  • F/O C.Pitman
  • Sgt J.E.Jones
  • Sgt J.W.Weight
  • F/S N.D.Higman
  • Sgt T.Waller

15 years ago, Anne-Marie and Bernard Langou of Bassevelle - 77750 France have found the survivors and the families of them and the families of the people who died on 19 july 1944 when the Lancaster JB318 crashed here. We wrote a booklet (80 pages). I wrote to Ivor GALE, the uncle of Norman, many times and Leonard MANNING, the air gunner, too, but only one answer, (I have a copy for you), after no contact. Here, at Bassevelle, we had commemorations on 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009 with many flags, music, and english families of the crew who are now our friends (families MANNING, RUSTON, BULCRAIG, TAYLOR and ROBSON). We have made a memorial, a panel and other things. the last ceremony : 18 july 2009.

I can give M. Padgett, what we have collected during these fifteen years and perhaps we can answer a little. We will be honored to receive you and your familie in the village like the other families.



Sgt. Garnet James Bailey 106 Squadron

Looking for details of Sgt.G J Bailey RAAF, lost on Gardening mission off Bordeaux 25/26 July 1942. I have details from CWGC and AUS. Roll of Honour but can't find his Aircrew Category or the cause of the loss of the aircraft, Lanc R5680 based at Coningsby at the time it was lost. Two of the crew became POW, and the body of one other was recovered and is buried at Pornic in France. The other four crew members were not found. Any information would be appreciated.



Alexander E Elsworthy 106 Squadron

I am researching my great-uncle John Alfred Withington who died during the Second World War. He was a gunner in a Lancaster bomber with the 106 Squadron; all but one of the crew died on the 2nd of January 1944. The remaining crew member Alexander Elsworthy is shown to have been in prisoner of war camps Stalag4B and Stalag Luft3. My father was told that his uncle, John Withington, helped an injured crew member when their plane was hit. John helped open the other crew members' parachutes but his own then failed. The surviving crew member apparently came back to tell the tale and I am assuming this must be Alexander Elsworthy. Any details on Alexander would be very gratefully received. I know that his POW number was 269841, he lived in Chelsea and was born 1921.



Sergeant David McLean 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Frederick Horace Garnett 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Flight Sergeant Theophilus John Thomas 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Theophilus Thomas 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Robert Charles Henry Webb 106 Squadron (d.3rd April 1943)

    I am currently trying to write a small book about my uncle, Sgt R.C.H.Webb and crew who were shot down over Germany in a Lanc from 106 Sqdn on the 3rd April 1943. All lost their lives.

    The book is for my family to pass on so that these airmen never be forgot and their bravery will always be remembered.

    I was wondering if anyone could help me with any info.

    Lanc ED 542:

  • Sgt T.J. Ridd, Pilot
  • Sgt R.C.H.Webb, F/Eng
  • P/O J.W.Simpson, Navigator
  • P/O A.C.Palmer, Bomb /Aimer
  • Sgt A.Burson, Wireless/Op
  • Sgt R.S.Sabell, Mid Upper Gunner
  • Sgt E.Williams, Rear Gunner



  • Sergeant Ernest Montague John Pease 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant John Alfred Withington 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    I am researching my great uncle John Alfred Withington who died during the Second World War. He was a gunner in a Lancaster bomber with the 106 Squadron, all but one of the crew died on the 2nd of January 1944. My father was told that his uncle, John Withington helped an injured crew member when their plane was hit. John helped open the other crew members parachute but his own then failed.

    www.lostbombers.co.uk reports the crash:

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hanover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW, was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Eric Edge 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hanover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW, was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Alexander E Elsworthy 106 Squadron

    I am researching my great-uncle John Alfred Withington who died during the Second World War. He was a gunner in a Lancaster bomber with the 106 Squadron; all but one of the crew died on the 2nd of January 1944. The remaining crew member Alexander Elsworthy is shown to have been in prisoner of war camps Stalag4B and Stalag Luft3. My father was told that his uncle, John Withington, helped an injured crew member when their plane was hit. John helped open the other crew members' parachutes but his own then failed. The surviving crew member apparently came back to tell the tale and I am assuming this must be Alexander Elsworthy. Any details on Alexander would be very gratefully received. I know that his POW number was 269841, he lived in Chelsea and was born 1921.



    Frederick Horace Garnett 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Theophilus Thomas 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant David McLean 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Ernest Montague John Pease 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Flight Sergeant Theophilus John Thomas 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hannover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant Eric Edge 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hanover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW, was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Sergeant John Alfred Withington 106 Squadron (d.2nd January 1944)

    I am researching my great uncle John Alfred Withington who died during the Second World War. He was a gunner in a Lancaster bomber with the 106 Squadron, all but one of the crew died on the 2nd of January 1944. My father was told that his uncle, John Withington helped an injured crew member when their plane was hit. John helped open the other crew members parachute but his own then failed.

    www.lostbombers.co.uk reports the crash:

    Lancaster JB642 bomber with the 106 Squadron on operation to Berlin, lost on the 2nd of January 1944. JB642 was one of two No.106 Sqdn Lancasters lost on this operation. Airborne 0020 2nd January 1944 from Metheringham. Outbound, crashed at Hoya, a town straddling the Weser, 14 km SSW of Verden. Those killed are buried in Hanover War Cemetery.

    At 18, Sgt Withington was amongst the youngest to die on air operations in Bomber Command.

  • P/O F.H.Garnett KIA
  • Sgt D.McLean KIA
  • F/S T.J.Thomas KIA
  • Sgt E.M.J.Pease KIA
  • Sgt E.Edge KIA
  • Sgt J.A.Withington KIA
  • Sgt A.A.E.Elsworthy PoW, was interned in Camps 4B/L3, PoW No.269841.



  • Flight Lieutentant John "Jack" O'Leary D.F.C. A.F.C. 106 Squadron

    My late father John O'Leary flew with 106 squadron from Oct 1943 till June 1944. I am still in posession of his log books covering all the missions he flew. There are names in the logs that I heard mentioned when I was very young. Names like F/O Harvey, P/O Perry, P/O Starkey and P/O Miffin. Sadley my father died from a heart attack when I was only 15 years old (now 63). and I never got to find out what part these people played in my parents life. I say parents because my Mother Winifred Boddy and her sister Mary Boddy, as they were then know were attached to 106 Sqd. Why do we always leave it till late in life to wonder about our parents or is it just me. I would be interested if anyone knew my father and can shed some light on his wartime activities



    F/O Allan John Alexander Woollard DFM navigator 106 Squadron

    My late father was a navigator and flew in Lancasters of 106 squadron under Guy Gibson and then 139 Jamaica Squadron Mosquito Pathfinders one of which he had to bale out of when a held up flare went off. I once saw a picture of him standing with Guy Gibson with his dog by his kennel and some other officers.Please, do you have a copy of this or similar. I am trying to put together his story for my sons and Grandchildren and this site may be the answer. I also have his log book with Guy Gibsons signature on a flight when he navigated for him and various other memorobilia. Please can you help. Regards Graham Woollard



    Winifred Boddy 106 Sqd.

    Mother Winifred Boddy and her sister Mary Boddy, as they were then know were attached to 106 Sqd, my father Flt Lt John O'Leary flew with 106 Sqd.



    Mary Boddy 106 Sqd.

    My Aunt Mary Boddy and my mother Winifred Boddy, as they were then known, were attached to 106 Sqd, my father Flt Lt John O'Leary flew with 106 Sqd.



    Sergeant William George Mann 106 Squadron (d.30th January 1944)

    I am trying to trace my brother-in-law William George Mann. He was 19 years old and stationed at Metheringham with No 106 Squadron, RAF. On the 30th Jan 1944 he took off for Berlin and never returned.

    If you could find the crew that he was flying with or photos I would very pleased to hear from you.



    F/Sgt Peter Richard " " Martin Observer (d.11th Oct 1944)

    I am researching the history of 58 former pupils of Highbury County Grammar School, London N.5 who died in WW2. Their names were recorded in a Book of Remembrance which was displayed in the School Hall in post-war years. It was unfortunately lost or destroyed when the school became a comprehensive in 1967 and the old buildings were demolished.

    Shortly before Christmas 2008 I was contacted by a former pupil of the class of 1930, now 90 years of age, living near Shrewsbury. He kindly provided me with a copy of the Order of Service from the Memorial Service which was held at Highbury in June 1946. I am now compiling a new version of the Book of Remembrance, which we hope to have displayed in the modern school on the site, and in the Islington Borough archives.

    I am also compiling a narrative version containing the stories behind the bare facts of their deaths obtained from the Commonwealth War Graves web site. It is recorded that F/Sgt Peter Martin was 23 years of age when he died, and was interred at Reichswald Forest Cemetery. I have discovered that 106 Squadron were flying Lancasters at that time, so we may infer that he and his crew were Killed in Action on a raid over the Ruhr, but his name is not mentioned above and I can find no mention of this on the Lost Bombers web site. Any information would be welcome.



    Sq/Ldr Harold Par "Happy " Williams DFC nav. 106 Squadron

    Happy Williams, my father-in-law, trained in Canada & the USA (like many others) during the early part of WW2 and then passed as Navigator and flew for the rest of the war, mainly in Lancasters of 106 Squadron. He also had a short spell flying for the RAF in the Korean War. He died in the 1980's without saying much about his wartime service.



    Flight Sgt. Ronald "Geordie" Moscrop 106 Squadron



    Flt Sgt. Anthony Robinson navigator 106 Squadron (d.28th Jun 1944)

    My Uncle, Anthony Robinson was killed with the rest of his crew. They are buried in Bransles in France.



    Flt Sgt. Willaum George Mann 106 Squadron. (d.30th Jan 1944)

    My brother Willaum Mann was stationed at Metheringham, he took off on raid to Berlin and went down on 30th Jan 1944. I would would like to know what crew he was with.

    Update:

    Willaum's aircraft was Lancaster ND336, ZN-Q, it crashed into the North Sea and all the crew were lost. Only one body was washed ashore, that of P/O Kirkland, he was found on the northern shores of Vlieland in the Frisian Islands on the 5th of March 44 and laid to rest there. The rest of the crew are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

    The crew were:

    • P/O K.H.Kirkland, RAAF
    • Sgt W.G.Mann
    • Sgt K.W.Barry
    • F/O J.Inston
    • Sgt D.Naylor
    • Sgt R.J.Winfindale
    • Sgt R.J.Charters



    Sgt. Edward George Havelock Day 106 Sqd. (d.9th Oct 1943)

    Ted was a rear gunner in a Lancaster Bomber. They took of at 23.10 on the 8th Oct 1943 and were shot down at 01.45 9th October 1943. All the crew perished.

    The crew had dropped their load on target and were heading out taking evasive action to avoid flak and patrolling Luftwaffe fighters. As thy were climbing to 12,000 feet they were caught by searchlight and the fighters attacked. All the crew are buried together in Hanover War Cemetery.

    • Sgt R T G Lester
    • Sgt R E Burgess
    • Sgt K Saunders
    • Fl/Sgt J F Ellins
    • Sgt E G H Day
    • Sgt H N Gustard



    Flying officer Anthony Carter 106 Sqd. (d.21st Dec 1941)

    I have been researching a story about the H.P.Hampden AE151 ZN-F of 106 Squadron. The medium bomber crashed the 21st of December 1941 at 16.15 in Schoonebeek in The Netherlands. Three crewmembers were taken pisoner of war and Anthony Carter was killed in action when the aircraft was hit by Flak above Oldenburg. I have photographs from all the crewmembers except F/O Carter as I could not find any relations who knew him.

    To complete my story I need a photograph of him, can anybody help me?



    Sgt. John Diggory Wireless Operator 106 Squadron (d.3rd Jul 1941)

    Died in the crash of Hampden HD862 near the village of Eben-Emael (Belgium) shot by Olt Knacke. First buried at Eben Cemetery, now Heverlee war Cemetery. If some one has more info please contact Thanks



    Sgt. Thomas George Goodwin 106 Squadron (d.7th Sep 1943 )

    Tommy was an uncle, my father's much loved brother whom I never met as I was born in 1951. My late father was serving in Egypt and the Middle East when he heard the news, so we know little of his service history. I have traced two Thomas Goodwins, one was with 106 squadron which operated Lancasters and I understand Tommy was a tail gunner in a Lancaster. The other Thomas Goodwin was with 78 squadron who I understand operated Halifax Bombers, hence I think he was in 106 squadron . I understand he was lost over the Black Forest, shot down on his way home



    Sgt. William Hamilton Lapsley MID. 106 Squadron (d.4th July 1941)

    William Lapsley was my Grandmother's youngest brother. He was killed on a mission to Dortmund. They took off at 23:00 on the 4th of Jul19 41 from RAF Conningsby in Hampden AD914 and were shot down by Flak near Heesch, Noord Brabant, crashing in the southern outskirts of Oss, Holland. All the crew were killed are buried in Eindhoven General Cemetery.

    The crew were:

    • F/S N.E.Bowering MID
    • F/S D.S.Bagnall
    • Sgt W.H.Lapsley MID
    • Sgt I.L.T.Reis



    Flt.Sgt. Robin William Caskey 106 Squadron (d.12th Aug 1942)

    Robin Caskey was a childhood friend of my late mother and I was named after him. I was disappointed his name was not mentioned at a recent High School Reunion at the school he once attended. I want to gather some information to send to Hastings High School together with a photo that I have of Robin in his RAF uniform. All I know is that he came from New Zealand and joined 106 squadron. Any information will be gratefully received.



    Sgt. Reginald Stone 106 Squadron (d.31st Jan 1943)

    Reg Stone was only 21 when he was shot down over Germany and presumed dead. He has a gravestone in the Becklingen War Cemetery in Germany. If anyone has any memories or pictures it would be lovely to share.



    Flying Officer James Conway Burns DFM Navigator 106, 99 Squadron (d.6th Oct 1945)

    My uncle F/O James Conway Burns completed his tours with 106 squadron as a Navigator and transferred to 99 bomber squadron as a navigator in Consolidated Liberators based on the Cocos/Keeling Islands near Singapore. He flew five sorties in Liberator EW236 "K" delivering supplies to Kallang airfield Singapore, believed to be for prisoners of war. On the 5th operation his plane was reported missing in bad weather and no distress call had been recieved. Whilst two attempts were made to find the plane and survivors the weather turned them back and the crew and plane were never found. James is commemorated with his fellow crew members at Kranji war cemetery in Singapore.



    Sgt. Donald Swaine 106 Sqd (d.29th Mar 1942)

    Donald Swaine was with 106 Sqd he died in 1942 and is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial.



    F/O Frank Wodehouse 106 Sqd. (d.8th Aug 1943)

    I am researching a family relative F/O Frank Wodehouse of 106 Squadron who died on 8th Aug 1943 after a raid on Turin. I would like to find out his Service history, his Flight Log and his Medal awards. - I have medals but ribbons are worn and we think there was a bar to one on them. Lancaster BIII DV 196 -ZNK Syerston of 106 Squadron (County of Nottingham) flying from Syerston departed at 20:55 on 7th Augusts 1943 for a bombing mission to Turin in Italy. During the return leg of the mission the Lancaster was intercepted by the radar station of St Jean Dackel Beef and was shot down. The victory being awarded to Captain Hans Wolfgang von Niebelschutz, Staffelkapitan of 5 ° Staffel II / NJG 4 (Dijon-Longvic) ME110 Night Fighter.

    Inside the Lancaster some unused incendiary projectiles ignited, and the evacuation order was given. The aircraft crashed at 2:55 in the morning near Vandenesse en Auxois and broke in two during the crash, 2 engines fell into a field, the other 2 in a stream. The pilot and bombardier were unable to evacuate the aircraft, lost their lives and were buried at Vandenesse en Auxois

    The crew were:

    • Flying Officer Frank George Wodehouse, aged 20 (pilot)
    • Sgt. John Cole, RAFVR aged 21 (bombardier)
    • Sgt AR Kidley (upper gunner)
    • Sgt JW Windiate RCAF (observer)
    • Sgt HL Nielsen 1077104 (wireless op)
    • Sgt T Adams 908221 (engineer)
    • F/O Gourlick RCAF J13457 (rear gunner)



    F/O Edward Worthy 106 Sqd.

    My uncle, F/O Edward Worthy, served with 106 Sqn at Methringham from the end of November 1943 to December 1943. He was a wireless operator/air gunner, his Lancaster jb593 zn-y was on operational duty the night of December 30/31 1943. They were to bomb the big city (Berlin). They took off on time and bombed on time over Berlin without any trouble, but on their return journey when they were near Bremen they were hit by an enormous explosion. The aircraft dived from 22,000 ft to below 9,000 ft. the pilot pulled out with help from the bomb aimer. Sadly the flight engineer was killed and my uncle was badly wounded. Both outboard engines were u/s and both turrets out of action, the main electrical conduit that sat above my uncle was damaged.

    Both gunners tended to my uncle, the rest of the crew jettisoned all excess weight to maintain height. They flew on over the North Sea but could not make Methringham. They diverted to Coltishall and landed without joining the circuit. They flew straight in flying under a Halifax coming the other way. It was established later that they had been hit by one of the first missiles made by the Germans.

    After hospital my uncle wanted to return to 106 but was deemed now unfit for flying duties. He remustered as an air control officer, thus maintaining contact with aircrews. Sadly as a footnote the rest of the crew returned to active duty with two replacements but were shot down in February 1944 with the pilot being killed and the rest made POWs.



    Sgt. Sidney James Holroyd Jones 106 Squadron (d.8th Nov 1941)

    Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner) Sidney James Holroyd Jones RAFVR of 106 Squadron RAF was killed in action on 8th November 1941. At 01.05 on the 8th of November Handley Page Hampden AD932 took off from RAF Conningsby in Lincolnshire to lay mines in Oslo Fjord. A radio message was received that the aircraft was down in the sea 48 miles East of Wick, one of three 106 Squadron aircraft lost on this operation.

    Sergeant Jones is buried in Kirwall (St Olaf) cemetery in Orkney. The other three crew members have no known grave and are commemorated on the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede.



    W/OII James Edward Quinn 106 Squadron (d.13th Jan 1943)

    James Quinn completed over 100 hours with his crew in W4261 Lancaster. They were shot down over Dusseldorf enroute to Essen. I would love to find anyone who may have know him or have relatives who knew him.



    Sgt. John Mclean Fraser 106 Sqdn (d.19th Sept 1940)

    John Fraser was a wireless operator air gunner with 106 squadron, he was 19 years old and is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.



    Sgt. Richard William Butler 106 Squadron (d.26th Jul 1942)

    My father was a Lancaster pilot with 106 Squadron, based finally at Coningsby in Lincolnshire. His squadron leader at that time was Guy Gibson. My father and mother both volunteered in 1939, my mother joined the WAAF and at the time of my father's death was also based at RAF Coningsby. My father was trained as a pilot in Medicine Hat in Canada, then at OTU Kinloss. He was lost on a bomb laying operation in the Bay of Biscay at the mouth of the Gironde River near Bordeaux. Only two of the crew survived, Adams and Church, the rest were killed when the plane was shot down by a flack ship. Coningsby was the last posting for my mother as she left the WAAF on compassionate grounds because she was pregnant. Prior to that she had been based at Stafford and occasionally used to commute (beyond the permissible distance) at weekends to visit my father at RAF Kinloss. RAF Conningsby was their first posting together.



    Sgt. John Harold Dyer 106 Squadron (d.2nd Jan 1944)

    John Dyer was my fathers brother, he joined the RAF as a wireless operator air gunner in 1942 going through training in 1943 on a variety of types - Dominies, Proctors, Bothas and Wellington all appear in his log book. He moved on to Manchesters and finally Lancasters in August 1943 at 1661 Conversion Unit at Swinderby and then to 106 Squadron Metheringham in September 1943 flying on his first operation to Mannheim on the 23/9/43.

    He was on his sixteenth op to Berlin when the whole aircraft and crew were lost on the 2nd January 1944, he was 21 years of age. The aircraft was JB 645 one of two lost on the same night



    Sgt. Robert Sidney Greep DFM 106 Sqdn. (d.18th Feb 1943)

    Sgt Greep was my uncle Bob. His name is listed with CWGC, but nowhere else. I have been to the war memorial in Capel-le-ferne Dover, his name is not listed their either. I have have searched many web sites including 106 Sdqn for WWII but found no mention of his name. How do I go about getting him some recognition?

    Editor's note:

    Your uncle is remembered at the Sage War Cemetery in Oldenburg, Germany where he is buried, it would be usual for an airman to be listed on the war memorial closest to his home or birthplace, or sometimes on a memorial inside the church they attended, names were usually nominated by family members who selected the place they felt most appropriate. CWGC lists his parents as living in Broadstairs, Kent so he may be listed there?



    Flt Sgt. Howard Gavin nav. 106 Squadron (d.22nd June 1944)

    Howard Gavin was my uncle, I believe that he was buried by the Dutch and I would like to know more about his squadron.



    Sgt. Raymond George Williams 106th Squadron (d.8th May 1944)

    Raymond is buried in Orleans Main Cemetery, France



    P/O. Stuart James Harvey 106 Sqn. (d.17th May 1941)

    Stuart James Harvey, known as Jimmy was killed, we think as a result of a crash, when his wife, Meryl, was 5 months pregnant with their only child (my father). His grave is at Wittering All Saints Church. Throughout the years, we were led to believe that Stuart had been shot down over Germany, but the revelation that there is a grave (we only found this out in the last couple of years) has led us to think that the more likely scenario was a crash. Rumour has it that the only survivor was the tail gunner, but I am unaware of any further graves at Wittering with the same date as my grandfather's.

    Having been with 106 Squadron, I'm sure Jimmy would have flown out of Conningsby, but we have precious few leads. We do know that, before the war broke out, he had been on HMS Repulse, he apparently 'jumped ship' so that he could fly. There is an entry in The Valetta Times proclaiming his bowling prowess, having taken six wickets in a match in 1938. Given what happened to Repulse and his own fate, he jumped out of the frying pan and into the fire.

    My Dad grew up never having known his father. When I was born my parents named me Stuart James, but I've always been known as Jim and I've always felt a draw towards him and would deeply love to find out more about him. I would be eternally grateful to anyone who has any information about my grandfather. Perhaps he appears in a group photo that's tucked away in someone's WWII artefacts?



    P/O. John Alan Worswick DFC. 106 Squadron (d.2nd Jun 1942)

    My Father Alan Worswick piloted Hampdens, Manchesters and Lancasters in 34 Ops over Germany and France. He was due for leave when on the night of the 14th /15th of April 1942 he force landed Manchester 7317 at Lee the Solent on return from raid on Dortmunde. On the 15th he and his crew were retrieved and flown back from Tangmere to Coningsby by W/C Guy Gibson in Manchester 7485. On the 30th of May Father piloted Lancaster 5848 on the first 1000 Raid to Cologne. On the 1st of June 1942 he piloted Lancaster 5844 on the second 1000 Raid to Essen. Father should not have been flying that night but at the last minute was ordered to take over S/L Lester Stenner's aircraft and crew as for some reason Stenner had declared himself unable to fly. I believe his may have been the the first Lancaster lost from Coningsby, Father was killed just before I was 2 years old.

    Pre-war he was a keen racing Motor Cyclist racing in the Manx Grand Prix in 1937 and 1938. They were on the boat in Douglas Harbor in 1939 but as war was imminent it returned to England as the races were cancelled.



    F/Lt. Donald Angus Evans 106 Squadron

    My father, Donald Angus Evans, was was born in 1919 in a tiny farming community called Oxbow in the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada. He was just 20 when he joined the RCAF and had never been off the farm. He came of age during the depression and they were greatly affected by the dust bowl that blew away the soft soil, and he lived through some very difficult times. My father used to tell me that in those days you were considered a man at 15!

    Anyways off he went to join RCAF and as I look at his pictures in uniform at that time, and know the feats he was to perform as a Navigator Officer in the Lancaster I am amazed! Of my father it could truly be said he was so young, so handsome, and so brave! He was selected to become a navigator. He did also train as a pilot and soloed but they decided his greatest skill set lay in navigating. Men selected as pilots and navigators trained much longer than for the other positions. Pilots and navigators trained for two years. In 1941 Dad completed his training and joined Bomber Command.

    He was stationed somewhere else before 106 Squadron which was based in Metheringham - but I don't think he ever told his children the name. He told me many details of his life there. Since he spent almost all his time with the crew of his Lancaster, he developed a deep attachment. Although I don't know exactly how long each mission took but my father indicated that by the time you got briefed on your mission, flew deep into Germancy to bomb the industrial targets and then got home, were debriefed and went to bed - that most of the day was used up. That breakfast (with always some crew missing from the mission) was a bit sad since you didn't know if they had parachuted safely or not. Then you would sleep, get up prep for the day and then start all over again with briefing.

    Days off were welcome and one tended to stay with your own crew of whom it could be said you became as attached as if they were your brothers. Either you went to a comrade's home if they were English or went into London with your comrades for something called a "Bash". Which, I think since young men don't change that much, we can imagine involved liqueur and meeting young women at dancehalls etc.

    I have the coolest picture of my Dad in full officer uniform with his arms around (he in the middle) 2 other officers that appear to be the pilot and co-pilot, it's a street photo taken in London. They are all officers and look happy & perhaps feeling no pain!

    Dad lasted in Bomber Command from 1941 through to June 1945 - an amazing length of tour of duty considering casuality rates were about 55 percent! He backup bombed on D-Day in June 1945 and then on a mission later that month was shot down over occupied France. Three out of four engines were on fire but the pilot managed to keep the plane in the air long enough for all 7 crew members to parachute to safety! As an officer Dad was either the third or second to last out. The bombadier named Jack Kingston broke both ankles. He had a bad habit of leaving his heavy combat boots untied and loosened and as he floated to earth they both fell off! The pilot also broke his leg.

    Immediately Nazis with dogs came to capture them. My father alone escaped detection and was not imprisoned. I believe he told me that he cut his chute and rolled in a dirty ditch to disguise himself and ran! He was afterall a country boy. At any rate after walking at night and hiding in the woods in the day, he realized would have to approach someone for help. He chose a French couple driving a wagon. He approached and as luck would have it they were members of the French underground. He was then hidden in a place in Gourney, Brittany until liberation.

    I have since read the following stats on RCAF Lancaster crews - 55% killed, 29% survived 14% captured, 2% parachuted to safety and evaded capture. He was only 26 and had been on active combat duty for 5 years.

    A toast to my father and all those brave, brave young men who gave their lives so we would live in freedom! Let us NEVER forget them. My Dad died 5 years ago at age eighty-seven. The WW2 vets are getting very old! We must honour them while they still remain and value their courage!! I am proud to be the daughter of a brave and wonderful man - a true warrior Donald Angus Evans.



    Sgt. Harry Fisher 106 Squadron (d.4th Sep 1943)

    Sgt Fisher is my Uncle Harry. But I know nothing about him, because my Nana was so devastated by his death that she would never ever talk about him and my Mum was too young to know much. Any information about him would be greatly appreciated.



    Sgt. Harry Fisher 106 Squadron (d.4th Sep 1943)

    Harry Fisher was my Mum's brother. Very little was ever said about him as my Nana was too devastated to talk about him. I am very keen to learn more about him. I have found out that he is buried in Hanover and am planning to visit his grave. Does anyone have any information on him. He died on the 4th of September 1943 how can I find out which sortie was he on?

    Editors Note: Bomber Command Losses records that Lancaster ED385 took off at 19.30 on the 3rd of September 1943 from Syerston. It crashed into a thickly wooded area between Burgdorf, 20 km from Hannover and the town of Uetze. All the crew perished and are buried in Hannover War cemetery.

    The crew were:

    • F/O L.W.Roper RAAF
    • Sgt K.E.Bright
    • Sgt A.s.Carscadden
    • Sgt K.D.Wellwood RCAF
    • Sgt H.Fisher
    • Sgt E.A.Cannon RCAF
    • Sgt R.C.Woolnough



    Sgt. Leonard Arthur "Arthur" Leadbitter 106 Sqdn (d.5th Mar 1943)

    Leonard Arthur Leadbitter, enlisted in the R.A.F in October 1938 he trained as a ground staff radio operator. When war came, one after another of his comrades did not return from operational flights he decided to avenge their deaths and applied to transfer to air crews and trained as an air gunner.

    Until march 1943 when he was reported missing his mother, my great grandmother Mary Leadbitter, thought he was still working on the ground staff. Leonard thought his mother would worry if he told her he was flying. So after long raids he would return home and tell her he was in a safe spot on radio staff. His only worry was his mother would find out he was flying.

    His mother received a consolation letter from Wing Commander Guy Gibson who awarded his brillant leadship and said he was a very fine rear gunner. Leonard was killed on the 5th of March 1913, his Lancaster took off from Syerston at 18.57 on a mission to Target Essen. They were shot down at 21.15 in target area. Leonard is buried in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery.

    I'm so proud of my great Uncle and am so pleased that there is going to be a memorial for these brave brave men. God Bless. x



    Flt.Sgt. Walter Smith 106 Sdq.

    My Father, Walter Smith, originally signed up in 1941 and was sent to the Isle of Islay to train as an electrician. Whilst he enjoyed the summer, he was not keen to stay the winter in such a cold climate, so decided to volunteer for flying training instead. He did his air crew training in Bridlington in 1942 and qualified in early April 1943 as an air gunner. Originally based at Syerston, he then moved base to Metheringham.

    He flew on 30 operations between August 1943 and April 1944. On his 30th and last operation on 27th April 1944, his report book confirms that, on the way back from Schweinfort, his Lancaster was intercepted by a night fighter whose fire set light to a fuel tank. One of the crew, Sgt. Jackson, got out onto the wing to try and put out the fire. He was later awarded the V.C. for his bravery. The remainder of the crew abandonded the plane, with all but two surviving. The captain of the plane 'Miff' Mifflin of course remained until last and was one of the two who did not survive, along with Flt. Sgt. Johnson. My Father insists that 'Miff' was the bravest amongst them all. My Father gave himself in to the Germans three days later and spent the rest of the war as a POW. I am a very proud daughter.



    Sgt. James William Blanchard 106 Squadron (d.22th June 1944)

    Sgt James Blanchard was the flight engineer onLancaster LM570 (call sign ZN-Z) when it left RAF Metheringham at 23:15 on the evening of 21/22 June 1944. The mission was to carry out the bombing of a synthetic oil plant (Buer) at Gelesenkirchen, Germany.

    Whilst airborne, the aircraft was shot down by a German night fighter and crashed at Rossum (Gelderland) on the bank of the Waal, approx 12Km SW of Tiel. All the crew were killed. Seven of the crew are buried in the Uden War Cemetary between Eindhoven and Nijmegen. Sgt Scott is buried in the Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetary. The crew were:

    • FO Bellingham, K G Captain (pilot)RAF
    • Sqn Ldr A J Loughborough (pilot)RAF
    • Sgt James William Blanchard (flight engineer)RAF
    • Flt Sgt H Gavin (navigator) RAAF
    • Flt Sgt L Toomey (air bomber)RAAF
    • Sgt A Goodacre (wireless air gunner) RAF
    • Sgt S J Malaband (mid upper gunner)RAF
    • Sgt C E Scott (rear gunner)RCAF



    Flt.Lt. Leslie Brodrick 106 Squadron

    I'm a journalist for a community paper in South Africa and did an article on Les Brodrick. I am posting it on this website as it helped me piece together the chain of events during the long march, as Les's memory was a little vague.

    Les recalls his Stalag Luft III escape -By Shelly Lawrie

    Sixty-six years ago, in one of the most daring and bold escapes from a Prisoner of War camp, Scottburgh¹s Leslie Brodrick, (now 88), one of 15 survivors, recalls the event and consequences. A Royal Air Force, Flight Lieutenant for 106 squadron, Brodrick, 22-years-old, was shot down. He crash landed near Amiens on his Stuttgart raid return flight. He was taken to Dulag Luft for interrogation, then to Stalag Luft III in Sagan, an airforce Prisoner of War camp run by the Luftwaffe.

    South African born Squadron Leader, Roger Bushell was the master-mind behind the audacious escape plan at the camp, and Brodrick was recruited immediately. Numerous tunnels had been dug but were found by the Germans. Bushell’s plan consisted of three tunnels, ‘Tom’, ‘Dick’ and ‘Harry’ being dug simultaneously. His aim was to have 250 men escape and spread chaos in Germany. Of all three tunnels, ‘Dick’ had the most ingenious trapdoor. Situated in block 122, the washroom, the tunnel entry was concealed in the sump. Water had to be removed, and the modified concrete slab put in place and sealed with a mixture of clay, soap and cement. Broderick was appointed ’trapfuhrer’, meaning he was responsible for the entrance to ‘Dick’. He had to unseal the slab for the ‘diggers’ then seal them in again and keep watch. After ‘Tom’ was discovered and ‘Dick’ abandoned after a prison compound was constructed in its path, all efforts were concentrated on ‘Harry’. ‘Dick’ was used as storage for all contraband.

    On the evening of March 24, 1944, 200 men hoped to escape through ‘Harry’. The tunnel, 8.5m down, to hide any tunnelling sounds that buried microphones might pick up, and about 102m long, had electrical light, a ventilation system and a railway track with three haulage points and carts. Things did not go according to plan. Firstly, the exit trapdoor was frozen shut. After opening it, it was discovered the tunnel was well short of the pine-forest tree line. Due to an air-raid on Berlin, all camp electricity was turned off. With the tunnel exit only 27m from the nearest guard tower, a plan was hatched. A length of rope was strung from inside the tunnel to a person just behind the tree line. A series of tugs were used to signal “the coast is clear”.

    Experienced escapees, German speakers and those that contributed the most to the operation, were first on the list. The rest of the men drew lots, Brodrick was drawn at number 52. In complete darkness, Brodrick made his way to the tunnel exit, he hit a snag at the exit ladder as his legs could not bend to climb up. He got out by hauling himself, hand-over-hand for the last 8.5m. Once free of the camp, Brodrick and two others, Henry Birkland and Denys Street, did not progress very far. For three days, travelling at night only, soaked and freezing, Brodrick and Street decided to find shelter as Birkland was ³in a bad way². Spotting a cottage, the three, street-fluent in German, decided to try their luck by “spinning a yarn” to the occupants of the cottage. Unfortunately, the occupants were German soldiers. The three were arrested, taken to a local police station and then to Gestapo head quarters at Gorlitz for interrogation. Brodrick said he recognised the Gestapo as they “dress in leather coats just like in the movies”.

    He was then returned to Stalag Luft III. On arrival he discovered Hitler had ordered 50 of the escaped 76 to been shot, Street was one of them. The men under pretence, individually or in pairs, were told they were being moved to another location. On the “trip”, German soldiers would stop the vehicle, either for the men to relieve themselves or ‘stretch their legs’, and when their backs were turned they were shot. The excuse given for their ’execution’ was that they had been trying to escape. Of the 76 escapees, three evaded recapture.

    On January 27, 1945, Stalag Luft III was evacuated due to Russian forces approaching. Broderick and many others were marched in sub-zero temperatures, westwards to Spremberg. Once there they were loaded into cattle trains, destination Marlag Nord in Tarmstedt. The British corporal in charge of the prisoners refused to stay at the Marlag camp, condemned by the Red Cross as unfit and unsanitary.

    Eventually Brodrick and the others ended up on a tobacco plantation near Lubeck. Here they were liberated on May 2, 1945, by British troops in open trucks shouting, “you’re free!”.

    During the march they were shot at by a Royal Air Force spitfire, until the pilot realised they were not the enemy. Broderick also witnessed concentration camps with “skeletal Jews and the systematic slaughter of them”. At one location the prisoners were given a shower, and they thought they were to be gassed.

    Brodrick was flown home to Canvey Island, England in a Lancaster, one from his old squadron. After tidal wave flooded Canvey Island in 1953, Brodrick and family came to South Africa in 1956, and moved to Scottburgh in 1963.



    F/O. James Conway Burns DFM. 106 Squadron (d.6th Oct 1945)

    My Uncle F/O James Conway Burns had tranferred to 99 Squadron, based on the Cocos Islands, following his completion of operations as a navigator with 106 Lancaster Squadron for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal.

    He flew five sorties with the same crew in 99 Squadron Liberator EW236 "K" King, taking supplies to Singapore for prisoners of war. On the 6th of October 1945 they were taking supplies to Kallang airfield when it is believed the aircraft crashed into the sea in bad weather; possibly due to a cyclone. Although attempts were made to find them the bad weather forced the search aircraft back to base. My uncle and his crew are commemorated at the Kranji War memorial Singapore. James was only 24 years old when he died.



    Sgt. Rex Joseph Chatwin 106 Squadron (d.19th Sep 1944)

    Uncle Rex was my mother's brother who died on 19th September, 1944. He was 19 years old. He was based at RAF Metheringham and was "tail end charlie" gunner on a Lancaster bomber that was shot down either on the way or on the way back from a night bombing raid to Rheydt. The plane crashed at Elmpt. We believe of the 7 occupants, 6 were killed but this has not been confirmed.



    Flt.Sgt. William Lewis Johnston Young 106 Squadron. (d.3rd May 1942)

    Flt.Sgt W. Lewis Young was my uncle, with formal photograph attached, who was based at Coningsby with 106 Squadron until he was killed in action on 3rd May 1942. His photograph album is available to view online.

    The photographs are in the sequence in which Lewis compiled the album. They are ordered, but not chronologically, and contain mainly pictures of RAF colleagues and of family. From the number of pictures of Exton Hall, I guess that it was a training centre with happy associations, as well as being very impressive to a young man from the Northern Ireland countryside. I have no information on any of the other airmen in the pictures.

    One of Lewis’s uncles was killed at Dunkirk. His stepfather was a padre in the Black Watch in North Africa and Burma; and his brother, my father, was a tank commander in the North Irish Horse in North Africa and Italy (including Monte Casino). His sister later joined the WRVS in London. And, remember, there was no conscription in Northern Ireland.



    F/O Jacques Robert Christian Hoboken DFC 106 Sqd. (d.27th Nov 1943)

    t by reducing its flight crew and Jacques Robert, Christian Hoboken was awarded his DFC for actions onboard Lancaster ED593 ZN on the 22/23rd of October 1943 on operations to Kassel. He was killed on a raid on Berlin (26/27-11-1943) crashing 3 km north of Gross-Karben in a Lancaster III, ZN-W, JB592. Op 22/23-10-1943 Lancaster ED593 ZN-Y target Kassel door het terugbrengen van zijn bemanning en vliegtuig DFC verdiend. Bij een raid op Berlijn (26/27-11-1943) 3 km ten noorden van Gross-Karben neergestort. Vloog in een Lancaster III, ZN-W, JB592. The crew were:

    • Pilot F/O Hoboken, Jacques Robert Christian (131136) DFC.
    • Fight Engineer Sgt. Lucas, George Emile Gaston (975066) DFM.
    • Navigator F/O Jenkins, James Peter Julian (134207)
    • Airbomber P/O Graham, John Crichton (134669)
    • WOp/Air Gunner F/O Read, Aubrey William (50611)
    • Rear Gunner F/O Stuffin, Harry George (49983)
    • M/U Gunner Sgt. Davies, Edgar William (1420122)
    They are buried first at Gloss Karban. Later buried at Durnbach War Cemetery Germany. Hoboken lies in grave 1.B.9-12.



    Sgt. Ralph Thomas Gyrden Lester 106 Squadron (d.9th Oct 1943)

    Ralph Lester joined the RAF when he was just seventeen, he lied about his age of course; He was a Flight Sergeant and was lost over Hanover, Germany 9 Oct 1943, when he was 18. He would go on leave in an aircraftsman uniform and told his mother he was a mechanic; she only found out the truth the day or so before he was lost. She herself joined the WAAFs and she was then over 43. Ralph is buried in Hanover War Cemetery.



    Sgt. Wilfred Worthington 106 Squadron (d.9th July 1943)

    I was 12 years old when I heard that my Uncle Wilfred Worthington was missing and presumed dead. What I understand was, that the Lancaster was on fire, and the Canadian pilot was trying to return to base. I believe but, not certain, that 2 or 3 of the crew managed to bail out at a low altitude. My Uncle Wilfred was on the radio, the aircraft then blew up with full bomb load and nothing was found of the rest of the crew or aircraft.

    I have tried to find out the facts of that mission, if anyone can help it would be appreciated.



    Sgt Patrick Michael Griffin 106 Squadron (d.7th Jul 1941)

    Patrick Griffin was serving as Wireless Operator/Rear Gunner. On July 6th 1941 he was detailed to carry out attack on enemy warships based at Brest, in Hampden Bomber serial no AE120. Hampden AE120 bombed its target at 0210 hours and returned to base. Unfortunately Patrick didn't. What happened to him I do not know.

    The other crew that night were

    • P/O Herd,
    • P/O McIver and
    • Sgt Sell.

    Hampden AE120 was subsequently shot down by a night fighter nr Arnhem and the crew are buried in Gendringen Roman Catholic Cemetery:

    • Sgt.W.L.Knowles,RNZAF,
    • Sgt.J.M.Macilwraith,
    • F/Sgt.A.P.Price DFM and
    • Sgt.C.Rhodes



    Flt.Sgt. William Stevenson "Mac" McPhail 106 Squadron

    My Father, William Stevenson McPhail, was Flight Engineer on Lancaster LL 975 ZN-H, in 106 Squadron based in Metheringham. On June 24th 1944, on a bombing mission over Pommereval attacking a rocket construction site, his Lancaster was shot down. Only he and the Bomb Aimer, Bill Knaggs managed to bail out. Bill Knaggs was picked up by the resistance and spent the rest of the war as an evader. My Father, however, was picked up by the Germans, found hanging by his parachute in trees surrounding the target. After interrogation by the Gestapo, he was transferred to Stalag Luft 7, from where he escaped, returning the the UK via Poland and Russia. Before his death, Bill Knaggs wrote a short book, The Easy trip, recounting his evader exploits. My Father died in 1984 and Bill Knaggs in 2007.



    William B. Lloyd 106 Squadron

    My grandfather, William B Lloyd, served as both a Rear and Mid-Upper Tail Gunner in World War II. He was trained at No. 3 B & G school in Macdonald' Manitoba. Then embarked from Halifax to go overseas in October of 1943. He was staying in Bournemouth for a few months and was in and out of the hospital due to severe bronchitis. From his logbook it states that he was at No. 17 O.T.U Turweston from December 14 1943 - February 20 1944 and was in the hospital again for the rest of Feb and March of '44. In April - May 1944, he was stationed at No. 1661 Heavy Conversion Unit in Winthorpe and then at the end of May and June 1944 at RAF Syerston where he started with the following crew:

    • Pilot Jack Netherwood
    • Navigator H S Wyatt
    • Bomb Aimer Glen Hendry
    • Wireless A.G L.J Lucas
    • Mid Upper A.G A.R Parisani
    • Rear A.G - W.B Lloyd
    From June of 1944 through to February of 1945 he was stationed at RAF Metheringham in Squadron 106. He completed 13 Ops with his original crew and then became grounded from flying due to bursting his ear drums and severe colds while the rest of his crew finished their tour. Once cleared to fly again he completed 6 Ops as a "Spare Bod" gunner flying with any crew that needed him. The next 11 Ops he completed with an Australian crew and Skipper by the name of Gord Laidlaw. In March of 1945 he and the Australian crew were stationed at RAF Coningsby as part of the Pathfinder Force, Squadron 83. They completed 3 Ops there. In total my grandfather completed 18 OPS as a rear gunner, and 15 as a Mid Upper. A total of 33 trips.

    I was fortunate enough to conduct an interview with him about his time in the war a few years before he passed away. As well he kept his flying logbook in great condition and his mother kept all the letters he wrote home to her as well. With these documents I have spliced together his war time experience. I am honoured to have a grandfather who was proud to fight for his country and freedom and survive as well. I hope my contributions to this website are insightful in some way.



    Fly/Off. Jack Taylor 106 Squadron (d.7th August 1944)

    I am in possession of the log book for Jack Taylor, my uncle, who was lost over Normandy on August 7th, 1944. He was lost when Lancaster LM641 was shot down. Jack is one of only 2 Commonwealth soldiers buried in a small village cemetry of Quetteville in France.

    I never met my uncle but the story that was when they were shot down, the pilot and others were able to bail out but Jack went down with the aircraft. As rear gunner, I believe they were unable to wear a parachute. My father, (Jack's younger brother) spoke of the pilot making contact with his family after the war to explain what happened. My father is still alive and I am hopeful of learning more about this event.



    W/O. Joseph Charles Edward Dellar 106 Squadron (d.5th Mar 1943)

    Joseph Charles Edward Dellar, served as a W.Op Class2/Air gunner on Lancasters of 106 Squadron. He was born and raised in Quebec, Canada. He perished on March 5th, 1943 in bombing raid over Essen. His brother Herbert perished in Normandy, on August 14th, 1944. They were survived by brother Leonard, and three sisters Claire, Olive and Caroline.



    P/O. Eric Williams 106 Sqd.

    I am trying to find out more about Rick Williams to help my mother whose memory, at 92, is sadly lacking. Rick was her wartime fiancée and left this life on one of the many raids from Conningsby around 1943/44. Sorry I can't be more specific, can anyone help me?



    Sgt. Caspar Harald "Jerk" Jurgensen 106 Sqd. (d.3th Jan 1943)

    Casper Jurgensen was the uncle I never met. He flew a fateful 13th mission and was shot down by a night fighter and the whole crew perished. I visited Appledorn cemetary in the 70's with my mother to see his grave. After leaving the station, we didn't go to a large supermarket for flowers but chose a little shop down the road. When we told the owner why we were there, he showed us a photo of the grave they looked after during the war and it was my uncle's. Very strange and kind of lovely at the same time. The German's made them move the body from the local cemetary to the war one and later some of the commonwealth crew were moved to a Canadian cemetery.



    Flt.Sgt Wilfred Harold "Wilf" Fixter 106 Sqd

    I am trying to find out some more information about Flt/Sgt W H Fixter who was the pilot of Manchester R5840 and was shot down on the night of 2/3 May 1942. We know Roy Dotrice was his rear gunner on this mission and with other members of the crew were picked up from their dinghy, earning him a commemorative Goldfish Badge. He spent time at Fallingbostle and Stalag Luft III plus other camps we are not sure of. My father was not very forthcoming with information as it was a time in his life with events he felt not suited to divulge to a young lady (me). While he was a POW we know from him he used to play poker with the guards to obtain equipment papers etc to help the escape committee. He was a fluent German speaker which also served later when he escaped whilst being marched to Poland towards the end of the war. His escape being assisted by one of the 'friendly' guards. Whilst making his way back towards the Allied lines he stayed on to assist in the interpretation of the inmates, one of whom was Irma Gresa.

    We also know that my father flew with Guy Gibson and had completed his training on the Lancs and would quite possibly have been part of the Dambusters raid had events not intervened. Regrettably his flight log books were given to someone other than family as Dad didn't realise they would be of interest to me as I grew older.



    Sgt Leslie Grahame Reynolds 106 Sqd.

    My Dad, Leslie Reynolds, never talked about the war just left me photos of missions over Germany, his crew, Navigators air bombers and gunners flying log book, Medals and a letter from a old Pal in new Zealand



    F/Sgt. Edwin Stanley Power 106 Squadron

    My Father Flight Sgt Edwin Stanley Francis Power 755045 joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve Air Crew Section in June 1939. He trained at Cranwell, Evanton in Scotland and Pembrey in Wales.

    He was posted to 106 Sqdn in 1940 to March 1942. Based at Cottesmore & Finningley as an Air Gunner wireless op. He flew in Hampdens over Germany dropping leaflets. He took part in bombing of the invasion barges at Antwerp, mine laying and bombing of Mannheim and other cities. In March 1942 he was posted to Idku in Egypt with 227 and 252 Sqdn and flew in Halifaxes and Beaufighters. He was posted to 272 Beaufighter Sqdn based at Takali Airfield, Malta. During this time he was involved in various missions including shipping strikes, ground attacks in North Africa and attacking troop carrying planes. He was posted to Sicily and then returned to England. From Jan 1945 to November 1945 he was posted to 577 Sqdn Bomber Command Naval cooperation.



    Sergeant Frank Chapman 106 Sqd (d.19th May 1942)

    My uncle was Frank Chapman and he took off from RAF Coningsby on May 19th 1942 in Manchester I Serial L7418 code ZN on a navigation exercise. The plane and crew were missing presumed lost at sea off the coast of Pembroke. The crew were:

    • 1367218 Sergeant Alexander McHardy age 20 from Aberdeenshire
    • 938995 Sergeant Kenneth Gill age 21 from Harborne, Birmingham
    • R/96124 Flight Sergeant Raplh Ainsworth Post RCAF age 21 from Manitoba, Canada
    • 404899 Sergeant Ralph Warren age 22 of Waverley, New South Wales, Australia
    • 1056809 Sergeant Frank Chapman age 27 of Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire
    I was born in 1946, so never knew Frank - but after much researching was grateful to receive this information from a World War 2 ex RAF website some time ago. Also to know that his name is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial along with the other crew members. Any other information would be much appreciated - if available. I do not know if planes were ever found or recovered in these situations.



    P/O. Harry Murdoch Stoffer 106 Squadron (d.24th Apr 1942)

    My uncle, Pilot Officer Harry Murdoch Stoffer flew Manchester bombers for 106 Squadron, operating out of RAF Conningsby. At 22.00 hours on April 23rd, he took off on a raid on Rostock in Northern Germany. The mission went to plan but on his return, the aircraft was hit by flack over Denmark and the port hand engine caught fire. Harry ordered his crew to bale out and those using the forward hatch had a desperate struggle to open it against the air stream. They finally departed the aircraft at around 2,000 ft and all landed safely.

    Harry remained at the controls and the aircraft hit the ground at a flat angle before bursting in to flames. Local people could see Stoffer sitting in his seat but had no chance of getting to him due to the intensity of the blaze. Only when the fire had burnt out could the Germans retrieve his remains and he was laid to rest at the Aabenraa Cemetary in Denmark. Touchingly, a German eight man squad fired a volley at the end of the ceremony out of respect for his bravery. His crew were all captured and became POW's.

    He was just 20 years old and I have a framed photograph of him hanging in my home. Looking impossibly youthful in his RAF uniform, the photo has a handwritten note from him reading 'To Mother, with all my love. Harry'. That photo was the most prized possession of Kitty, his mother and sat as a central shrine in her living room in Streatham, South London. It was then equally prized by his sister who was my God Mother in her home in Dingwall, Scotland. Harry's grandfather (and mine) was Captain Duncan Finlayson who was for many years the Chief Constable for Ross and Cromarty.



    P/O. James Brodie 106 Squadron (d.22nd June 1944)

    Pilot Office Jim Brodie at home

    Jim Brodie's Lancaster bomber LL955, call sign ZN-E, was shot down by a night fighter over Netherlands, on 22nd June 1944. They were returning from a raid on oil installations at Scholven-Buer, and he was posted as missing, presumed dead.

    They were shot down by Oberleutnant Martin Drewes of III.NJG 1. The bodies of Jim and his crew are buried in Oosterwolde Cemetery, Oldebroek. The plot contains the bodies of Jim, a Pilot Officer, and his 6 crew:

    • Aldridge, Frank Henry, F H Sergeant (Flt. Engr.) 1853526 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 22/06/1944 20 Plot 2. Coll. grave. 2
    • Brodie, James, J Pilot Officer (Pilot) 174302 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 22/06/1944 22 Plot 2. Coll. grave. 3
    • Brownlee, William, W Flight Sergeant (Nav.) 1560442 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 22/06/1944 20 Plot 2. Coll. grave.
    • Horton, Ronald Elmer, R E Pilot Officer (Air Gnr.) J/88617 Royal Canadian Air Force 22/06/1944 19 Plot 2. Coll. grave. 1
    • Keith, David Robinson Neill, Flight Sergeant (Air Bomber) 416005 Royal New Zealand Air Force 22/06/1944 28 Plot 2. Coll. grave.
    • O'connell, George Francis Leo, Flight Sergeant (Air Gnr.) R/203907 Royal Canadian Air Force 22/06/1944 Unknown Plot 2. Coll. grave.
    • Sleep, Royston, Sergeant (W.Op. [Air]) 1533681 Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve 22/06/1944 21 Plot 2. Coll. grave.



    F/Lt. Thomas Brodie Herd DFC 106 Squadron (d.8th Nov 1941)

    Thomas Brodie Herd was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Herd of Broughty Ferry, Angus, Dundee, Scotland. My Grandmother Mary Jane Herd's Uncle was Thomas Herd, Chairman of the Distillers Company (Limited) Edinburgh. His son F/Lt. T.B. Herd DFC, served with 106 Squadron and died, aged 24, on Saturday, 8th November 1941. The information I have is that F/Lt. Herd was killed when his aircraft, a Handley-Page Hamden, Serial Number AD932 of No 106 Squadron Coningsby, failed to return from a raid on Essen. F/Lt. Herd was the pilot of the aircraft. The other three crew members also perished on this operation. I do not have the names of the other crew members.

    I would be most grateful for any information on F/L Herd's operations on 106 Squadron.



    P/O. Lloyd George Harris 106 Sqn (d.11th Aug 1943)

    Pilot Officer Harris (RAAF) was my grandmother's cousin from Australia. Lloyd was posted to 106 Squadron in 1943 as a Pilot flying the Lancaster. He completed his flying training at No.10 E.F.T.S. Temora in country NSW Australia. This is where he met his wife Sylvia Lachlan and where they got married on the 17 Jan 1942.

    On the night of 10/11th of August 1943, having been posted to the squadron for only a "few" days and on his 3 operational mission, he failed to return from a bombing mission over Nuremburg Germany. He was 21 years old. A letter was received from the then C.O. of 106 Squadron Wing Commander R.E. Baxter informing his parents of his death. He was greatly impressed with his "obvious enthusiasm for flying", further adding "How appreciative we are of the motives which brought him from Australia to help us"

    R.I.P. Thank-you for your Service and sacrifice.



    WO. Fredrick Smooker 106 Sqn.

    My Uncle F.H. Smooker flew with 106 Sqn. as a bomb aimer. And along with the crew of Lancaster ED 720 ZN-R were shot down near Cambrai on the night of 8/9 July 1943. The Lancaster had a crew of seven on normal operations and on this occasion was apparently carrying a second pilot gaining experience of operations before captaining his own crew. The crew that Uncle Fred flew with routinely were First Lt. Eugene Rosner USAAF, on his last op with the RAF before transferring. Sgt. Disbury second pilot. F.Sgt. James Calder Air Gunner RCAF. F.Sgt Dalton Turner Air Gunner RCAF. Sgt. J Hougham W.OP/Air Gunner. Sgt. W Bailey Navigator. The aircraft was damaged by flack and then a night fighter from 1/NJG4 piloted by Ob. Lt. Fritz Graef attacked and shot them down near Hirson at approx 0250. Uncle Fred in the nose had tried to fight it off, along with the other gunners, but the front turret was dead. Flying as they were on only 3 engines they could not keep up with the bomber stream and were the classic sitting duck. Of the crew of 8 only my Uncle survived and said that on landing by parachute the wreckage of the Lancaster was burning in a field 500 yards away. He managed to evade capture until Sept of 43 but then spent 56 days in Fresnes prison (Paris) before internment in Stalag camp 4B were he was prisoner 263424. There have only been 3 Smookers in the RAF My Father Ernest, my uncle Fred and myself W.O.E.P. Smooker. I mentioned this to Jacko Jackson the BBMF Lancaster pilot who then took me flying in the Lancaster so all 3 Smookers have flown in a Lanc. I mention this as it made me appreciate what those crews endured in the pitch black and freezing cold nights over Europe. We should always remember the sacrifice that so many made and never forget the debt we owe. To me they were all heroes, although they would be embarrassed to spoken of in such a way. Gentlemen I salute you. "Per Ardua Ad Astra"



    P/O Robert Fleming Chase 106 Squadron (d.17th Sep 1942)

    P/O Robert F. Chase (d. 17 Sept 1942) was with the 106 Squadron, stationed in Coningsby. He is remembered on the Runnymede Memorial.



    Sgt. John Warren Badley 106 Sqd. (d.8th Dec 1942)

    John Badley was the uncle of my wife, the only son of Victor Badley, who never got over losing his son at 20. John was found in the wreckage of his crashed aircraft by local German villagers and buried in their local cemetery. After the war he was re-interred at the Rheinberg War Cemetery, Kamp Lintfort, Nordrhein-Westfal, Germany. The Red Cross alerted his parents of his death at the time. I know nothing of his Air Force career and would be grateful for any further information.








    Can you help us to add to our records?

    The names and stories on this website have been submitted by their relatives and friends. If your relations are not listed please add their names so that others can read about them


    Did you or your relatives live through the Second World War? Do you have any photos, newspaper clippings, postcards or letters from that period? Have you researched the names on your local or war memorial? Were you or your relative evacuated? Did an air raid affect your area?

    If so please let us know.

    Help us to build a database of information on those who served both at home and abroad so that future generations may learn of their sacrifice.




    Celebrate your own Family History

    Celebrate by honouring members of your family who served in the Secomd World War both in the forces and at home. We love to hear about the soldiers, but also remember the many who served in support roles, nurses, doctors, land army, muntions workers etc.

    Please use our Family History resources to find out more about your relatives. Then please send in a short article, with a photo if possible, so that they can be remembered on these pages.









    Website and ALL Material © Copyright MMII
    - All Rights Reserved