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RAF Scampton in the Second World War 1939-1945 - The Wartime Memories Project -

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- RAF Scampton during the Second World War -


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World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

RAF Scampton



Sept 1939 

Jan 1940 Detachment

11th May 1940 Raid

12th June 1940 

27th Jun 1940 49 Squadron Hampden lost

12th August 1940 Attack Made

17th Aug 1940 49 Squadron Hampden lost

11th Feb 1941 49 Squadron Hampden lost

25th Jun 1941 Aircraft Lost

3rd Jul 1941 Aircraft Lost

5th Jul 1941 Aircraft Lost

15th Sep 1941 Aircraft Lost

28th Sep 1941 Aircraft Lost

8th Dec 1941 83 Squadron Hampton lost

18th Dec 1941 Aircraft Lost

April 1942 

31st May 1942 49 Squadron Manchester lost

3rd Jun 1942 49 Squadron Manchester lost

July 1942 

4th Sept 1942 Conversion

17th Oct 1942 

1st Jan 1943 

13th Jun 1943 57 Squadron Lancaster lost

28th August 1943 

23rd Jan 1945 
153 Squadron Lancaster lost


If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Those known to have served at

RAF Scampton

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

  • Bell Andrew. Ft/Sgt
  • Carpenter John Alexander. Sgt. (d.13th Jul 1943)
  • Crocker George William Osborne. F/Sgt
  • Crocker George William Osborne. Flt.Sgt.
  • Farrow Dorothy.
  • Feirn John Rowland. P/O. (d.13th Mar 1942)
  • Fisk George Charles. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Gaunt Philip Henry. WO.
  • Gellatly Charles Dewitt. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Gibson VC, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar. Guy Penrose. Wing Cdr. (d.19th Sep 1944)
  • Hitchings Sydney James. Sgt.
  • Hutchinson Geoffrey Douglas. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Hutchinson Geoffrey Douglas. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Irving Frederic Cleveland. F/Sgt. (d.16th January 1945)
  • Lovegrove Peter Anthony. Flying Officer (d.12th November 1942)
  • McCrea DFC.. William Ernest. Sqd Ldr.
  • Morphett Jack Heathcote. Pilot Officer (d.9th April 1942)
  • Morphett Jack Heathcote. Pilot Officer (d.9th April 1942)
  • Muir MID. Iain Menzies. PO
  • Nash MID. Reginald Morris.
  • Powley DFC, AFC. Francis Sidney. Wing Commander (d.5th April, 1945)
  • Ramey G. H.. WO2 (d.10th December 1942)
  • Ritch Aliston Rank Gray. F/O (d.5th Feb 1943)
  • Robertson Sam.
  • Salter Albert Henry. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Salter Albert Henry. Flight Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Snooke Dudley Delacourtte. (d.28th Sep 1940)
  • Stace John Alan. Flt.Sgt.
  • Vowles Peter Adrian. F/Sgt.
  • Webb Robert John.
  • Williams Reginald Stanley. Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Williams Reginald Stanley. Sergeant (d.9th April 1942)
  • Williamson Gladis Sarah.

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List

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Pilot Officer Jack Heathcote Morphett 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Sergeant Reginald Stanley Williams 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant Albert Henry Salter 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Wing Commander Francis Sidney "Logger" Powley DFC, AFC B flight 166 Squadron (d.5th April, 1945)

    photo taken sometime in 1945 of my namesake uncle W/C Francis (Frank) Powley (centre) along with S/L Gee (second from right) and other officers of #153 squadron at Scampton. Both Powley and his friend and colleague Gee, who survived the war, were earlier with #166 squadron at Kirmington.

    My namesake Canadian uncle, W/C Francis (Frank) Sidney Powley, was posted CO of "B" Flight 166 squadron based at Kirmington in July 1943. He flew missions from Kirmington until Sept-Oct 1944 when he was promoted to W/C of the re-formed 153 squadron, which was moved to Scampton for the duration of the war. Many of the 166 crews and aircraft were attached to 153. Following his initial flight training at RAF Depot Uxbridge in 1937, Powley was posted first to #4 Flying Training School at Abu Sueir in Egypt and later to 27 squadron in Kohat and other bases in the Northwest Frontier Province of British India. He also served as CO of the Advanced Training School of #1 Flying Training School at Ambala. Powley was listed as missing on the night of 4-5 April 1945 when the Lancaster RA 544 he was piloting on a mine-laying mission off the coast of occupied Denmark was shot down by a German night-fighter. As it happens, I have been living and working as a news journalist in Denmark for the past 30 years. My recent research into the uncle I never knew has turned up some interesting facts and anecdotes both from his time in India and later in Bomber Command in England. Naturally, I would very much appreciate any information, pictures or other material people might have about Powley and his activities at Kirmington.

    Frank L. Powley



    Flying Officer Peter Anthony Lovegrove 83 Squadron (d.12th November 1942)

    Peter Anthony Lovegrove died in German captivity on 12 November 1942 age 22. He was a Flying Officer (Pilot) with 83 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve Service No: 62324. He was the son of Edward T and Hilda M Lovegrove of Thorpe Arnold, Leicestershire

    The RAF 83 Squadron operation he was on involved an Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery. The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Pilot Officer Jack Heathcote Morphett 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Sergeant Reginald Stanley Williams 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant Albert Henry Salter 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG:Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant George Charles Fisk 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot:P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot:P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs:Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG:Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG:Flt/Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG:Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Flight Sergeant Charles Dewitt Gellatly 83 Squadron (d.9th April 1942)

    RAF 83 Squadron operation: Avro Manchester Mk.I on mission to Hamburg, the 8th of April 1942. It was last heard from just after midnight on the 9th of April, thought to be in the Lastrup area of Germany. It crashed northeast of Cloppenburg. The crew killed are buried at Sage War Cemetery.

    The only survivor was P A Lovegrove who later died in captivity and is buried in grave 6 A 14 Poznan Old Garrison Cemetery, Poland.

  • Pilot: P/O 67046 Jack Heathcote Morphett RAFVR killed.
  • Pilot: P/O 62324 Peter Anthony Lovegrove 22 RAFVR PoW, died in captivity 12Nov42.
  • Obs: Flt/Sgt 402188 Geoffrey Douglas Hutchinson 27 RNZAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG: Flt/Sgt 647009 Albert Henry Salter 20 RAF killed, age 20.
  • Wop/AG: Sgt 923926 Reginald Stanley Williams 22 RAFVR killed, age 22.
  • AG: Flt/Sgt R/66159 George Charles Fisk RCAF killed.
  • AG: Flt/Sgt R/69897 Charles Dewitt Gellatly RCAF killed.

  • Michael Allbrook



    Sgt. John Alexander Carpenter 57 Squadron (d.13th Jul 1943)

    My Mum would not talk about her brother John Carpenter, all I know is his Lancaster went missing on the 13th of July 1943.

    Dave Hawkes



    Sgt. Sydney James Hitchings 49 Squadron

    My father Sgt Sidney Hitchings was POW number 276 in Stalag Luft 1

    WR Chorley’s RAF Bomber Command Losses of Second World War (vol 1939 – 40) states: Night of 4/5 Set 1940 49 Squadron Hampden mk 1 P 1347 EA-D Op: Stettin

    • Pilot F/O LM Hodges POW escape report WO 208/3304 S/PG 345
    • Observer Sgt SJ Hitchings POW 276
    • WOp/AG Sgt JH Wyatt POW escape report WO 208/3303 S/PG 280
    • Wop/AG Sgt LC Turnbull POW 285

    t/o Scampton. Strayed off course after being fired on by light flak from an airfield in Brittany, the Hampden was force landed in a field near St Brieuc. (Hodges and Wyatt escaped and arrived home via Gibraltar on 31 July 1941. Hodges rose in rank to become Air Chief Marshall Sir Lewis Hodges and was president of the RAF Escaping Society).

    My father was one of the early pows in Stalag Luft 1 and the accompanying photos are from there. He was moved to several other camps including Stalag Lufts 3 and 4 and eventually after the forced marches of winter 1944 arrived at Camp 357 from which he was repatriated.

    A group photo in front of what appears to be stage set. The reverse shows that it was posted from Stalag Luft 1 and I think the postmark is 1942-7-18. S.J.Hitchings is second from left front row

    A propaganda “Christmas Spread” photo but my father told me all of the items were made of paper! SJH 3rd from right. 4th from left (with beard) is Sgt JC Shaw

    Sgt JC Shaw (middle) and SJH back right. Others unknown. Sgt Shaw was shot while attempting to escape on the night of 2/3 Jan 42 (see Footprints in the Sands of Time, Clutton-Brock. p46.)

    Sgt LC Turnbull

    Sgt LC Turnbull (front) and SJH

    6. S.J.Hitchings back left, others unknown.

    In 2015 I visited Pordic and met members of the Association Bretagne de Sovenir Arien (www.absa3945.com) who took me to the site of the crash. One of the old men was a boy of seven at the time and he saw the two parachutes of my father and Sgt Turnbull, both of whom were subsequently captured.

    Photos of Hampden P1347 in which my father, Sgt SJ Hitchings, was observer on the raid to Stettin on the night of 4th Sept 1949, after it crash landed in a field near Pordic, Brittany, were sent to me by Rick of Historical-media.com to whom I am grateful.

    Robert Hitchings



    F/O Aliston Rank Gray Ritch 57 Squadron (d.5th Feb 1943)

    On the night 4-5 February 1943, an Avro Lancaster I, serial ED352, code DX-Q, of squadron n°57 of 5 Bomber Group, Royal Air Force, based at Scampton Lincolnshire took off for a bombing raid on Turin. In terrible weather the plane crashed on the slopes of Belleface in the mountains of the Massif de la Pointe de Terrasse opposite the small hamlet of Crêt Bettex, ten kilometres north of Bourg Saint Maurice, Savoie, France.All seven crew members were killed.
    • F/O Aliston Rank Gray Ritch J/10305 RCAF, pilot
    • Sgt Thomas Cosford 1244294, Flight Engineer
    • Sgt Eric Atkins 1318855 RAF, Navigator
    • Sgt D.G.Busby 1391156 RAF, Bombardier
    • Sgt Douglas McNeil 1025811 RAF, Wireless Operator
    • Sgt Eric Norman Perkins 1601353 RAF, Gunner
    • F/Sgt Ronald Shears 542963 RAF, Gunner
    There was thick snow covering the spot at the time but as the snow melted a search was set up by the Italian army of occupation. At the end of June 1943 two bodies and later three more were recovered from a snow drift in the area. On July 1st the Italian authorities requested the town council of Bourg Saint Maurice to make coffins and to dig graves to bury these airmen. Eight bodies enclosed in six coffins were carried from the village of Les Chapieux to Bourg Saint Maurice with the assistance of the Italian authorities. On July 5th July a religious service was held in the Parish church and the burial took place in the local churchyard in the presence of the local council, the local police officer and officers of the Italian Army who buried the dead with Military Honours. In 1950 the bodies were exhumed and transferred for burial to the British Military Cementry of Saint Germain au Mont d'Or, Rhône, France

    Lancaster RAF of Bourg Saint Maurice, Memoire- Aeronautique.

    To aid in the research any details would be most welcome from any of the families or friends of the airmen. Local interest has indicated that a historical group would like to erect a monument to commemorate these airmen.

    Michèle Howell



    F/Sgt George William Osborne Crocker

    My Father, George Crocker was mid upper & tail end gunner in Lancaster bomers, and was stationed at Scampton. My mother Gladis was also in the WAAF, and they met at RAF Scampton. My father took part in droping food on Rotterdam to the starving Dutch. I am now married to a Dutch girl from Rotterdam. Due to my father's part during and after the war with dropping food to my wife's parents, they met and gave me my loving wife Ineke. Is that something to be very gratefull for, or was it meant to be? I would like to learn more about my father's RAF career.

    George Crocker



    Robert John Webb 617 Squadron

    My father, Robert John Webb, will be 84 years old this year and we are taking him for a visit to RAF Scampton, Lincoln as a surprise where he was stationed in his teens in 1944-1945, as ground crew with 617 Squadron

    If you re-call my father could you please let me know.

    Judy Atkins



    Reginald Morris Nash MID 57 Squadron

    My dad, Reginald Nash did not talk very much about his war time experiences but I inherited from my mother, who died recently, my dad's wartime 'stuff' including his flying log.

    He qualified as flight engineer with effect from 8th of October 1942 and as flight engineer with effect from 24th of May 1944. He began operational duties on the night of 13th of February 1943 from Scampton with a sortie on Lorient in France. Throughout his time with the 57 squadron during 1943 he flew 29 successful sorties with 1 abort mostly over German cities.

    Some of the sorties were recorded as eventfull:

    • 8th July 1943, aircraft attacked over target (Cologne) by junkers 88, mid upper gunner killed, enemy aircraft destroyed by rear gunner.
    • 13th May 1943, Skoda arms works Pilsen, aircraft attacked by 2 Junkers 88s.
    • 3rd Apr 1943 Duisberg, rear gunner unconcious.
    • 12th May 1943 Duisberg, 'heaviest raid of war to date'.

    My Dad's pilot on most of the ops was Flt Lt Greig but I note that he flew 3 ops with Flt Lt Astell in Feb 43 who, I believe, was killed on the Dambusters raid.

    My dad then flew a limited number of operations during 1944 with 50 squadron and his last sortie of the war was on the 6th of May 1945 'Operation Exodus' to Brussels to transport POW's.

    My dad was at 97 Squadron Woodhall Spa from Oct42 to Jan43. Then 57 Squadron Scampton to Aug43; then 1660 conversion unit Swinderby to Aug 1944 and finished the war with 50 squadron based at Skellingthorpe. The aircraft types flown seems to have been almost everything the RAF had in service, Lancaster, Halifax, Sterling, Manchester and Oxford. In total my Dad flew 228hrs at night and 174.25 daytime and he survived without a scratch or being a POW.

    He was released from service on the 4th of September 1945. He had met my mother whilst doing his leaders coarse at St Athan and they married in Penarth on the 30th of September 1944. After the War my Dad joined BOAC then BA based at their engine overhaul site in Treforest near Pontypridd, South Wales as a Production Engineer before his retirement in 1975.

    He was, as well, for a number of years, President of the Penarth RAFA and I remember one of their guests at an annual dinner was W/Comdr Barder. There are many programmes on the TV these days about WW2 and now that I am custodion of some of my dad's wartime memories and know a lot more than I did I feel a real connection with those times. I am very proud of my dad's courage and achievements and I regret not finding out more of what it must have been like for him and thousands more of his generation when he was alive. Maybe he was embarassed with all the controversey over the tactics used by Bomber Command but I am pleased that at long last their sacrifice has finally been recognised and so would have my Dad.

    David. B. Nash



    Dudley Delacourtte Snooke 83rd Squadron (d.28th Sep 1940)

    Dudley Snooke was a pilot with 83 Squadron, based out of Scampton.

    Michael Snooke



    Ft/Sgt Andrew Bell 153 Sqn.

    I believe the picture of this Lancaster crew to have been taken at RAF Scampton in 1945. The pilot, I believe, was F/O Clark and the crew member on the extreme left was my father, Ft Sgt Andrew Bell whose role was that of Air Bomber.

    Douglas Bell



    Flt.Sgt. George William Osborne Crocker 153 Squadron

    My father was George William Osborne Crocker. He was an air gunner during the second world war on Ansons, Wellingtons & Lancasters. On Lancasters he was Mid Upper & Tail End Gunner. He served at Bishopscourt, Wymeswold, Worksop, Scampton & Binbrook. I have my fathers log books that tell of his raids on Germany and his crew who were sent after training to their first operation unit at 153 Squadron at RAF Scampton, his first entry being 12th March 1945.

    • His crew were:
    • Pilot: A. West. Pilot Officer
    • Bomb Aimer: G Cutting SGT
    • Navigator: Mac Millan SGT
    • Engineer: H. Brooks SGT
    • WOP: W. Teagle SGT
    • Rear Gunner: J. Adkin SGT
    • Mid Upper Gunner: G.Crocker SGT

    I have dates of his raids on Nordhawsen / Lutzkendorf / Keil Canal where the Admiral Scheer was sunk on 9th April 1945, Bremen and his attack on a daylight raid on Hitlers residence Berchesgaden on 25/04/1945, with his comment " If only he was there" This gives you some background information on my dad; however the most important fact being that he dropped food on Rotterdam in Holland on 1st May 1945, at 300 feet height.

    I am now married to a Dutch girl from Rotterdam, we have been together for 38 years. The dropping of food by my dad on Rotterdam saved my wife's parents who lived in Rotterdam at the time. When they met they produced my beautiful wife Ineke. So thank you dad for giving Ineke to me by your deed of dropping this food on the starving Dutch.

    George Crocker



    P/O. John Rowland Feirn 83 Sqdn. (d.13th Mar 1942)

    I am transcribing the 'Thomas Hedley ROH' book, the pre-runner of Procter and Gamble Ltd., and on page 47 of the book is an entry for a John Rowland Feirn. The entry reads: Missing Presumed Killed Pilot Officer. I would be interested in any other information on him. This book will be showing as a memorial on www.newmp.org.uk as a North East War Memorial.

    Update: Pilot Officer John Feirn was the son of Arthur and Lillian Feirn and husband of Doris Ethel Feirn, of East Ham, Essex. John Feirn was responsible for the navigation for the mission from RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, to Cologne. The crew took off at 20:30, and were shot down by a night-fighter and crashed in Nijmegen, Netherlands. John Feirn was 34 years old when he was killed, and he is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey.

    Jim



    Sam Robertson

    Sam Robertson can remember sitting at home at Crawfordston Farm near Annbank, Ayrshire when war was declared — the whole family gathered round the wireless to listen to Chamberlain’s speech. Sam’s twin brother joined the Navy and owing to colour blindness — could not become a member of aircrew (which was his ambition) so he became a mechanical engineer. Sam’s elder sister joined the ATS and became a member of an anti-aircraft battery near Newcastle. His other sister who was still a schoolgirl at this time became a nurse on leaving school, and spent her career in Ayrshire Central after training as a midwife. Sam served in 5 Group Bomber Command and served from the world-renowned RAF base at Scampton, Lincolnshire. This base was previously occupied by the Dambuster Squadron lead by Guy Gibson VC. Sam joined the RAF in February 1944 after being a member of Ayr Training Corp and his first posting was to the selection board in London where he was intrigued to discover that soldiers on guard duty outside the block of flats were armed solely with a pick axe handle! The building was opposite Regents Park — where the soldiers were fed in the Monkey House - and soldiers were marched up and down the road with a white light at the top and a red light at the rear. Sam’s basic training took place at Bridgenorth, Shropshire. After a weary period there, he was posted to Andreans, Isle of Man for initial training as an air gunner. A training group was roughly 100 individuals. Air firing and flight training was carried out in old Avro Ansons where the crew, other than the turret gunner, had to wind the undercarriage up and down. The flying was all done in daylight and specialised training took place i.e. aircraft recognition (which had to be of a high standard and was a continuing process throughout aircrew flying careers). Here Sam met his first gunner mate - Len Smee, an older career RAF man (i.e. a regular) Subsequently Sam was posted to RAF Bottesford, Nottingham where the training was on Wellingtons. Wellingtons were single tail units and the toughest things that ever flew. The construction was of geodetic aluminium strutting and the aircraft body was covered with fabric. Here was where Sam crewed up. Aircraft crewing was done like a cattle market in so much as there were pools of all the aircrew trades — pilot, navigator, radio operator, bomb aimer, flight engineer and mid, upper and rear gunners. Sam was a rear gunner. Sam crewed up with a Rhodesian pilot called Juggler Jones who was a well-known rugby player in his own country, all the other crew members were English other than Sam, the only Scot. Sam was unlucky at RAF Bottesford as he spent double time there with his first crew. During a training flight, the Wellington crashed near Daventry — the plane was landed safely by the pilot, but ran into trees. The skipper was unable to continue flying so the crew were split up and put back into the melting pot. The skipper (a diamond miner to trade) felt he could better aid the war effort by returning home and continue to mine for diamonds - having previously lost an older brother, a gunner in bomber command. The spirit in the first crew was tremendous but unfortunately this was lost when they were scattered all over the command to re-crew. The second crew was run of the mill in comparison. Sam stayed with this crew for the rest of his flying career. His next station was RAF Silverstone for further training in four engine aircraft i.e. Lancasters. After completing his flying training he was posted to an operational squadron based RAF Scampton of Guy Gibson fame. This was followed by a lengthy training period of night and day flying. Night flying was introduced by the RAF in the early forties as the loss from daylight raiding was becoming unsustainable due to the numbers of German fighter planes (they had a quicker response time because of their proximity to the operational area). Lancasters had black undersides to minimise reflection if caught in searchlights. When the war was drawing to a close and bombing commands reduced, the RAF together with the American Air Force were called upon by the Germans to try to feed the Dutch population particularly in the large cities as the condition there was drastic. Sam remembers being involved in airlifting food parcels to Holland towards the end of the war. Supplies in canvas sacks consisted of tins, dried egg powder etc. The people in The Hague, Rotterdam, Amsterdam were absolutely starving — any crops grown in Holland were being sent to Germany for the people there. People in cities in particular were worst off as country people could benefit by hiding some of their own production for personal or family use. This rescue operation was mounted at the behest of the Germans — possibly in an attempt to mitigate their undoubted guilt. RAF bomber command agreed to this procedure of low level. Low speed dropping of canvas sacking of food in pre-arranged areas in or adjacent to the cities. In some cases areas selected were near glass houses — which of course became almost targets. Sam says that it was so satisfying to know that he and his crew were doing something to help people who had been through years of hell and still suffering badly. After the atomic bombs landed on Japan there was no need for the air activity in the Far East and a lot of aircrew were surplus to requirements and relocated to ground jobs. Many of them were sent to RAF Newquay (probably a typing error by the RAF) as drivers. Driver training was undertaken at RAF Weeton, Preston for those unable to drive. They learned to drive everything from private cars to Queen Marys — a long loader that could carry the hull of an aircraft. Sam went to Germany as a driver for the RAF




    Flt.Sgt. John Alan Stace 111th Sqd.

    My Dad, John Stace, served in the RAF Bomber Command on Lancasters. I believe his crew were:

    • Johnny Brown Pilot Flight Engineer
    • John Stace Wireless Operator
    • Peter Bishop Mid Air Gunner
    • Gordon Cox Rear Gunner
    • Nobby Clark Observer or Bomb Aimer Hadfield

    Dad joined the RAF in 1942 from school having been an Air Cadet. He left in 1946. The only time he crashed was not whilst with his own crew but with another crew in 1946 he survived but the pilot died. I believe he was at Eastchurch and Feltwell amongst other bases. He flew with 115 Sqadron and also 44 Squadron. He was at Cranwell and also Scampton

    I would love to know more about his life as sadly he died in 1977 so I didn't get time to ask him.

    Dawn



    F/Sgt. Peter Adrian "Chick" Vowles 103 Sqn

    Op Manna

    Op Dodge

    Crew inside

    Crew on aircraft

    My Uncle Peter Vowles was proud of his service with 103 Sqn as an Air Gunner (Tail and occasional Mid Upper), serving at Elsham Wolds as part of Taff Slee’s crew from late 1943 until converting to Lincolns transferring “en Bloc” to 57 Sqn at Scampton.

    He took part in Op Manna and Op Dodge but we know little about any other operations he was involved in and would love to hear from anyone who can fill in these gaps for us. I attach some photos from his Diary that may jog memories.

    David Wookey



    Sqd Ldr. William Ernest "Paddy" McCrea DFC. 57 Squadron

    Bill's crew

    Bill's Crew

    Bill McCrea flew with 57 Sqd. during the war, his memoirs " A Chequer Board of Nights", was published several years ago, Sadly he died in February but saw the rough cut of a short film I and the Granddaughter of his mid upper gunner made of chapter 6 of his book.

    The film will be ready for the Squadron centenary next year. The true accounts of one crew's tour in a Lancaster Bomber during WWII. We follow one raid, at a time when any raid could be their last. The Crew are a team interdependant, but their gunners should be even closer, why doesn't Ace like Chris?, this could spell disaster. For more information follow facebook.com/AChequerBoardofNights

    Doug Kirby



    Gladis Sarah Williamson

    My mother Gladys Williamson met my father, George Crocker who was mid upper & tail end gunner in Lancaster bombers, when they were both stationed at Scampton.

    George Crocker



    WO2 G. H. Ramey 57 Squadron RAF (d.10th December 1942)

    My father, WO2 G. H. Ramey, was a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force, serving in 57 Squadron, based at RAF Scampton. He was killed on 10th December 1942 when his damaged Lancaster W4250 crashed while attempting to land at Woodhall Spa after returning from a sortie to Turin. I would like to contact anyone who was in 57 Squadron at that time.

    Gord H Ramey



    F/Sgt. Frederic Cleveland Irving 153 Squadron (d.16th January 1945)

    My brother, Frederic Irving, was stationed with 153 Squadron at Scampton. He was last heard of on 16th January 1945 when he left on an operation to bomb an oil plant in Seitz and was reported lost without trace. All crew members were presumed dead.

    William G Irving



    Dorothy Farrow Bomber Command

    My mother, Dorothy Farrow, served as a WAAF radio operator in Bomber Command from 1941 to 1945. She served at Elsham Wolds, Binbrook, Scampton and Bawtry Hall. I believe she trained at Blackpool.

    Ian Boulby



    WO. Philip Henry "Tubby" Gaunt 49 Squadron

    My late father, Tubby Gaunt flew with 49 Sqn. completing his first tour on Hampdens, out of Scampton, 1941 & 42, as wireless op air gunner, having trained in South Africa to be a pilot. Gaining his wings he moved on to Wellingtons at Foggia, with 37 & 70 Sqns. After 23 operations, he iced up and force landed in Gorski Kotar. He and all his crew were safe and fairly sound, where they were helped by Titos partisans, and repatriated back to Tortorella, then back to Liverpool by troop ship. It was late April 1942, and thinking he had done his bit, they demobbed him in November 1945.

    Starting in 1939 having a forced landing at Manston, and a little while later a mid air collision with a Lancaster, later to survive his crash in the mountains of Gorski Kotar, Croatia as it is now, he lived a charmed life indeed.




    PO Iain Menzies Muir MID 83 Sqd.

    Iain Muir took of from RAF Scampton on 8 Aug 1940 to attack Ludwigshafen. He was an RAF pilot with 83 Sqd flying a Hampden Mk 1 (OL-N, L4053). Crashed and became a POW in Stalag Luft III. Was part of the Great Escape team, but had to stay behind because of illness. He survived the war.

    Michael Curtis







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