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The Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry



The Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Regiment, was formed in 1881 when the army was reorgansied. The 43rd and 52nd Regiments had historical links going back to 1751 and so it was decreed that they should become the 1st and 2nd Battalions of The Oxfordshire Light Infantry. (The old regimental numbers continued in unofficial use.) The new regiment was based at Cowley, Oxford. In 1908 'Buckinghamshire' was added to the title.

During the Second World War, the 1st (43rd) Battalion (TA) of the Ox and Bucks were in France with the British Expeditionary Force and were rescued from Dunkirk after suffering heavy casualties. The 4th (TA) Ox and Bucks were not so lucky, being overwhelmed near Watou, many were taken prisoner.

The 7th Battalion saw action in Tunisia and Italy taking part in the Anzio and Salerno landings, The 1st Battalion (43rd) took part in the Normandy landings and saw action in the advance from Normandy to Hamburg.

The 2nd Battalion (52nd) were part of the airbourne glider troops being among the first to arrive in Normandy, before the beach landings had begun, they siezed and held the bridges over the Caen Canal (Pegasus Bridge) and River Orne (Horsa Bridge). In March 1945 the battalion suffered heavy losses in an assault landing while attempting to cross the Rhine. They then took part in action across Germany eventually meeting up with the Russians on the Baltic.

The 6th Battalion saw action in Burma from Arakan down the west coast to Tamandu.

In 1958 the Regiment changed its title to become the 1st Green Jackets (43rd and 52nd)
Battalions during the Second World War.




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Apr 2014 - Please note we currently have a large backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 214975, your information is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

      

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List of those who served with The Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry during The Second World War

Select a story link or scoll down to browse those stories hosted on this website

  • Pte. Ronald Adams 4th Btn. Read his Story.
  • James Victor Allen Read his Story.
  • Pte. Leslie Cyril Atkinson Read his Story.
  • Cpl. David L. Bateman 52nd Btn. Read his Story.
  • Sgt. Donald Peter Belcher 4th Btn. Read his Story.
  • Pte. Moses Bingham Read his Story.
  • Pte. Bertie Boscott Read his Story.
  • Donald Brownsey 1st Battalion Ox and Bucks Read his Story.
  • Pte. Howard Clifford Bryant Read his Story.
  • Quartermaster Sergeant John William "Bonnie" Cannon Read his Story.
  • Pte Bernard Cherry
  • Pte. Charles "Mick" Cushing 7th Battalion. Read his Story.
  • 2nd Lt. Colin Lewis Dillwyn 4th Bn. (d.30th May 1940) Read his Story.
  • Sgt. Wilfred Albert "Dabber" Disbury Read his Story.
  • Pte. Dennis William Gutteridge 4th Btn, B Company Read his Story.
  • Sgt. James Stanley Hicks Read his Story.
  • Private Albert Jobson 1st Bucks, Company D, 13 Platoon Read his Story.
  • Pte. Thomas John Lawrence Read his Story.
  • Richard Lawson Read his Story.
  • Roy Liebermann Read his Story.
  • L/Cpl. Maurice Raymond Maine Read his Story.
  • Leslie Bruce Marcham (d.30th May 1944) Read his Story.
  • Private James Albert Meadowcroft 1st Bucks. Battalion Read his Story.
  • Pte. James Albert Meadowcroft 1st Battalion Read his Story.
  • 2nd Lt. Peter Hubert Mosenthal 1st Btn. Read his Story.
  • Pte. Raymond Herbert " " Nash 4th Btn (d.Between 25th & 28th May 1940) Read his Story.
  • Pte Arthur Frederick Newman 70th Young Soldier Battalion Read his Story.
  • Marshall Lindsay Newton Read his Story.
  • John "Paddy" O'Connor Read his Story.
  • Sgt. Thomas Parkin Read his Story.
  • W/O Frank Richards King Shropshire Light inf Read his Story.
  • Sgt. Arthur George Riley Read his Story.
  • Eric Foye Rogers Read his Story.
  • Sgt. Richard Rolfe Read his Story.
  • Pte. Bertie Edward Seager
  • Arthur Soilleux Read his Story.
  • Pte. John Harry Wasdell 2nd (Airborne) Bn. (d.6th April 1945) Read his Story.
  • Pte. E. G. Wheeler Read his Story.
  • Sgt Basil Collins. 7th Btn.Read his story
  • Donald Anderson.
  • Pte Annetts 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl Aris 2nd Btn. Coy. B 14 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut M. Aston. N15 platoon commander B Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Baalam 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl Bailey 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Corporal Frederick Charles Ball Read his story
  • Lieut H.J.C. Bashford. N11 platoon commander A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Bates 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Charles "Jack" Beecham.Read his story
  • Pte Bourlet 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Capt Martin J. Brabner. Second in command B Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn. (d. 19th June 1944.)
  • Lt. Brotheridge 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Cdr Read his story
  • Cpl Burns 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte. Frederick George Bryant. (d. 7th October 1940)
  • Lieut P.G. Bulford. N2 section commander Recconnaissance platoon. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Leslie Ernest Butler. (d. 22nd November 1944)
  • Cpl Caine 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Chamberlain 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Chatfield 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut G.C. Chicken. Mortar platoon commander Support coy. 2nd Airbourne Btn.
  • Pte Cheesley 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Clare 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Clark 48 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Clarke 33 2nd OBtn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Collett 2nd Btn. Coy. 2nd Oxf.Bucks 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl Cowperthwaite 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut C.T. Cross. N20 platoon commander C Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut W.A. Bousfield. N8 platoon commander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut H.D. Brotheridge. N24 platoon commander D Coy 22nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Dancey 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Major M. Darell-Brown. Second in command HQ Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • L/C Drew 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut E.H. Budds. N9 platoon commander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Capt J.F.S. Busher. Transport officer. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte. Ronald Joseph Cordas. 2nd Airbourne Btn. (d. 26th November 1942)
  • Lieut C.H. David-Goff. Second in command Recconnaissance platoon. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte D S Davis. 2nd Airbornee Btn. (d. 08 May 1945)
  • Lieut T. Deacon. N3 section commander Recconnaissance platoon. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte. Reginald Bob Dell. 2nd Btn. (d. 2nd February 1945)
  • Pte. Christopher Arthur Downton. 7th Btn. (d. 8th June 1945)
  • Pte. Ronald Drew. Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry att. 4th Bn (d. 22nd September 1944 )
  • Pte. Frank Herbert Durden. 2nd Airborne btn. (d. 6th February 1945)
  • Major J.S.R. Edmunds. Company commander B Coy. 2nd Airbourne Btn.
  • Pte Edwards 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl Evans 2nd Btn. Coy. B 14 Platoon Read his story
  • Capt P.K. Everett. Heavy Coy. Second in command 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl. Frederick Danvers Kirkham Faulkner. (d. 22nd September 1941)
  • Major E.V.M Favell. Company commander Support coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut D.B. Fox. N17 platoon commander B Coy. Read his story
  • Pte Gardner 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut R.E. Gleed. Reserve transport officer 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl Godbold 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut P.H. Godsal. N10 platoon commander A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut C.W. Groos. Reserve mortar officer 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Major J. Granville. C Company commander. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Albert Gregory. R.A.M.C att. to D Company 2nd Airborne Btn. Read his story
  • Pte Gray 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut K. Gunter. N13 platoon commander A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Harman 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Sgt Harrison 2nd Btn. Coy. B 14 Platoon Read his story
  • 2/Lieut S.G. Harvey. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Major S.J. Heath-Smith. Heavy Company commander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut P.G. Henstridge. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl Higgs 2nd Btn. Coy. B 14 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut C.A Hooper. N25 platoon commander D Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Major R.J. Howard. Officer Commanding Coup de Main Force Read his story
  • Pte Hubbert 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • L/Sgt D H Hunt. 7th Btn. (d. 14 Sept 1944)
  • Cpl Ilsley 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Jackson 08 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut J. James. Quartermaster. 2nd Btn. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut P.S. Jones. N1 section commander Recconnaissance platoon. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl Lally 2nd Oxf.Bucks 2nd Btn. Coy. 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl. William Henry Lambley. 2nd Airborne Btn. (d. 8th February 1945)
  • Pte Lawton 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Sgt Leather 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Leonard 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Lewis 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • L/C Loveday 2nd Btn. Coy. 2nd Oxf.Bucks 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Malpas 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Capt J. Marriott, G.M. Second in command A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Capt A.C. Mason Recconnaissance platoon commander. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • L/C Minns 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Capt J.J.W. Molloy. Second in command 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut C.M. Moncrieff. N26 platoon commander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lt. Charles Edwin Morley. 1st Btn. Attd 1st Btn. Gordon Highlanders. (d. 16th November 1944)
  • L Cpl. Walter Frank Morris. 2nd btn. (d. 3rd February 1941)
  • Pte Musty 2nd Oxf.Bucks D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut E.H. Nankivell. N19 platoon commander C Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut D.M. Neale. N12 platoon commander A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lt L. Nicholson. Loading officer. HQ Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Padre Capt A. Nimmo. att 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte O'Donnell 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte O'Shaughnessy 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Sgt Ollis 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Lt R.M. Osborne. Intelligence officer HQ Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte. Frederick William Oxford. (d. 14th September 1943)
  • L/C Packwood 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut J.A. Pankhurst. N16 platoon commander B Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Parr 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Pepperall 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Peverill 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Pope 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Lt. Robert "Bob" Preston. att. from The Kings Liverpool Regiment (d. 24 March 1945)
  • Capt B.C.E. Priday. Second in command D Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut R.N. Prince. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • John Bertie Pusey. 1st btn.
  • Cpl. Herbert Denis Pyne. 2nd Airborne Btn. (d.11th May 1943.)
  • Pte John William Charles Reeves. 2nd Airborne Btn. (d. 7th December 1944)
  • Pte Radford 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Major G.B. Rahr. Company commander A coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl Reynolds 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Jim Richardson. 7th Airborne Btn. Read his story
  • L/C Roberts 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Lt Col M.W. Roberts. Commanding officer HQ Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Sgt. Donald George McIntyre Robertson. 1st Btn. (d. 22nd November 1944.)
  • Lieut S.F. Robin. Signal officer Support coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • 2/Lt Alan Derrick Roscoe. att. 1st Wing Glider Pilot Regiment A.A.C. (d. 14th June 1942.)
  • Pte Rudge 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Lieut B.M. Rutherford. N18 platoon commander C Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut H.J.S. Seville. N7 platoon commander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut F.B. Scott. N21 platoon commander C Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl. Jack Small. 2nd Btn. (d. 14th January 1943)
  • Lt. Smith 2nd Btn. Coy. B 14 Platoon Cdr Read his story
  • Lieut D.O. Smith. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airbourne Btn.
  • Lieut R.A.A. Smith. N14 platoon commander B Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Medical Officer Capt S. Smith (RAMC) att 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Arthur Soilleux. Signaller. 4th Btn. Read his Story
  • Pte Storr 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Major C.H. Styles. Reserve Company Comander 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • 2/Lieut M.L. Southern. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Summersby 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte. Bertram Swan. (d. 23rd December 1942)
  • Lieut H.J. Sweeney. N22 platoon commander D Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Cpl Tappenden 2nd Btn. Coy. Wireless Operator, Coy. HQ Read his story
  • Sgt Thornton 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Tilbury 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Capt J.M. Tillet. Adjutant HQ Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Frederick Arthur Tofield. (d. 11th February 1943)
  • Lieut G. Van Klaveren. Pionner platoon commander. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte Ward 2nd Oxf.Bucks B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Warmington 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Waters 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Watson 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Ptes. Harold Francis Watts. 6th Btn. (d. 29th January 1941)
  • Pte Weaver 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Read his story
  • Cpl Webb 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte. John William James Webdale. 1st Btn. (d. 22nd November 1944)
  • Lieut A.F. White. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Pte White 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Whitbread 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Whitehouse 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Reginald Albert Wilkins. 'C' Company, 5th Btn. Read his Story
  • Pte Windsor 2nd Btn. Coy. D 25 Platoon Read his story
  • Pte Robert Frederick Winter. 1st Btn. (d. 9th August 1944.)
  • Lieut D.J. Wood. N23 platoon commander D Coy 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lieut F.H. Wood. Reserve Coy. 2nd Airborne Btn.
  • Lt. Wood 2nd Btn. Coy. D 24 Platoon Cdr Read his story
  • Pte Woods 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story
  • Sgt. Edward Frank Woodley. 2nd Airborne Btn. (d. 28th July 1943.)
  • Pte Wyatt 2nd Btn. Coy. B 17 Platoon Read his story


Marshall Lindsay Newton Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

My father Marshall Lindsay Newton talked to me when I was a little girl about being a prisoner of war and being kept in a "pit" and fed on only onions,as he was moved from camp to camp, Stalag V11A must have been where he ended up. He talked about being liberated by the Americans at the end of the war and them pulling him out of the pit. Mum said he looked half starved when he came home " you could put your fist in the hollows of his cheeks". I found only yesterday his identity tag it says, Stalag V11/A 137638 Does anyone have any relevant information about my dad, or the pow camp? Dad was in the Army with the Oxford and Bucks L.I. I would be grateful of any information at all to pass onto his grandchildren.



Arthur Soilleux Oxfordshire and Bucks Light Infantry

I am trying to retrieve any military records of Arthur Soilleux, my Grandad. I believe went to Dunkirk and was captured as a POW there. Any information is a help, thank you.



John "Paddy" O'Connor Ox & Bucks Light Infantry

My father's name was John 'Paddy' O'Connor. All I know is that my father joined the Ox & Bucks Regiment when he was 15/16 years old in about 1937. He lied about his age (so he used to say!) He came over from Ireland as there was nothing for him there. He said he was at Dunkirk. We have a photo of him, very young, in his uniform but with no insignia - I presume he was a private. Mum said he was a 'valet to the Padre'. He also mentioned being 'in the Gliders'. His only physical war wound was losing his big toenail of his right foot!! My father hardly ever talked about the war. He died over twenty years ago now but as a family we would love to know his history. He was demobbed at the Cowley Barracks in Oxford sometime between 1947 and 1949. Post war he worked as a Brickie, and at Morris' Car Works in Cowley Oxford.



Donald Brownsey 1st Battalion Ox and Bucks West Yorkshire Regiment

I am trying to find out about my father, Don Brownsey. He served in 1st Batt Ox and Bucks and later in the West Yorkshire Regiment from which he was discharged in June 1946. If anyone can help I will be very grateful.



Leslie Bruce Marcham Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry (d.30th May 1944)

I am part of a team researching the names on our local Memorial to the Fallen, in Woodcote village. One of the names, Leslie Bruce Marcham, 15311 of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was at some point a POW at Stalag VIIIB and drowned in a quarry whilst exercising on 30 May 1944. He was buried in Krakow Rakowicki Cemetery. Can anyone tell us more about him?



Private James Albert Meadowcroft 1st Bucks. Battalion Oxford & Bucks. Light Infantry

My father was in the BEF defending Hazebrouk in France as part of the Dunkirk retreat. He was captured and sent to Stalag XXI B and at the end of the war walked across Germany, returning home by USAF transport plane. I was born in 1940 and did not see my father until his return home in 1944. He lived until 1990 but hardly ever spoke of his wartime experiences. I have photos etc. similar to those on your site and have also been to Hazebrouk.



Private Albert Jobson 1st Bucks, Company D, 13 Platoon Royal Norfolk Regiment

My father, Pte. Albert Jobson, crossed to Arromanches beach on D Day +1 June 8th 1944 with the Royal Norfolks and was transferred to the Ox and Bucks in Sept. 1944.

I have photographs of him in Hannover in May 1945 and Bremnen. He is also pictured as a member of 1st Bucks Coy.D 13 Platoon with the other members (names recorded on back of photo) with a captured German tank at Alterhunden. Glad to share with anyone interested.



Pte. Raymond Herbert " " Nash 4th Btn (d.Between 25th & 28th May 1940)



Sgt. Wilfred Albert "Dabber" Disbury Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My Father, Wilfred Disbury, never really spoke too much about his time as a POW, he was taken prisoner during the retreat at Dunkirk, he was a Terriortial. I would like to hear from anyone with any information about him. As with many, I suppose, you want to know more when it is too late to ask. Sadly he passed away in 1980.



Pte. Bertie Boscott Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Bertie Bosciott was in the BEF at Dunkirk & just missed out on getting on a ship only to see it bombed moments later with many killed. He was able to get on another ship and got back to England.



Pte. James Albert Meadowcroft 1st Battalion Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My father, James Meadowcroft, was captured at 2130 hrs in Hazebrouk, Northern France on 27 May 1940 with a group headed by Major Elliot Viney who had been in an orphanage garden. He was taken by train across Germany to Stalag XXB in Poland.

I was born in 1940 and did not see my father until he returned home. I understand he walked out across Poland and was picked up by the Americans who flew him back to Wescott Bucks. He was taken to Hartwell House near Aylesbury to clean up, which was only a mile or so across the fields from home.

I have a few POW photos from this time but otherwise know nothing about his time in the POW camp. For years after I can remember him waking in the night, swearing in German as described by another writer on this site.

I would appreciate if anyone has any further information as he would never talk to me about his experiences. Two years ago I attended a ceremony in Hazebrouk where they have set up a plaque remembering the stand taken by the Ox and Bucks and others. Also a similar ceremony at Cassel.



Sgt. Donald Peter Belcher 4th Btn. Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

I have no outstanding events just routine. I did see active service in Sicily, D Day, Ardennes, Rhine crossing also when the war ended served in Palestine, as a regular. I was demobbed February 1949 I would dearly like to be able to contact some or if anyone is still out there with army numbers around mine, it would be interesting to see us trying to step out at light infantry pace.



Sgt. Arthur George Riley Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

I am trying to find out details of my late uncle Arthur Riley, who passed away 1993. We have found newspaper cuttings and letters showing he was amongst the first gliders to land at Peagsus bridge. Would be grateful for any further information



Cpl. David L. Bateman 52nd Btn. Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My granddad, David Bateman was in glider 4 out of the 6 gliders that landed at Pegasus bridge on d-day. His glider landed 8 miles away from the bridge and was later captured I believe on the 7/6/44. He served under Major Howard and there is a memorial at Pegasus bridge Ranville-Benouville Normandy for the men who served in the 6th airborne division, 52nd battalion Oxford and Buckingham Light Infantry. I do not know much about his time at Stalag 357 as I never had the chance to meet my granddad as he died before I was born. If by chance anybody has any more info on David Bateman please let me know.

I do know he did a lot of his training in Ilfracombe, Devon and I believe this is where he met his wife, Kathleen Pugsley. On a picture of a glider is a list of ladies names including Kath.



Quartermaster Sergeant John William "Bonnie" Cannon Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

I am trying to find out more about my father, QMS John Cannon during the war, I have his book with his details, he served in the Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry He joined up from Father Hudson Homes in Birmingham at the age of 15 and he served for over 22 years. If anybody has any information about him I would appreciate hearing from you.



Pte. Leslie Cyril Atkinson Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Les Atkinson was my father who was in the TA prior to the outbreak of WW2, he was in the Ox and Bucks and was sent to Northern Ireland where he married Mary Dunnion from Co Tyrone, he was stationed in or near Coleraine at the time of his marriage, and was married in Coleraine. He transferred to KOYLI, in 1943/44, and saw action in Italy. It would be nice to know if anyone remembered him, it might be a bit late.



Pte. E. G. Wheeler Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

I have an old newspaper cutting with a picture of E G Wheeler along with Private S Pettit both from North Stoke amongst about 40 stalag prisoners. This was in my late fathers scrapbook from the war. His name was Percy Albert Wheeler from Reading. I am trying to find information about E G Wheeler as suspect he may be a cousin of or somehow related to my father.



Pte. Howard Clifford Bryant Ox & Bucks Light Infantry

Like many of the prisoners my Dad, Howard Bryant never spoke about his time as a POW but I know he was captured at the time of Dunkirk and was then marched to Poland where he spent many years. I have his Stalag badge with the details: Stalag V111B Number 10170.



Pte. John Harry Wasdell 2nd (Airborne) Bn. Ox and Bucks Light Infantry (d.6th April 1945)

John Wasdell is buried in Hannover Germany. He went over to Northern Ireland in 1940 where the Airborne was formed with the Royal Ulster Rifles, and that is where he met my mother, however we do not know much more about what he did during the war.



2nd Lt. Peter Hubert Mosenthal 1st Btn. Ox and Bucks Light Infantry

My grandfather, Peter Mosenthal, served with the TA Battalion (1 Bucks I believe) in France in 1940. He was captured in Hazebrouk on 27 May. His company had been holed up in a farmhouse which was surrounded by German infantry and armoured cars. They had fought for a number of hours before the farm house took a direct hit from a mortar and was burning fiercely. The cellar by this stage had been filled with wounded who would perish if not evacuated. The remaining men had no choice but to surrender. He had been lightly wounded and the German medics put his arm in a sling. He was part of a group that was force-marched to trains in Germany, but a young German officer saw his rank and arm in a sling and gave him a lift to the train in his Kubelwagen. He was sent to an Oflag 7C in Laufen, on the border between Germany and Austria. The prison building is now luxury flats which I visited when by coincidence when I was an exchange student in the town. He subsequently moved to various camps in Poland and suffered increasing deprivations. He was liberated by American forces on 30 April 1945 and flown back to England, but not until after he had been in charge of guarding German prisoners in early May. He had been on some fairly horrendous forced marches from Poland to Ingolstadt as the Germans emptied the camps in Poland from the advancing Soviets. Very sadly his column was strafed by the US Air Force which mistook their 1940 battledress uniform as Hungarian. A lot of prisoners were killed.

I have photos of the farmhouse where his company was captured, taken when he visited Hazebrouk in 1946. The burnt out shells of the trucks in which they arrived on the 26th of May and which were destroyed in the fighting on 27th of May were still there. He also told me of the Battalion Adjutant going off to recce the forward elements of the Wehrmacht advance and never being seen again. On or around the 25th of May his platoon were in trenches when the German recce infantry were spotted. His platoon still had 12 inch WW1 bayonets which he ordered to be fixed. All the Germans could see were the bayonets glinting from the top of the trenches and they ran away as fast as possible. They did not shoot the fleeing Germans as it was regarded as ungentlemanly. The battalion was neither equipped nor trained to fight German armour and was effectively destroyed. His only armour training had been a battalion exercise on Newbury racecourse in December 1939 where cyclists with flags represented German tanks!

He had had to temporarily change his name to Morten in 1939 at the Army's request, for his name was German Jewish, although he was Christian. This was lucky in view of the fate of his company.



2nd Lt. Colin Lewis Dillwyn 4th Bn. Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry (d.30th May 1940)

My great-uncle was Colin Lewis Dillwyn, who died during the Retreat to Dunkirk in May 1940. If anyone has any info to share about him, I would be most grateful.



Pte. Thomas John Lawrence Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Tom Lawrence passed away in 2010 leaving behind a family of 3 girls and a boy, a family who didn't really know the man? It quite by chance that I found a newspaper clipping of his marriage, this gave no more than the regiment he had served in, I also remember how he would talk of how he had been in Germany while serving. That would make him about 20 in the late 40s, there is no other information, just a reference to the Oxford & Buckinghamshire Regiment, following his discharge he worked as a printer, or in a printing environment in Bletchley, Milton Keynes. I am his son-in-law and the question asked was can you find anything else? My answer was, I don't know but at least I will try. I'm sorry to burden you with this and without the relevant info, but I hope you understand, like most families it is not until those most important go that you realise how empty life can be. Can anyone help?



Sgt. Richard Rolfe Ox & Bucks Light Infantry

Hi, I am attempting to trace some history of my Uncle Richard 'Dick' Rolfe. Here's the tricky part, I don't know that much to be going on with and what I do know may not be exactly correct.

The family history goes as told by my Dad (now suffering from Alzheimers, so difficult to confirm) was that Dick was in the Ox Bucks Light Infantry and then drafted into the 6th Airborne.

I thought I was told that he was in the initial glider assault on Pegasus Bridge under Major Howard, but any research I have attempted has drawn a blank. Another family member seems to think he was in the parachute support at the bridge after the gliders had landed and taken the bridge. After the war, I believe my uncle lived in Royston, Herts, and sadly passed away some years ago. I wish I had found out more, but I was only a child. Has anyone any ideas of where to try next or any information on Dick himself? Many thanks in advance.



Eric Foye Rogers Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry

My grandfather Eric Rogers was in the Ox & Bucks in WW2. He died recently, but was always very private about his role in the war. He did open up to me on several occasions and it was so interesting (the bits he told me) I would love to find out more and now that he's passed away I really don't think he'd mind! I don't know much about the rank he held, any specific missions he went on, so if anyone has any info, or knows where I can find out.... please help.



Pte Arthur Frederick Newman 70th Young Soldier Battalion Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My father, Arthur Newman, enlisted with the 70th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry on the 15th May 1942, in Birmingham. He started his military training at No:16 Infantry Traning Centre, which I believe was at Cowley Barracks in Oxford, in June 1942. After his training he remained with the 70th Bn until his embarkation for India in April 1943.

If anyone has any information about the 70th Battalion OBLI between these dates, then I would love to hear from you



L/Cpl. Maurice Raymond Maine Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

My father, Maurice Maine has been dead now for over 20 years but I have only recently found out that Stalag 8b was in Poland, stupidly I presumed it was in Germany. My father rarely talked about the war but I would really pleased to hear if anyone knows anything about him.

He was captured on the 30th of May 1940 in Hazebruck, France. He spent 4 years and 11 months in Stalag 8b. He was moved to a camp called Altheim, spending 3 weeks there before his release on 29 th of April 1945. I am not absolutely certain but I think he worked in the coal mines. He tried to escape several times and was shot in the leg on one occasion. He only explained this when I saw his scar. I do know he was in a very poor state when he finally came home and my uncle didn't recognise his own brother. My father was married to his first wife Doris when he was captured.

I am not hopeful of finding out too much as so much time has passed but if anyone can help, please contact me



Richard Lawson Oxford & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My dad, Dick Lawson was prisoner at Stalag 9c Bad Sulza. He worked in the Salt mines at minegan and was released by the Americans in 1945. He served with the Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry and is still alive, living near Croydon and going strong. We are looking to contact anyone who was in Stalag 9c after the Anzio Landings in 1944.



Pte. Charles "Mick" Cushing 7th Battalion. Ox & Bucks Light Infantry

I never knew my father, Charles Cushing. I only have his service record which indicates he joined up in 1931 then served in India and Burma. During WW2 in India then France. He was possibly Court Marshalled and reduced to the ranks in March 1943. He was back up to Corporal but due to injuries and malaria he again lost rank due to hospitalization (in Scotland) many times. He was demobbed on the 29th of Oct 1949 to the reserve, his Military Conduct was Exemplary.



Pte. Ronald Adams 4th Btn. Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

My uncle, Ronald Adams, a gardener pre war, served with the 4th Bucks Battalion (TA) Oxford and Bucks L.I. He was captured while acting in the rearguard defending those escaping from Dunkirk June 1940. He was then interred in Stalag VIIIB Lamsdorf until 1945 and was force marched westwards due to the Russian advances. He wrote several cards to us (Kriegsgefangenekarten) all heavily censored. He told me after the war he had worked in coalmines and in industry during his captivity. He returned to live in Slough after his marriage to his fiancee Lena, also from Beaconsfield. If any one has any further information, please contact me.



Sgt. Thomas Parkin Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My father, Sgt Thomas Parkin, was with the Ox & Bucks as a Bren Gun carrier driver. I assume he was with the First Battalion. I am trying to get background on any Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry action in South West Holland and in and around the town of Goes. Time frame is sketchy but would be, I believe, late July to October, 1944.

Can anyone assist?



Roy Liebermann Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry

My Uncle was Roy Liebermann of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry who, according to family stories, was captured very near the start of the war and spent most of his time at Thorn Podgorz (Stalag XXa). He told us very little, the only thing I can remember is that instead of weeding the vegetable fields they hoed up the veges and left the weeds!!



Sgt. James Stanley Hicks Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

My grandad's father, Stan Hicks was in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. I know that he was a POW sometime between 1939-1945 in Stalag IV-A and was a Private at the time. He was wounded in battle (shot in the upper arm) and was told he would need the arm amputated, but it was saved.

I know that when he returned from the POW camp he was very thin and could barely eat for weeks. He also used to say he hated the smell of oranges and if I remember correctly this was due to a battle in an orange grove where people lay dying around him.



Pte. Moses Bingham Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

I've just discovered that my late uncle, Moses Bingham, was a prisoner of war. I would appreciate any photos or other records that are available.



Pte. Dennis William Gutteridge 4th Btn, B Company Ox & Bucks Light Infantry

Sadly, my father Dennis Gutteridge was no different to many others who found they couldn't talk about what happened to them during the war with those who hadn't gone through the experience. And now I have useful questions to ask, he's long gone.

I have some notebooks and various other memories of what he told me - enough to piece together a rough outline of his wartime story: He enlisted at Kidmore End into 4th OBLI on 24th April 1939, just 6 days after his 24th birthday and his engagement to my mother, who also shared the same birth date (she was 18). They married in November 1939, and in January 1940 he was sent to France. He served as batman to a Lieutenant 'Whinney' (?sp) in Belgium and was notorious for riding his bicycle everywhere even on route marches. After a brief sojourn back in UK, he returned to France and took part in the rearguard action to hinder the German advance on Dunkirk - one of the forgotten army which was sacrificed. As a member of B commpany he defended Cassel, and retreated through the woods at Watou (Wateau St Jean), where the Germans encircled them and took them prisoner on May 30th 1940. He was lucky not to have been captured by one of the units/commanders who massacred British POWS after surrender/capture, and was transported to Lamsdorf, where he arrived on June 25th 1940 - so this journey took a month! He never spoke about this part of the war, and the next I know was he was assigned to a work camp - E114, in a stone quarry.

Not unusually, his notesbooks are not a chronicle of how hard conditions were, but a collection of stories, songs, jokes, poems, articles, thoughts, comments, memoirs of pre-war days, and a list of POWs in camp E114. He demonstrated a trenchant wit which got him in a bit of hot water with his fellow POWs from time to time, and at every turn you can see his wry humour. There is one rather sad story about his early life, and another regaling the reader with his encounters as a young man with women. The final story is his description of being on a German farm in Bavaria and his thoughts and comments about the life of the small German farmer. He left Germany for home in 1945 and that is all he says.....whether he took part on one of the Death or Long Marches I can only guess, but as he was in Bavaria, he must have. Not a word did he write about this.

The only stories I can remember from when I was a child is how he was hiding in a wood and the Germans were calling to the British soldiers in English, to give themselves up. Fellow POWs who I know he kept in touch with after the war were 2 sappers serving in the Royal Engineers: Douglas (Duggie) Lawrence, and Rupert Sugden, who kept an offlicence after the war in Henley on Thames and was married to Molly Sugden the TV actress.



W/O Frank Richards King Shropshire Light inf Northants Regiment

My father, Frank Richards, was in the K.S.L.I 1936-1939, Northants Regiment 1939- April 1944, Oxs and Bucks 1944-April 1945,the Queens Regiment April 1945-May 1946. I Know very little detail about his actual movements during the war except that he was at Dunkirk and that he learned Swahili and trained African troops. This was the reference his commanding officer gave him when he left the Army. Of which I am very proud. "Thoroughly reliable and has plenty of initiative. Can handle men well. Hopes to obtain appointment in police force, for which his leading, tact, and wide military experience including the handling of native troops in East Africa,should make him ideally suited. A fine type of man." signed by Captain Balding Commanding 2/7 Queens Royal Regiment. Any information relating to my father would be gratefully recieved. He passed away in 1997.



James Victor Allen Oxford and Bucks

I believe my father, James Victor Allen, from the Oxford and Bucks was a prisoner in Stalag 8B he was reported to have been in the march from Poland to Germany. My father died in 1967, aged 44. I know almost nothing about his life during the war, but would love to know more about it. Is there anyone who remembers him?





My late father Reginald Albert Wilkins, served with 'C' Company, 5th Battalion Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry (having enlisted via his involvement in the TA) and I do have a few photographs.

Unfortunately my father passed away on 27th December 2001, though I do remember some of the stories he told me when I was considerably younger. Alas I can find no record "online" of where his battalion served, though I recall he mentioned he was stationed in Ireland for some time during the war and seemed to do little work, but a lot of fishing! He then went in with the liberation forces and faced horrendous scenes as the result of booby traps etc. He was not a national hero but he did his bit and was always a hero to me!



My dad Arthur Soilleux known as Solly was a Millitia boy, called up from London 1938/9 and sent to Oxford. He was trained as a Signaler and was captured at Cassel. When coming off duty he went to lay on a bed when a shell came through the wall tracking down his body and killed his Major who was sat at his desk. This is all dad told us, apart from being transported in trucks then told to get out and walk into the woods, a German Major came by and stopped what was about to happen. Dad was then sent on to Stalag 8b where he was moved to many different camps. He did the long march around the Sudeten Mountains and was found by the Americans near Nuremburg on St Georges day 23rd April 1945 they all remarked on this. A few days later they were flown home to Great Missenden in a Dakota aircraft.



My grandad, Corporal Frederick Charles Ball, joined the army 1st Dec 1939 and was in a few different battallions and companys in the oxford and bucks, B company 1st batt 1940, HQ company 1st batt 3rd platoon, C company 4th batt, HQ company 7th batt 18th platoon 1943.

From 1943 he was a pow after getting captured in italy (i think) and spent the rest of the war in Stammlager 7a. I would like to know more about how he was captured if anyone knows.

My nan was beatrice skinner and she was in the some kind of army at home(territorial army?)

Adam Bennett



I am researching the war time activities of my uncle Jim Richardson who I believe served with the 7th Airborne Battalion Oxford and Bucks Regiment. All I have is a photograph of him in uniform showing a L/corporal stripe and that I was named after him. He came from Buckingham Road Bicester Oxfordshire. Some years ago I met a person, Basil Collins, who said he was a Sgt in the same platoon but have since lost contact with him. I would be interested to hear from anyone who has any information on my uncles war time activities and the other soldiers who served with him.



Charles "Jack" Beecham's relatives are seeking information and believe that he may have died in Burma, possibly on the railway. Before the war, Jack lived in Kingswood in Bristo. If you can help, could you please contact Chrsi Bradley



Photographs




This is a group photo of 'D' Company, 2nd Bn Oxf.Bucks Lt Infty. Who were involved in the Coup de Main operation, Pegasus Bridge on D-Day. Sadly no similar pic exists for the 2 Platoons of 'B' Company or the 30 Royal Engineers. Read their story

Denis Edwards

If you have any Photographs you would like to share please get in touch.








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