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The 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell



The 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell was a Territorial Force Hospital with 88 Officer beds and 852 Other Ranks beds. The hospital was located in St Gabriel's College, a former missionary college in Corniont Road, and was staffed by 92 St Bartholomew's Hospital Territorial Army Nursing Service nurses and women of the Voluntary Aid Detachment (VADs). The hospital was later extended to huts in the adjacent Myatt's Fields.

Vera Brittain, a VAD Nurse, worked for a time at the 1st London General, Camberwell recording her experiences in Testament of Youth, published in 1933.



The 1st of September 2017 is The Wartime Memories Project's 18th Birthday. If you would like to send us a present, a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web.



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The Wartime Memories Project is run by volunteers and this website is funded by donations from our visitors.

If the information here has been helpful or you have enjoyed reaching the stories please conside making a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web. In these difficult times current donations are falling far short of this target.

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Announcements

  • The Wartime Memories Project is the original WW1 and WW2 commemoration website

    This website has been running for 18 years and receives in excess of a million hits per month. The website and our group will continue long after the 2014-18 events are over. We hope that people will continue to support us by submitting material and stories in addition to submitting to the new websites set up for the anniversary.

  • We are looking for volunteers to help with researching the activities of units of the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers, Territorial Force, Regular Army, Pals Battalions, Kitchener's New Armies, Voluntary Organisations and the Ships of the Royal Navy. We currently have a huge backlog of stories and historical documents which need to be edited or transcribed for display online, if you have a good standard of written English, an interest in the two World Wars and a little time to spare online we would appreciate your help. For more information please see our page on Volunteering.

Wanted: Digital copies of Group photographs, Scrapbooks, Autograph books, photo albums, newspaper clippings, letters, postcards and ephemera relating to the Great War. If you have any unwanted photographs, documents or items from the First or Second World War, please do not destroy them. The Wartime Memories Project will give them a good home and ensure that they are used for educational purposes. Please get in touch for the postal address, do not sent them to our PO Box as packages are not accepted.





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Dec 2017

    Please note we currently have a backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 237716 your submission is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

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Did you know? We also have a section on World War Two. and a Timecapsule to preserve stories from other conflicts for future generations.




List of those who served at the 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell during The Great War



List of those who were treated at the 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell during The Great War

    If you have any names to add to this list, or any recollections or photos of those listed, please get in touch.




History of the Shiny Seventh

C Digby Planck


Written in the 1920's and recently reprinted. This history tells the story from those early beginnings to the end of WWII including the period between wars when, in 1936, the the regiment's role changed from infantry to searchlight and the title to 32nd (7th City of London) AA Battalion, RE.,TA. Most of the book, some 200 pages, is concerned with the Great War and the record of the two active battalions, 1/7th and 2/7th. The narrative includes extracts from letters, diaries and articles written by officers and men, casualty details are given as they occur and gallantry awards and other incidents. The inter-war years and WWII are only briefly covered and the Roll of Honour for The Great War has one list, officers and men of both battalions, in alphabetical order but without identifying the battalion; Honours and Awards are shown under 1/7th and the combined 2/7th and 7th.
More information on: History of the Shiny Seventh



Dawn Raid: Bombardment of the Hartlepools

J M Ward


An excellent account of the naval bombardment on the 16th of December 1914.
More information on: Dawn Raid: Bombardment of the Hartlepools



Guns of the Northeast: Coastal Defences from the Tyne to the Humber

Joe Foster


A detailed study of the coastal defences of North East England, including accounts of the bombardment of the East coast in 1914, with many excellent photgraphs and diagrams.
More information on: Guns of the Northeast: Coastal Defences from the Tyne to the Humber



Bombardment: The Day the East Coast Bled

Mark Marsay


A well researched book with many personal accounts of the events of the 16th of December 1914
More information on: Bombardment: The Day the East Coast Bled



Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders

Alastair Of Airds Campbell


More information on: Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders



The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders: A Concise History

Trevor Royle


The Argylls have a stirring history of service to the British Crown. The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders is one of the best known regiments in the British Army. When it was ordered to disband in 1968 as part of wide-ranging defence cuts, a popular 'Save the Argylls' campaign was successful in keeping the regiment in being. They served all over the empire, taking part in the Indian Mutiny and the Boer War, and fought in both World Wars.In the post-war period the Argylls captured the public imagination in 1967 when they re-occupied the Crater district of Aden following a period of riots. Recruiting mainly from the west of Scotland, the regiment has a unique character and throughout its history has retained a fierce regimental pride which is summed up by its motto: 'sans peur', meaning 'without fear'. "The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders" puts its story into the context of British military history and makes use of personal testimony to reveal the life of the regiment.
More information on: The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders: A Concise History



Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-19: Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders)


A roll call of those killed during the Great War whilst serving with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. A valuable research tool.
More information on: Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-19: Princess Louise's (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders)



God's Own: 1st Salford Pals, 1914-1916

Neil Drum & Roger Dowson


This superbly researched book looks at the story of the raising and training of the Pals. It then moves on to their first experiences in France, and concludes with their destruction on the First Day of the Somme. Throughout there are numerous references to officers and men, and many first hand accounts, both of which combine to make it a fascinating account. This first section then ends with biographies of all the casualties, many of them accompanied by a photograph and some in great detail. The second part of the book is a complete roll of every officer and man that served with the 15th Lancashire Fusiliers from formation until 1st July 1916. It gives basic details of every soldier; some men have lengthy entries. A wonderful piece of research!
More information on: God's Own: 1st Salford Pals, 1914-1916



Salford Pals , A History of the Salford Brigade: 15th, 16th, 19th and 20th Battalions Lancashire Fusiliers

Michael Stedman


Salford was late in recruiting for its Pals battalions, with many of its men already joining Territorial units and a new Pals battalion in Manchester. Yet within a year it had raised four Pals battalions and a reserve battalion. Raised mainly from Lancashire's most notorious slums, the men trained together in Wales, North East England and on Salisbury Plain, they had great expectations of success. On the 1st of July 1916 the Somme offensive was launched and in the very epicentre of that cauldron the first three of Salford's battalions were thrown at the massive defences of Thiepval - the men were decimated, Salford was shattered. Michael Stedman records the impact of the war from the start on Salford and follows the difficulties and triumphs. Whether the actions small or great the author writes graphically about them all. Unusual photographs and a variety of sources make this both a readable and a scholarly account.
More information on: Salford Pals , A History of the Salford Brigade: 15th, 16th, 19th and 20th Battalions Lancashire Fusiliers



Tyneside Scottish: 20th, 21st, 22nd and 23rd (Service) Battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers

John Sheen


A detailed account of the Tyneside Scottish Brigade, formed in response to Kitchener's c all for a new army, made up of local men from around Newcastle, few of whom were Scots
More information on: Tyneside Scottish: 20th, 21st, 22nd and 23rd (Service) Battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers



Three Before Breakfast

Alan Coles


'A true & dramatic account of how a German U-boat sank three British, Aboukir, Hogue and Cressey in one desperate hour
More information on: Three Before Breakfast



Ireland's Unknown Soldiers: The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War

Terence Denman


The Great War of 1914-18 saw the Irish soldier make his greatest sacrifice on Britain's behalf. Nearly 135,000 Irishmen volunteered (conscription was never applied in Ireland) in addition to the 50,000 Irish who were serving with the regular army and the reserves on 4 August 1914. Within a few weeks of the outbreak of the war no less than three Irish divisions - the 10th (Irish), 16th (Irish) and 36th (Ulster) - were formed from Irishmen, Catholic and Protestant, who responded to Lord Kitchener's call to arms. An estimated 35,000 Irish-born soldiers were killed before the armistice came in November 1918. Over 4,000 of those who died were with the 16th (Irish) Division.
More information on: Ireland's Unknown Soldiers: The 16th (Irish) Division in the Great War



Border Regiment in the Great War

H.C. Wylly


More information on: Border Regiment in the Great War



Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-19: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)


More information on: Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-19: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)



Massacre on the Marne: The Life and Death of the 2/5th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War

Fraser Skirrow


Reconstructs the experiences of a small closely knit group of fighting men - the 2/5th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment - in the Great War. These men were not elite regular troops or Kitcheners' Men - they were Territorials. In many ways, they were typical of the men who fought on the Western Front. Massacre on the Marne presents fascinating insights into the First World War. It gives a "warts and all" view of the often chaotic preparations and challenges of mobilising an army. It tells the personal stories of ordinary men caught up in this great conflict. The book is scholarly and detailed but also presents a gripping and engaging view of what the Great War would have been like for typical soldiers. This book is a timely reminder of the horrific conflict that is now disappearing from living memory. I thoroughly recommend it, not only for those with an existing interest in the period, but also for anyone who wants to understand the First World War from the viewpoint of the indi
More information on: Massacre on the Marne: The Life and Death of the 2/5th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War



History of the Cheshire Regiment in the Great War.

Arthur Crookenden


Naval and Military Press, have once again provided the military historian and researcher with an invaluable service by re-publishing this long out of print volume at the most reasonable price. It chronicles the war record of the fifteen battalions of the regiment which served on the Western Front, in Italy, Gallipoli, Mesopotamia, Palestine and Macedonia. The large appendices will however be invaluable for researchers, as having commenced with a summary showing the totals of dead officers and other rank totals by battalions, it is followed by the nominal rolls, with officers grouped alphabetically and other ranks in their battalions. The comprehensive 56-page list of Honours and Awards, including Mentions In Despatches, is arranged alphabetically and although the ranks of the recipients are not given, the citations for the VC, DSO, MC and DCM awards are. The final appendix, entitled `Mobilization', is useful too as it briefly provides the story of each battalion before it went overseas
More information on: History of the Cheshire Regiment in the Great War.



Hearts & Dragons: the 4th Royal Berkshire Regiment in France and Italy During the Great War

Charles R. M. F. Crutwell


The story of a territorial regiment, the 4th Royal
More information on: Hearts & Dragons: the 4th Royal Berkshire Regiment in France and Italy During the Great War



Fourth Battalion the Kings's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) and the Great War

W.F.A. Wadham & J. Crossley


More information on: Fourth Battalion the Kings's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) and the Great War



History of the Queen's Royal (West Surrey) Regiment in the Great War

H.C. Wylly


More information on: History of the Queen's Royal (West Surrey) Regiment in the Great War



History of the 1st and 2nd Battalions: The Leicestershire Regiment in the Great War

H.C. Wylly


More information on: History of the 1st and 2nd Battalions: The Leicestershire Regiment in the Great War



Invicta: With the First Battalion The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment in the Great War

C.V. Molony


More information on: Invicta: With the First Battalion The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment in the Great War



History of the Black Watch in the Great War

A.G. Wauchope


More information on: History of the Black Watch in the Great War



East Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War 1914-1918

Everard Wyrall


More information on: East Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War 1914-1918



Digging Up Plugstreet

Richard Osgood and Martin Brown


The compelling story of the Australian soldiers of the 3rd Infantry Division who journeyed to England in 1914, and who fought and died on the Western Front during the First World War. Using archaeology as the vehicle for their story, Martin Brown and Richard Osgood follow in the footsteps of the 'Aussies', from their training on windswept Salisbury Plain to the cheerless trenches of Belgium, where they 'dug-in' north-east of Ploegsteert to face the Germans. It presents a unique window into the world of the men who marched away to fight the so-called 'war to end wars
More information on: Digging Up Plugstreet



Letters from the Trenches: A Soldier of the Great War

Bill Lamin


Harry Lamin was born in Derbyshire in 1877 and left school at thirteen to work in the lace industry, but by December 1916 he had been conscripted into the 9th Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment and sent to war. Harry's letters home to his family describe the conflict with a poignant immediacy, even ninety years on, detailing everything from the action in battle to the often amusing incidents of life amongst his comrades.Throughout the letters, Harry's tone is unwaveringly stoical, uncomplaining and good-humoured. "Letters From The Trenches" is a fitting tribute to the unsung heroes of the Great War who fought and endured and returned home, and the one in six who did not. The letters describe the war through the eyes of those who really lived it, bringing the horrors and triumphs to life for the twenty-first-century reader. Edited by Harry's grandson, Bill, "Letters From The Trenches" tells the moving story of a brave, selfless and honourable man who endured everything that the war
More information on: Letters from the Trenches: A Soldier of the Great War



Messines Ridge: Ypres

Peter Oldham


The latest in the Battleground Europe series of books covers the terrible Battle of Messines which was p receded by 19 mine explosions, the biggest mining effort in history. Additional sections include maps & cover car tours, memorials & cemeteries
More information on: Messines Ridge: Ypres



Pillars of Fire: The Battle of Messines Ridge, June 1917

Ian Passingham


Gentlemen, we may not make history tomorrow, but we shall certainly change the geography.' So said General Plumer the day before 600 tons of explosives were detonated under the German positions on Messines Ridge. The explosion was heard by Lloyd George in Downing Street, and as far away as Dublin. Until 1918, Messines was the only clear cut Allied victory on the Western Front, coming at a time when Britain and her allies needed it most: boosting Allied morale and shattering that of the Germans. Precisely orchestrated, Messines was the first true all-arms modern battle which brought together artillery, engineers, infantry, tanks, aircraft and administrative units from a commonwealth of nations to defeat the common enemy. So why is its name not as familiar as the Somme, Passchendaele or Verdun? General Sir Herbert Plumer, perhaps the most meticulous, resourceful and respected British general of WW1, is also unfamiliar to many. This book examines the battle for the Messines-Wytschaete Rid
More information on: Pillars of Fire: The Battle of Messines Ridge, June 1917



Plumer: The Soldier's General

Geoffrey Powell


Sir Herbert Plumer was one of the best-performing and best-regarded officers on the Allied side. He was famously thoughtful of his men and sparing of their lives.
More information on: Plumer: The Soldier's General



Ghosts on the Somme: Filming the Battle, June-July 1916

Alastair H. Fraser, Andrew Robertshaw and Steve Roberts


The Battle of the Somme is one of the most famous, and earliest, films of war ever made. The film records the most disastrous day in the history of the British army - 1 July 1916 - and it had a huge impact when it was shown in Britain during the war. Since then images from it have been repeated so often in books and documentaries that it has profoundly influenced our view of the battle and of the Great War itself. Yet this book is the first in-depth study of this historic film, and it is the first to relate it to the surviving battleground of the Somme. The authors explore the film and its history in fascinating detail. They investigate how much of it was faked and consider how much credit for it should go to Geoffrey Malins and how much to John MacDowell. And they use modern photographs of the locations to give us a telling insight into the landscape of the battle and into the way in which this pioneering film was created. Their analysis of scenes in the film tells us so much about th
More information on: Ghosts on the Somme: Filming the Battle, June-July 1916



From Messines to Third Ypres: A Personal Account of the First World War by a 2/5th Lancashire Fusilier

Thomas, Floyd


the story of just a few weeks between May 1917 and July 1917 as experienced by a subaltern of the Lancashire Fusiliers. It is a detailed account where personalities and small events seem to fifi ll its pages to become tellingly signififi cant-whole lifetimes seem to pass in months. Life in the trenches is recorded with all its dangers, tragedies and discomforts punctuated by lighter moments, as we share the inexorable build-up to the big attack and the fury of war that changed and ended lives in minutes. This is a first rate, intimate and personal account of the Western Front warfare the British infantry knew.
More information on: From Messines to Third Ypres: A Personal Account of the First World War by a 2/5th Lancashire Fusilier



History of the 51st (Highland) Division 1914-1918

F.W. Bewsher


The Highland Division was one of the pre-war Territorial divisions. Its HQ was in Perth with brigade HQs in Aberdeen, Inverness and Stirling. On mobilization the division moved down to its war station in Bedford where it remained, carrying out training till embarking for France in May 1915. During this period six of its battalions were sent to France, three in November 1914 and three in the following March, replaced by two Highland battalions and a brigade of four Lancashire battalions; it is not clear whether the latter were required to wear kilts. They were transferred to the 55th (West Lancashire) Division when that division reformed in France in January 1916 and were replaced, appropriately, by Scottish battalions. It was in May 1915, just as the division arrived in France, that it was designated 51st and the brigades 152nd, 153rd and 154th; by the end of the war the 51st (Highland) Division had become one of the best known divisions in the BEF.
More information on: History of the 51st (Highland) Division 1914-1918



History of the 9th (Scottish) Division

John Ewing


The division’s record is graphically described in this history - what Field Marshal Lord Plumer in his foreword referred to as “a record of wonderful development of fighting efficiency.” There are useful appendices giving the Order of Battle, command and staff lists with the various changes; a table showing periods spent in the line, with locations; a table of battle casualties and the VC citations. The maps are good with adequate detail for actions to be followed.
More information on: History of the 9th (Scottish) Division



Liverpool Scottish 1900-1919

A.M. McGilchrist


The story of the 1/10th, 2/10th and 3/10th (Scottish) Battalions of the King’s (Liverpool Regiment), referred to in this account as 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalions Liverpool Scottish. The 1st and 2nd fought on the Western Front , the 3rd remained in the UK. Appendices include nominal roll of 1st Battalion on embarkment, list of Honours and Awards including the only VC and bar awarded, and Roll of Honour.
More information on: Liverpool Scottish 1900-1919



CROWN AND COMPANY 1911-1922. 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers

Col. H. C. Wylly


This volume is concerned principally with the battalion’s service in the Great War during which it fought on the Western Front in 10th Brigade, 4th Division till the end of 1916 when it was transferred to 48th Brigade of 16th(Irish) Division. The last part gives a very full and often moving description of the disbandment of the battalion. 269 officers and 4508 WOs, NCOs and men of the Regiment died during the war and an appendix lists the names of the officers showing which battalion they were serving in. There is a full list of Honours and Awards including Mentions in Despatches and foreign awards for the whole regiment. Another appendix lists the officers of the 1st and 2nd battalions serving at the time of disbandment and shows which regiments they transferred to or whether they retired.
More information on: CROWN AND COMPANY 1911-1922. 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers



History of the London Rifle Brigade 1859-1919


A Detailed & readable history with num. anecdotes . Appendices inc. officers’ services, awards. The first 60 or so pages deal with the pre-war history,. The rest of book is devoted to the Great War in which three battalions served, the 1st and 2nd Battalions on the Western Front, the 3rd was a training battalion. Each battalion is covered separately concluding, in the case of the active service battalions, with a detailed itinerary. This is a very good history with many informative appendices including casualty lists by battalions, nominal roll of all officers who served between 1859 and 1919 with service, and in a number of cases biographical details, honours and awards including mentions
More information on: History of the London Rifle Brigade 1859-1919



Honourable Artillery Company in the Great War 1914-1919

G. Goold Walker


The history of this somewhat complex regiment has been admirably handled. Each of the units has a section to itself and each section has its own chapters numbered separately. The story begins with the 1st Battalion, then follow ‘A’ Battery. ‘B’ Battery, the Siege Battery, 2nd Battalion, 2/A Battery, 2/B Battery and finally the third line units and the regimental Depot. There is a combined regimental Roll of Honour, arranged alphabetically (officers and men together) There are three indexes, one of persons, one of places and one of units.
More information on: Honourable Artillery Company in the Great War 1914-1919



History of the Welsh Guards

C.H.Dudley Ward


A very good history incorporating nominal roll of all WOs, NCOs and men who served with it, noting casualties and awards, records of service of all officers, chronology of every move from arrival in France to arrival in Cologne and list of enemy divisions engaged.
More information on: History of the Welsh Guards



Devonshire Regiment 1914-1918

C.T. Atkinson


The author is among the foremost of the Great War divisional and regimental historians and this book is typical of his standard of writing and composition. He has provided a continuous narrative in a chronological order, bringing in the various battalions as they came onto the stage in the relevant theatre of war. He has made use of war diaries, not only of the battalions but also, where appropriate of brigades and divisions. He was also able to make use of collected accounts of various actions and experiences of those who took part in them, giving the point of view of the man in the trenches. One third of the book, some 250 pages, contains the complete list of honours and awards, including Mention in Despatches, and the Roll of Honour, listed alphabetically by battalions.
More information on: Devonshire Regiment 1914-1918



Artists Rifles: Regimental Roll of Honour and War Record 1914-1919

S.Stagoll Higham


This remarkable book contains a complete record of all whose names have been inscribed in the regiment’s Muster Roll since August 1914, showing commissions obtained, when and in which corps/regiments; honours and decorations awarded with citations where published; and a list of all casualties. There is a total of 15,022 names, that is everyone who at one time or another served in the Regiment in any capacity. 10,256 received commissions, eight VCs were awarded, and the casualties suffered throughout the war numbered 6,071 of whom 2,003 were killed. There are summary tables of awards and of casualties
More information on: Artists Rifles: Regimental Roll of Honour and War Record 1914-1919



History and Records of Queen Victoria's Rifles 1792-1922

C.A.Cuthbert Keeson


This is a good history with plenty of detail and with many names, covering the period from the earliest days up to the Great War in an appendix (185 pages) at the end of the book. It covers each battalion in turn - 1/9th, 2/9th, the amalgamated 9th and finally 3/9th. There is the Roll of Honour and a list of Honours and Awards, including Mentions in Despatches.
More information on: History and Records of Queen Victoria's Rifles 1792-1922



Cast-iron Sixth: A History of the Sixth Battalion, London Regiment (City of London Rifles)

E.G. Godfrey


This history begins with the names of divisional and brigade commanders under whom the battalion served, followed by the Honours list where all recipients are named, except for Mention in Despatches where totals are given. The early history of the battalion is briefly narrated before the Great War, which takes up the bulk of the book. In addition to details of actions fought, in each chapter attention is given to some particular aspect of military training or operations, such as communications between front and rear, transport difficulties, individual exploits and so on, while to facilitate reading, at the head of each page appears the number of the battalion being discussed. The book ends with the Roll of Honour (1050 dead) and an index.
More information on: Cast-iron Sixth: A History of the Sixth Battalion, London Regiment (City of London Rifles)



Royal Fusiliers in the Great War

H.C. O'Neill


Sourced frm the battalion diaries, personal diaries of officers, special accounts of particular actions contributed by soldiers actually involved, letters and conversations, the author explains in some detail how the regiment expanded and how each wartime battalion came to be formed. The appendix gives the Roll of Honour of officers (1054 names); a table showing the numbers of Warrant Officers, NCOs and Men on the Roll of Honour, by battalions; a table summarising decorations awarded, including foreign awards; brief biographies or notes on a number of RF general ranking officers; and several accounts of soldiers who took part in the various operations.
More information on: Royal Fusiliers in the Great War



Footprints of the 1/4th Leicestershire Regiment: August 1914 to November 1918

John Milne


This account is written primarily for those who served or whose relatives served in the battalion, which is a good thing as we get plenty of names and the details of daily life in the trenches, officer casualties and new arrivals are mentioned by name in the text other ranks by totals. A reprint of the 1935 original.
More information on: Footprints of the 1/4th Leicestershire Regiment: August 1914 to November 1918



Fifth Leicestershire: A Record of the 1/5th Battalion the Leicestershire Regiment, TF, During the War 1914-1919

J.D. Hills


This battalion history, based essentially on the War Diary supplemented by contributions from various battalion members. There is plenty of meat in this history, detailed accounts of actions and events in and out of the trenches, names of officers and other ranks, list of honours and awards.
More information on: Fifth Leicestershire: A Record of the 1/5th Battalion the Leicestershire Regiment, TF, During the War 1914-1919



East Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War 1914-1918

Everard Wyrall


This history covers all the battalions though only very briefly those that did not go overseas. The author, a prolific writer of divisional/regimental histories follows his customary pattern of arranging his story chronologically with chapters devoted to specific battles and periods of trench warfare. In the margins of the text describing events he notes the dates, as in a diary, and identifies the battalions involved. The Roll of Honour lists the officers alphabetically by ranks without indicating the battalion or date of death; the other ranks are shown by battalions and by ranks within each battalion. Given the number of battalions covered in this single volume the account of all the activities is necessarily compressed, based essentially on the War Diaries, without anecdotal contributions The maps are very good, uncluttered yet displaying tactical detail easy to follow.
More information on: East Yorkshire Regiment in the Great War 1914-1918



History of the Dorsetshire Regiment 1914-1919


This reprint covers the Regular and TF battalions, each with their own index; And deals with the Service battalions and includes the Roll of Honour and the list of Honours and Awards for all battalions. It also has a separate index. There are numerous sketch maps in the text.
More information on: History of the Dorsetshire Regiment 1914-1919



History of the Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's) 1914-1919

Everard Wyrall


Wyrall arranges his record of the regiment in chronological order, following the course of the war from the arrival of the1st Battalion in France. As he describes the operations and events he indicates in the margin the date of the action he is writing about with the identity of the battalion involved; operations in other theatres have their own chapters. Appendices list, by name, Honours and Awards including Mention in Despatches, promotions for service in the field, summary of other rank casualties (deaths) in each battalion (officers are totalled together) and brief records of service.
More information on: History of the Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's) 1914-1919



History of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions 1881-1923

C.D. Bruce


The first two chapters in the book provide an historical outline of the raising of the 1st Battalion in 1702 and take its story through to 1923. The book recounts story of the 2nd Battalion on the Western Front, mainly by use of quotations from eyewitness accounts, letters, diaries and official documents supported by good maps. A good feature of this history is the recording by name of officers joining the battalion or leaving or becoming casualties, and the arrival of drafts with strengths.
More information on: History of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions 1881-1923



United States Naval Aviation 1910-1918

Noel C Shirley


United States Naval Aviation 1910-1918 for the first time provides a comprehensive study of the formation and initial deployment of naval aviation in the first world war. The book covers not only the subject of naval aircraft, but also describes the activities of the Navy in the field of lighter-than-air craft. Specific information is provided on each of the Naval Air Stations constructed and operated, both domestically as well as in Foreign Service during the War. Detailed discussion is also provided regarding the role of Marine Corps aviation during this time period.
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Brodick: Arran and the Great War 1914-1918

James Inglis


Account of war service of men and women from Brodrick, Isle of Arran and list of other Arran men on active service. This book begins with an account of the effect of the war on the island, especially preoccupation with the danger from U-boats threatening the communications and supply route with the Scottish mainland. The main part of the book consists of war service details of those who served, including nurses; some accounts are brief, others are much longer. There are separate headings for Nurses, Royal Navy and Merchant Navy, for regiments/corps, for Canadians and Australians and individuals are shown under the appropriate heading. At the end is list of names of other Arran men on active service
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Beneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers War 1914-1918

Peter Barton, Peter Doyle & Johan Vandewalle


Whilst the war raged across Flanders fields, an equally horrifying and sometimes more dangerous battle took place underground. "Beneath Flanders Fields" tells the story of the tunnellers' war, which still remains one of the most misunderstood, misrepresented and mystifying conflicts of the Great War. A wealth of personal testimonies reveal the engineering, technology and science behind how this most intense of battles was fought - and won. They speak of how the tunnellers lived a relentless existence in the depths of the battlefield for almost two and a half years, enduring physical and mental stresses that were often more extreme than their infantry counterparts. Their lives were reduced to a complex war of silence, tension and claustrophobia, leading up to the most dramatic mine offensive in history launched on 7 June 1917 at Messines Ridge. Yet, Messines was not the end of their story, which continued with the crafting of a whole underground world of headquarters, cookhouses and hos
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Underground Warfare 1914-1918

Simon Jones


Simon Jones's graphic history of underground warfare during the Great War uses personal reminiscences to convey the danger and suspense of this unconventional form of conflict. He describes how the underground soldiers of the opposing armies engaged in a ruthless fight for supremacy, covers the tunnelling methods they employed, and shows the increasingly lethal tactics they developed during the war in which military mining reached its apotheosis. He concentrates on the struggle for ascendancy by the British tunnelling companies on the Western Front. But his wide-ranging study also tells the story of the little known but fascinating subterranean battles fought in the French sectors of the Western Front and between the Austrians and the Italians in the Alps which have never been described before in English. Vivid personal testimony is combined with a lucid account of the technical challenges - and ever-present perils - of tunnelling in order to give an all-round insight into the extraord
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The Other Side of the Wire. Volume 1

Ralph J. Whitehead


"The Other Side of the Wire" brings to life a period long forgotten in the decades that have passed since the Great War ended in 1918. Until recently most books written on the Battle of the Somme concentrated almost exclusively on the British effort with only a brief mention of the period before 1 July 1916 and the German experience in the battle. Most simply ignore the nearly two years of warfare that preceded the momentous offensive. By focusing on one of the principal German formations involved in the Somme fighting, author Ralph Whitehead brings to life this little-known period, from the initial German advance on the Somme in September 1914 through the formation of the front that became so well known almost two years later. - Ralph Whitehead is a member of the Plugstreet Project Team.
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No Labour, No Battle: The Labour Corps in the First World War

John Starling & Ivor Lee


From 1917 British Soldiers who were unfit or too old for front line service were to serve unarmed and within the range of German guns for weeks or even months at a time undertaking labouring tasks. The vital, yet largely unreported role played by these brave soldiers was crucial to achieving victory in 1918. For this book John Starling and Ivor Lee have brought together extensive research from both primary and secondary sources. It traces how Military Labour developed from non-existent in 1914, to a Corps in November 1918 some 350,000 strong, supported by Dominion and foreign labour of more than a million men. The majority of the Labour Corps did not keep war diaries, therefore this work provides vital information for those wishing to acquire information about an ancestor who served in the Corps.
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Tea, Rum and Fags: Sustaining Tommy 1914-1918

Alan Weeks


It is said that 'an army marches on its stomach', but histories of the First World War usually concentrate on its political and military aspects. The gargantuan task of keeping the British Expeditionary Force fed and watered is often overlooked, yet without adequate provision the soldiers would never have been able to fight. Tommy couldn't get enough tea, rum or fags, yet his commanders sent him bully beef and dog biscuits. But it was amazing how 2 million men did not usually go short of nourishment, although parcels from home, canteens and estaminets had a lot to do with that. Incredibly, Tommy could be in a civilised town supping, beer, wine, egg and chips, and a few hours later making do with bully beef in a water-filled trench. Alan Weeks examines how the army got its food and drink and what it was like.
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The Steel of the DLI (2nd Bn 1914/18)

John Sheen


Sheen's history has all of the insight and detail we have come to expect of modern scholarship, drawing deeply on official, regimental and private records. With many excellent photographs, most of which will not have been seen before, and lacing the battalion's history with the stories of individual officers and men, he takes us through the whole war from the battalion's first searing experiences on the Aisne, right through to the honour of advancing into Germany as part of the army of occupation. In between, the 1915 nightmares of Hooge, the latter stages of the Somme, Hill 70, Cambrai and ceaseless engagement in 1918. The story also brings out how the nature of the battalion inevitably changed, from wholly regular through mostly volunteer to conscript, yet managed to maintain an ethos and professional air throughout.
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Machine-Guns and the Great War

Paul Cornish


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Messines 1917

Alexander Turner


Osprey Campaign book exploring the Battle of Messines. At 0310 hours on 7 June 1917, the pre-dawn gloom on the Western Front was shattered by the 'pillars of fire' - the rapid detonation of 19 huge mines, secreted in tunnels under the German lines and containing 450 tonnes of explosives. Admitted by the Germans to be a 'masterstroke', the devastating blasts caused 10,000 soldiers to later be posted simply as 'missing'. Launching a pre-planned attack into the carnage, supported by tanks and a devastating artillery barrage, the British took the strategic objective of Messines Ridge within hours. A rare example of innovation and success in the First World War, this book is a fresh and timely examination of a fascinating campaign.
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The Attack of the British Ninth Corps at Messines Ridge (1917)

The War Department


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Beneath Hill 60 [DVD]


BENEATH HILL 60 tells the extraordinary true story of Oliver Woodward, the legendary Australian metal scientist. In 1916, Woodward faced the most difficult decision, ultimately having to separate from his new young love for the deadly carnage of the Western Front. On treacherous territory, behind the German enemy lines, Woodward and his secret platoon of Australian tunnelers face a suicidal battle to defend a leaking, tunnel system. A tunnel packed with enough high explosives to change the course of the War.
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Artillery Operations of the Ninth British Corps at Messines, June 1917

Army War College (U.S.)


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Hill 60: Ypres (Battleground Europe)

Nigel Cave


The shell-ravaged landscape of Hill 60, some three miles south east of Ypres, conceals a labyrinth of tu nnels and underground workings. This book offers a guide to the memorials, cemeteries and museums at the site '
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New Zealand and the Great War: A Photographic Record of New Zealanders at War 1914-1918

Glyn Harper


They shall not grow old...In 1914, despite being forbidden, many a Kiwi soldier's kitbag included a portable camera, known as 'The Soldiers' Kodak'. In a major research project, Glyn Harper and the Queen Elizabeth II Army Memorial Museum have combined official war photographs with more informal images to produce a moving visual history. While primarily drawn from the Museum's collection, many photographs from private sources have been included. From more than 25,000 photographs, just over 800 have been selected - most of which have never been published. Chosen to depict each theatre of the 1914-18 war, including Gallipoli, Sinai-Palestine and the Western Front, poignant images from the home front are also included, along with graphic portraits of wounded soldiers, whose treatment marked the beginnings of modern plastic surgery. Despite the First World War being described as the most important and far-reaching political and military event of the twentieth century, pivotal in forging our
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Beneath Hill 60 [Paperback]

Will Davies


'Ten seconds, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one - fire! Down goes the firing switch. At first, nothing. Then from deep down there comes a low rumble, and it as if the world is spliting apart...' On 7th June 1917, nineteen massive mines exploded beneath Messines Ridge near Ypres. The largest man-made explosion in history up until that point shattered the landscape and smashed open the German lines. Ten thousand German soldiers died. Two of the mines - at Hill 60 and the Caterpillar - were fired by men of the 1st Australian Tunnelling Company, comprising miners and engineers rather than parade-ground soldiers. Drawing on the diaries of one of the key combatants, "Benealth Hill 60" tells the little-known, devastatingly brutal true story of this subterranean war waged beneath the Western Front - a stygian battle-ground where men drowned in viscous chalk, suffocated in the blue gray clay, choked on poisonous air or died in the darkness, caught up up in vicious hand-to-han
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Border Regiment in the Great War

Col. H. C. Wylly


Tightly written regimental history of the Border Regiment in the Great War, which blends the story of its 13 battalions in six theatres of war into one continuous narrative. lllustrated by 14 photographic plates and seven maps.
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Diary of 2/4th Battalion the Border Regiment, 1914-19


Reproduction of a book published before 1923
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Lander's War: The War Diaries of Lt. Charles Herbert Lander 10th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Charles Herbert Lander


Charles Lander, had to wait until the chest measurement was reduced before he could apply as a private soldier with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Upon his commission, Charles was to serve in the 10th Battalion which was a part of 57th Brigade, 19th (Western) Division. Read on, and let Charles take you into the tumultuous world of the Great War, where moments of comedy, low points and sheer terror combine; and wonder as to how humans could endure, go home and live again in everyday society. Lt. Charles Herbert Lander truly had the skill to pull back the curtains on the window of time; with his words, he will take you to the now quiet fields of France and Flanders, now transformed from the most dangerous places on Earth to their former rural peace. He tells us how it was and who were the players in the great game, as they appear and all too often disappear from these pages.
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Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front.

Edward Rowbotham


It is 1915 and the Great War has been raging for a year, when Edward Rowbotham, a coal miner from the Midlands, volunteers for Kitchener's Army. Drafted into the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps, he is sent to fight in places whose names will forever be associated with mud and blood and sacrifice: Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele. He is one of the 'lucky' ones, winning the Military Medal for bravery and surviving more than two-and-a-half years of the terrible slaughter that left nearly a million British soldiers dead by 1918 and wiped out all but six of his original company. He wrote these memoirs fifty years later, but found his memories of life in the trenches had not diminished at all. The sights and sounds of battle, the excitement, the terror, the extraordinary comradeship, are all vividly described as if they had happened to him only yesterday. Likely to be one of the last first-hand accounts to come to light, Mud, Blood and Bullets offers a rare perspective of the First World W
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Durham Pals: 18th, 19th, 20th and 22nd Battalions of the Durham Light Infantry in the Great War

John Sheen


The Durham Pals were the volunteer Geordie battalions of the Durham Light Infantry raised in the north-east in the Great War. The 18th Durhams had the proud distinction of being the first unit of Kitchener's New Armies to come under enemy fire before even leaving Blighty when German ships shelled Hartlepool in December 1914. The 19th were raised as Bantams ( men blow the minimum height requirement) ; the 20th (Wearside) hailed from Sunderland; while the 22nd was the last raised - and fought through the hard battles of 1918. After their baptism of fire while training in Hartlepool, the 18th were seriously blooded on July 1st 1916 as the battle of the Somme opened, when they fought in support of the Leeds and Bradford Pals. After fighting in the successful Messines offensive in June 1917 the 20th were sent to the Italian front; while the 19th distinguished themselves in Flanders during the final Allied advance of 1918. This book pay tribute to them all.
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World War I

S. L. A. Marshall


A "full-dress history of the war by one of our most distinguished military writers" (NEW YORK TIMES), WORLD WAR I takes us from the first shots in Sarajevo to the signing of the peace treaty in Versailles and through every bunker, foxhole, and minefield in between. General S.L.A. Marshall drew on his unique firsthand experience as a soldier and a lifetime of military service to pen this forthright, forward-thinking history of what people once believed would be the last great war. Newly introduced by the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, David M. Kennedy, WORLD WAR I is a classic example of unflinching military history that is certain to inform, enrich, and deepen our understanding of this great cataclysm.
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A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918

G. J. Meyer


The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed twenty million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today.
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Flying for France

James R. McConnell


This a fun aviation story detailing the day-to-day adventures of a young American pilot who volunteered to join the French air force at the beginning of World War I. There were several Americans who did this, as America was not directly involved in the war, and the French military assembled them all together in an Escadrille (squadron). The trials of day to day flight using Nieuport fabric and wood airplanes, fighting German Bosches and Fokkers, are all charmingly explored in this short, easy read.
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World War I

Simon Adams


Packed with photos on every double-page spread and dense with facts and snippets of analysis, this large-size volume in the Eyewitness series provides a quick, informative overview of WWI: how it started; who fought and why; the equipment used; what it was like in the trenches and at home; the horrific final cost. Even seasoned Web browsers accustomed to busy formats may sometimes feel bombarded by all the bits and pieces, especially when the tiny type is printed over colored pictures. It's the dramatic photos (many from London's Imperial War Museum) that will make readers pause and bring them close to the soldiers' experiences. Then there's John Singer Sargent's realistic painting Gassed, showing blinded soldiers led by their sighted colleagues toward a dressing station in northern France in 1918
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To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918

Adam Hochschild


World War I stands as one of history’s most senseless spasms of carnage, defying rational explanation. In a riveting, suspenseful narrative with haunting echoes for our own time, Adam Hochschild brings it to life as never before. He focuses on the long-ignored moral drama of the war’s critics, alongside its generals and heroes. Thrown in jail for their opposition to the war were Britain’s leading investigative journalist, a future winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, and an editor who, behind bars, published a newspaper for his fellow inmates on toilet paper. These critics were sometimes intimately connected to their enemy hawks: one of Britain’s most prominent women pacifist campaigners had a brother who was commander in chief on the Western Front. Two well-known sisters split so bitterly over the war that they ended up publishing newspapers that attacked each other.
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Hard as Nails: The Sportsmen's Battalion of World War One

Michael Foley


This is the history of the Sportsmen's Battalion, Royal Fusiliers 23rd service battalion, which consisted almost entirely of men from the world of sport or entertainment. The battalion was privately raised and took men up to the age of 45. The battalion included a champion boxer, cricketers, footballers, MPs and the author John Chessire. They were men who did not need to serve in the First World War but had an unquestioning sense of duty. The history is enhanced by the letters and drawings by John Chessire, giving a first-hand account of their experiences. A man from the upper classes, a writer, poet and artist, he chose to serve as a private so he could do his duty, even when it conflicted with his religious beliefs and love for his family. The book covers the battalion's beginnings in London and progression to Hornchurch, France and then Germany. It includes their time at Vimy Ridge, at the Somme and at the Battle for Deville Wood.
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In Flanders Fields: And Other Poems of the First World War

Brian Busby


a book that shows the reality of war through the poems of many soldiers who didn't return. Beautifully written.
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Poems of the Great War: 1914-1918

Several


Published to commemorate the eightieth anniversary of Armistice, this collection is intended to be an introduction to the great wealth of First World War Poetry. The sequence of poems is random - making it ideal for dipping into - and drawn from a number of sources, mixing both well-known and less familiar poetry. The work of 21 poets is represented: including Rupert Brooke, Robert Graves, Ivor Gurney, Thomas Hardy, Charlotte Mew, Alice Meynell, Wilfred Owen, Herbert Read, Isaac Rosenberg, Siegfried Sassoon and Edward Thomas
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Poetry of the First World War

Various


Packed full of analysis and interpretation, historical background, discussions and commentaries, York Notes will help you get right to the heart of the text you’re studying, whether it’s poetry, a play or a novel. You’ll learn all about the historical context of the piece; find detailed discussions of key passages and characters; learn interesting facts about the text; and discover structures, patterns and themes that you may never have known existed. In the Advanced Notes, specific sections on critical thinking, and advice on how to read critically yourself, enable you to engage with the text in new and different ways. Full glossaries, self-test questions and suggested reading lists will help you fully prepare for your exam, while internet links and references to film, TV, theatre and the arts combine to fully immerse you in your chosen text. York Notes offer an exciting and accessible key to your text, enabling you to develop your ideas and transform your studies!
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York Notes on Poetry of the First World War

Hana Sambrook


The York Notes series continues to be the leading range of GCSE and A-level study guides. If you are a GCSE student this will be invaluable for your coursework/exam preparation, as it covers all of the poems in the 'World War I' section of the AQA poetry anthology. Covering language, structure, form, style and context, amongst other useful exam information; the guide also offers a summary of each poem and some advice on how the poems can be compared. Essential book for students, and a competitive price on here.
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Out in the Dark: Poetry of the First World War in Context and with Basic Notes

David Roberts


This anthology, based on "Minds at War" - by same author - has been prepared for the general reader who requires less background information, and for students, including GCSE and A Level. One of mankind's greatest tragedies was the First World War. For over four years whole nations unleashed the full might of their new-found destructive powers. Poets played their part in this war as promoters of it, soldiers, victims and onlookers. Their stories and their responses to their experiences are deeply moving, and their work includes some of the greatest poetry of the 20th Century. Many of the poems in Out in the Dark are currently selected by exam boards. The 19th Century poems, examples of the culture of Empire and militarism, help to explain both the rush to war and the nature of the early poetry of the First World War - 140 poems in all.
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Anthem for Doomed Youth

Jon Stallworthy


This is an excellent introduction to the lives and work of twelve poets of WWI, many of whom were killed in action. The book was produced to accompany an exhibition at the Imperial War Museum and is illustrated with many photographs and original manuscripts. The famous are here - Owen and Sassoon- but there are also less well-known names - David Jones and Francis Ledwidge - whose work deserves recognition. I've read some of these poems many times, and I never fail to be moved by "Dulce et decorum est" (Owen), "Anthem for doomed youth" (Owen) and "When you see millions of the mouthless dead" (Sorley). The savagery and sarcasm of "The General" (Sassoon) and the grim humour of "Break of day" (Rosenberg), a meditation on a rat moving between the German and British lines, are also moving. Stallworthy tells the stories of their (mostly) brief lives sparingly, concentrating on the poetry and offering some interesting criticisms and insights. This poetry has influenced our imagery of the Great
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Journey's End

Robert Cedric Sherriff


Set in the First World War, Journey's End concerns a group of British officers on the front line and opens in a dugout in the trenches in France. Raleigh, a new eighteen-year-old officer fresh out of English public school, joins the besieged company of his friend and cricketing hero Stanhope, and finds him dramatically changed ... Laurence Olivier starred as Stanhope in the first performance of Journey's End in 1928; the play was an instant stage success and remains a remarkable anti-war classic.
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Goodbye to All That

Robert Graves


In 1929 Robert Graves went to live abroad permanently, vowing 'never to make England my home again'. This is his superb account of his life up until that 'bitter leave-taking': from his childhood and desperately unhappy school days at Charterhouse, to his time serving as a young officer in the First World War that was to haunt him throughout his life. It also contains memorable encounters with fellow writers and poets, including Siegfried Sassoon and Thomas Hardy, and covers his increasingly unhappy marriage to Nancy Nicholson. Goodbye to All That, with its vivid, harrowing descriptions of the Western Front, is a classic war document, and also has immense value as one of the most candid self-portraits of an artist ever written. About the Author Robert Ranke Graves (1895-1985) was a British poet, novelist, and critic. He is best known for the historical novel I, Claudius and the critical study of myth and poetry The White Goddess.
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A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918

G.J. Meyer


One only has to look at a few of today's "hotspots" (the Balkans and the Middle East) to realize that World War I's effects remain a determining factor in international relations. It may seem impossible to write an "intimate" account of such a global catastrophe, but Meyer has succeeded in doing just that: a masterful narrative history that eloquently conveys the sense of a civilization engaged in massive self-destruction, while its leaders, blinded by hubris, nationalism, or outright ignorance, led the charge. Although Meyer pays ample attention to the broad themes of causation and military strategies, he consistently reminds us that the war was a compilation of millions of individual tragedies. He captures the horror and futility of trench warfare, the slaughter at Gallipoli, and the genocide of Armenians as experienced by those who were there. Meyer also offers interesting and controversial insights into the motivations of many of the key participants. This is an outstanding survey
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The Beauty and the Sorrow: An Intimate History of the First World War

Peter Englund


In this masterly, highly original narrative history, Peter Englund takes a revelatory new approach to the history of World War I, magnifying its least examined, most stirring component: the experiences of the average man and woman—not only the tragedy and horror but also the absurdity and even, at times, the beauty. The twenty people from whose journals and letters Englund draws are from Belgium, Denmark, and France; Great Britain, Germany, and the Austro-Hungarian Empire; Italy, Australia, and New Zealand; Russia, Venezuela, and the United States. There is a young man in the British army infantry who had been considering emigrating until the war offered him its “grand promise of change” and a middle-aged French civil servant, a socialist and writer whose “faith simply crumbled” at the outbreak of war. There is a twelve-year-old German girl thrilled with the news of the army’s victories because it means that she and her classmates are allowed to shout and scream at school. There i
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The First World War


In a riveting narrative that puts diaries, letters and action reports to good use, British military historian Keegan (The Face of Battle, etc.) delivers a stunningly vivid history of the Great War. He is equally at easeAand equally generous and sympatheticAprobing the hearts and minds of lowly soldiers in the trenches or examining the thoughts and motivations of leaders (such as Joffre, Haig and Hindenburg) who directed the maelstrom. In the end, Keegan leaves us with a brilliant, panoramic portrait of an epic struggle that was at once noble and futile, world-shaking and pathetic. The war was unnecessary, Keegan writes, because the train of events that led to it could have been derailed at any time, "had prudence or common goodwill found a voice." And it was tragic, consigning 10 million to their graves, destroying "the benevolent and optimistic culture" of Europe and sowing the seeds of WWII. While Niall Ferguson's The Pity of War (Forecasts, Mar. 8) offers a revisionist, economic int
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A Coward If I Return, a Hero If I Fall: Stories of Irish Soldiers in World War I

Neil Richardson


IRELAND'S FORGOTTEN LEGACY In 1914-1918, two hundred thousand Irishmen from all religions and backgrounds went to war. At least thirty-five thousand never came home. Those that did were scarred for the rest of their lives. Many of these survivors found themselves abandoned and ostracised by their countrymen, their voices seldom heard. The book includes: * The Irish soldier firing the first shot * The first Victoria Cross * Leading the way at Gallipoli and the Somme * North and South fighting side by side at Messines Ridge * Ireland's flying aces * Brothers-in-arms -- heart-rending stories of family sacrifice * The lucky escapes of some; the tragic end of others * The homecoming -- why there was no hero's welcome
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The Complete Idiot's Guide to World War I

Alan Axelrod Ph.D.


For history buffs, students, and anyone interested in the 20th century, this book reveals why World War I began, explores the "guns of August," describes the horrors of trench warfare and the first uses of poison gas, and explains why the Americans were so slow to enter the war. From the eastern front to the west, from Gallipoli to the Marne, from the Lafayette Escadrillo to Lawrence of Arabia, the book tells the whole story of "the war to end all wars."
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The Eastern Front 1914 - 1920 (History of World War I)

Michael Neiberg David Jordan


Recreates the battles and campaigns that raged at The Eastern Front during World War I Updated for 2012 with a new foreward by Dennis Showalter The front in the East was much longer than in the West. The theatre of war was delimited by the Baltic Sea in the West and Moscow in the East, a distance of 1,200kms, and Saint Petersburg in the North and the Black Sea in the South, a distance of more than 1,600kms. While World War I on the Western Front developed into trench warfare, the battle lines on the Eastern Front were much more fluid; trenches never truly developed. The greater length of the front ensured that the density of soldiers in the line was lower so the line was easier to break. Once broken, the sparse communication networks made it difficult for the defender to rush reinforcements to the rupture in the line, to mount a counteroffensive and seal off a breakthrough. Also, the terrain in the Eastern European theatre was quite solid, often making it near impossible to construct a
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To the Last Man: A Novel of the First World War

Jeff Shaara


Moving on from the American Revolution and the Civil War, Shaara (The Glorious Cause, etc.) delivers an epic account of the American experience in WWI. As usual, he narrates from the perspective of actual historical figures, moving from the complexity of high-level politics and diplomacy to the romance of the air fight and the horrors of trench warfare. Gen. John J. "Black Jack" Pershing commands all American forces in France in 1917–1918 and must prepare his army for a new kind of war while resisting French and British efforts to absorb his troops into their depleted, worn-out units. Two aviators, American Raoul Lufbery and German Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron) fly primitive aircraft in an air war that introduces new ways to die. And Pvt. Roscoe Temple, U.S. Marine Corps, fights with rifle and bayonet in the mud and blood of Belleau Wood and the Argonne Forest. These men and a supporting cast of other real-life characters provide a gruesomely graphic portrayal of the brutality
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Wipers: A Soldier's Tale From the Great War

Jeff Simmons


The World War One battlefield that bulged out around Ypres, Belgium, was one of the most horrific killing grounds of the bloody, four-year conflict. Not familiar with the proper pronunciation of "Ypres," (EE-pruh), the Allied soldiers called the sector "Wipers." The Allies took thousands of casualties daily there from 1914 to 1918. Unable to break the German line, a plan was made to dig 5 miles of tunnels under No Man's Land, planting charges, and blowing up the enemy from below. This novel follows a British miner-turned-soldier and his unlikely companion: a mischievous, wisecracking soldier who was a magician in civilian life and joined the army under shady circumstances. Their struggle to survive is often tragic, yet often humorous. The story climaxes with the tunnel attack and the shocking aftermath. Ultimately, it shows war is not glorious; it ruins lives, even among those who survive.
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The Guns of August

Barbara W. Tuchman


Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Barbara Tuchman has brought to life again the people and events that led up to World War I. With attention to fascinating detail, and an intense knowledge of her subject and its characters, Ms. Tuchman reveals, for the first time, just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped but wasn't. A classic historical survey of a time and a people we all need to know more about, The Guns of August will not be forgotten.
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The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War

Hew Strachan


This illustrated history is an outstanding summary of current scholarship on the war that was supposed to end all wars. Nearly two dozen contributors write smart and accessible essays on a range of subjects, including the military strategies of the Allies and the Central Powers, the war at sea, economic mobilization, politics on the home front, and the peace settlement. The chapters are full of intelligent insights. John Morrow, writing on the air war, notes that fighter pilots became "the ultimate heroes of the First World War" because their feats of individual combat could be easily romanticized, in contrast to the mass slaughter taking place in the trenches below.
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The Myth of the Great War: A New Military History of World War I

John Mosier


Mosier (English, Loyola Univ.) offers a scathing indictment of the Allied military mindset that caused so many senseless deaths on the Western Front during the Great War. For example, Mosier argues that it took the slaughter of thousands of infantrymen before the British and French commands tried to use artillery as an effective offensive weapon. Even then, Allied artillery bombardments never matched their opponents' effective use of heavy-caliber howitzers. Mosier points out that from the very beginning the German General Staff attempted to minimize losses by making firepower central to its offensive tactics. Consequently, German casualties were half those of the Allies. Blind adherence to antiquated military doctrines is not a new criticism of Allied generalship, but Mosier's original scholarship does offer a fresh perspective on an old theme. Recommended for public and academic libraries with strong military history collections.
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Adventures of a Motorcycle Despatch Rider During the First World War

W.H.L. Watson


The Battle of Mons, The Battle of le Cateau, The Great Retreat, Over the Marne to the Aisne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Move to the North, Round la AssÉe, The Beginning of Winter 1914, St Jans Cappel, Behind the Lines
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The Marne, 1914: The Opening of World War I and the Battle That Changed the World

Holger H. Herwig


It is one of the essential events of military history, a cataclysmic encounter that prevented a quick German victory in World War I and changed the course of two wars and the world. Now, for the first time in a generation, here is a bold new account of the Battle of the Marne. A landmark work by a distinguished scholar, The Marne, 1914 gives, for the first time, all sides of the story. In remarkable detail, and with exclusive information based on newly unearthed documents, Holger H. Herwig superbly re-creates the dramatic battle, revealing how the German force was foiled and years of brutal trench warfare were made inevitable. Herwig brilliantly reinterprets Germany’s aggressive “Schlieffen Plan”–commonly considered militarism run amok–as a carefully crafted, years-in-the-making design to avoid a protracted war against superior coalitions. He also paints a new portrait of the run-up to the Marne: the Battle of the Frontiers, long thought a coherent assault but really a series of hap
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World War I: Contains a 16-Page Guide to WWI Battlefields and Memorials

H. P. Willmott


beautifully produced and illustrated, an everything you need to know compendium
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Murder At Zero Hour

Paul Westwood


Author's Note: The idea of a murder occurring during the middle of a war seemed like an interesting idea to pursue. I chose The Great War since it has a level of brutality that was unparalleled until later wars. Research for this novel was particularly dreadful since the war seemed so senseless. With that in mind, I had my character lose much, but still gain something in return for his sacrifices
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The War to End All Wars: World War I

Russell Freedman


Nonfiction master Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I. The tangled relationships and alliances of many nations, the introduction of modern weaponry, and top-level military decisions that resulted in thousands upon thousands of casualties all contributed to the "great war," which people hoped and believed would be the only conflict of its kind. In this clear and authoritative account, the author shows the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first. Numerous archival photographs give the often disturbing subject matter a moving visual counterpart. Includes source notes, a bibliography, and an index.
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LETTERS FROM VERDUN: Frontline Experiences of an American Volunteer in World War 1 France

Avery Wolfe


A beautifully written and fully illustrated experience of the Great War from a participant . . .Though the United States was late to enter the Great War, a number of idealistic young Americans wished to take part from the beginning. One of these was Avery Royce Wolf, a highly educated scion of a family in America's burgeoning industrial heartland.Volunteering as an ambulance driver with the French Army in the Verdun sector, Royce sent back a constant stream of highly detailed letters describing the experience of frontline combat, not excluding comments on strategy, the country he encountered, and the Allies' prospects for success. This treasure trove of brilliant letters, only recently discovered, is accompanied by several albums worth of rare, high-quality photos depicting aspects of the Great War in France never previously published. The book contains expert overviews to set the reader in Royce's time and place; however, the narrative is most gripping with his own day-to-day percepti
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New York Times Current History: The European War from the Beginning to March 1915, Vol 1, No. 2 Who Began the War, and Why?

Various


This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
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Eye-Deep in Hell: Trench Warfare in World War I

John Ellis


Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I. More than six million died there. In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique and terrifying world—the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death.
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Faces of World War I: The Great War in Words and Pictures

Max Arthur & Ian Hislop


This magnificent commemorative volume traces the tragedy of the Great War in words and pictures. Best-selling author Max Arthur brilliantly conveys not only the heroism, but also the universal horror, futility, absurdity and boredom of early 20th-century warfare. From the frontline troops and the daily dance with death, to the support lines, communications, enlistment, training, and propaganda, the story of the war is illustrated with over 200 images that have been handpicked from the world famous collection of the Imperial War Museum in London. Every aspect of the soldier's life is covered in this brilliant collection of images and eyewitness accounts that bring the Great War to life once more.
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Where Poppies Grow: A World War I Companion

Linda Granfield


When World War I began in 1914, no one knew that millions of young people would die in the agonizing years ahead. No one imagined the effect it would have on family life, or that whole villages would disappear, or that entire nations would be changed forever. They believed their sons and daughters, mothers and fathers would be home by Christmas. They were tragically mistaken. With photos, memorabilia, and anecdotes, Linda Granfield brings us face-to-face with people from all walks of life who risked everything for their country. These painstakingly-gathered bits and pieces are remnants of conflict on a scale never before witnessed. Hastily-penned letters, notes written in code, and prayers for deliverance form an eloquent portrait of humanity, and a startling comment on the devastation of war.
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Hell in the Holy Land: World War 1 in the Middle East

David R. Woodward


In the modern popular imagination, the British Army's campaign in the Middle East during World War I is considered somehow less brutal than the fighting on European battlefields. A romantic view of this conflict has been further encouraged by such films as Lawrence of Arabia and The Light Horsemen. In Hell in the Holy Land, David R. Woodward uses graphic eyewitness accounts from the diaries, letters, and memoirs of British soldiers who fought in that war to describe in rigorous detail the genuine experience of the fighting and dying in Egypt and Palestine. The massive flow of troops and equipment to Egypt eventually made that country host to the largest British military base outside of Britain and France. Though many soldiers found the atmosphere in Cairo exotic, the desert countryside made the fundamentals of fighting and troop maintenance extremely difficult. The intense heat frequently sickened soldiers, and unruly camels were the only practical means of transport across the soft sa
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The Pity Of War: Explaining World War I

Niall Ferguson


In The Pity of War, Niall Ferguson makes a simple and provocative argument: that the human atrocity known as the Great War was entirely England’s fault. Britain, according to Ferguson, entered into war based on naïve assumptions of German aims—and England’s entry into the war transformed a Continental conflict into a world war, which they then badly mishandled, necessitating American involvement. The war was not inevitable, Ferguson argues, but rather the result of the mistaken decisions of individuals who would later claim to have been in the grip of huge impersonal forces.That the war was wicked, horrific, inhuman,is memorialized in part by the poetry of men like Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, but also by cold statistics. More British soldiers were killed in the first day of the Battle of the Somme than Americans in the Vietnam War; indeed, the total British fatalities in that single battle—some 420,000—exceeds the entire American fatalities for both World Wars. And yet, as Ferg
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A Short History Of The Great War...

Albert Frederick Pollard


This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
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The First Day on the Somme 1 July 1916

Martin Middlebrook


On 1 July, 1916, a continous line of British soldiers climbed out from the trenches of the Somme into No Man's Land and began to walk slowly towards dug-in German troops armed with machine-guns and defended by thick barbed wire. By the end of that day, as old tactics were met by the reality of modern warfare, there had been more than 60,000 British casualties - a third of them fatalities. Martin Middlebrook's classic account of the blackest day in the history of the British army draws on official sources, local newspapers, autobiographies, novels and poems from the time. Most importantly, it also takes in the accounts of hundreds of survivors: normal men, many of them volunteers, who found themselves thrown into a scene of unparalleled tragedy and horror. Compelling and intensely moving, it describes the true events behind the sacrifice of a generation of young men - killed as much by the folly of their commanders as by the bullets of their enemies.
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Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce

Stanley Weintraub


In the early months of World War I, on Christmas Eve, men on both sides of the trenches laid down their arms and joined in a spontaneous celebration. Despite orders to continue shooting, the unofficial truce spread across the front lines. Even the participants found what they were doing incredible: Germans placed candlelit Christmas trees on trench parapets, warring soldiers sang carols, and men on both sides shared food parcels from home. They climbed from the trenches to meet in "No Man's Land" where they buried the dead, exchanged gifts, ate and drank together, and even played soccer. Throughout his narrative, Stanley Weintraub uses the stories of the men who were there, as well as their letters and diaries, to illuminate the fragile truce and bring to life this extraordinary moment in time.
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Stolen Voices: Young People's War Diaries, from World War I to Iraq

Zlata Filipovic


Zlata Filipovic’s diary of her harrowing war experiences in the Balkans, published in 1993, made her a globally recognized spokesperson for children affected by military conflict. In Stolen Voices, she and co-editor Melanie Challenger have gathered fifteen diaries of young people coping with war, from World War I to the struggle in Iraq that continues today. Profoundly affecting testimonies of shattered youth and the gritty particulars of war in the tradition of Anne Frank, this extraordinary collection— the first of its kind—is sure to leave a lasting impression on young and old readers alike.
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Truce: The Day the Soldiers Stopped Fighting

Jim Murphy


Two-time Newbery Honor Book author Jim Murphy writes a stunning nonfiction masterpiece about a Christmas miracle on the Western Front during World War I. On July 29th 1914, the world’s peace was shattered as the artillery of the Austria-Hungary Empire began shelling the troops of the country to its south. What followed was like a row of falling dominoes as one European country after another rushed into war. Soon most of Europe was fighting in this calamitous war that could have been avoided. This was, of course, the First World War. But who could have guessed that on December 25 the troops would openly defy their commanding officers by stopping the fighting and having a spontaneous celebration of Christmas with their "enemies"?
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Causes of World War I

Stewart Ross


The disputes that led to the outbreak of World War I were festering for decades before the first shots were fired. This book examines the long term causes, such as the system of alliances and the arms race, as well as examining the lead up to Franz Ferdinand's assassination which was the trigger for war to break out over Europe. It also provides important insights into the prevailing attitudes and key personalities that led to this devastating war. This book is a clear, well-written, authoritative text packed with useful information, fascinating, thought-provoking photographs, paintings, posters, cartoons and maps. It has a wealth of panels that give biographical details of the major personalities, statistical information, eye-witness accounts and poetic responses to the war. The book ends with a comprehensive date list, glossary and a list of further resources.
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Between the Sword and the Wall: a novel of World War I

Jeff Shaara


Jeff Shaara has enthralled readers with his New York Times bestselling novels set during the Civil War and the American Revolution. Now the acclaimed author turns to World War I, bringing to life the sweeping, emotional story of the war that devastated a generation and established America as a world power. Spring 1916: the horror of a stalemate on Europe’s western front. France and Great Britain are on one side of the barbed wire, a fierce German army is on the other. Shaara opens the window onto the otherworldly tableau of trench warfare as seen through the eyes of a typical British soldier who experiences the bizarre and the horrible–a “Tommy” whose innocent youth is cast into the hell of a terrifying war. In the skies, meanwhile, technology has provided a devastating new tool, the aeroplane, and with it a different kind of hero emerges–the flying ace. Soaring high above the chaos on the ground, these solitary knights duel in the splendor and terror of the skies, their courage
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Between the Sword and the Wall: a novel of World War I

Thomas De Angelo


a novel set in 1914-15 during a period in World War I when it seemed the fighting would never end. From the first pages the author brings the WWI era to life and the reader feels everything that an eyewitness must have felt. One begins to understand the struggles of allied soldiers trapped in occupied Belgium, and the sacrifices some people made in helping them escape to Holland and freedom.
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Angels in the Gloom: A Novel (World War I)

Anne Perry


With this latest entry in a bestselling series that evokes all the passion and heroism of history’s most heartbreaking conflict–the war that was meant to end all wars–Anne Perry adds new luster to her worldwide reputation. Angels in the Gloom is an intense saga of love, hate, obsession, and murder that features an honorable English family–brothers Joseph and Matthew Reavley and their sisters, Judith and Hannah. In March 1916, Joseph, a chaplain at the front, and Judith, an ambulance driver, are fighting not only the Germans but the bitter cold and the appalling casualties at Ypres. Scarcely less at risk, Matthew, an officer in England’s Secret Intelligence Service, fights the war covertly from London. Only Hannah, living with her children in the family home in tranquil Cambridgeshire, seems safe. Appearances, however, are deceiving. By the time Joseph returns home to Cambridgeshire, rumors of spies and traitors are rampant. And when the savagely brutalized body of a weapons sc
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Til the Boys Come Home: A World War I Novel

Jerry Borrowman


A gripping tale that brings to life the meaning of freedom and patriotism and how the now little-appreciated Great War engulfed the lives of young Americans. A valuable addition to LDS literature
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Shoulder the Sky: A Novel

Anne Perry


In the firmament of great historical novelists, Anne Perry is a star of the greatest magnitude. First there were her acclaimed Victorian mysteries, sparkling with passion and suspense. Now readers have embraced this bestselling new series of World War I novels–which juxtapose the tranquil life of the English countryside with the horrors of war. By April of 1915, as chaplain Joseph Reavley tends to the soldiers in his care, the nightmare of trench warfare is impartially cutting down England’s youth. On one of his rescue forays into no-man’s-land, Joseph finds the body of an arrogant war correspondent, Eldon Prentice. A nephew of the respected General Owen Cullingford, Prentice was despised for his prying attempts to elicit facts that would turn public opinion against the war. Most troublesome to Joseph, Prentice has been killed not by German fire but, apparently, by one of his own compatriots. What Englishman hated Prentice enough to kill him? Joseph is afraid he may know, and his si
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No Graves As Yet: A Novel

Anne Perry


Through Anne Perry’s magnificent Victorian novels, millions of readers have enjoyed the pleasures and intrigue of a bygone age. Now, with the debut of an extraordinary new series, this New York Times bestselling author sweeps us into the golden summer of 1914, a time of brief enchantment when English men and women basked in the security of wealth and power, even as the last weeks of their privileged world were swiftly passing. Theirs was a peace that led to war. On a sunny afternoon in late June, Cambridge professor Joseph Reavley is summoned from a student cricket match to learn that his parents have died in an automobile crash. Joseph’s brother, Matthew, as officer in the Intelligence Service, reveals that their father had been en route to London to turn over to him a mysterious secret document—allegedly with the power to disgrace England forever and destroy the civilized world. A paper so damning that Joseph and Matthew dared mention it only to their restless younger sister.
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At Some Disputed Barricade: A Novel (World War I)

Anne Perry


Anne Perry’s gift for illuminating the heart’s deepest secrets shines through in her bestselling series of World War I novels. With compelling immediacy, she depicts the struggles of men and women torn by their convictions and challenged by the perils of war. July 1917. Joseph Reavley, a chaplain, and his sister, Judith, an ambulance driver, are bone-weary as they approach the fourth year of the conflict; the peace of the English countryside seems a world away. On the Western Front, the Battle of Passchendaele has begun, and among the many fatalities from Joseph’s regiment is the trusted commanding officer, who is replaced by a young major whose pompous incompetence virtually guarantees that many good soldiers will die needlessly. But soon he, too, is dead–killed by his own men. Although Joseph would like to turn a blind eye, he knows that he must not. Judith, however, anguished at the prospect of courts-martial and executions for the twelve men arrested for the crime, has no such inh
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Crossing Stones

Helen Frost


Grade 6–10—The children of the Norman and Jorgensen families have grown up together, with their family farms located on either side of Crabapple Creek. In 1917, the outbreak of World War I shatters their idyllic lives: strong-willed Muriel opposes it, but the two young men, Frank and her brother, Ollie, enlist and are soon sent overseas. Muriel's lively personality comes alive in free-verse poems that roam across the page like the free-flowing waters of the creek. "My mind sets off at a gallop/down that twisty road, flashes by 'Young Lady,'/hears the accusation in it—as if it's/a crime just being young, and 'lady'/is what anyone can see I'll never be/…." The poems of Ollie and friend Emma are written in "cupped-hand" sonnets; their rounded shapes resemble the crossing stones of the creek and record their growing love. While the young men find themselves amidst the horrors of trench warfare, their families attempt to cope with their absence. Muriel travels to Washington, DC, to be with
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War Horse

Michael Morpurgo


In 1914, Joey, a beautiful bay-red foal with a distinctive cross on his nose, is sold to the army and thrust into the midst of the war on the Western Front. With his officer, he charges toward the enemy, witnessing the horror of the battles in France. But even in the desolation of the trenches, Joey's courage touches the soldiers around him and he is able to find warmth and hope. But his heart aches for Albert, the farmer's son he left behind. Will he ever see his true master again? Made into a movie 2012
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An Ice-Cream War: A Novel

William Boyd


"Boyd has more than fulfilled the bright promise of [his] first novel. . . . He is capable not only of some very funny satire but also of seriousness and compassion." --Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times 1914. In a hotel room in German East Africa, American farmer Walter Smith dreams of Theodore Roosevelt. As he sleeps, a railway passenger swats at flies, regretting her decision to return to the Dark Continent--and to her husband. On a faraway English riverbank, a jealous Felix Cobb watches his brother swim, and curses his sister-in-law-to-be. And in the background of the world's daily chatter: rumors of an Anglo-German conflict, the likes of which no one has ever seen. In An Ice-Cream War, William Boyd brilliantly evokes the private dramas of a generation upswept by the winds of war. After his German neighbor burns his crops--with an apology and a smile--Walter Smith takes up arms on behalf of Great Britain. And when Felix's brother marches off to defend British East Africa,
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World War I (Chronicle of America's Wars)

Ruth Tenzer Feldman


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The Great War and Modern Memory

Paul Fussell


The year 2000 marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of The Great War and Modern Memory, winner of the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and recently named by the Modern Library one of the twentieth century's 100 Best Non-Fiction Books. Fussell's landmark study of WWI remains as original and gripping today as ever before: a literate, literary, and illuminating account of the Great War, the one that changed a generation, ushered in the modern era, and revolutionized how we see the world. Exploring the work of Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Edmund Blunden, David Jones, Isaac Rosenberg, and Wilfred Owen, Fussell supplies contexts, both actual and literary, for those writers who most effectively memorialized WWI as an historical experience with conspicuous imaginative and artistic meaning. For this special edition, the author has prepared a new afterword and a suggested further reading list. As this classic work draws upon several disciplines
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Storm of Steel

Ernst Jünger


A memoir of astonishing power, savagery, and ashen lyricism, Storm of Steel illuminates not only the horrors but also the fascination of total war, seen through the eyes of an ordinary German soldier. Young, tough, patriotic, but also disturbingly self-aware, Jünger exulted in the Great War, which he saw not just as a great national conflict but—more importantly—as a unique personal struggle. Leading raiding parties, defending trenches against murderous British incursions, simply enduring as shells tore his comrades apart, Jünger kept testing himself, braced for the death that will mark his failure. Published shortly after the war’s end, Storm of Steel was a worldwide bestseller and can now be rediscovered through Michael Hofmann’s brilliant new translation.
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Rites of Spring : The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age

Modris Eksteins


Dazzling in its originality, Rites of Spring probes the origins, impact, and aftermath of World War I, from the premiere of Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring in 1913 to the death of Hitler in 1945. Recognizing that “The Great War was the psychological turning point . . . for modernism as a whole,” author Modris Eksteins examines the lives of ordinary people, works of modern literature, and pivotal historical events to redefine the way we look at our past and toward our future.
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The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry (Penguin Classics)

George Walter


Unrivaled in its range and intensity, the poetry of World War I continues to have a powerful effect on readers. This newly edited anthology reflects the diverse experiences of those who lived through the war, bringing together the words of poets, soldiers, and civilians affected by the conflict. Here are famous verses by Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen; poetry by women writing from the home front; and the anonymous lyrics of soldiers' songs. Arranged thematically, the selections take the reader through the war's stages, from conscription to its aftermath, and offer a blend of voices that is both unique and profoundly moving.
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World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon, Rosenberg and Others (Unabridged)

Candace Ward


Rich selection of powerful, moving verse includes Brooke's "The Soldier," Owen's "Anthem for Doomed Youth," "In the Pink" by Sassoon, "In Flanders Fields" by Lieut. Col. McCrae, Thomas Hardy's "In Time of the Breaking of Nations," many more by Kipling, de la Mare, Bridges, others
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Regeneration

Pat Barker


In 1917 Siegfried Sasson, noted poet and decorated war hero, publicly refused to continue serving as a British officer in World War I. His reason: the war was a senseless slaughter. He was officially classified "mentally unsound" and sent to Craiglockhart War Hospital. There a brilliant phsychiatrist, Dr. William Rivers, set about restoring Sassoon's "sanity" and sending him back to the trenches. This novel tells what happened as only a novel can. It is a war saga in which not a shot is fired. It is a story of a battle for a man's mind in which only the reader can decide who is the victor, who the vanquished, and who the victim. It is one of the most amazing feats of fiction of our time.
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14-18: Understanding the Great War

Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau


With this brilliantly innovative book, Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau and Annette Becker have shown that the Great War was the matrix on which all subsequent disasters of the twentieth century were formed. Three elements of the conflict, all too often neglected or denied, are identified as those that must be grasped if we are to understand the war: First, what inspired its unprecedented physical brutality, and what were the effects of tolerating such violence? Second, how did citizens of the belligerent states come to be driven by vehement nationalistic and racist impulses? Third, how did the tens of millions bereaved by the war come to terms with the agonizing pain? With its strikingly original interpretative strength and its wealth of compelling documentary evidence drawn from all sides in the conflict, 14-18: Understanding the Great War has quickly established itself as a classic in the history of modern warfare.
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The Price of Glory: Verdun 1916

Sir Alistair Horne


The battle of Verdun lasted ten months. It was a battle in which at least 700,000 men fell, along a front of fifteen miles. Its aim was less to defeat the enemy than bleed him to death and a battleground whose once fertile terrain is even now a haunted wilderness. Alistair Horne's classic work, continuously in print for over fifty years, is a profoundly moving, sympathetic study of the battle and the men who fought there. It shows that Verdun is a key to understanding the First World War to the minds of those who waged it, the traditions that bound them and the world that gave them the opportunity.
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Aircraft of World War I, 1914-1918 (Essential Aircraft Identification Guide)

Jack Herris


Illustrated with detailed artworks of combat aircraft and their markings, 'The Essential Aircraft Identification Guide: Aircraft of WWI' is a comprehensive study of the aircraft that fought in the Great War of 1914-18. Arranged chronologically by theater of war and campaign, this book offers a complete organizational breakdown of the units on all the fronts, including the Eastern and Italian Fronts. Each campaign includes a compact history of the role and impact of aircraft on the course of the conflict, as well as orders of battle, lists of commanders and campaign aces such as Manfred von Richtofen, Eddie Rickenbacker, Albert Ball and many more.Every type of aircraft is featured, including the numerous variations and types of well-known models, such as the Fokker Dr.I, the Sopwith Camel and the SPAD SVII, through to lesser-known aircraft, such as the Rumpler C.1, and the Amstrong Whitworth FK8. Each aircraft profile is accompanied by exhaustive specifications, as well as details of in
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Albatros Aces of World War 1 Part 2 (Aircraft of the Aces) (v. 2)

Greg Vanwyngarden


Nearly every German ace who flew before the summer of 1918 scored victories in Albatros fighters, whose introduction coincided with the development of the famous and highly successful Jagdstaffeln, the first true German fighter formations, which became a critical German air tactic and helped to wrest back air superiority from the Allies. After wreaking havoc in the skies over Arras the Albatros was eventually outclassed by succeeding generations of Allied aircraft, but still remained the most numerous and ubiquitous of all German fighters in World War I, with Albatros biplanes contributing almost two-thirds of the German fighters at the front during the Spring Offensive of 1918. This book, with its 32 color profiles, charts the unique markings and design of one of the most menacingly beautiful fighters of the war. Featuring famous and unsung aces, a multitude of first-hand accounts and original photographs, this book offers a fresh view into the experiences of the German pilots who
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Italian Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Paolo Varriale


The Italian aces of World War 1 have gone down in history as the irrefutable masters of the skies in the battle against their Austro-Hungarian enemies. In this often forgotten theater of warfare these remarkable pilots gave the Italian forces an undisputed air superiority and left an enduring legacy as extraordinary men. Having interviewed the descendants of almost every Italian ace from the Great War, Paolo Varriale uncovers these fighters' incredible and sometimes tragic histories. Years of painstaking research has culminated in this truly groundbreaking study which brings to life the exploits of such famous aces as Baracca, Ruffo and Piccio, and the lesser known Riva, Sabelli and Nardini. Letters, diaries and unpublished photographs shed light on previously unknown personal and unit insignia, exposing many myths and making this a commanding addition to the aviation history of World War 1.
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Pfalz Scout Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Greg Vanwyngarden


The Pfalz Flugzeug Werke, located at Speyer am Rhein in Bavaria, was the third in the great triumvirate (along with Fokker and Albatros) of German fighter manufacturers in the Great War. When World War I broke out in 1914, Pfalz initially produced copies of the Morane-Saulnier parasol monoplanes for the German air service. With the advent of the famed Fokker Eindeckers with their synchronized machine guns, Pfalz entered the fighter market with the Pfalz E.I and its successors, all monoplanes which were similarly armed. Though never as as numerous as the Albatros or Fokker designs, the D III/IIIa was flown in combat by many well-known aces: Werner Voss, Carl Degelow, Erich Löwenhardt, and the balloon buster Fritz von Röth, among others. This book examines the little-known aircraft flown by these incredible men.
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Sopwith Pup Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


The Sopwith Pup was the forerunner of the hugely successful Sopwith Camel, which duly became the most successful fighter of World War 1. The first proper British fighting scout, the first Pups – the Royal Naval Air Service – arrived on the Western Front in 1916. Although regarded as a ‘nice’ aeroplane to fly, pilots who used it in combat gained much success during the first half of 1917. The Royal Flying Corps also used the Pup from January 1917 onwards, with the final combats with the machine occurring in December of that year. This book describes the combat careers of the successful Pup aces, how they flew and how they fought.
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Fokker DVII Aces of World War 1 Part 2 (Aircraft of the Aces 63)

Norman Franks


Volume 53 in this series covered Fokker D VII aces from the four elite Jagdgeschwadern of the German army, and this follow-on volume charts the story of the many aces who flew the famed fighter in other units committed to combat in the final months of World War 1. D VII operations covered the entire Western Front, from the North Sea to the Swiss border. In the latter half of 1918 the Fokker was not only the mainstay of the army Jagdstaffeln, but also the most potent fighter flown by home defence Kests and the pilots of the German navy in Flanders. The D VII easily proved the equal of the many British, French, Belgian and American aircraft it met in combat, and served in such roles as day bomber interceptor, 'balloon buster' and nightfighter. Though handicapped by a lack of fuel and other supplies as the German war machine fell apart, aces such as Sachsenberg, Degelow and Rumey utilised the D VII to rack up impressive scores against consistently superior odds.
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Pusher Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


The quest for an effective fighter airplane to achieve air superiority during World War 1 resulted in a series of pusher fighter planes, designed with the engine at the rear and the machine gun at the front. These ungainly, heavy looking fighters did surprisingly well and they were able to hold their own against their German counterparts - including the Fokker Eindeckers with their synchronized machine guns - until 1917. By then, however, the drag-producing design rendered the pusher fighter unable to match the performance of tractor-engined machines. This is the story of the unusual pusher and its many aces, including Lanoe Hawker VC, who formed and led Britain's first fighter squadron before dying in a ten-minute duel with Manfred von Richtofen, American 'cowboy' ace Frederick Libby, third-ranking French ace Charles Nungesser and the aggressive Belgian ace Fernand Jacquet. Packed with colorful artwork of a variety of pusher designs, paint schemes, and camouflage from many different n
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Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.
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Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War 1

Anonymous


Aircraft of World War 1
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Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War 1

Anonymous


Aircraft of World War 1
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British and Empire Aces of World War I (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 45)

Christopher Shores


"Perhaps the most useful section is Chapter Five, a dispassionate evaluation of the British victory credit system and how it evolved during the war. The final chapter includes short bios of more than 50 notable pilots, with due attention to the Bishop-Mannock controversy. Nearly 100 photos are augmented by 36 color profiles depicting a dozen aircraft types, emphasizing SE-5s, SPADs, and Nieuports. The appendices are excellent, containing more information than many Osprey titles. Five stars." -Barrett Tillman, Aerodrome From the Publisher Osprey's Aircraft of the Aces series combines full colour artwork, the best archival contemporary photography, and first hand accounts from aces to bring history's greatest airborne conflicts to life. See all Editorial Reviews
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Sopwith Triplane Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


The inspiration behind the iconic Fokker Dr I, Sopwith's Triplane was built as a replacement for the company's hugely successful, and much loved, Pup. Thanks to its massive wing area, the revolutionary Triplane boasted an unmatched rate of climb and greatly improved manoeuvrability. Indeed, when the type made its combat debut in late 1916, the Triplane could easily out-fight any other aircraft operated by either side. Used exclusively by the Royal Naval Air Service and the French Navy, theTriplane had a far greater impact on the aerial war over the Western Front than its meagre production numbers really deserved. Pilots such as Ray Collishaw, Bob Little and Roderic Dallas all enjoyed success in the bloody struggle for aerial supremacy over the Western Front in 1917. The first volume in print devoted exclusively to Triplane aces, this book includes numerous first-hand accounts, detailed appendices, more than 90 rare photographs and over 40 all-new colour profiles and planforms.
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Naval Aces of World War 1 part 2 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


Part 2 of Naval Aces looks at the many flying Naval heroes who flew alongside or against those of the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). While the RNAS operated its own formidable arsenal of Nieuport and Sopwith scouts over the Flanders coast, the German navy countered with its own Land Feld Jagdstaffeln and Seefront Staffeln. In addition, German floatplane units, most notably at Zeebrugge, produced at least three aces of their own at the expense of British flying boats, airships and other patrol craft. Unique to World War 1 was the use of flying boats as fighters in combat, which figured at least partially in the scores of Russian aces Aleksandr de Seversky and Mikhail Safanov. Austrian ace Gottfried Banfield scored all nine of his victories in flying boats and Friedrich Lang claimed two of his total of five in one. The best flying boat fighter, however, was Italy's Macchi M 5, flown by three aces and also the mount of Charles H Hammann, the first American to earn the Medal of Honor in a
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Dolphin and Snipe Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


This book focuses on the combat careers of the last of the famous Sopwith fighters to enter service during World War 1, the Dolphin and the Snipe, both of which were built on the strong scouting heritage of the Pup and Camel. The Dolphin featured the unique negative-staggered biplane wing arrangement, which provided the pilot with the best possible tactical view forward for seeking out his enemy. Used extensively on the Western Front, the Dolphin proved very effective in combat, with a substantial number of British aces scoring kills with the fighter. The Snipe was built as the successor of the highly successful Camel, and entered service with the fledgling Royal Air Force in the summer of 1918. Although seeing just a few months of action before the Armistice, the Snipe nevertheless proved its superiority over virtually all other fighters.
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Bristol F2 Fighter Aces of World War I (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


This is the history of the best Allied fighter-destroyer of World War 1 and the pilots who flew it. Nicknamed "Biff" by the pilots, the Bristol F2 Fighter enjoyed extraordinary success over the Western Front in the final 18 months of the war. However, it had an inauspicious debut, as an entire flight of F2As was wiped out by von Richthofen's Jasta 11. A new improved F2B was soon delivered to the front which functioned in an entirely different manner. The crews operated the plane not as a standard two-seater, but as a single-seat with a "sting in the tail" in the form of a rear gunner with a Lewis machine gun. Numerous ace teams earned the "Biff" grudging respect from its German opponents. This book charts the development of the plane from its unpromising beginnings to the revised model operating with a new kind of tactics. Moreover, the numerous first-hand accounts and combat reports give a fascinating insight into the experiences of the pilots themselves.
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Austro Hungarian Aces of World War I (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 46)

Chris Chant


Starting the war with only 35 aircraft, Austro-Hungarian industry went on to produce only moderate numbers of poor quality aircraft. The fliers of the Austro-Hungarian Empire operating on the Serbian and Russian fronts were fortunate at first, finding themselves faced by small numbers of aircraft yet more obsolescent than their own. Serbia fell in 1915, but when Italy declared war the Austro-Hungarians were still faced with a two-front war – a static front against Italy, and a far more fluid one against Russia. Austro-Hungarian fighter pilots performed bravely and often very effectively under extremely difficult geographic, climatic and operational conditions.
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French Aircraft Of The First World War

James Davilla


This is the full story behind some of the most important Allied aircraft of WWI. More than 950 rare photos and 25 pages of color plates document all 400 French planes that were the mainstay of Allied air power. Three-view drawings in standard scales (1/48 and 1/72) are perfect for modelers and artists. Includes operational details and orders of battle.
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Sopwith Camel Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


Responsible for destroying 1294 enemy aircraft between June 1917 and November 1918, the Camel was the most successful fighting scout employed by either side in terms of the sheer number of victories that it scored. The Camel was renowned for its sensitivity and need for skill and experience, and casualties amongst pilots undergoing training on the type were very high. More than 5490 examples were constructed, and this book covers its combat use on the Western Front, in Palestine, on the Italian front, in the Home Defence role in the UK and in Russia.
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Aircraft of World War I

John Hamilton


Age Level: 10 and up | Grade Level: 5 and up
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Pfalz Aircraft of World War I (Great War Aircraft in Profile, Volume 4)

Jack Herris


This book details every Pfalz design, from the early two seaters and prototypes through the classic D.III, D.VIII and D.XIII fighters that saw combat on the Western Front. It features more than 320 never-published photos, many of operational aircraft and their markings, plus a lavish, 18-page color section highlighting 62 aircraft, many of which have never been portrayed in color, and excellent five-view scale drawings of 15 Pfalz designs to standard modelers' scales of 1/48 a
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Nieuport Aces of World War I (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 33)

Norman Franks


The French Nieuport company provided the Allied air forces with the first true fighter scout of World War 1 in the shape of the diminutive XI of 1915. Based on the Bebe racer, built for the abandoned Gordon-Bennett Trophy of the previous year, the aircraft utilised a sesquiplane (lower wing much smaller than the upper wing) arrangement which gave the XI extreme manoeuvrability. It was the only scout respected by the all-conquering German Fokker E-series of 1915-16, and was flown by French, British, Russian, Belgian and Italian aces. The XI was replaced from May 1916 onwards by the bigger and more powerful XVII. which proved to be one of the best fighters of World War 1.
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Fokker V5/DR.1: (Schiffer Military History)

Achim Sven Engels & Wolfgang Schuster


This famed tri-winged World War I German aircraft was flown by Manfred von Richthofen, and was as legendary then as it is now. Detailed text and photographs explain development, technical aspects, and operations.
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Flying for the Air Service: The Hughes Brothers in World War I

David K. Vaughan


Flying for the Air Service provides a realistic picture of the typical flying experiences of the pilots who flew for the fledgling American Air Service during World War I. The narrative describes two brothers from Boston, George and Gerard Hughes, as they progress from apprentice pilots to flight instructors and combat pilots. After completing their pilot training program together, both were assigned as instructors. Then George was sent to France with the 12th Aero Squadrom, where he flew two-place observation aircraft over the front lines. Gerard, meanwhile, remained in America, instructing students in Texas. Eventually Gerard joined his brother's squadron in France as the war ended. Through the detailed letters and narrative comments of these two pilots, we can see clearly the hazards and challenges that were faced by those who flew in the early years of American aviation.
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British Aviation Squadron Markings of World War I: RFC - RAF - RNAS

Les Rogers


Years in the making, this book covers the wide variety of markings used by British aviation units in World War I. Organized numerically by squadron number the book includes both textual and photographic examples for nearly all RFC, RAF, and RNAS squadrons. Many of the photographs are published here for the first time, and the color profiles offer a representative selection of units, aircraft, and color schemes. A classic book.
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SE 5/5a Aces of World War I (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


The SE 5/5a British single-seat aircraft was one of the major fighting scouts of the last 18 months of the war in France during World War I and was a true workhorse of the Royal Flying Corps, handling fighter-versus-fighter actions, combating the high-flying German photo-reconnaissance planes as well as balloons. A total of five SE 5/5a pilots, including the legendary Albert Ball, received the Victoria Cross, Britain's highest award for gallantry. A detailed account of the SE 5/5a, this title covers the development of the machine and its first tentative initiation into combat on the Western Front until it grew in stature to become a machine feared by the German Air Service. Packed with first-hand accounts and combat reports, this is a thrilling insight into the dangerous dogfights and fearless actions of the pilots who flew the SE 5/5a, bringing to life the deadly exploits of these "knights of the air" as they dueled for dominance over the Western Front.
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SE 5/5a Aces of World War I (Aircraft of the Aces)

Norman Franks


The SE 5/5a British single-seat aircraft was one of the major fighting scouts of the last 18 months of the war in France during World War I and was a true workhorse of the Royal Flying Corps, handling fighter-versus-fighter actions, combating the high-flying German photo-reconnaissance planes as well as balloons. A total of five SE 5/5a pilots, including the legendary Albert Ball, received the Victoria Cross, Britain's highest award for gallantry. A detailed account of the SE 5/5a, this title covers the development of the machine and its first tentative initiation into combat on the Western Front until it grew in stature to become a machine feared by the German Air Service. Packed with first-hand accounts and combat reports, this is a thrilling insight into the dangerous dogfights and fearless actions of the pilots who flew the SE 5/5a, bringing to life the deadly exploits of these "knights of the air" as they dueled for dominance over the Western Front.
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Naval Aces of World War 1 Part I (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


Though understandably overshadowed by their army colleagues, naval aviators played a significant role in World War 1, including some noteworthy contributions of fighter aviation. At a time when the Royal Flying Corps was struggling to match the 'Fokker Scourge' of 1915-16, the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was first to use Sopwith's excellent line of scouts, such as the Pup, Triplane and Camel. Some RNAS pilots such as Raymond Collishaw, Robert A Little and Roderick Stanley Dallas rated among the most successful in the British Commonwealth. Their ranks also included David Ingalls, the only US Navy pilot to 'make ace' with eight victories in Camels while with No 213 Sqn RAF. The Germans, too, formed Marine Feld Jagdstaffeln to defend the northern coast of Flanders, and also produced a number of aces, led by Gotthard Sachsenberg and Theo Osterkamp. Besides these land fighters, the Germans produced at least two floatplane aces. Unique to World War 1 was the use of flying boats as fighter
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War Bird Ace: The Great War Exploits of Capt. Field E. Kindley (C. A. Brannen Series)

Dr. Jack Stokes Ballard Ph.D.


Capt. Field E. Kindley, with the famous Eddie Rickenbacker, was one of America’s foremost World War I flying aces. Like Rickenbacker’s, Kindley’s story is one of fierce dogfights, daring aerial feats, and numerous brushes with death. Yet unlike Rickenbacker’s, Kindley’s story has not been fully told until now. Field Kindley gained experience with the RAF before providing leadership for the U.S. Air Service. Kindley was the fourth-ranking American air ace; his exploits earned him a Distinguished Service Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster from the United States and a Distinguished Flying Cross from the British government. In February 1920, during a practice drill Kindley led, some enlisted men unwittingly entered the bombing target area. “Buzzing” the troops to warn them off the field, Kindley somehow lost control of his plane and died in the ensuing crash. Using arduously gathered primary materials and accounts of Great War aces, Jack Ballard tells the story of this little-known hero
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WORLD WAR ONE AIRCRAFT CARRIER PIONEER: The Story and Diaries of Captain JM McCleery RNAS/RAF

Guy Warner


Jack McCleery was born in Belfast in 1898, the son of a mill owning family. He joined the RNAS in 1916 as a Probationary Flight Officer. During the next ten months he completed his training at Crystal Palace, Eastchurch, Cranwell, Frieston, Calshot and Isle of Grain, flying more than a dozen landplanes, seaplanes and flying boats, gaining his wings as a Flight Sub-Lieutenant. In July 1917 he was posted to the newly commissioning aircraft carrier HMS Furious, which would be based at Scapa Flow and Rosyth. He served in this ship until February 1919, flying Short 184 seaplanes and then Sopwith 1.50 Strutters off the deck. He also flew a large number of other types during this time from shore stations at Turnhouse, East Fortune and Donibristle. He served with important and well-known naval airmen including Dunning, Rutland (of Jutland) and Bell Davies VC. He witnessed Dunning's first successful landing on a carrier flying a Sopwith Pup in 1917 and his tragic death a few days later. He als
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60 Years of Combat Aircraft: From World War One to Vietnam War

Bruno Pautigny


From the Battle of the Marne to the end of the Vietnam War, this "first half" of the 20th Century must undeniably be considered as quite representative of aerial warfare. With the 400 profiles and illustrations contained in this book, Bruno Pautigny, the world famous illustrator, paints the technical portraits of the most famous fighters and bombers of all the great conflicts of the previous century: First and Second World Wars, Indochina, Korea and Suez, Algeria, Vietnam, etc.
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Sikorsky S-16 (Great War Aircraft in Profile, Volume 1) (Great War Aircraft in Profile 1)

Vadim Mikheyev


Exclusive photos and scale drawings highlight this detailed look at Imperial Russia's first fighter plane.
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Aircraft Nose Art: From World War I to Today (Motorbooks Classics)

Jeffrey Ethell


This photo-filled collection takes readers on an extraordinary journey through the hearts and minds of the pilots, crews and artists who used cowling for canvas and left this colorful legacy. Ethell and Simonsen combine their knowledge to reveal stories behind the greatest nose art of all time. Packed with over 400 photographs of the best nose art from WWI, the Spanish Civil War and WWII, the Korean War, Vietnam and today.This is a paperback reprint of the original
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SPAD XII/XIII Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


This book details the exploits of the pilots who flew the hugely successful SPAD XIII and the trickier SPAD XII. Built in response to the combat inadequacies of the SPAD VII, the XIII first entered service with the French Aviation Militaire in late 1917. Despite suffering engine unreliability, the XIII enjoyed great success on the Western Front, where it was flown by numerous French, American, Italian and Belgian aces, including Eddie Rickenbacker, leading US ace of World War I. The SPAD XII, meanwhile, was the product of numerous improvements to the SPAD VII model. Entering service in July 1917, the aircraft boasted a single-shot 37 mm Puteaux cannon, which had to be hand-reloaded in flight! Tricky to fly, the XII was only issued to experienced pilots, and was flown briefly by a number of aces.
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Early German Aces of World War I (Aircraft of the Aces)

Greg Vanwyngarden


The Fokker Eindecker (monoplane) can truly be said to have begun the age of fighter aviation. With the development of its revolutionary synchronised system that enabled the machine gun to fire through the propellor, Fokker E I pilots caused consternation in the Allied air services as they began to reap a harvest of victims in the summer of 1915. While the first victory with a Fokker E-type is now believed to have been earned by Kurt Wintgens on 1 July 1915, it was the exploits of Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke that made the machine legendary. These men, along with others such as Parschau and Hohndorf, received the adulation of the German public along with such honors as the first awards of the coveted Blue Max. They created the tactics and principles of German fighter aviation as they did so, developing doctrine that is still relevant to today's fighter pilots. However, by the end of 1916, the glory days of the lone hunter and his Fokker Eindecker were over. They were replaced by
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Balloon-Busting Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Jon Guttman


Tethered balloons reached their zenith as a means of providing a stationary observation platform above the battlefield during World War I. It took a special breed of daredevil to take on such odds deep in enemy lines in order to destroy a balloon, with Balloon specialists such as Willy Coppens, Pierre Bourjade and Michel Coiffard rising to the challenge. This book covers the story of these 'balloon busters' from both sides in World War 1 through a mix of first-hand accounts and expert analysis, which compares tactics, theatres of operation, aircraft types and the overall odds for success.
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'Richthofen's Circus': Jagdgeschwader Nr 1 (Aviation Elite Units)

Greg Vanwyngarden


Undoubtedly the most famous of any nation’s aviation units in World War 1 was the legendary Jagdgeschwader Nr 1, or ‘The Flying Circus’ as its respectful foes labelled it. Germany’s first true fighter wing, it would always be associated with its first commander, the charismatic and revered Manfred von Richthofen. JG 1 was formed in July 1917, and for sixteen months the unit’s young pilots in their colourful aircraft battled for aerial dominance of the Western Front. From its ranks emerged many of Germany’s most successful airmen, including the Red Baron’s brother Lothar; Ernst Udet; Werner Voss; Erich Löwenhardt and Hermann Göring. This book charts the World War I experiences of JG 1.
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A Grandstand Seat: The American Balloon Service in World War I

Eileen Lebow


The little-known American Balloon Service worked in combat to help direct artillery fire more accurately and provide essential intelligence on enemy troop movements during World War I. German use of observation balloons to direct artillery fire in August of 1914 forced the Allies to develop a similar force. With the U.S. entry into the war in 1917, the balloon service, starting from scratch, evolved into an effective, disciplined fighting unit, whose achievements are unfortunately overshadowed by those of the flying aces. Reminiscences from balloon veterans form the basis of this book, the first to picture life as a gasbagger in the three major American engagements of the war. Amazingly, life as an observer suspended in a wicker basket under an elephantine hydrogen balloon proved less deadly than piloting an airplane. From his grandstand seat, the observer kept tabs on the war below him and telephoned vital information to headquarters command. These reports were often the only accur
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Zeppelins of World War I: The Dramatic Story of Germany's Lethal Airships

Wilbur Cross


This is a very well-written book about the Zeppelin raids on Great Britain during World War 1. Both sides' development of new weapons and tactics is documented, and key events are described in a very dramatic style. Personalities such as Peter Strasser, the German airship fleet commander, emerge through the story. The book is a very readable history of the most important events in Zeppelin operations of WWI, including the failed resupply mission from Bulgaria to German East Africa. A final chapter briefly recounts the attempts to develop commercial Zeppelins between the wars, ending, of course, with the Hindenburg disaster.
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The Imperial Russian Air Service Famous Pilots and Aircraft of World War One

Alan Durkata


This book covers in great detail the Imperial Russian Air Service. The presentation is for the serious aviation enthusiast - one that has been longed for ! The massive book is well worth the price. Excellent 3-views are provided for virtually all Russian aircraft of World War One. There is also a complete section of beautiful color drawings of numerous aircraft from the war. The text covers all manufacturers, all aces and provides a detailed overview of Russian air operations. For modelers this will be a reference work that could keep you occupied for years ! For aviation enthusiasts its a wonderful reference work though its presentation isn't a start to finish type of read - it is presented in well defined broken doen catagories. A wonderful book - well worth the apparently steep price
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SPA124 Lafayette Escadrille: American Volunteer Airmen in World War 1 (Aviation Elite Units)

Jon Guttman


This book tells the story of one of World War I’s most famous squadrons, Spa. 124 - the only French squadron made up entirely of American volunteers (save for the commander and executive officer.) Organised in April 1916, the group was successively dubbed the Escadrille Americaine, Escadrille des Volontaires and finally the Escadrille Lafayette. Its achievements were modest, but it included several colourful characters who captured the public imagination and played a major role in gaining American sympathy for the Allied cause. When the United States finally entered the war, many Lafayette veterans helped prepare US Army Air Service and Navy pilots for combat, although a few chose to stay on with the French.
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Aircraft Archive: Aircraft of World War I, Vol. 1


Aircraft of World War I
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Nieuport Aircraft of Wold War One (Crowood Aviation)

Ray Sanger


The French firm of Nieuport built some of the most numerous, best-looking and effective fighting planes of World War I -- they type 17 and 29 gaining particular fame. Ray Sanger's authoritative book covers all these aircraft in detail, paying attention to both thecical detail and operational use. Illustrated throughout with rare photographs this will be an indispensible volume for any World War I avaiation library.
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American Aces of World War I (Osprey Aircraft of the Aces No 42)

Norman Franks


American fliers arriving in Europe from September 1917 brought with them no aircraft. Instead, US units had to obtain machines mainly from the British and French. From early 1918 American pilots were issued with SPAD fighters and they never looked back. As this volume details, the first American trained pilot to become an ace was Lt Douglas Campbell, who shot down five German aircraft by the end of May 1918. He was a member of the celebrated 94th 'Hat in the Ring' Aero Squadron, which created the bulk of American aces in World War I.
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RAF in Camera: 1903-1939 Archives Photographs from the Public Record Office and the Ministry of Defence (The Raf in Camera Series) (v. 1)

Roy Conyers


Now in paperback -- the first volume in this successful pictorial history of the RAF with more than 200 rare and previously unpublished photographs. The three handsome volumes in this series bring together a representative selection of the previously unpublished photographs offering an exciting visual history of the RAF in all its glory. This volume covers the earliest period with its early attempts at flying, the First World War, operations in the inter-war years and the preparations for World War II.
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German and Austrian Aviation of World War I: A Pictorial Chronicle of the Airmen and Aircraft that Forged German Airpower (Osprey Aviation Pioneers 3)

Hugh Cowin & Hugh W. Cowin


This book underlines the technological advances represented by the different aircraft, and it comes as quite a shock to find out just how many German aircraft types were developed during, and deployed in, the Great War. This volume illustrates and analyses every single type. Aces featured include the Red Baron, Theodore Osterkamp with his Fokker EV, and Hermann Goering, a famous Ace who would feature even more prominently in a later conflict. This volume includes recon, training, bomber and fighter types.
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Flak: German Anti-Aircraft Defenses, 1914-1945

Edward B. Westermann


Air raid sirens wail, searchlight beams flash across the sky, and the night is aflame with tracer fire and aerial explosions, as Allied bombers and German anti-aircraft units duel in the thundering darkness. Such "cinematic" scenes, played out with increasing frequency as World War II ground to a close, were more than mere stock material for movie melodramas. As Edward Westermann reveals, they point to a key but largely unappreciated aspect of the German war effort that has yet to get its full due. Long the neglected stepchild in studies of World War II air campaigns, German flak or anti-aircraft units have been frequently dismissed by American, British, and German historians (and by veterans of the European air war) as ineffective weapons that wasted valuable matériel and personnel resources desperately needed elsewhere by the Third Reich. Westermann emphatically disagrees with that view and makes a convincing case for the significant contributions made by the entire range of German
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Classic Aircraft of World War I (Osprey Classic Aircraft)

Melvyn Hiscock


Illustrated with colour photographs, this guide presents the most authentic examples of restored and full-scale replica aircraft from the World War I era, and describes their specifications and the restoration techniques that have been used on them.
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Aircraft of World War One (i,1), Vol. 3 (Aircraft Archive)


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Italian Aces of World War I and their Aircraft


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Anti-Submarine Warfare in World War I: British Naval Aviation and the Defeat of the U-Boats (Cass Series: Naval Policy and History)

John Abbatiello


Investigating the employment of British aircraft against German submarines during the final years of the First World War, this new book places anti-submarine campaigns from the air in the wider history of the First World War. The Royal Naval Air Service invested heavily in aircraft of all types—aeroplanes, seaplanes, airships, and kite balloons—in order to counter the German U-boats. Under the Royal Air Force, the air campaign against U-boats continued uninterrupted. Aircraft bombed German U-boat bases in Flanders, conducted area and ‘hunting’ patrols around the coasts of Britain, and escorted merchant convoys to safety. Despite the fact that aircraft acting alone destroyed only one U-boat during the war, the overall contribution of naval aviation to foiling U-boat attacks was significant. Only five merchant vessels succumbed to submarine attack when convoyed by a combined air and surface escort during World War I. This book examines aircraft and weapons technology, aircrew train
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"Groupe de Combat 12, 'Les Cigognes'": France's Ace Fighter Group in World War 1 (Aviation Elite Units)

Jon Guttman


This book traces the combat history of the most famous and highest-scoring fighter group in France's World War I Aviation Militaire. Groupe de Combat 12 boasted the highest-scoring Allied fighter pilot, René Fonck, and France's most celebrated hero of the air, Georges Guynemer. Its ranks included numerous other famous aces, such as Rene's Dorme, Alfred Heurteaux, Albert Deullin, and American volunteers Edwin Parsons and Frank L. Baylies. Additionally, Guynemer was instrumental in developing France's premier series of fighter planes, the SPAD VII, XII, XIII and XVII.
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ALBERT BALL VC: THE FIGHTER PILOT HERO OF WORLD WAR I

Colin Pengelly


Albert Ball's individuality and his insistence on fighting alone set him apart from other fighter pilots during World War One. His invincible courage and utter determination made him a legend not only in Britain but also amongst his enemies, to whom the sight of his lone Nieuport Scout brought fear. In 1914 he enlisted in the British army with the 2/7th Battalion (Robin Hoods), of the Sherwood Foresters, Notts and Derby Regiment. By the October of 1914 he had reached the rank of Sergeant and then in the same month was made a Second-Lieutenant to his own battalion. In June 1915 he paid for private tuition and trained as a pilot at Hendon. In October 1915 he obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate and requested transfer to the Royal Flying Corps. The transfer granted, he further trained at Norwich and Upavon, being awarded the pilot's brevet on 22 January 1916. On 16 May 1916 - flying Bristol Scout 5512 - he opened his score, shooting down an Albatros C-type over Beaumont. On 29 May 1916 he
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The Dream of Civilized Warfare: World War I Flying Aces and the American Imagination

Linda R. Robertson


Linda R. Robertson argues that the development of the United States as a global military power arose from the influence of an image of air combat carefully constructed during World War I to mask the sordid realities of modern ground warfare. The Dream of Civilized Warfare carries this trajectory to its logical end, tracing the long history of the American desire to exert the nation's will throughout the world without having to risk the lives of ground soldiers-a theme that continues to reverberate in public discussions, media portrayals, and policy decisions today. Histories of American air power usually focus on World War II, when the air force became the foundation for the military strength of the United States. The equally fascinating story of World War I air combat is often relegated to a footnote, but it was the earlier war that first inspired the vision of the United States attaining dominance in world affairs through a massive air force. In The Dream of Civilized Warfare, Rober
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De Havilland Aircraft of World War I: Volume 1, D.H.1-D.H.4 (Great War Aircraft in Profile, Volume 5)

Colin Owers


Noted military aviation expert Colin Owers presents the most comprehensive work ever compiled on the great de Havilland aircraft of World War I. Volume I in this two-book set contains groundbreaking information on the D.H.1 and D.H.1A, D.H.3, D.H.4 and the U.S. D.H.4 "Liberty Plane". Among the 160 rare photos, detailed drawings (including 8 pages of 8 x 12-inch fold-outs) and 40 lavish full-color illustrations are first drawings ever of the D.H.3.
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French Army, Vol. 1: 1914 (Officers and Soldiers)

Andre' Jouineau


In January 1914, the French Army had 47 divisions (777,000 French and 46,000 colonial troops) in 21 regional corps, with attached cavalry and field-artillery units. Most these troops were deployed inside France with the bulk along the eastern frontier. With the fear of war with Germany a further 2.9 million men were mobilized during the summer of 1914. This book details the French Army's first year of the Great War.
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RAF in Camera: 1903-1939 Archives Photographs from the Public Record Office and the Ministry of Defence (The Raf in Camera Series) (v. 1)

Roy Conyers Nesbit


Now in paperback -- the first volume in this successful pictorial history of the RAF with more than 200 rare and previously unpublished photographs. The three handsome volumes in this series bring together a representative selection of the previously unpublished photographs offering an exciting visual history of the RAF in all its glory. This volume covers the earliest period with its early attempts at flying, the First World War, operations in the inter-war years and the preparations for World War II.
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Flying Guns of World War I

Anthony G. Williams


This book describes the history of aircraft guns, their ammunition and their installations in aircraft. It commences with a technical history covering the development of guns, their ammunition, and related issues such as mountings and sights. This is followed by chapters on aircraft installations covering all nations and an evaluation of their use in combat. Appendices include comprehensive tables of the gun installations of WWI combat aircraft with details and illustrations of the guns used and specifications of their ammunition. Comparative drawings and specifications of service weapons are provided, plus illustrations and data concerning their ammunition.
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American War Plans, 1890-1939

Steven T. Ross


By the close of the 19th century, the United States was no longer a continental power, but had become a nation with interests that spanned the globe from the Caribbean to China. Consequently, the country faced a new set of strategic concerns, ranging from enforcing the Monroe Doctrine to defending the Philippines. As a result of the United States' new geostrategic environment, the armed services had to establish a system for the creation of war plans to defend the country's interests against possible foreign aggression. A Joint Army and Navy Board, established in 1903, ordered the creation of war plans to deal with real and potential threats to American security. Each major country was assigned a colour: Germany was Black, Great Britain Red, Japan Orange, Mexico Green and China Yellow. War plans were then devised in case Washington decided to use force against these or other powers.
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Allied Aviation of World War I: A Pictorial History of Allied Aviators and Aircraft of the Great War (Osprey Aviation Pioneers 5)

Hugh Cowin


This title details every aircraft type that saw action in World War I. It encompasses a story of courage and technical innovation, focusing on some of the characters of the war and providing an overall account of allied aviation.
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Pensacola Bay, A Military History (FL) (Images of America)

Dale Manuel


Shortly after Ponce de Leon discovered La Florida in 1513, early Spanish settlers found a large and sheltered bay on the Gulf of Mexico. The bay became known as Pensacola after the Penzacola Indians who lived along the shore. In 1698, the first permanent colony was established by pioneers who recognized the strategic importance of a fine harbor with protective barrier islands and a high bluff, or barranca, on the mainland across from a defensible mouth. For centuries the bay was fortified and refortified. Battles raged in four wars, and five nations raised their flags along the harbor. Pensacola Bay: A Military History traces the rich military history of the bay from Spanish times to the present-day Naval Air Station Pensacola, home of the Navy's Blue Angels. The book presents over 200 black-and-white images that highlight the acquisition of Florida by the United States in 1821, the construction of fortifications and naval installations, the Civil War, both World Wars, the Old Navy Yar
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The Camel Drivers: The 17th Aero Squadron in World War I

George Roland & Otis Lowell Reed


The 17th Aero Squadron flew Sopwith Camels under British command along the Western Front during the summer of 1918. This definitive work on the 17th Aero Squadron in World War I is drawn from a wide range of official and personal sources, including original squadron records (found in an attic!), numerous interviews, letters written home, and half a dozen diaries including one kept by a German pilot flying in opposition.
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Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare: The Evolution of British and American Ideas about Strategic Bombing, 1914-1945

Tami Davis Biddle


A major revision of our understanding of long-range bombing, this book examines how Anglo-American ideas about "strategic" bombing were formed and implemented. It argues that ideas about bombing civilian targets rested on--and gained validity from--widespread but substantially erroneous assumptions about the nature of modern industrial societies and their vulnerability to aerial bombardment. These assumptions were derived from the social and political context of the day and were maintained largely through cognitive error and bias. Tami Davis Biddle explains how air theorists, and those influenced by them, came to believe that strategic bombing would be an especially effective coercive tool and how they responded when their assumptions were challenged. Biddle analyzes how a particular interpretation of the World War I experience, together with airmen's organizational interests, shaped interwar debates about strategic bombing and preserved conceptions of its potentially revolutionary
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German Fighter Units 1914-May 1917 (Osprey Airwar 13)

Alex Imrie


This book traces the combat history of German fighter units. Major aircraft types are all covered, and their missions detailed. Aircraft markings and aircrew uniforms are shown in full colour illustrations
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"Top British Fighter Pilots of World War One" - Thrilling Deeds of British Airmen [Illustrated]

Eric Wood


IN the changed conditions of modern warfare airmen have become the eyes of the army. Starting from their bases, aviators wing their way over the enemy's lines and observe every passing thing that comes within their vision, so that generals, sitting at headquarters, know exactly to where enemy reinforcements have gone, how many trains of munitions have been sent to certain places, where batteries are placed, and a thousand things that the brains of an army must be cognizant of. Trenches dug overnight are noted the next morning and inscribed upon the large-scale maps which are used as bases for the plans of operations. In fact, little that happens escapes notice—if the flying corps of an army has won command of the air.
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Junkers Aircraft and Engines 1913-1945 (Putnam Aviation)

Antony L. Kay


This volume maintains the high standards of Putnam's Manufacturer series, examining in detail the output of one of Germany's most famous aircraft manufacturers, Junkers. With 3-view drawings, cut-aways, fine photographs and unsurpassed in-depth treatment of the design history of Junkers aircraft, this volume is the definitive history of a German engineering legend. Hugo Junkers was a leading pioneer of aviation, especially all-metal aircraft construction, and his name is associated with great aerodynamic and structural advances in engineering. His design and manufacturing bureau was responsible for some of the most distinctive and famous aircraft of the 20th century, including the terrifying Ju87 Stuka divebomber and the Ju88 bomber which battered London in the Blitz, but successful airliners and transports were also part of the Junkers roster over the course of its 30-year history.
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SEPTEMBER EVENING: The Life and Final Combat of the German World War One Ace Werner Voss

Barry Diggens


This is the first full-length biography ever written on the life and death of the nineteen-year-old Werner Voss, who was a legend in his own lifetime and the youngest recipient of the Pour le Me'rite, Germany's highest award for bravery in WWI. At the time of his death he was considered by many, friend and foe alike, to be Germany's greatest ace and, had he lived, he would almost certainly have overtaken Manfred von Richthofen's victory total by early spring 1918. Voss is perhaps best remembered for his outstanding courage, his audacity in the air and the prodigious number of victories he achieved before being killed in one of the most swash-buckling and famous dogfights of the Great War; a fight involving James McCudden and 56 Squadron RFC, the most successful Allied scout squadron. Yet the life of Voss and the events of that fateful day in September are surrounded by mystery and uncertainty and even now aviation enthusiasts continue to ask questions about him almost on a daily basi
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America's First Air War

Terry Treadwell & Terry C. Treadwell


This fascinating pictorial study explains the main reasons why the US entered WWI and the violations by Germany that exacerbated the situation. Lavishly illustrated chapters cover the development of the US Air Service and the US Naval Air Service and their first use of aircraft in a combat situation. This pictorial essay highlights the personalities that emerged from the war. Contains original escape reports from USAS pilots and observers providing detailed insight into the conditions under which they were imprisoned.
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Ghosts of the Great War: Aviation in WWI (Ghosts Aviation Classics)

Philip Makanna; Javier Arango


The First World War began to hammer aircraft into reliable flying form only ten summers after man s first flight. These first warplanes, born as sport planes, soon evolved into the lethal aircraft that swarmed over the bloody trenches of Europe. They altered the history of the world and carried the dreams and the nightmares of all mankind on their wings. Renowned aviation photographer Philip Makanna has captured the essence of this era in the forthcoming GHOSTS of THE GREAT WAR, a hardbound book that weaves his stunning color photographs with an extraordinary collection of archival duotones. Makanna has spent 31 years taking aviation photography to amazing heights. In this edition, his images depict the beginnings of military aviation with Bleriot s wing-warping Model XI, Fokker s Spider , a web of wires and wood, and Sopwith s simple seaplane racer. The book continues through to the advanced aircraft that appeared at the war s end. Javier Arango has written a passionate and informativ
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Fokker Dr.I Triplane: A World War One Legend

Paul Leaman


A detailed study of one of the greatest warplanes in aeronautical history, made famous by Manfred von Richthofen and other leading German aces. This generously illustrated book includes a brief outline of the history of the Fokker company, the development of the Triplane, its initial employment and its subsequent use over the front line. There is also an analysis of unit and individual markings. This book will become a leading reference work on the subject.
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First to the Front: The Aerial Adventures of 1st Lt. Waldo Heinrichs and the 95th Aero Squadron 1917-1918 (Schiffer Military History)

Charles Woolley


The 95th Aero Squadron was the first American pursuit squadron to fly over the front in March 1918 and 1st Lt. Waldo Heinrichs was one of its original members. The history of the Squadron is told through the words of those who served, Heinrichs' richly written diary forms the nucleus of the story supported by contemporary letters, anecdotes, and combat reports from many of the other flyers. Entries from the official Squadron history as contained in the History of the American Air Services A.E.F. (the Gorrell History) round out the narrative. Over 280 photos, most unpublished from the personal albums of the participants, show planes, places and personnel which surrounded this happy band of warriors.
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Italian Military Aviation in World War I 1914-1918

Alexis Mehtidis


Air Orders of Battle for the Italian military air arms in World War I 1914-1918, including Army, Naval, and Balloon units. Air orbats are given by months: five months in 1915, seven in 1916, and every month from January 1917 to the Armistice in November 1918. Units are listed by commands, groups, squadrons, bases, and aircraft types. An appendix gives a glossary/abbreviations, a list of Italian airships during the war, notes, and a bibliography for further reading. 58 content pages.
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War Birds: Diary of an Unknown Aviator (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series)

John MacGavock Grider


The Diary of Lt John M Grider, KIA in France, 1918, as amended and edited by his friend E.W. Springs. Springs believed it would add to the value of the book if he kept it anonymous and mysterious. The book was serialized in a popular magazine in 1926 and created a scandal because it depicts the American boys as womanizers, drinkers, etc. (the racist attitudes of the flyers caused no comment at the time). Later Griders sisters forced Springs to admit that the book was based on their brothers diary, although apparently Springs also included considerable material from his own letters home. Springs was a Princeton graduate from a wealthy family. He was a top pilot and received the DFC, shooting down 5 enemy planes. He wrote some other books but none as popular as this one. This book is gritty and tough, and depicts very well the descent from idealistic recruit to hardened and battle weary veteran.
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Aircraft Carriers: A History of Carrier Aviation and Its Influence on World Events, Volume 1: 1909-1945

Norman Polmar


Aircraft Carriers is the definitive history of world aircraft carrier development and operations. Norman Polmar’s revised and updated, two-volume classic describes the political and technological factors that influenced aircraft carrier design and construction, meticulously records their operations, and explains their impact on modern warfare. Volume I provides a comprehensive analysis of carrier developments and warfare in the first half of the twentieth century, and examines the advances that allowed the carrier to replace the battleship as the dominant naval weapons system. Polmar gives particular emphasis to carrier operations from World War I, through the Japanese strikes against China in the 1930s, to World War II in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, Arctic, and Pacific theaters. It begins with French inventor Clément Ader’s remarkably prescient 1909 description of an aircraft carrier. The book then explains how Britain led the world in the development of aircraft-carrying ships,
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The Zeppelin Base Raids - Germany 1914

Ian Castle


In the summer of 1914, as Europe teetered on the brink of war, the prospect of immediate Zeppelin raids on London and other major British towns and cities loomed large. Britain's aerial defenses were negligible, while German armed forces mustered a total of eleven airships. The First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston S. Churchill, accepted responsibility for the defense of London, which translated to defense against Zeppelin attack. His resources were limited, but he believed that attack was the best means of defense. As such, the final four months of 1914 saw the Royal Navy Air Service (RNAS) launching four separate ground-breaking air attacks on Zeppelin bases in Germany, making these Britain's first ever strategic bombing raids: Düsseldorf/Cologne (September), Düsseldorf/Cologne again (October), Friedrichshafen (November) and Cuxhaven (December). The raids achieved mixed results, but coming so early in the history of military aviation they all demonstrate evidence of great dete
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Memoirs of Lt. Camillo Viglino: Italian Air Force 1915-1916

Lt. Camillo Viglino


In July of 1915, just two months after Italy joined the Allied Forces during World War I, Lieutenant Camillo Viglino, age 23, volunteered for flight training in the Italian Air Force. His account of the training provides the freshness and intimacy of an on-the-scene, firsthand report. It reveals an idealistic young man with an unbridled passion for flying and a patriotic zeal to fight for his country -- a young man daring to go up in the fragile flying machines of those early years of aviation, routinely placing himself at the mercy of the weather, cantankerous engines, and unreliable instruments. The discomforts of flying an open-cockpit 1914 Maurice Farman, the frequent crashes at the flight school, and the constant occurrences of pilots getting lost are all related with a nonchalant bravado befitting a 20-year-old. Viglino follows his diary-like accounts with a copy of a letter from a cousin at the front describing an air raid on Adelsberg, Austria. This book was written in Ital
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World War I (DK Eyewitness Books)

Simon Adams


Ages 8 and up. Gr. 6-12. Packed with photos on every double-page spread and dense with facts and snippets of analysis, this large-size volume in the Eyewitness series provides a quick, informative overview of WWI: how it started; who fought and why; the equipment used; what it was like in the trenches and at home; the horrific final cost. Even seasoned Web browsers accustomed to busy formats may sometimes feel bombarded by all the bits and pieces, especially when the tiny type is printed over colored pictures. It's the dramatic photos (many from London's Imperial War Museum) that will make readers pause and bring them close to the soldiers' experiences. Then there's John Singer Sargent's realistic painting Gassed, showing blinded soldiers led by their sighted colleagues toward a dressing station in northern France in 1918. For more reading suggestions, see the Read-alikes column, "The War to End All Wars" [BKL N 1 01]. Hazel Rochman
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The Kid's Book of World War I: A Project and Activity Book

Kathi Oram Peterson


Ages 9 & up. Revealing the causes, battles, and key players behind the Great War, this exploration provides a variety of hands-on activities for children, guaranteed to foster an appreciation for this complex period. Topics covered include Morse code, life in the trenches, the race for naval superiority, and tips on visiting museums and memorials. Featuring a collection of intriguing real-life wartime stories, biographies of notable world figures, and details on the food, music, and atmosphere of World War I, this educational book provides a deeper investigation into this historical era, spotlighting the United States’ emergence onto the international stage
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True Stories of World War One (Usborne True Stories)

Paul Dowsall


Offering an approachable insight into key events of the past, this book contains true stories of courage, heroism and disaster from World War I.
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Christmas in the Trenches

John McCutcheon


Ages 6 & up. Grade 2-4–In 1914, British and German troops were dug into trenches in France, facing one another across the barbed wire and barren ground called No Man's Land. On Christmas Eve, the British soldiers heard the Germans singing Stille Nacht and joined in. Spontaneously, soldiers on both sides climbed out of their trenches and met in between the lines, sharing small gifts, food, and drink. They played a game of soccer. Then they went back to their trenches. The next day, the shooting resumed. McCutcheon's account of this true event is based on a song he wrote about it in 1984. An accompanying CD includes that song, Silent Night/Stille Nacht, and a reading of the story. Sørenson's illustrations sanitize trench warfare somewhat. Michael Foreman's War Game (Pavillion, 2002) is a more sophisticated–and somewhat more cynical–presentation of this same Christmas truce.–Virginia Walter, University of California, Los Angeles
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Sgt. York: His Life, Legend & Legacy: The Remarkable Untold Story of Sgt. Alvin C. York

John Perry


In a world desperate for authentic heroes, the story of Alvin C. York reminds us of the true meaning of heroism. York's bravery on the battlefield made him famous, but it was his decision to turn down the easy riches of celebrity that secured his position as one of history's greatest Christian patriots. Based on new interviews with all of York's living children, and York's own diaries, this exhaustive biography follows the young soldier from the hills of Tennessee to the battlefields of France, down Broadway in a triumphant ticker-tape parade, and back home to his family farm where he spent the rest of his life in service to his community and his God.
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Heroic Children of World War One: True Tales of Courage from the Warzone

Ruth Royce


The brave children of World War One France including: the child despatch bearer, the Heroine of Fort Montere and the Hero of the Guns...
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The First World War

John Keegan


The First World War created the modern world. A conflict of unprecedented ferocity, it abruptly ended the relative peace and prosperity of the Victorian era, unleashing such demons of the twentieth century as mechanized warfare and mass death. It also helped to usher in the ideas that have shaped our times--modernism in the arts, new approaches to psychology and medicine, radical thoughts about economics and society--and in so doing shattered the faith in rationalism and liberalism that had prevailed in Europe since the Enlightenment. With The First World War, John Keegan, one of our most eminent military historians, fulfills a lifelong ambition to write the definitive account of the Great War for our generation. Probing the mystery of how a civilization at the height of its achievement could have propelled itself into such a ruinous conflict, Keegan takes us behind the scenes of the negotiations among Europe's crowned heads (all of them related to one another by blood) and minister
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The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry: Revised Edition (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin)

Various


Ages 18 & up. The recent PBS 8-part miniseries THE GREAT WAR sparked renewed interest in the First World War. More than photographs or eyewitness reports, the poetry written during the embedded the horror of the war in our consciousness. Now, supplemented with five new poems, the works of 38 British, European, and American writers collected here include some of the most outstanding and poignant poems of this century.
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The Penguin Book of First World War Stories (Penguin Classics)

Various


ages 18 & up. This new collection of short stories about World War I features works by such famous British authors as Joseph Conrad, W. Somerset Maugham, Arthur Conan Doyle, John Buchan, Rudyard Kipling, D. H. Lawrence, John Galsworthy, Radclyffe Hall, Katherine Mansfield, Robert Graves, Muriel Spark, and Julian Barnes. Written during the war and after, these stories illustrate the impact of the Great War on British society and culture, as well as the many ways in which short fiction contributed to the literature of that time period.
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Fields of Agony: British Poetry of the First World War (Literature Insights)

Stuart Sillars


An illustrated study guide to poetry written by men and women in all parts of the British Isles during the First World War, 1914–18. This rich and valuable ebook has numerous fascinating hyperlinks to online resources. It discusses significant individual poems by the writers named, exploring them within their social, political and aesthetic frames and summarising important earlier critical readings and responses. It is copiously illustrated and covers Thomas Hardy, Popular Poetry, Anthologies, War Poetry by Women, the work of Graves, Blunden and Gurney, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Edward Thomas, David Jones, Irish poetry, Scottish poetry, War Poetry and Modernism. Stuart Sillars is Professor of English at the University of Bergen, Norway. He has written extensively on the literature and visual art of the twentieth century: his books include Art and Survival in First World War Britain (Macmillan, 1987), British Romantic Art and the First World War (Macmillan, 1991) and Structure a
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In Flanders Fields: Scottish Poetry and Prose of the First World War by Trevor Royle

Trevor Royle


This anthology addresses Scotland`s unique contribution to the literature of the First World War. Well-known writers such as John Buchan, Eric Linklater, Hugh MacDiarmid, Compton Mackenzie, are included, as well as poets like Joseph Lee and Roderick Watson Kerr.
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The Second Battlefield: Women, Modernism and the First World War

Angela K. Smith


This book investigates the connection between women's writing about WWI and the development of literary modernisms, focusing on issues of gender which remain topical today. Drawing on a wealth of unpublished diaries and letters, the book examines the way in which the new roles undertaken by women triggered a search for new forms of expression. Blending literary criticism and history, the book contributes to the scholarship of women and expands our definition of modernisms
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World War One Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions)

Bob Blaisdell (ed)


This original anthology features tales written mostly by former soldiers and others with firsthand experience of World War I's devastation. Contents include "Introduction to the Trenches" by Richard Aldington, "The Blind Ones," by Isaak Babel, and tales by Ernest Hemingway, Ford Madox Ford, John Galsworthy, Rudyard Kipling, Katherine Mansfield, and others.
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Voices of Silence: The Alternative Book of First World War Poetry

Vivien Noakes


There are many anthologies of poetry of the First World War, reflecting the huge interest there is in this subject, but "Voices of Silence" is unlike any of them. The poetry of the First World War has determined our perception of the war itself. Yet, this perception is based on the interpretation of a few poets who have become household names - writers such as Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon and Isaac Rosenberg. Less literary but equally important, the poetry gathered together in this volume has been drawn from old newspapers and journals, trench and hospital magazines, individual volumes of verse, gift books, postcards, and an illicit manuscript magazine put together by conscientious objectors. For the first time, the huge body of rich, exciting and often deeply moving work that complements the established literary canon has been revived. It adds a new dimension to our perception of the immediate response to war - not least in the soldiers' recurring and important use of humour. Writt
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Women's Writing on the First World War

Dorothy Goldman Ed


Until now the impact of The First World War upon women writers has been less visible than that of their male counterparts. This anthology brings together women's writing about the War from the period 1914 to 1930. Letters, diary entries, and essays offer an interesting counterpoint to the novels and short stories through which women sought to encompass the extremes of wartime life.
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Because You Died: Poetry and Prose of the First World War and Beyond

Vera Brittain


Bringing together a selection of Vera Brittain’s poetry and prose, some of it never published before, this collection commemorates the men she loved—fiancé, brother, and two close friends—who served and died in World War I. It draws on her experiences as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse in London, Malta, and France, and illustrates her growing conviction of the wickedness of all war. Illustrated with many extraordinary photographs from Brittain’s own albums, and edited with a new introduction by Mark Bostridge, this is an elegy to men who lost their lives in a bloody conflict.
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Scars Upon My Heart: Women's Poetry and Verse of the First World War

Catherine Reilly (Compiler)


Your battle wounds are scars upon my heart' wrote Vera Brittain in a poem to her beloved brother, four days before he died in June 1918. The rediscovery of TESTAMENT OF YOUTH has reminded a new generation of the bitter sufferings of women as well as men in the terrible madness of the First World War. This, the first anthology of women war poets for over sixty years, will come as a surprise to many. It shows, for example, that women were writing protest poetry before Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, and that the view of 'the women at home', ignorant and idealistic, was quite false. Many of these poems come out of direct experiences of nursing the victims of trench warfare, or the pain of lovers, brothers, sons lost. Poets include: Nancy Cunard, Rose Macaulay, Charlotte Mew, Alice Meynell, Edith Nesbit, Edith Sitwell, Marie Stopes, Katharine Tynan. Here, as elsewhere, 'the poetry is in the pity' - a moving record of women's experience of war.
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A Corner of a Foreign Field: The Illustrated Poetry of the First World War

Fiona Waters - Ed


Illustrated with magnificent crisp, contemporary photographs from the Daily Mail of World War I battlefields, battles, and heartbreaking scenes on the homefront, this book would serve as a fine companion to Paul Fussell's "The Great War and Modern Memory," which also invokes poetry. The text of "A Corner of a Foreign Field," however, is entirely of poems written during the war, many by well known writers like Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Sigfried Sassoon, etc. Far more, however, are by lesser known or unknown poets, including many women, all of whom I was unaware. These include some of the finest entries, made even more powerful because they came as a surprise. This book features prominently on my bookshelf.
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The Nation's Cause: French, English and German Poetry of the First World War (Routledge Revivals)

Elizabeth A. Marsland


As we approach the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, this timely reissue, first published in 1991, evaluates the function of poetry in wartime Europe, arguing that war poetry must be understood as a social as well as a literary phenomenon. As well as locating the work of well-known French, English and German war poets in a European context, Elizabeth Marsland discusses lesser-known poetry of the war years, including poems by women and the neglected tradition of civilian protest through poetry. Identifying shared characteristics as well as the unique features of each nation’s poetry, The Nation’s Cause affords new insight into the relationship between nationalism and the social attitudes that determined the conduct of war.
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Irony and the Poetry of the First World War

Susanne Christine Puissant


How does irony affect the evaluation and perception of the First World War both then and now? Irony and the Poetry of the First World War traces one of the major features of war poetry from the author's application as a means of disguise, criticism or psychological therapy to its perception and interpretation by the reader.
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English Poetry of the First World War

George Parfitt


George Parfitt aims to recover a sense of the poetry of the war and places it in a context of national, cultural, and literary history. One of his aims is to recover a sense of the range of responses to the war that were recorded in the poetry of the time, and to suggest that the tendency to focus on just a few well-known figures (Brooke, Owen, and Sassoon) distorts our sense of what the poetry can tell us about the war itself and its appalling effects. Contents: 1 Overviews; 2 Cleansing and Ruper Brooke; 3 Satire and Siegfried Sassoon; 4 The Voice of the Noncommissioned; 5 Belief and Wilfred Owen; 6 England: Country and History; 7 Robert Graves; 8 Reception and Valuing; Conclusion; Bibliography.
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The First World War in Irish Poetry

Jim Haughey


This first book-length study of Irish poetry about the First World War, examines the extent to which the war has been preserved and appropriated in Irish memory. While the early chapters explore the various historical myths about Ireland's role in the war and review the war verse written by Irish soldier poets, the attention later shifts to Irish poets on the various home fronts who express a wide range of attitudes toward the war.
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Three Poets of the First World War (Penguin Classics)

Ivor Gurney & Wilfred Owen


ages 18 & up. This new selection brings together the poetry of three of the most distinctive and moving voices to emerge from the First World War. Here are the controlled passion and rich metaphors of Wilfred Owen's celebrated verses such as "Anthem for Doomed Youth" and "Strange Meeting", along with many of his lesser-known works. The elegiac poems of Ivor Gurney, including "Requiem" and "The Silent One", reflect his love of language, music and landscape, while the visceral works of Isaac Rosenberg, such as "Break of Day in the Trenches", are filled with stark imagery but also, as in "Louse Hunting", with vitality and humour. Each poet reflects the disparate experiences of ordinary soldiers in war, and attempts to capture man's humanity in the most inhumane of circumstances.
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Canadian Poetry from the Beginnings Through the First World War (New Canadian Library)

Carole Gerson & Gwendolyn Davies (eds)


This is the only anthology to present a full history of Canadian poetry — from the early 1600s through the expansiveness of poetic activity during the 18th and 19th centuries and into the flourishing first decades of the 20th century. The editors have compiled works from over 50 poets, including the verse of Isabella Valancy Crawford, Bliss Carman, Archibald Lampman and Duncan Campbell Scott, and several long narrative poems, including Oliver Goldsmith's "The Rising Village" and Crawford's "Malcolm's Katie." It includes World War 1
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Lads: Love Poetry of the Trenches (Duckbacks)

Martin Taylor Ed


A remarkable anthology, including many largely unknown poems from the trenches, in which Martin Taylor illustrates the extraordinary range of emotions generated by the horror of the First World War and the experience of trench warfare.
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Race, Empire and First World War Writing

Santanu Das Ed.


In a time when First World War studies remains largely Eurocentric, this book offers space for discussion in a comparative framework, giving a multi-racial and international view on modern memories of the War. It recounts experiences of combatants and non-combatants and draws upon fresh historical, literary and visual archival material.
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Stand in the Trench, Achilles: Classical Receptions in British Poetry of the Great War (Classical Presences)

Elizabeth Vandiver


Elizabeth Vandiver examines the ways in which British poets of the First World War used classical literature, culture, and history as a source of images, ideas, and even phrases for their own poetry. Vandiver argues that classics was a crucial source for writers from a wide variety of backgrounds, from working-class poets to those educated in public schools, and for a wide variety of political positions and viewpoints. Poets used references to classics both to support and to oppose the war from its beginning all the way to the Armistice and after. By exploring the importance of classics in the poetry of the First World War, Vandiver offers a new perspective on that poetry and on the history of classics in British culture.
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Modern English War Poetry

Tim Kendall


Tim Kendall's study offers the fullest account to date of a tradition of modern English war poetry. Stretching from the Boer War to the present day, it focuses on many of the twentieth-century's finest poets - combatants and non-combatants alike - and considers how they address the ethical challenges of making art out of violence. Poetry, we are often told, makes nothing happen. But war makes poetry happen: the war poet cannot regret, and must exalt at, even the most appalling experiences. Modern English War Poetry not only assesses the problematic relationship between war and its poets, it also encourages an urgent reconsideration of the modern poetry canon and the (too often marginalised) position of war poetry within it. The aesthetic and ethical values on which canonical judgements have been based are carefully scrutinized via a detailed analysis of individual poets. The poets discussed include Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling, Wilfred Owen, Charlotte Mew, Edward Thomas, Ivor Gurney,
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Other Combatants, Other Fronts: Competing Histories of the First World War

James E. Kitchen & Alisa Miller and Laura Rowe


The First World War is a subject that has fascinated the public as well as the academic community since the close of hostilities in 1918. Over the past thirty years in particular, the historiography associated with the conflict has expanded considerably to include studies whose emphases range between the economic, social, cultural, literary, and imperial aspects of the war, all coinciding with revisions to perceptions of its military context. Nevertheless, much of the discussion of the First World War remains confined to the experiences of a narrow collection of European armies on the battlefields of Northern France and Belgium. This volume seeks to push the focus away from the Western Front and to draw out the multi-spectral nature of the conflict, examining forgotten theatres and neglected experiences. The chapters explore the question of what total war meant for the lives of people around the world implicated in this momentous event, broadening current debates on the First World War
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Women Writers of the First World War: An Annotated Bibliography

Sharon Ouditt


'They also serve who only stand and wait' The idea of there being a 'women's writing' during the First World War is often dismissed. The war, the story goes, was a masculine domain, and as women did not fight, it is also assumed that they were excluded from a war experience. This bibliography challenges that view by listing and annotating hundreds of published books, articles, memoirs, diaries and letters written by women during the First World War. Included are: * Virginia Woolf * Katherine Mansfield * G.B Stern * Brenda Girvin * known and unknown autobiographers and diarists * writers of pro and anti-war propaganda * journal and magazine articles * literary, cultural and historical criticism
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A Treasury of War Poetry, British and American Poems of the World War, 1914-1917 (Volume 1)

George Herbert Clarke


Volume: 1 Publisher: Boston and New York, Houghton Mifflin company Publication date: 1917 Subjects: World War, 1914-1918 Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be numerous typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there.
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The Price of Pity: Poetry History and Myth in the Great War

Martin Stephen


On page 78, Stephen quotes another author as saying, "In the Great War eight million people were destroyed because two persons, the Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his consort, had been shot." Stephen's response is: "Historically, this is hogwash. Eight million people died because Germany was a lethal combination of militarism and expansionism, without the saving virtues of wisdom or humility. Eight million people died because Germany quite calmly decided to invade two countries against whom it had no specific quarrel..." This off-topic digression dooms him. His decision to digress, and the substance of that digression, forces one to ask how we can trust the rest of his writing, in this book and others. How dare he make such a statement when not 15 years earlier, Britain invented concentration camps to imprison and starve South African civilians. What about English behavior in India not only before the Great War, but after? When was England itself ever not militaristic or expansioni
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Military Miscellany: Manuscripts from the Seven Years War, the First and Second Sikh Wars and the First World War v. 1

Alan J. Guy (Editor), etc. (Editor), R.N.W. Thomas (Editor), Gerard DeGroot (Editor)


Spanning nearly two hundred years, this volume brings together letters and diaries recounting British experience in very diverse theatres of war. Included is the journal of George Durant on the Expedition to Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1758-58 and Rev.Duncan's diary gives a personal view of Haig's GHQ from 1916-18.
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Great Poets of World War I: Poetry from the Great War

Jon Stallworthy


In times of war and national calamity—writes Jon Stallworthy in his illuminating survey of the lives and work of twelve celebrated war poets—large numbers of people seldom seen in church or bookshop will turn for consolation and inspiration to religion and poetry. Never more so than in World War I did the poignant poetry of hundreds of young men scarred by battle reach so large and eager an audience. Among the most famous and memorable of these youthful voices were those of the strikingly handsome, golden-haired, nobly patriotic Rupert Brooke, dead at twenty-eight; the serious-minded, poignantly truthful Wilfred Owen, who was shot down, at twenty-five; and the defiant Siegfried Sassoon whose gallantry in the Somme Offensive earned him the Military Cross and nickname Mad Jack. Profiled in this volume, too, and illustrated throughout with photographs of the action they saw and manuscripts of the poems they wrote are Edmund Blunden, whose work is haunted by the war until his death in 1974
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A Traveller In War Time

Winston Churchill


I am reprinting here, in response to requests, certain recent experiences in Great Britain and France. These were selected in the hope of conveying to American readers some idea of the atmosphere, of "what it is like" in these countries under the immediate shadow of the battle clouds. It was what I myself most wished to know. My idea was first to send home my impressions while they were fresh, and to refrain as far as possible from comment and judgment until I should have had time to make a fuller survey. Hence I chose as a title for these articles, - intended to be preliminary," A Traveller in War-Time." I tried to banish from my mind all previous impressions gained from reading. I wished to be free for the moment to accept and record the chance invitation or adventure, wherever met with, at the Front, in the streets of Paris, in Ireland, or on the London omnibus. Later on, I hoped to write a book summarizing the changing social conditions as I had found them. Unfortunately for me, my
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Roots of Strategy, Book 3: 3 Military Classics: von Leeb's Defense/von Freytag-Loringhoven's The Power of Personality in War/Erfurth's Surprise

Wilhelm Leeb (Author), Hugo Friedrich P. J. Freytag-Loringhoven (Author), Waldemar Erfurth (Author)


The roots of strategy books have been an invaluble asset in my study of military strategy. The priciples set forth in Von leebs book should be read and if not implemented, certainly used as a spring board for further deliberatiion and study. I would strongly encourage the student of warfare to aquire this book and spend much time meditating on its contents. Although the material may seem outdated and archaic when viewed superficialy, many of the foundational points hold true. The middle book is especialy relevant to todays military comanders, As J.F.C. Fuller said, the art of generalship never changes.
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Poets of World War I: Comprehensive Research and Study Guide (Bloom's Major Poets) (Part 2)

Harold Bloom


Though overshadowed by others, Rupert Brooke's gifts as a poet were palpable; Siegfried Sassoon is known as a talented and prolific writer and poet. Learn much more about both poets with this edition of Bloom's Major Poets, which includes critical analyses and biographies of each writer. This series is edited by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University; Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Professor of English, New York University Graduate School. History’s greatest poets are covered in one series with expert analysis by Harold Bloom and other critics. These texts offer a wealth of information on the poets and their works that are most commonly read in high schools, colleges, and universities.
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Tom Swift and his War Tank

Victor Appleton


Reading the books in the original Tom Swift series is a look back to a more jingoistic and simplistic time. This book, written at the height of anti-German feeling in America during World War I, mimics some of the more propagandistic publications of that era. In this installment Tom is given an exemption from military service, which gets him unfairly branded as a slacker. The mandate is that everyone must "do their bit" for the war effort. In truth, he is working on a new and more powerful military tank and is sworn to secrecy so he cannot defend himself. Like most of the inventions showcased in the original series, the new device is an improvement on an existing technology and not a revolution. The villains in this case are German spies trying to glean Tom's secrets. In keeping with the jingoistic, simplistic portrayals they are not terribly efficient at the spy trade, failing largely due to their own incompetence rather than any effective countermeasures on the part of Tom Swift.
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Poets of World War I: Comprehensive Research and Study Guide (Bloom's Major Poets) (Part 1)

Wilfred Owen (Author), Isaac Rosenberg (Author)


ages 13 & up. Grade 7-Up Bloom's introduction is little more than the scribbled notes for a dry professorial aside on the featured poets. However, there is much to recommend this book. It gathers in one volume the essential elements necessary for research on Owen and/or Rosenberg. The materials are well chosen and effectively edited to give students a taste of the sweet rewards of more serious research. Touched on specifically are eight poems (four by each poet), and each selection is given a thematic analysis, followed by criticism supplied in the form of excerpted essays by Dylan Thomas, Ted Hughes, and Philip Larkin, as well as many other important modernists. -Herman Sutter, Saint Agnes Academy, Houston, TX Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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The Peace Negotiations

Robert Lansing


While we were still in Paris, I felt, and have felt increasingly ever since, that you accepted my guidance and direction on questions with regard to which I had to instruct you only with increasing reluctance.. "... I must say that it would relieve me of embarrassment, Mr. Secretary, the embarrassment of feeling your reluctance and divergence of judgment, if you would give your present office up and afford me an opportunity to select some one whose mind would more willingly go along with mine." These words are taken from the letter which President Wilson wrote to me on February 11, 1920. On the following day I tendered my resignation as Secretary of State by a letter, in which I said:
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The War Poems of Siegfried Sassoon

Siegfried Sassoon


"In later years, when Siegfried Sassoon had written much else in prose and verse, he was annoyed at always being referred to simply as a war poet, but it was the Great War that turned him into a poet of international fame, and I feel sure that his ghost will forgive me for thus bringing together these magnificently scarifying poems."--Rupert Hart-Davis, from his Introduction
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Siegfried Sassoon : The Making of a War Poet, a Biography (1896-1918)

Jean Moorcroft Wilson


The World War I poet Siegfried Sassoon is one of the twentieth century's greatest icons and Jean Moorcroft Wilson is the leading authority on him. In Siegfried Sassoon: The Journey from the Trenches, the second volume of her best-selling, authorized biography, Wilson completes her definitive analysis of his life and works, exploring Sassoon's experiences after the Great War. For many people, Sassoon exists primarily as a First World War poet and bold fighter, who earned the nickname 'Mad Jack' in the trenches and risked Court Martial, possibly the firing squad, with his public protest against the War. Much less is known about his life after the Armistice. Wilson uncovers a series of love affairs with such larger-than-life characters as Queen Victoria's great-grandson, Prince Phillip of Hess, the flamboyant Ivor Novello and the exotic and bejewelled Hon. Stephen Tennant. This period also sees Sassoon establishing close friendships with some of the greatest literary figures of the age, H
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Biggles' Big Adventures (Biggles Omnibus 1)

Capt. W. E. Johns


Ages 12 & up. This thrilling compendium features four action-packed stories starring air ace James Bigglesworth. In Biggles Flies North, Biggles, Algy, and Ginger fly in to help an old friend counter the attempts of a vicious gang to stifle his air freight business in Canada. In Biggles Sees it Through, at the outbreak of World War II Biggles and his crew struggle to help a Polish scientist prevent his revolutionary aircraft designs from falling into the hands of Biggles’s old enemy Major Von Stalhein. In Biggles in the Baltic, Biggles’s first mission of the war sees him taken by submarine to a hidden air base in the Baltic, where he is to set up a secret unit of the RAF. In Biggles in the Jungle, our hero lands in Belize where he helps the local British governor destroy a gang of thugs who have enslaved native workers in the depths of the jungle.
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Pals at Suvla Bay

Henry Hanna


This is an unusual book in that it is the record of a company, a company of the 7th Royal Dublin Fusiliers(RDF) - `D' Company - at Gallipoli. The battalion was raised in August 1914 and allocated to 30th Brigade, 10th Irish Division. At the request of a Mr Browning, President of the Irish Rugby Football Union, the CO of the new battalion agreed to keep open a special company, `D' Company as it was subsequently known, for "Pals" from the Irish Rugby Union volunteers. It was a remarkable mix of volunteers - barristers, doctors, solicitors, stockbrokers, bankers, civil servants and the like, nearly all well known in Dublin's public and social life. Training in Ireland went on until, on the last day of April 1915, 7th RDF sailed for Holyhead and from there travelled to Basingstoke, the concentration area of the 10th Division. The final period training at divisional level lasted to the end of June and a week later they were off to the Dardanelles. They landed at Suvla Bay on the morning of
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For John, Winston, and of course, Harry

Mr David Michael Holmes


I started a journey to discover my Grandfather's War. This is the record of part of it, in prose, images, but mainly in poem.
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War Prose (Selections)

Ford Madox Ford (Author), Max Saunders (Author, Editor)


Ford's novel, "Parade's End", has been acknowledged as one of the great British novels about World War I. This book features a selection of Ford's other writings about the war, and should shed light on the tetralogy. It includes reminiscences, an unfinished novel, stories, and excerpts from letters.
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The Collected Poems of Wilfred Owen (New Directions Book)

Wilfred Owen


“The very content of Owen’s poems was, and still is, pertinent to the feelings of young men facing death and the terrors of war.” —The New York Times Book Review Wilfred Owen was twenty-two when he enlisted in the Artists’ Rifle Corps during World War I. By the time Owen was killed at the age of 25 at the Battle of Sambre, he had written what are considered the most important British poems of WWI. This definitive edition is based on manuscripts of Owen’s papers in the British Museum and other archives.
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The Red Flower: Poems Written in War Time

Henry Van Dyke


Kindle edition
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Rhymes of a Red Cross Man 1ST Edition

Robert W. Service


Rhymes of a Red Cross Man is a collection of poems based on Robert Service's experience as a Red Cross ambulance driver in France during World War I. The book begins with the patriotic call to war: "High and low, all must go: Hark to the shout of War!" Some of the volunteers never come back (e.g. "The Fool," "Our Hero," and "My Mate"). Others are severely wounded (e.g. "The Convalescent" and "Wounded"). Throughout the collection there is evidence of ambivalence toward the individual German soldier. In some moments he is "Only a Boche" (or Hun) who has killed the soldier's buddies, but in other moments the narrators reflect that their opponents are also ordinary men, sons and fathers, who love their families. Robert Service's poems are generally patriotic and meant to build morale.
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Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature

Santanu Das


The First World War ravaged the male body on an unprecedented scale, yet soldiers experienced moments of great tenderness and physical intimacy in the trenches. Touch, the most elusive and private of the senses, became central to the traumatic experience of war. Through extensive archival and historical research, analysing previously unknown letters and diaries alongside literary texts such as the poetry of Wilfred Owen, Santanu Das opens up new ways of understanding First World War writing through an intimate history of how war was experienced by the body.
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War poets, 1914-1918 (Bibliographical series of supplements to British book news on writers and their work)

Edmund Blunden


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A Preface to Wilfred Owen

John Purkis


This text seeks to understand how the poet Wilfred Owen fits into the poetic debate about the meaning of war. It also explores how his literary stance was formed by earlier and contemporary influences and comments in detail about some of his works.
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Edgar a Guest Collection (3 Antique Books; Rhymes of Childhood, War Time Rhymes, Just Folk)

Edgar Guest


WW I era poetry set
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In Parenthesis (New York Review Books)

David Jones


"This writing has to do with some things I saw, felt, and was part of": with quiet modesty, David Jones begins a work that is among the most powerful imaginative efforts to grapple with the carnage of the First World War, a book celebrated by W.B. Yeats and T.S. Eliot as one of the masterpieces of modern literature. Fusing poetry and prose, gutter talk and high music, wartime terror and ancient myth, Jones, who served as an infantryman on the Western Front, presents a picture at once panoramic and intimate of a world of interminable waiting and unforeseen death. And yet throughout he remains alert to the flashes of humanity that light up the wasteland of war.
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The Audacious War

Clarence W. Barron


The war of 1914 is not only the greatest war in history but the greatest in the political and economic sciences. Indeed, it is the greatest war of all the sciences, for it involves all the known sciences of earth, ocean, and the skies.
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The Great War Syndicate

Frank R. Stockton


In the spring of a certain year, not far from the close of the nineteenth century, when the political relations between the United States and Great Britain became so strained that careful observers on both sides of the Atlantic were forced to the belief that a serious break in these relations might be looked for at any time, the fishing schooner Eliza Drum sailed from a port in Maine for the banks of Newfoundland. It was in this year that a new system of protection for American fishing vessels had been adopted in Washington. Every fleet of these vessels was accompanied by one or more United States cruisers, which remained on the fishing grounds, not only for the purpose of warning American craft who might approach too near the three-mile limit, but also to overlook the action of the British naval vessels on the coast, and to interfere, at least by protest, with such seizures of American fishing boats as might appear to be unjust. In the opinion of all persons of sober judgment, there w
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In Flanders Fields: The Story of the Poem by John McCrae

Linda Granfield


The lines of the celebrated poem are interwoven with fascinating information about the First World War, details of daily life in the trenches, accounts of McCrae's experience in his field hospital, and the circumstances that led to the writing of "In Flanders Fields."
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The Fierce Light : The Battle of the Somme, July-November 1916 : Prose and Poetry

Anne Powell


At 7.30 am on 1 July 1916, the Battle of the Somme opened when the first waves of the British troops went 'over the top'; by the end of the day nearly 60,000 had become casualties on the 18-mile front; one third of these men had been killed. During the following 140 days the relentless, appalling slaughter continued. By mid November, when the winter weather had set in and the battleground had become a sea of mud, the offensive was halted. The British and French armies had advanced six miles. The combined Allied and German losses were over a million men; 420,000 of those were British. "The Fierce Light" contains a selection of prose and poetry from 38 contemporary British, Australian and New Zealand writers who fought during the Battle of the Somme. Men from different backgrounds tell their terrible stories in powerful and vivid language. The extracts from their published works, depicting the horrendous bloodshed and destruction they experienced, are placed in chronological order betwee
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Why Nations Go to War

John G. Stoessinger


Meant to transmit an understanding of warfare from World War I to the present, WHY NATIONS GO TO WAR, a unique book and a product of reflection by the author, is built around ten case studies culminating in the two new wars that ushered in the twenty-first century, Afghanistan and Iraq. The distinguishing feature of the text remains the author's emphasis on the pivotal role of the personalities of leaders who take their nations or their following across the threshold into war.
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Forever England: The Life of Rupert Brooke

Mike Read


Rupert Brooke became for many the embodiment of a generation that was all but wiped out between 1914 and 1918. He became a legend largely due to one of his sonnets: "If I should die, think only this of me / That there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever England". The poem, and all that it represented, became the focal point of a nation's grief for its lost youth. Brooke died in 1915 on board ship in the Aegean Sea on his way to fight at Gallipoli. Winston Churchill wrote his obituary. In this book, Mike Read writes about Brooke's days from his life at Rugby, through his time at King's College, Cambridge, to The Orchard, The Old Vicarage, Grantchester, America, Canada, the South Seas and the Great War. His poems emerge dramatically from a tangled love life, a nervous breakdown, an eminent circle of friends, Fabian politics and a South Seas love affair that produced a previously unrecorded daughter.
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Nicholas Everard (Mariner of England) (v. 1)

Alexander Fullerton


At 2.28pm on the last day of May 1916, in the grey windswept North Sea off the coast of Jutland, the fire-gongs ring...THE BLOODING OF THE GUNS is the first of the Nicholas Everard novels, the series that has won Alexander Fullerton world-wide acclaim. Dramatic and meticulously researched, this is how it felt to fight in the Battle of Jutland: to be in a tiny destroyer racing to launch torpedoes into a line of Dreadnoughts' blazing guns, to fight inside a battleship's fifteen-inch turrets, or on the bridge of a cruiser under pulverising bombardment. This IS battle at sea...Also in this volume are SIXTY MINUTES FOR ST GEORGE, a thrilling account of the raid on Zeebrugge, and PATROL TO THE GOLDEN HORN, where Nick Everard embarks on a dangerous submarine mission in the dying days of the war.
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A Century of Spies: Intelligence in the Twentieth Century

Jeffery T. Richelson


Here is the ultimate inside history of twentieth-century intelligence gathering and covert activity. Unrivalled in its scope and as readable as any spy novel, A Century of Spies travels from tsarist Russia and the earliest days of the British Secret Service to the crises and uncertainties of today's post-Cold War world, offering an unsurpassed overview of the role of modern intelligence in every part of the globe. From spies and secret agents to the latest high-tech wizardry in signals and imagery surveillance, it provides fascinating, in-depth coverage of important operations of United States, British, Russian, Israeli, Chinese, German, and French intelligence services, and much more. All the key elements of modern intelligence activity are here. An expert whose books have received high marks from the intelligence and military communities, Jeffrey Richelson covers the crucial role of spy technology from the days of Marconi and the Wright Brothers to today's dazzling array of Space Ag
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Regeneration Trilogy

Pat Barker


A trilogy of novels set during World War I which mingle real and fictional characters. "The Ghost Road" won the 1995 Booker Prize
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EASTERN FRONT 1914-1920, THE (History of World War I)

Michael Neiberg (Author), David Jordan (Author)


The length of the front in the East was much longer than in the West. The theater of war was roughly delimited by the Baltic Sea in the West and Moscow in the East, a distance of 1,200 kilometers, and Saint Petersburg in the North and the Black Sea in the South, a distance of more than 1,600 kilometers. This had a drastic effect on the nature of the warfare. While World War I on the Western Front developed into trench warfare, the battle lines on the Eastern Front were much more fluid and trenches never truly developed. This was because the greater length of the front ensured that the density of soldiers in the line was lower so the line was easier to break. Once broken, the sparse communication networks made it difficult for the defender to rush reinforcements to the rupture in the line to mount a rapid counteroffensive and seal off a breakthrough. There was also the fact that the terrain in the Eastern European theater was quite solid, often making it near impossible to construct any
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A Short History of World War I

James L. Stokesbury


World War I was a bloodletting so vast and unprecedented that for a generation it was known simply as the Great War. Casualty lists reached unimagined proportions as the same ground -- places like Ypres and the Somme -- was fought over again and again. Other major bloody battles remain vivid in memory to this day: Gallipoli and the Battle of Jutland are but two examples. Europe was at war with itself, and the effect on Western civilization was profound, its repercussions felt even today. World War I saw the introduction of modern technology into the military arena: The tank, airplane, machine gun, submarine, and -- most lethal of all -- poison gas, all received their first widespread use. Professor Stokesbury analyzes these technological innovations and the war's complex military campaigns in lucid detail. At the same time he discusses the great political events that unfolded during the war, such as the Russian Revolution and the end of the Hapsburg dynasty, putting the social and pol
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World War One: A Short History

Norman Stone


Ages 12 & up. The First World War was the overwhelming disaster from which everything else in the twentieth century stemmed. Fourteen million combatants died, four empires were destroyed, and even the victors’ empires were fatally damaged. World War I took humanity from the nineteenth century forcibly into the twentieth—and then, at Versailles, cast Europe on the path to World War II as well. In World War One, Norman Stone, one of the world’s greatest historians, has achieved the almost impossible task of writing a terse and witty short history of the war. A captivating, brisk narrative, World War One is Stone’s masterful effort to make sense of one of the twentieth century’s pivotal conflicts.
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World War I 101: The Animated TextVook

Dr. Vook Ph.D


In 1914, for the first time in history, the WORLD would go to war. Whether you’re a history buff or always wanted to know a little more about the faces and places of the Great War, “World War I 101: The TextVook” is the newest, most engaging way to learn it all. This Vook presents World War I in an engaging and easy-to-follow format, combining text AND video. Download it now and experience this massive military precedent in a whole new light! World War I began with one man’s assassination and ended in massive casualties worldwide as well as dramatic shifts in global power. The world would never be the same again. The war inspired classic texts and art from all corners of the world, and dominated five years of life on Earth. In “World War I 101: The TextVook,” Dr. Vook, Ph.D, breaks it down for you into eight chapters that will leave you inspired and help you retain all that you’ve learned. Take a leap back in history with Dr. Vook, and explore the battles, strategy, and key figures
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The First World War, Second Edition: A Complete History

Martin Gilbert


It was to be the war to end all wars, and it began at 11:15 on the morning of June 28, 1914, in an outpost of the Austro-Hungarian Empire called Sarajevo. It would end officially almost five years later. Unofficially, it has never ended: the horrors we live with today were born in the First World War. It left millions-civilians and soldiers-maimed or dead. And it left us with new technologies of death: tanks, planes, and submarines; reliable rapid-fire machine guns and field artillery; poison gas and chemical warfare. It introduced us to U-boat packs and strategic bombing, to unrestricted war on civilians and mistreatment of prisoners. Most of all, it changed our world. In its wake, empires toppled, monarchies fell, whole populations lost their national identities as political systems, and geographic boundaries were realigned. Instabilities were institutionalized, enmities enshrined. And the social order shifted seismically. Manners, mores, codes of behavior; literature and the arts;
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The First World War: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

Michael Howard


By the time the First World War ended in 1918, eight million people had died in what had been perhaps the most apocalyptic episode the world had known. This Very Short Introduction provides a concise and insightful history of the Great War--from the state of Europe in 1914, to the role of the US, the collapse of Russia, and the eventual surrender of the Central Powers. Examining how and why the war was fought, as well as the historical controversies that still surround the war, Michael Howard also looks at how peace was ultimately made, and describes the potent legacy of resentment left to Germany. This edition was previously published in paperback as The First World War.
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The Russian Origins of the First World War

Sean McMeekin


The catastrophe of the First World War, and the destruction, revolution, and enduring hostilities it wrought, make the issue of its origins a perennial puzzle. Since World War II, Germany has been viewed as the primary culprit. Now, in a major reinterpretation of the conflict, Sean McMeekin rejects the standard notions of the war’s beginning as either a Germano-Austrian preemptive strike or a “tragedy of miscalculation.” Instead, he proposes that the key to the outbreak of violence lies in St. Petersburg. It was Russian statesmen who unleashed the war through conscious policy decisions based on imperial ambitions in the Near East. Unlike their civilian counterparts in Berlin, who would have preferred to localize the Austro-Serbian conflict, Russian leaders desired a more general war so long as British participation was assured. The war of 1914 was launched at a propitious moment for harnessing the might of Britain and France to neutralize the German threat to Russia’s goal: partitio
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The War to End All Wars: The American Military Experience in World War I

Edward M. Coffman


" The War to End All Wars is considered by many to be the best single account of America's participation in World War I. Covering famous battles, the birth of the air force, naval engagements, the War Department, and experiences of the troops, this indispensable volume is again available in paperback for students and general readers.
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The Ottoman Road to War in 1914: The Ottoman Empire and the First World War (Cambridge Military Histories)

Mustafa Aksakal


Why did the Ottoman Empire enter the First World War in late October 1914, months after the war's devastations had become clear? Were its leaders 'simple-minded,' 'below-average' individuals, as the doyen of Turkish diplomatic history has argued? Or, as others have claimed, did the Ottomans enter the war because War Minister Enver Pasha, dictating Ottoman decisions, was in thrall to the Germans and to his own expansionist dreams? Based on previously untapped Ottoman and European sources, Mustafa Aksakal's dramatic study challenges this consensus. It demonstrates that responsibility went far beyond Enver, that the road to war was paved by the demands of a politically interested public, and that the Ottoman leadership sought the German alliance as the only way out of a web of international threats and domestic insecurities, opting for an escape whose catastrophic consequences for the empire and seismic impact on the Middle East are felt even today.
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Naval Battles of the First World War (Military Classics Series)

Geoffrey Bennett


With the call to action stations of August 1914, the Royal Navy faced its greatest test since the time of Nelson. Geoffrey Bennett's classic history of the Great War at sea combines graphic and stirring accounts of all the principal naval engagements - battles overseas, in home waters and, for the first time, under the sea - with analysis of the strategy and tactics of both sides. He brings these sea battles dramatically to life, and confirms the Allied navies' vital contribution to victory. In his words, "Though the titanic struggle on the Western Front dominated the strategy of the Allies, it was their navies, of which the British was immeasurably the strongest, that in the end brought Germany to her knees". Illustrated with maps, plans and contemporary photographs, this detailed, immaculately-researched account is the authoritative history on an often overlooked but hugely important aspect of the First World War. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this
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Germany’s Western Front: Translations from the German Official History of the Great War, 1914, Part 1

Mark Osborne Humphries (Editor), John Maker (Editor)


This multi-volume series in six parts is the first English-language translation of Der Weltkrieg, the German official history of the First World War. Originally produced between 1925 and 1944 using classified archival records that were destroyed in the aftermath of the Second World War, Der Weltkrieg is the inside story of Germany’s experience on the Western front. Recorded in the words of its official historians, this account is vital to the study of the war and official memory in Weimar and Nazi Germany. Although exciting new sources have been uncovered in former Soviet archives, this work remains the basis of future scholarship. It is essential reading for any scholar, graduate student, or enthusiast of the Great War. This volume, the second to be published, covers the outbreak of war in July–August 1914, the German invasion of Belgium, the Battles of the Frontiers, and the pursuit to the Marne in early September 1914. The first month of war was a critical period for the German a
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The First World War: Volume I: To Arms (First World War (Oxford Paperback))

Hew Strachan


This is the first truly definitive history of World War I, the war that has had the greatest impact on the course of the twentieth century. The first generation of its historians had access to a limited range of sources, and they focused primarily on military events. More recent approaches have embraced cultural, diplomatic, economic, and social history. In this authoritative and readable history, Hew Strachan combines these perspectives with a military and strategic narrative. The result is an account that breaks the bounds of national preoccupations to become both global and comparative. The first of three volumes in this magisterial study, To Arms examines not only the causes of the war and its opening clashes on land and sea, but also the ideas that underpinned it, and the motivations of the people who supported it. It provides pioneering accounts of the war's finances, the war in Africa, and the Central Powers' bid to widen the war outside Europe.
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The Devil Dogs at Belleau Wood: U.S. Marines in World War I

Dick Camp


Facing massed German machine guns, the Marines made sweep after bloody sweep through Belleau Wood. Repeatedly accosted by the retreating French and urged to turn back, Captain Lloyd Williams of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, uttered the now-famous retort, "Retreat, hell. We just got here." And indeed, by the end of that terrible June of 1918, the Marines had broken the back of the Germans powerful spring offensive. Their ferocity had earned them the nickname Teufelshunde--Devil Dogs--from their enemies; it also won such admiration from their allies that the French government changed the name of Belleau Wood to Bois de la Brigade de Marine. The Devil Dogs at Belleau Wood recreates the drama of the battle for Belleau Wood as it was experienced by those who were there. Drawing on numerous firsthand accounts of the month-long engagement, the book captures the spirit of the Leathernecks in desperate battle. It offers a harrowing look at a critical campaign in which, as one sold
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A Grateful Heart: The History of a World War I Field Hospital (Contributions in Military Studies)

Michael E. Shay


Shay looks at the crucial yet unheralded role played by support troops in World War I, in particular those in the medical branch. The unarmed men of the 103rd Field Hospital Company, 26th (Yankee) Division spent a year and a half in France performing their duty bravely under arduous conditions. The experiences of the men of the 103rd Field Hospital were undoubtedly shared by any member of a frontline field hospital. Based on nearly four years of research, including original archival material, he fills an important gap in the military history of World War I. A Grateful Heart is a detailed account of the 103rd Field Hospital Company, 26th (Yankee) Division in World War I. All aspects of the company are examined. The book is more than a chronological narrative and it places the unit in the context of the larger role of the 26th Division. It features original maps and passenger lists showing the members of the unit who sailed to France in 1917 and who returned in 1919.
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To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918 The Epic Battle That Ended the First World War

Edward G. Lengel


On September 26, 1918, more than one million American soldiers prepared to assault the German-held Meuse-Argonne region of France. Their commander, General John J. Pershing, said that in thirty-six hours the doughboys would crack the German defenses and open the road to Berlin. Six weeks of savage fighting later, the battle finally ended with the signing of the armistice that concluded the First World War. The Meuse-Argonne had fallen at the cost of more than 120,000 American casualties, including 26,000 dead. In the bloodiest battle the country had ever seen, an entire generation of young Americans had been transformed forever. To Conquer Hell is gripping in its accounts of combat, studded with portraits of remarkable soldiers like Pershing, Harry Truman, George Patton, and Alvin York, and authoritative in presenting the big picture. It is military history of the first rank and, incredibly, the first in-depth account of this fascinating and important battle.
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Battles of World War 1 (Vital Guides)

Martin Marix Evans


The major land, sea and air battles of World War I are described with concise data on more than 50 confrontations. This text is structured so that readers can follow events in a chronological order on the Western and Eastern Fronts of the war in Europe and also in the Balkan, Middle East, Africa and at sea.
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Sub-Machine Gun: The Development of Sub-Machine Guns and their Ammunition from World War 1 to the Present Day

Maxim Popenker & Anthony G. Williams


In this book, weapons experts Maxim Popenker and Anthony Williams present a study of the development of the sub-machine gun and its ammunition, before undertaking a country-by-country survey of the weapons designed, built and used across the world. With data tables giving details of ammunition and hundreds of photographs, this is an authoritative account of an essential infantry weapon.
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The World War I Reader

Michael S. Neiberg (Editor)


Almost 100 years after the Treaty of Versailles was signed, World War I continues to be badly understood and greatly oversimplified. Its enormous impact on the world in terms of international diplomacy and politics, and the ways in which future military engagements would evolve, be fought, and ultimately get resolved have been ignored. With this reader of primary and secondary documents, edited and compiled by Michael S. Neiberg, students, scholars, and war buffs can gain an extensive yet accessible understanding of this conflict. Neiberg introduces the basic problems in the history of World War I, shares the words and experiences of the participants themselves, and, finally, presents some of the most innovative and dynamic current scholarship on the war. Neiberg, a leading historian of World War I, has selected a wide array of primary documents, ranging from government papers to personal diaries, demonstrating the war’s devastating effect on all who experienced it, whether Presiden
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Origins of the First World War: Revised 3rd Edition (3rd Edition)

Gordon Martel


A concise, reliable, readable and up-to-date account for students of the origins of the First World War. The study of the First World War is key to all courses in Modern European History. Written to be a clear, concise introduction, without being simplistic. Suitable as an introduction for those new to the subject, or as a quick source of reference for more advanced undergraduates who may be struggling with early twentieth century geo-politics. It includes a particularly helpful guide to further reading divided by geographical region and by topic to support essay writing. Also offers a section of documents that includes key treaties, crises and representations of popular militarism and nationalism, as well as a chronology, glossary and who’s who.
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The Greatest War Stories Never Told: 100 Tales from Military History to Astonish, Bewilder, and Stupefy (History Channel)

Rick Beyer


Search the annals of military history and you will discover no end of quirky characters and surprising true stories: The topless dancer who saved the Byzantine Empire. The World War I battle that was halted so a soccer game could be played. The scientist who invented a pigeon-guided missile in 1943. And don't forget the elderly pig whose death triggered an international crisis between the United States and Great Britain. This is the kind of history you'll find in The Greatest War Stories Never Told. One hundred fascinating stories drawn from two thousand years of military history, accompanied by a wealth of photographs, maps, drawings, and documents that help bring each story to life. Little-known tales told with a one-two punch of history and humor that will make you shake your head in disbelief -- but they're all true!
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The Wolf: The Mystery Raider That Terrorized The Seas During World War I

Richard Guilliatt & Peter Hohnen


On November 30, 1916, an apparently ordinary freighter left harbor in Kiel, Germany, and would not touch land again for another fifteen months. It was the beginning of an astounding 64,000-mile voyage that was to take the ship around the world, leaving a trail of destruction and devastation in her wake. For this was no ordinary freighter—this was the Wolf, a disguised German warship. In this gripping account of an audacious and lethal World War I expedition, Richard Guilliatt and Peter Hohnen depict the Wolf ’s assignment: to terrorize distant ports of the British Empire by laying minefields and sinking freighters, thus hastening Germany’s goal of starving her enemy into submission. Yet to maintain secrecy, she could never pull into port or use her radio, and to comply with the rules of sea warfare, her captain fastidiously tried to avoid killing civilians aboard the merchant ships he attacked, taking their crews and passengers prisoner before sinking the vessels. The Wolf thus bec
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The Illusion Of Victory: America In World War I

Thomas Fleming


In this sweeping historical canvas, Thomas Fleming undertakes nothing less than a drastic revision of our experience in World War I. He reveals how the British and French duped Wilson into thinking the war was as good as won, and there would be no need to send an army overseas. He describes a harried president making speech after speech proclaiming America's ideals while supporting espionage and sedition acts that sent critics to federal prisons. And he gives a harrowing account of how the Allies did their utmost to turn the American Expeditionary Force into cannon fodder on the Western Front.Thoroughly researched and dramatically told, The Illusion of Victory offers compelling testimony to the power of a president's visionary ideals-as well as a starkly cautionary tale about the dangers of applying them in a war-maddened world.
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Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I

Michael S. Neiberg


The common explanation for the outbreak of World War I depicts Europe as a minefield of nationalism, needing only the slightest pressure to set off an explosion of passion that would rip the continent apart. But in a crucial reexamination of the outbreak of violence, Michael Neiberg shows that ordinary Europeans, unlike their political and military leaders, neither wanted nor expected war during the fateful summer of 1914. By training his eye on the ways that people outside the halls of power reacted to the rapid onset and escalation of the fighting, Neiberg dispels the notion that Europeans were rabid nationalists intent on mass slaughter. He reveals instead a complex set of allegiances that cut across national boundaries. Neiberg marshals letters, diaries, and memoirs of ordinary citizens across Europe to show that the onset of war was experienced as a sudden, unexpected event. As they watched a minor diplomatic crisis erupt into a continental bloodbath, they expressed shock, revu
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The Great War, 1914-1918: Essays on the Military, Political and Social History of the First World War (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series)

R. J. Q. Adams (Editor)


R. J. Q. Adams is professor of history at Texas A&M University. He is co-author and author of several books, including Arms and the Wizard: Lloyd George and the Ministry of Munitions, 1914-1918, published by Texas A&M University Press.
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The Arming of Europe and the Making of the First World War (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

David G. Herrmann


David Herrmann's work is the most complete study to date of how land-based military power influenced international affairs during the series of diplomatic crises that led up to the First World War. Instead of emphasizing the naval arms race, which has been extensively studied before, Herrmann draws on documentary research in military and state archives in Germany, France, Austria, England, and Italy to show the previously unexplored effects of changes in the strength of the European armies during this period. Herrmann's work provides not only a contribution to debates about the causes of the war but also an account of how the European armies adopted the new weaponry of the twentieth century in the decade before 1914, including quick-firing artillery, machine guns, motor transport, and aircraft. In a narrative account that runs from the beginning of a series of international crises in 1904 until the outbreak of the war, Herrmann points to changes in the balance of military power to e
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Over Here: The First World War and American Society

David M. Kennedy


The Great War of 1914-1918 confronted the United States with one of the most wrenching crises in the nation's history. It also left a residue of disruption and disillusion that spawned an even more ruinous conflict scarcely a generation later. Over Here is the single-most comprehensive discussion of the impact of World War I on American society. This 25th anniversary edition includes a new afterword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author David M. Kennedy, that explains his reasons for writing the original edition as well as his opinions on the legacy of Wilsonian idealism, most recently reflected in President George W. Bush's national security strategy. More than a chronicle of the war years, Over Here uses the record of America's experience in the Great War as a prism through which to view early twentieth century American society. The ways in which America mobilized for the war, chose to fight it, and then went about the business of enshrining it in memory all indicate important aspects
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The Hat in the Ring Gang: The Combat History of the 94th Aero Squadron in World War One (Schiffer Military History)

Charles Woolley


The names Raoul Lufbery, Doug Campbell, Reed Chambers, Ham Coolidge, and the greatest American fighter ace of World War I, Eddie Rickenbacker, are those most closely associated with Uncle Sam's "Hat in the Ring" squadron, the 94th Aero Squadron, U.S. Air Service, 1917-1919. This all new book, "The Hat in the Ring Gang," contains a rich mixture of official as well as personal contemporarily written accounts of the 94th Aero Squadron, the most successful pursuit squadron in the United States Air Service. Combat reports, letters of the aces, and diary entries of other pilots are woven together to tell the story. Over 375 photographs, color profiles on Nieuports and Spads, rosters of pilots, aircraft, and citations for bravery awards round out this lively history of war in the air American style, spotlighting the gallant 94th.
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The Marne, 1914: The Opening of World War I and the Battle That Changed the World

Holger H. Herwig


For the first time in a generation, here is a bold new account of the Battle of the Marne, a cataclysmic encounter that prevented a quick German victory in World War I and changed the course of two wars and the world. With exclusive information based on newly unearthed documents, Holger H. Herwig re-creates the dramatic battle and reinterprets Germany’s aggressive “Schlieffen Plan” as a carefully crafted design to avoid a protracted war against superior coalitions. He paints a fresh portrait of the run-up to the Marne and puts in dazzling relief the Battle of the Marne itself: the French resolve to win, and the crucial lack of coordination between Germany’s First and Second Armies. Herwig also provides stunning cameos of all the important players, from Germany’s Chief of General Staff Helmuth von Moltke to his rival, France’s Joseph Joffre. Revelatory and riveting, this is the source on this seminal event.
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Zeppelins of World War I

Wilbur Cross


Zeppelins of World War I details the saga of the most daring aerial campaigns of the Great War, the story of the development of dirigibles by Germany as machines of war, the psychological horror of air raids on London, the heroic efforts of Englands fighter pilots to shoot down these invading monsters and the consequent failure of Zeppelins to bring England to its knees.
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Nothing Less Than War: A New History of America's Entry into World War I

Justus D. Doenecke


When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. In Nothing Less Than War: A New History of America's Entry into World War I, Justus D. Doenecke examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I. Doenecke reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.S. economy was threatened by European blockades and as Americans died on ships sunk by German U-boats. The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as Doenecke demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. Noth
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Uncle Sam Wants You: World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen

Christopher Capozzola


Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of th
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Tanks and Trenches: First Hand Accounts of Tank Warfare in the First World War

David Fletcher (Editor)


The vivid accounts in this book are taken from the early days of tank warfare and give an idea of the crucial role that tanks played in breaking the murderous stalemate on the Western Front. This influence was acknowledged by friend and foe alike and, while not decisive, it certainly hastened the end of that dreadful conflict, saving thousands of Allied lives and ushering in a new era of mechanised warfare. David Fletcher, the editor, draws his material exclusively from the archives of the world famous Tank Museum at Bovington Camp, Dorset. His linking narrative guides us through the war, battle-by-battle, from 15 September 1916 to the Armistice, using first hand accounts of the tank actions. A wealth of original photographs showing the tanks and their crews, both in action and at rest, support these vivid accounts. Tanks and Trenches is an invaluable aid to our deeper understanding of the war on the Western Front, seen as it is through the eyes of those who were actually there.
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World War One: German Army (Brassey's History)

Stephen Bull


This is a great book for those who are interested in the German Imperial Army. It contains historical info on the uniforms and weapons used by the German Soldat of WWI. I was disappointed to find not many colour photos of the equipment and uniforms, however, this book makes up by its large amount of period photos of soliders and its few colour photos it does have which are excellent.
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The First World War in Africa

Hew Strachan


To Arms is Hew Strachan's most complete and definitive study of the opening of the First World War. Now, key sections from this magisterial work are published as individual paperbacks, each complete in itself, and with a new introduction by the author. The First World War was not just fought in the trenches of the western front. It embraced all of Africa. Embracing the perspectives of all the nations who fought there, this is the first ever full account of the Great War in Africa.
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French Tanks of World War I (New Vanguard)

Steven Zaloga


This title examines the emergence of the first modern tank, the Renault FT. It is a little known fact that France fielded more tanks in World War I than any other army. However, France's early tanks suffered from poor mobility and armor compared to their contemporaries. Indeed, their initial use on the Chemin des Dames in 1917 was a bloody fiasco. In spite of initial set-backs, the French army redeemed its reputation with the Renault FT. The Renault FT pioneered the modern tank design, with armament in a revolutionary central turret and the engine in the rear. More importantly, the Renault was designed to be cheap and easy to manufacture. Discover the history of the early French armor developments and their triumphant new design, the Renault FT, that helped to turn the tide of war in the favor of the Allies.
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A Brief History of the First World War (HistoryWorld's Pocket History Series)

Bamber Gascoigne


Kindle edition.This account of the First World War begins with the dangerous arms race developing between Germany and Britain in the early 1900s. Europe seems poised for a war, which is ignited when the heir to the Austrian empire is assassinated in 1914. There follow the four dreadful years of trench warfare, with soldiers undergoing constant bombardment and dying in their hundreds of thousands. The final end is ominous too. While an influenza pandemic adds millions more to the global death toll, the peace negotiators in Versailles impose on Germany a harsh treaty that can be partly blamed for a second world war a mere 20 years later.
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The US Army of World War I (Men-at-Arms)

Mark Henry


When the USA entered World War I in April 1917 her Regular Army counted just 128,000 men and lacked all the necessary equipment and training for modern trench warfare. By the Armistice of November 1918, General John J.Pershing's American Expeditionary Force in France had more than 2 million men and was holding 25 per cent of the Western Front. They had helped smash Ludendorff's brilliant Operation "Michael" in the lines before Paris; had turned onto the offensive themselves at St Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne; and if Germany had not negotiated peace with unexpected speed the US Army would have taken over from their tired Allies an even greater share of the planned 1919 campaign. This concise account of America's first world class army, its organization, uniforms, weapons and character, is illustrated with rare photos and eight full color plates.
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The Encyclopedia of World War I : A Political, Social, and Military History ( 5 vol. set)

Spencer C. Tucker & Priscilla Mary Roberts (Editors)


The Encyclopedia of World War I: A Political, Social, and Military History treats its monumental subject with the scope and insight it deserves. Its lavishly illustrated volumes, produced by an international team of experts, offer a deeper, more richly researched presentation of the battles, campaigns, and weapons technologies of the Great War than any previous work. The encyclopedia also ranges well beyond the day-to-day battlefield struggles to capture the whole impact of the war, offering in-depth portraits of historic figures, everyday soldiers, and civilians on all home fronts. It provides the latest thinking from experts around the world on the war's buildup (the Anglo-German naval arms race), legacy (the Russian Revolution and Civil War, the Red Scare in the United States), and unresolved questions such as the ultimate responsibility for the war. With over 1,200 entries (over one million words), plus a volume of primary documents, The Encyclopedia of World War I is the defini
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The Origins of the First and Second World Wars (Cambridge Perspectives in History)

Frank McDonough


Ages 16 & up. This innovative new study analyzes the origins of the First and Second World Wars in one single volume by drawing on a wide range of material, including original sources. In concise, readable chapters, the author surveys the key issues surrounding the causes of both wars, offers an original and critical survey of the conflict of opinion among historians and provides a lively selection of primary documents on major issues. The result is a unique perspective on the origins of the two most devastating military conflicts in world history.
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The British Soldier of the First World War (Shire Library)

Peter Doyle


The First World War affected the lives of a whole generation of people in Britain and the Commonwealth. Most people living today will have an ancestor who fought or died in the conflict, and as the 90th anniversary of the conclusion of the war approaches, there has been a rush of people trying to trace their ancestors and understand what life for them was like during World War I. While the familiar images - the photographs, film, poetry and prose of the First World War focus on the hellish trenches, mud and death, there is another dimension to the soldiers life in the war - that of everyday life at the front. The Tommy was only in the trenches for at most one-quarter of his time overseas, and when away from the front, vigorous routine, training and order soon took over. Peter Doyle addresses this, describing the lives of British soldiers while not in the trenches at the front, exploring the life of the average soldier of the First World War and answering the question: what was it r
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US Marine Corps in World War I, 1917-1918 (Men-At-Arms Series, 327)

Mark Henry


Though the US Marines initially struggled to maintain their distinctive identity within the huge American Expeditionary Force in France, their unforgettable performance at Belleau Wood, Soissons, St Mihiel, Blanc Mont and the Meuse-Argonne established their reputation as 'the most aggressive body of diehards on the Western Front'. This book describes the organization of this formidable force during World War II, from 1917 to 1918, and details their uniforms, insignia and decorations, weapons and equipment. Numerous photographs and eight full colour plates vividly depict the various ranks of the US Marine Corps.
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Toward the Flame: A Memoir of World War I

Hervey Allen


Considered by many to be the finest American combat memoir of the First World War, Hervey Allen’s Toward the Flame vividly chronicles the experiences of the Twenty-eighth Division in the summer of 1918. Made up primarily of Pennsylvania National Guardsmen, the Twenty-eighth Division saw extensive action on the Western Front. The story begins with Lieutenant Allen and his men marching inland from the French coast and ends with their participation in the disastrous battle for the village of Fismette. Allen was a talented observer, and the men with whom he served emerge as well-rounded characters against the horrific backdrop of the war. As a historical document, Toward the Flame is significant for its highly detailed account of the controversial military action at Fismette. At the same time, it easily stands as a work of literature. Clear-eyed and unsentimental, Allen employs the novelist’s powers of description to create a harrowing portrait of coalition war at its worst.
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The Yankee Division in the First World War: In the Highest Tradition (C. A. Brannen Series)

Michael E. Shay


Historians have been unkind to the 26th Division of the U.S. Army during World War I. Despite playing a significant role in all the major engagements of the American Expeditionary Force, the “Yankee Division,” as it was commonly known, and its beloved commanding officer, Maj. Gen. Clarence Edwards, were often at odds with Gen. John J. Pershing. Subsequently, the Yankee Division became the A.E.F.’s “whipping boy,” a reputation that has largely continued to the present day. In The Yankee Division in the First World War, author Michael E. Shay mines a voluminous body of first-person accounts to set forth an accurate record of the Yankee Division in France—a record that is, as he reports, “better than most.” Shay sheds new light on the ongoing conflict in leadership and notes that two of the division’s regiments received the coveted Croix de Guerre, the first ever awarded to an American unit. This first-rate study should find a welcome place on military history bookshelves, both for
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Over There: The American Experience in World War I (Classics of War)

Frank Freidel


Over There: The American Experience In World War I by Frank Freidel (Professor of History, Harvard University) presents the sometimes amazing, often horrifying experiences of American soldiers and sailors during World War I, and as told by the servicemen themselves! Extracts from diaries and letters, regimental histories, interviews, and more fill the pages of this detailed and vivid military history. Over There is very highly recommended as an "up-close" look at what it was really like to risk your life in order to "make the world safe for democracy" in the lethal arena of the Great War.
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The Origins of the First World War (3rd Edition)

James Joll


Although there are many narratives relating to this subject, the unique ambition and depth of this book make it a spectacular success. Revised and updated to incorporate the latest scholarship. The interest in World War One remains widespread. Global focus - incorporates a wider geographical scope in order to make it less Euro-centric.
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The First World War, Vol. 1: The Eastern Front 1914-1918 (Essential Histories)

Geoffrey Jukes


The first of four volumes that together provide a comprehensive account of World War I, this book unravels the complicated and tragic events of the war's Eastern Front. In particular, this book details the history of conflict between Germany and Russia, which proved disastrous for the Russian forces and would ultimately pave the way for the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917.
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Ottoman Army Effectiveness in World War I: A Comparative Study (Military History and Policy)

Edward J. Erickson


This volume examines how the Ottoman Army was able to evolve and maintain a high level of overall combat effectiveness despite the primitive nature of the Ottoman State during the First World War. Structured around four case studies, at the operational and tactical level, of campaigns involving the Ottoman Empire and the British Empire: Gallipoli in 1915, Kut in 1916, Third Gaza-Beersheba in 1917, and Megiddo in 1918. For each of these campaigns, particular emphasis is placed on examining specific elements of combat effectiveness and how they affected that particular battle. The prevalent historiography attributes Ottoman battlefield success primarily to external factors - such as the presence of German generals and staff officers; climate, weather and terrain that adversely affected allied operations; allied bumbling and amateurish operations; and inadequate allied intelligence. By contrast, Edward J. Erickson argues that the Ottoman Army was successful due to internal factors,
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The West Point Atlas of American Wars, Vol. 2: 1900-1918

Vincent J. Esposito


Long considered an authoritative reference, this updated edition of the classic military atlas of World War I is available again for the first time in 10 years. It analyzes the development of military theory and practice from the prewar period of Bismarck's Prussia to the creation of the League of Nations. This new edition incorporates research undertaken since the book's initial publication. 84 color maps .
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War In The Air. Being The Story Of The Part Played In The Great War By The Royal Air Force. Volume One.

Sir Walter Raleigh


The first book in the seven volume official history of the RAF in the Great War. This opening volume - the only one written by Sir Walter Raleigh before his death - covers the early days of the RFC and RNAS and the first months of the war.
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American Military Vehicles of World War I: An Illustrated History of Armored Cars, Staff Cars, Motorcycles, Ambulances, Trucks, Tractors and Tanks

Albert Mroz


In World War I the American motor vehicle industry was tested by the sudden appearance of vast transport challenges. The nation's immense manufacturing capabilities and abundant natural resources combined with increased standardization and mass production to enable the industry to meet the military's needs. Motor vehicles and aircraft were quickly cemented as the most influential military tools of the early twentieth century. This book both describes the development and use of a wide range of specialized motor vehicles during World War I and analyzes how their advent indelibly altered modern warfare and transportation.
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The Canadian Corps in World War I (Men-at-Arms)

Rene Chartrand


In 1914 with a regular army of only 3,110 men Canada was ill-prepared to enter World War I (1914-1918). Yet, in a display of incredible unanimity thousands of young Canadians volunteered to fight for the Allied cause. Ultimately the Canadian contribution was the most important non-British contingent within the vast Allied armies with a total of nearly 700,000 Canadians in uniform. For a nation of only 8 million people this was a remarkable war effort and nearly one of every ten who fought in the war did not return. The Canadians served in all the major conflicts on the Western Front; they were the first troops to suffer a gas attack in 1915 and served at Ypres and the Somme. The Canadian Corps is most famously remembered for their victory at Vimy Ridge one of the major successes of the war. This victory was also a national coming of age, having started the war as a single division under British command, here for the first time the four divisions of the Canadian Corps had attacked a
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The Origins of the First World War: Controversies and Consensus

Annika Mombauer


The seminal event of the 20th century, the origins of the First World War have always been difficult to establish and have aroused deep controversy. Annika Mombauer tracks the impassioned debates as they developed at critical points through the twentieth century. The book focuses on the controversy itself, rather than the specific events leading up to the war. Emotive and emotional from the very beginning of the conflict, the debate and the passions aroused in response to such issues as the ¿war-guilt paragraph¿ of the treaty of Versailles, are set in the context of the times in which they were proposed. Similarly, the argument has been fuelled by concerns over the sacrifices that were made and the casualities that were suffered. Were they really justified?
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Brave Battalion: The Remarkable Saga of the 16th Battalion (Canadian Scottish) in the First World War

Mark Zuehlke


German grenades generally fell short as they were throwing uphill, but their rifle fire was "deadly accurate." Casualties mounted. Unless something were to be done quickly, Mackie realized that No. 4 Company would be wiped out. Suddenly Richardson turned to the sergeant. "Will I gie them wund?" he asked calmly. "Aye mon, gie 'em wind, " Mackie barked back. Coolly, the young smooth-faced solder marched back and forth in front of the wire, playing the pipes while a storm of fire swirled past him on either side. "The effect was instantaneous," reads his Victoria Cross commendation. "Inspired by his splendid example, the company rushed the wire with such fury and determination that the obstacle was overcome and the positions captured."
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For Home and Country: World War I Propaganda on the Home Front (Studies in War, Society, and the Militar)

Celia M. Kingsbury


World War I prompted the first massive organized propaganda campaign of the twentieth century. Posters, pamphlets, and other media spread fear about the “Hun,” who was often depicted threatening American families in their homes, while additional campaigns encouraged Americans and their allies to support the war effort. With most men actively involved in warfare, women and children became a special focus—and a tool—of social manipulation during the war. For Home and Country examines the propaganda that targeted noncombatants on the home front in the United States and Europe during World War I. Cookbooks, popular magazines, romance novels, and government food agencies targeted women in their homes, especially their kitchens, pressuring them to change their domestic habits. Children were also taught to fear the enemy and support the war through propaganda in the form of toys, games, and books. And when women and children were not the recipients of propaganda, they were often used in p
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No Man's Land: Combat and Identity in World War 1

Eric J. Leed


Based on the firsthand accounts of German, French, British, and American front-line soldiers, No Man's Land examines how the first modern, industrialized war transformed the character of the men who participated in it. Ancient myths about war eroded in the trenches, where the relentless monotony and impotence of the solder's life was interrupted only by unpredictable moments of annihilation. Professor Leed looks at how the traumatic experience of combat itself and the wholesale shattering of the conventions and ethical codes of normal social life turned ordinary civilians into 'liminal men', men living beyond the limits of the accepted and the expected. He uses the concept of liminality to illuminate the central features of the war experience: the separation from 'home': the experience of pollution, death, comradeship, and 'the uncanny': and the ambivalence of returning veterans about civilian society. In a final chapter Professor Leed assesses the long-term political impact of the fro
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The Long Fuse: An Interpretation of the Origins of World War I

Laurence Lafore


In analyzing the causes of World War I without concern for the question of guilt, the author places emphasis on two central facts: first, that when statesmen and peoples took actions they knew might lead to war, they were not envisaging the catastrophe that the war became but rather a quick and limited war; and, second, that among the many conflicts that might have led to war, the one that did was the threat to the integrity of Austria-Hungary posed by Serbia and Serb nationalism.
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Eagles Over the Trenches: Two First Hand Accounts of the American Escadrille at War in the Air During World War 1-Flying For France: With the American Escadrille at Verdun and Our Pilots in the Air

James R. McConnell & William B. Perry


The fighter pilots-their aircraft and aerial battles fighting for France These two books are brought together in a single volume by Leonaur for the first time. They concern the lives, adventures, dogfights-and sometimes violent deaths-in the skies over the battlefields of the Western Front of young Americans who found common cause with France at a time when their own nation remained neutral. Their squadron was originally entitled the Escadrille Americain, but it became the internationally renowned Lafayette Escadrille and subsequently became part of the infant American Air Force. The first book, Flying for France is the account of one of the earliest groups of Americans who rallied to the tricolour. Drawn from among soldiers of fortune and the ranks of the Foreign Legion they flew the Spads and Nieuports bearing the Indian Chief head insignia which became the hallmark of their skill and daring. The second title Our Pilots in the Air is a is an account written as 'faction' by a serving
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Dictionary of the First World War (Pen & Sword Military Classics)

Stephen Pope & Elizabeth-Anne Wheal


This comprehensive dictionary of one of the world's greatest conflicts contains over 1,200 entries, combining facts, narrative and analysis, and covers all aspects of history's first global conflict such as :- *Actions from Achi Baba to the Zeebrugge raid, from the Falkland Islands to the Masurian lakes. *Campaigns from the Arab Revolt to Verdun, from East Africa to East Prussia. *Theaters of war from the Baltic to the Balkans, from Africa to the Arctic. *Fighters and commanders from Abdullah ibn Hussein to Sergeant York via Pershing, Pilsudski and Petain. *Forces from the Romanian Navy to the Royal Flying Corps. *Weapons and equipment from balloons and bayonets to Battleships and Big Bertha. *Tactics and strategies from submarine warfare to sniping, from the Schlieffen Plan to strategic bombing, breakthrough and blockade. *Politcs and diplomacy from Wilhelm II to Woodrow Wilson, from the July Crisis to Versailles. *Home Fronts from the Armenian massacres to the Amiens Dispatch, from A
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World War I Posters (Schiffer Book for Collectors with Price Guide)

Gary A. Borkan


World War I was the first war in which the pictorial full color poster played a major propaganda role. The eras greatest illustrators and fine artists contributed their energies to produce hundreds of great and classic posters. A surprising number of these posters have survived and many are still found in attics and barns today. This book illustrates over 450 World War I posters that were produced in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Many great classics are featured, but numerous less dramatic posters are also included which still have much historic importance. The text discusses the history of World War I posters and how they were designed and printed by color lithography. The book also devotes considerable attention to issues relevant to collectors: condition, conservation, display, and value. World War I posters are increasing in recognition and value as new collectors discover the beauty and power of these historic artifacts.
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The Mammoth Book of Eyewitness World War I: Over 280 First-Hand Accounts of the War to End All Wars

Jon Lewis


The Great War haunts the world still. It slaughtered a generation of young men; claimed limbs, wounded souls; drenched battlefields in blood; made sad legends of the Western Front, Gallipoli, and Jutland, and made heroes of poets; farmers, and factory workers. Clerks it made into Tommies, doughboys, or the Hun. And in this new Mammoth volume the voices of such eyewitnesses to history as these are heard again. So are the words of generals, statesmen, and kings. From the trenches in Flanders to the staff rooms of the Imperial German Army, with the Land Girls in England and U-boat crews in the Atlantic, alongside T. E. Lawrence in Arabia's desert and the Red Baron in the air—with a variety of extracts from letters, speeches, memoirs, diaries, and dispatches, this gripping collection covers each year and every facet of World War I. Among its wide range of witnesses are King George V, Robert Graves, Leon Trotsky, Erwin Rommel, Ernst Junger, Ernest Hemingway, American aviator Eddie Rickenbac
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The Great War in the Heart of Dixie: Alabama During World War 1

Dr. Martin T. Olliff


There has been much scholarship on how the U.S. as a nation reacted to World War I, but few have explored how Alabama responded. Did the state follow the federal government’s lead in organizing its resources or did Alabamians devise their own solutions to unique problems they faced? How did the state’s cultural institutions and government react? What changes occurred in its economy and way of life? What, if any, were the long-term consequences in Alabama? The contributors to this volume address these questions and establish a base for further investigation of the state during this era.
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The Lost History of 1914: Reconsidering the Year the Great War Began

Jack Beatty


In The Lost History of 1914, Jack Beatty offers a highly original view of World War I, testing against fresh evidence the long-dominant assumption that it was inevitable. "Most books set in 1914 map the path leading to war," Beatty writes. "This one maps the multiple paths that led away from it." Chronicling largely forgotten events faced by each of the belligerent countries in the months before the war started in August, Beatty shows how any one of them-a possible military coup in Germany; an imminent civil war in Britain; the murder trial of the wife of the likely next premier of France, who sought détente with Germany-might have derailed the war or brought it to a different end. In Beatty's hands, these stories open into epiphanies of national character, and offer dramatic portraits of the year's major actors-Kaiser Wilhelm, Tsar Nicholas II , Woodrow Wilson, along with forgotten or overlooked characters such as Pancho Villa, Rasputin, and Herbert Hoover. Europe's ruling classe
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The Somme: Heroism and Horror in the First World War

Martin Gilbert


"Gilbert has unearthed fascinating details of the campaign . . . An unforgettable read."--The Philadelphia Inquirer At 7:30 a.m. on July 1, 1916, the first Allied soldiers climbed out of their trenches along the Somme River in France and charged into no-man's-land, toward the barbed wire and machine guns at the German front lines. In the months that followed, the fifteen-mile-long territory erupted into the epicenter of the Great War, marking a pivotal moment in both the war and military history as tanks first appeared on the battlefield and air war emerged as a devastating and decisive factor in battle. All told, there were more than one million casualties, with 310,000 men dead in just 138 days. In this vivid account of one of history's most destructive battles, distinguished historian Martin Gilbert tracks the experiences of foot soldiers, generals, and everyone in between. With new photographs, journal entries, original maps, and military planning documents, The Somme is the
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British Popular Culture and the First World War (History of Warfare)

Jessica Meyer (Editor)


Much of the scholarship examining British culture of the First World War focusses on the 'high' culture of a limited number of novels, memoirs, plays and works of art, and the cultural reaction to them. This collection, by focussing on the cultural forms produced by and for a much wider range of social groups, including veterans, women, museum visitors and film goers, greatly expands the debate over how the war was represented by participants and the meanings ascribed to it in cultural production. Showcasing the work of both established academics and emerging scholars of the field, this book covers aspects of British popular culture from the material cultures of food and clothing to the representational cultures of literature and film. The result is an engaging and invigorating re-examination of the First World War and its place in British culture. The contributors to this book are: Keith Grieves; Rachel Duffett; Jane Tynan; Krisztina Robert; Lucy Noakes; Stella Moss; Carol Acton; Doug
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American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam (Modern War Studies)

Peter S. Kindsvatter


Some warriors are drawn to the thrill of combat and find it the defining moment of their lives. Others fall victim to fear, exhaustion, impaired reasoning, and despair. This was certainly true for twentieth-century American ground troops. Whether embracing or being demoralized by war, these men risked their lives for causes larger than themselves with no promise of safe return. This book is the first to synthesize the wartime experiences of American combat soldiers, from the doughboys of World War I to the grunts of Vietnam. Focusing on both soldiers and marines, it draws on histories and memoirs, oral histories, psychological and sociological studies, and even fiction to show that their experiences remain fundamentally the same regardless of the enemy, terrain, training, or weaponry. Peter Kindsvatter gets inside the minds of American soldiers to reveal what motivated them to serve and how they were turned into soldiers. He recreates the physical and emotional aspects of war to te
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World War I: The American Soldier Experience

Jennifer D. Keene


World War I explores the daily lives of the men and women who served the United States in the Great War. Relying extensively on letters, diaries, and reminiscences of those Americans who fought or served in World War I, Jennifer D. Keene reports on the training camp experience at home; the journey overseas; and the unique difficulties African Americans, Native Americans, women, and immigrants encountered in the predominately white and native-born army. She also describes in vivid detail the perspective of naval and air service personnel and, for those on the ground in France, the horrors of static trench warfare and active engagement in combat. Chapters describe coping with and treating disease and wounds; the devastating frequency of death; and for those who came home, the difficult reentry into civilian life, as well as the causes, strategic decisions, and political outcome of the war. This volume includes a timeline, illustrations, and an extensive bibliography of recommended source
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United States Army Shoulder Patches and Related Insignia: From World War I to Korea 1st Division to 40th Division)

William Keller


Beginning in the Civil War, the U.S. Army sought to find an effective system to distinguish troops from different units. In the closing days of World War I, it finally arrived at a practical and desirable solution with the adoption of the shoulder patch or shoulder sleeve insignia. For more than eighty years, this often simple device, has been the source of pride and inspiration for servicemen everywhere. This new book (the first of a multi-volume set), with a gallery of more than 800 color and sepia toned illustrations of original insignia and period photographs, documents the evolution of these special insignia. From the period beginning with World War I to the Korean War era, you won't find a more indispensable guide for the study and collection of U.S. Army shoulder patches. Collectors will especially enjoy the handy reference section for determining whether a patch was made by an ally or a former foe. With special emphasis on theater made patches, this volume and the ones that wil
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The First World War (Questions and Analysis in History)

Ian J. Cawood & David McKinnon-Bell


The First World War examines the outbreak, events themselves and aftermath of the Great War, and the political, social and economic effects on the European countries involved. Important themes explored include : * recruitment and propaganda * women's involvement in the war * protest and pacifism * the links between the war and the revolutions in Russia and Germany.
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Ordered to Die: A History of the Ottoman Army in the First World War (Contributions in Military Studies)

Edward J. Erickson


The first general history in English of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Ordered to Die is based on newly available Turkish archival and official sources. Outnumbered and outgunned, the Ottoman Army performed astonishingly well in the field and managed to keep fighting until the end of the war, long after many other armies had quit the field. It fought a multi-front war against sophisticated and capable enemies, including Great Britain, France, and Russia. Erickson challenges conventional thinking about Ottoman war aims, Ottoman military effectiveness, and the influence of German assistance. Written at the strategic and operational levels, this study frames the Turkish military contributions in a unitary manner by establishing linkages between campaigns and theaters. It also contains the first detailed discussion of Ottoman operations in Galicia, Romania, and Macedonia. Erickson provides a wealth of information on Ottoman Army organization, deployments, strategy, and staff p
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The Great War: An Imperial History

John H. Morrow


The Great War is a landmark history that firmly places the First World War in the context of imperialism. Set to overturn conventional accounts of what happened during this, the first truly international conflict, it extends the study of the First World War beyond the confines of Europe and the Western Front. By recounting the experiences of people from the colonies especially those brought into the war effort either as volunteers or through conscription, John Morrow's magisterial work also unveils the impact of the war in Asia, India and Africa. From the origins of World War One to its bloody (and largely unknown) aftermath, The Great War is distinguished by its long chronological coverage, first person battle and home front accounts, its pan European and global emphasis and the integration of cultural considerations with political.
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Brushes and Bayonets: Cartoons, sketches and paintings of World War I (General Military)

Luci Gosling


It is often said that a picture is worth a thousand words, but, during World War I, newspaper illustrations were worth even more, not only conveying the news to anxious families at home and soldiers in battle, but also entertaining and lifting the spirits of a nation at war. Featuring work by some of the most well-known illustrators of the period fromW. Heath Robinson to Bruce Bairnsfather, this thematic collection of 250 WorldWar I magazine illustrations is published in association with The Illustrated London News (the British Harper's). The illustrations included range from light-hearted strip cartoons and line drawings, to poignant sketches and dark and hard-hitting political satire. The images not only depict events as they happened, but reveal all the moods of a nation at war. Many are published here for the first time in 90 years, creating a unique, bittersweet portrayal of the Great War and a fascinating and very human, historical and artistic reference source.
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A Short Military History of World War I with Atlas

Various


A short history of the campaigns of World War I used as a text at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Covers the Fronties, Marne, East Prussia, Eastern Front, Dardanelles, Verdun-Somme, Italy & the Balkand, Mesopotamia & Palestine, Western Front, The German Drives, and St. Mihiel & Meuse-Argonne Operations.
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Winged Warfare - In World War I

Billy Bishop


Kindle edition. This was a very informative and entertaining account of what it was like to be a Canadian fighter pilot on the Western Front. I have read biographies of most of the WWI and WWII aces and this compared very favorably. It really is a fascinating story; it compares well with the classics by pilots McCudden and Lewis.
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German Artillery of World War One

Herbert Jager


World War I introduced the use of artillery on a hitherto unprecedented scale, changing the very nature of war from a series of set-piece battles to stalemates punctuated by attacks on frontlines. Starting with development of German artillery through 1914, this illustrated history describes in detail the light and heavy howitzers used by the Germans before going on to examine heavy mortars and long-range weapons. Specialist weapons for mountain, coastal and railway use are also covered, along with specialist engineer and infantry guns.
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French Women and the First World War: War Stories of the Home Front (Legacy of the Great War)

Margaret H. Darrow


Despite acts of female heroism, popular memory, as well as official memorialization in monuments and historic sites, has ignored French women's role in the First World War. This book explores stories that were never told and why they were not. These include the experiences of French women in the war, the stories they themselves told about these experiences and how French society interpreted them. The author examines the ways French women served their country - from charity work, nursing and munitions manufacture to volunteering for military service and espionage. In tracing stories about war heroines, but also about villainesses like Mata Hari, this fascinating study shows what these stories reveal about French understanding of the war, their hopes and fears for the future. While the masculine war story was unitary and unchanging, the feminine story was multiple and shifting. Initially praised for their voluntary mobilization, women's claims of patriotism were undercut by criticisms
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The Story of the Great War, Volume 1 Introductions; Special Articles; Causes of War; Diplomatic and State Papers

Allen L. (Allen Leon) Churchill (Editor), Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds Francis Trevelyan Miller (Editors)


Kindle edition.This is a collection of essays and historical documents related to WWI. Some really fascinating tidbits on the war. The essay prepared by an American Admiral is fascinating to me. He believed that WWI showed that submarines weren't that impressive, and same to airplanes. He has a remarkable comment about no one doubted that a submarine could sink a ship that insisted on being sunk. He also really overstated the value of the battle cruiser, IMO. The chapters on the various countries are quite interesting. Lots on the Balkans, also. This was written during WWI, so it didn't have the full information. Still, interesting for the thoughts during the war. If you like WWI history, this is a no-brainer download for free. Haven't checked out the other volumes yet.
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When Europe Went Mad: A Brief History of the First World War

Terence T. Finn


"When Europe Went Mad: A Brief History of the First World War" is not your typical World War I read. Terence T. Finn offers his readers the important facts of one of the most significant wars in human history, yet presents it in a concise and comprehensive style meant for the common reader and history buff alike. "When Europe Went Mad" recounts the harrowing events of a war now nearly a century behind us, and boldly tells the story of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF). Finn reminds the reader that well before General Dwight D. Eisenhower led American G.I.s into combat (1943-1945), John J. Pershing took an American army 'over there' and made history. With grace, Finn resurrects an understanding of this war's significance and ensures that its worldwide impacts, and the lives lost in the name of it, are never forgotten.
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The Battle of the Bulge: The Losheim Gap / Holding the Line (Stackpole Military History Series)

Hans Wijers


Most accounts of the Battle of the Bulge focus on Bastogne, but the Germans' main thrust actually occurred to the north, where Sepp Dietrich's Sixth SS Panzer Army stormed through the Losheim Gap. In this region of thick forests and tiny villages, U.S. troops halted the best of the German war machine, including the 12th SS Panzer and the 3rd Fallschirmjager Divisions.
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World War I Gas Warfare Tactics and Equipment (Elite)

Simon Jones


Osprey's study of gas warfare tactics that were employed during World War I (1914-1918). Battlefield Gas was first employed in April 1915 at the village of Langemarck near Ypres. At 1700 hours the Germans released a five mile-wide cloud of 168 tons of chlorine gas from 520 cylinders, causing panic and death in the French and Algerian trenches. Despite initial widespread condemnation and disgust, its use rapidly spread with all the armies entering into the race to produce gases, new ways to use them, and protective measures including masks and warning systems. For the first time in detail, this book charts the development of gas as a battlefield weapon and the steps taken to counter it. Delivery methods, including the use of artillery, the consequences of changing wind direction, and infantry advancing into an area just gassed, are all covered alongside key milestones in its introduction and usage. With an abundant array of artwork and photographs illustrating the gas masks, insig
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A Soldier in World War I: The Diary of Elmer W. Sherwood

Robert H. Ferrell & Elmer W. Sherwood


In April 1917 a sophomore from Indiana University, inspired by the stories of his grandfather’s service in the Union army during the Civil War, left school and enlisted with a National Guard unit in Indianapolis that became the 150th Field Artillery Regiment. Before long the young man, Elmer W. Sherwood, found himself in the thick of fighting in France, as his artillery regiment served in combat with the 42nd (Rainbow) Division, including the horrendous Meuse-Argonne offensive that claimed 26,000 American lives. Sherwood, who described himself as the Rainbow Hoosier, kept a diary of his time overseas, including his experiences in the army of occupation following the war’s end. Published by the Indiana Historical Society Press and edited by Robert H. Ferrell, Indiana University distinguished professor of history emeritus , A Soldier in World War I: The Diary of Elmer W. Sherwood, captures the words of the Hoosier soldier as he wrote them on the front lines. Corporal Sherwood tells of t
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The First Air War: 1914-1918

Lee Kennett


"In this fascinating book, Lee Kennett tells of (World War I fliers and) their experiences on all fronts and skillfully places them in proper context" (Edward M. Coffman, author of "The Old Army"). "A welcome and long overdue addition to the literature of military aviation."--Richard P. Hallion, Lindbergh Professor, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
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The World Crisis, 1911-1918

Winston S. Churchill


As first lord of the admiralty and minister for war and air, Churchill stood resolute at the center of international affairs. In this classic account, he dramatically details how the tides of despair and triumph flowed and ebbed as the political and military leaders of the time navigated the dangerous currents of world conflict. Churchill vividly recounts the major campaigns that shaped the war: the furious attacks of the Marne, the naval maneuvers off Jutland, Verdun's "soul-stirring frenzy," and the surprising victory of Chemins des Dames. Here, too, he re-creates the dawn of modern warfare: the buzz of airplanes overhead, trench combat, artillery thunder, and the threat of chemical warfare. In Churchill's inimitable voice we hear how "the war to end all wars" instead gave birth to every war that would follow, including the current war in Iraq. Written with unprecedented flair and knowledge of the events, The World Crisis remains the single greatest history of World War I, essential
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Pride of America, We're With You: The Letters of Grace Anderson U.S. Army Nurse Corps, World War I (American Voices Series)

Shari Lynn Wigle


All of our strength we'll gladly give you ... In their unit song, Grace Anderson and the Base Hospital No. 115 nurses promised the soldiers: "Pride of America, we're with you, all of our strength we'll gladly give you ." More than ten thousand World War I army nurses volunteered for a perilous overseas venture. They aided the troops in the fight for democracy before American women had the right to vote. Grace, a nurse anesthetist, helped save lives in the operating rooms and hospital wards. She healed "our boys" and her own heartaches-a life-changing romance and the tragic loss of a loved one. Her 1917-1925 letters follow her from Camp Pike training to France, occupied Germany, and her return home. The narrative interweaves her correspondence with World War I history and her personal life, including her secret relationship with an army surgeon. The true story focuses on the human side of the Great War and recounts Grace's challenges in the postwar years. About the Author During a home
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The Home Front: Civilian Life in World War One (Revealing History)

Peter Cooksley


From bombing to rationing, from civil defense to war work, the face of Britain was radically changed as a result of World War I. More than once Britain was almost brought to its knees by unrestricted submarine warfare, and by the end of the war German Zeppelins and Gotha bombers had managed to bomb many parts of Eastern England, while in 1914 the German High Seas fleet bombarded the East Coast. The First World War was the first war to have a huge impact on civilians and few were safe from attack. In this book, Peter Cooksley tells us the true story of civilians at war on the Home Front.
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Bradford in the First World War

Bradley World War 1 Group


The men and women of Bradford, along with their cousins in other British towns and cities, made a distinguished if unhappy contribution to the First World War, as war memorials all around the city make clear. This book weaves together many personal accounts to tell the full story of Bradford at war - not just the experience of the trenches but primarly the impact that the war had at home: the part played by factories that manufactured aircraft and machine tools, the story of one of Britain's foremost sons, J.B. Priestley (publishing for the first time some of his letters home), the background to a massive munitions explosion, and of course, everyday life on the home front. Amply illustrated and impeccably researched, this book will appeal to anyone who is interested in Bradford's history.
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The Second Infantry Division in World War I: A History of the American Expeditionary Force Regulars, 1917-1919

George B. Clark


When the United States entered World War I in 1917, it sent the American Expeditionary Force to relieve the worn and beleaguered Allied Forces. On September 20, 1917, Congress approved the creation of the Second Division of the American Expeditionary Force. A hybrid Marine/Army unit, it was conceived and ultimately formed overseas, primarily from units in France. Giving themselves the nickname "Second to None," the Second Division effectively stopped the German drive on Paris in June 1918, becoming the first American unit to fight the enemy in a major engagement and revitalizing the Allied war effort. This volume details the fighting experiences of the Second Division, from its creation in the fall of 1917 through 1919. The book follows the unit from training in Toulon through the major campaigns including Chateau Thierry, Soissons, Blanc Mont and Meuse Argonne and records the experiences of the men who served. Appendices provide information regarding the pedigree of the division an
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Mons 1914: Britain's Tactical Triumph (Praeger Illustrated Military History)

David Lomas


The first major clash of the Great War, Mons came as a nasty shock to the Imperial German Army. Assured by their commanders that they would sweep the French and their British allies in the British Expeditionary Force--"that contemptible little army"--into the sea in a matter of weeks; they were stopped in their tracks at Mons by a numerically inferior British force. Eventually forced to fall back by overwhelming German numbers, the British carried out a masterful fighting retreat across Belgium and northern France. David Lomas examines not just the battle of Mons itself but also the ensuing British retreat, the battle of Le Cateau and several smaller engagements. The British Expeditionary Force of 1914 was one of the most highly trained armies ever fielded by the United Kingdom: having been denied the requested number of machine-guns due to financial considerations its soldiers had been taught to fire 15 aimed shots per minute, in some cases more, from their excellent Lee Enfield rifle
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Brief History of the Royal Flying Corps in World War One (Brief Histories)

Ralph Barker


This accessible text tells the story of the most star-studded of fighter squadrons, the RFC, and its part in all the major battles of World War I, from Bloody April 1917, when the squadrons suffered enormous casualties, through Third Ypres and Passchendaele to the chaotic retreat from Ludendorff's offensive. Drawing extensively from letters and diaries of the men who took part, Ralph Barker creates a bird's eye view of the battleground from the menacing skies above France and brings fresh off the page the exhiliration of combat, the debility of the "shakes", the grit of observers and gunners, the strain of low-level flying, the bonding of pilot and ground mechanic, and the awareness of tragedy as brave men gave their lives.
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War's Waste: Rehabilitation in World War I America

Beth Linker


With U.S. soldiers stationed around the world and engaged in multiple conflicts, Americans will be forced for the foreseeable future to come to terms with those permanently disabled in battle. At the moment, we accept rehabilitation as the proper social and cultural response to the wounded, swiftly returning injured combatants to their civilian lives. But this was not always the case, as Beth Linker reveals in her provocative new book, War’s Waste. Linker explains how, before entering World War I, the United States sought a way to avoid the enormous cost of providing injured soldiers with pensions, which it had done since the Revolutionary War. Emboldened by their faith in the new social and medical sciences, reformers pushed rehabilitation as a means to “rebuild” disabled soldiers, relieving the nation of a monetary burden and easing the decision to enter the Great War. Linker’s narrative moves from the professional development of orthopedic surgeons and physical therapists to the
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The British Working Class and Enthusiasm for War, 1914-1916 (Military History and Policy)

David Silbey


Millions of men volunteered to leave home, hearth and family to go to a foreign land to fight in 1914, the start of the biggest war in British history. It was a war fought by soldier-citizens, millions strong, most of whom had volunteered willingly to go. They made up the army that first held, and then, in 1918, thrust back the German Army to win the Great War. The British 'Tommy' has been lionized in the decades since the war, but little attention has been made in the literature to what motivated the ordinary British man to go to France, especially in the early years when Britain relied on the voluntary system to fill the ranks. Why would a regular working-class man leave behind his job, family and friends to go to fight a war that defended not British soil, but French? Why would a British man risk his life to defend places whose names he could pronounce only barely, if at all? This book answers why, in the words of the men who were there. Young and old, from cities and country, si
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Casualty Figures: How Five Men Survived the First World War

Michèle Barrett


Casualty Figures is not about the millions who died in the First World War; it is about the countless thousands of men who lived as long-term casualties—not of shrapnel and gas, but of the bleak trauma of the slaughter they escaped. In this powerful new book, Michèle Barrett uncovers the lives of five ordinary soldiers who endured the “war to end all wars,” and how they dealt with its horrors, both at the front and after the war’s end. Through their stories, Barrett sheds new light on the nature of the psychological damage of war, which for the first time became both widely acknowledged and profoundly controversial through the term "shell shock." Drawing on a wealth of previously unpublished material, Casualty Figures is a moving and original account of the psychological havoc caused by war."
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The First World War (2nd Edition)

Stuart Robson


This clear, concise account of the First World War examines the experience of nations drawn into the conflict from the perspectives of both the Home Front and the Trenches. The history of the First World War, its origins and consequences are still of global significance Benefits from being brought up-to-date with the latest reasearch Contains a new section on current debates about interpreting and remembering the war Includes all the usual seminar study features such as Who's Who, Glossary and Chronology of Key Events.
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Battleships of World War I: A Fully Illustrated Country-By-Country Directory Of Dreadnoughts, Including Armoured Cruisers, Battlecruisers And Battleships From 1906-1918

Peter Hore


n illustrated history of battleships of the world from 1906 to 1918, featuring fascinating expert descriptions of over 70 ships that details their construction, function and history.
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With A Machine Gun To Cambrai

George Coppard


First World War memoir of George Coppard who served as a private soldier from 1914 until he was wounded at the end of 1917.
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History of the 12th (Eastern) Division in the Great War

Arthur B. Scott


12th (Eastern) Division was a New Army division formed in August 1914, they arrived in France in June 1915 and fought at Loos, Somme, Arras and Cambrai; Contains a detailed order of battle and succession of commanders and staff.
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BATTLE ON THE SEVEN SEAS: GERMAN CRUISER BATTLES 1914 - 1918

Gary Staff


The cruisers of the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserlische Marine) were active throughout the First World War and saw action all around the globe, tying up valuable Allied naval resources out of all proportion to their number. Drawing on firsthand accounts and original research in German archives, the author here describes in detail some of their most significant and/or audacious battles. Some are well known, such as their role at Jutland, Goeben's attack on the Russian fleet (which brought Turkey into the war) and the sagas of Konigsberg and Emden; but others have been unduly neglected. Gary Staff deliberately focuses on the latter to bring new material to the attention of the reader and to demonstrate the global span of the cruisers' activities. The blow-by-blow accounts of the action (drawing heavily on firsthand Allied and especially German accounts) are supported by dozens of photographs, many previously unpublished, from the author's own impressive collection. The battles described
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Death At Sea: Graf Spee and the Flight of the German East Asiatic Naval Squadron in 1914

Eric Dorn Brose


Death at Sea is the story of Graf Maximilian von Spee, commander of the German squadron in China at the outbreak of World War One. His was a powerful flotilla, but not powerful enough to remain in Asia, where the ships of Britain, France, Russia, and Japan could destroy him. If Graf Spee fled the Far East, however, attractive options beckoned. By sailing into the heart of the British Empire surrounding the Indian Ocean he could disrupt commerce and troop movements and perhaps spark rebellion in India. But if he sailed east across the Pacific and into the Atlantic, all the way around the world to Germany to reinforce the home fleet, together they represented a significant threat to the British navy. It all depended on what he decided to do. To a significant extent the outcome of World War One also depended on what he decided to do. Death at Sea is the novelistic history of what happened to Graf Spee's squadron and the ships that Britain deployed in an anxiety-charged effort to eliminate
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Death At Sea: Graf Spee and the Flight of the German East Asiatic Naval Squadron in 1914

Eric Dorn Brose


Death at Sea is the story of Graf Maximilian von Spee, commander of the German squadron in China at the outbreak of World War One. His was a powerful flotilla, but not powerful enough to remain in Asia, where the ships of Britain, France, Russia, and Japan could destroy him. If Graf Spee fled the Far East, however, attractive options beckoned. By sailing into the heart of the British Empire surrounding the Indian Ocean he could disrupt commerce and troop movements and perhaps spark rebellion in India. But if he sailed east across the Pacific and into the Atlantic, all the way around the world to Germany to reinforce the home fleet, together they represented a significant threat to the British navy. It all depended on what he decided to do. To a significant extent the outcome of World War One also depended on what he decided to do. Death at Sea is the novelistic history of what happened to Graf Spee's squadron and the ships that Britain deployed in an anxiety-charged effort to eliminate
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Tirpitz and the Imperial German Navy

Patrick J. Kelly


Grand Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz (1849–1930) was the principal force behind the rise of the German Imperial Navy prior to World War I, challenging Great Britain's command of the seas. As State Secretary of the Imperial Naval Office from 1897 to 1916, Tirpitz wielded great power and influence over the national agenda during that crucial period. By the time he had risen to high office, Tirpitz was well equipped to use his position as a platform from which to dominate German defense policy. Though he was cool to the potential of the U-boat, he enthusiastically supported a torpedo boat branch of the navy and began an ambitious building program for battleships and battle cruisers. Based on exhaustive archival research, including new material from family papers, Tirpitz and the Imperial German Navy is the first extended study in English of this germinal figure in the growth of the modern navy.
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The Real German War Plan, 1904-14

Terence Zuber


On the basis of newly discovered or long-neglected documents in German military archives, this book gives the first description of Schlieffen’s war plans in 1904 and 1905 and Moltke’s plans from 1906 to 1914. It explodes unfounded myths concerning German war planning, gives the first appraisal of the actual military and political factors that influenced it, proves conclusively that there never was a "Schlieffen Plan," and reveals Moltke’s strategy for a war against Russia from 1909 to 1912. Tracing the decline in the German military position and the recognition by 1913 that Germany would be forced to fight outnumbered on both the eastern and western fronts, it is an essential read for anyone with an interest in World War I.
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Under Fire

Henri Barbusse


Ages 18 & up. Based on his own experience of the Great War, Henri Barbusse?s novel is a powerful account of one of the greatest horrors mankind has inflicted on itself. For the group of ordinary men in the French Sixth Battalion, thrown together from all over France and longing for home, war is simply a matter of survival, lightened only by the arrival of their rations or a glimpse of a pretty girl or a brief reprieve in the hospital. Reminiscent of classics like Hemingway?s A Farewell to Arms and Remarque?s All Quiet on the Western Front, Under Fire (originally published in French as La Feu) vividly evokes life in the trenches?the mud, stench, and monotony of waiting while constantly fearing for one?s life in an infernal and seemingly eternal battlefield.
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Testament of Youth

Vera Brittain


Ages 18 & up.Much of what we know and feel about the First World War we owe to Vera Brittain’s elegiac yet unsparing book, which set a standard for memoirists from Martha Gellhorn to Lillian Hellman. Abandoning her studies at Oxford in 1915 to enlist as a nurse in the armed services, Brittain served in London, in Malta, and on the Western Front. By war’s end she had lost virtually everyone she loved. Testament of Youth is both a record of what she lived through and an elegy for a vanished generation. Hailed by the Times Literary Supplement as a book that helped "both form and define the mood of its time," it speaks to any generation that has been irrevocably changed by war. * New introduction by Brittain's biographer examines her struggles to write about her experiences and the book's reception in England and America
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George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

Miranda Carter


In the years before the First World War, the great European powers were ruled by three first cousins: King George V of Britain, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany and Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Together, they presided over the last years of dynastic Europe and the outbreak of the most destructive war the world had ever seen, a war that set twentieth-century Europe on course to be the most violent continent in the history of the world. Miranda Carter uses the cousins’ correspondence and a host of historical sources to tell the tragicomic story of a tiny, glittering, solipsistic world that was often preposterously out of kilter with its times, struggling to stay in command of politics and world events as history overtook it. George, Nicholas and Wilhelm is a brilliant and sometimes darkly hilarious portrait of these men—damaged, egotistical Wilhelm; quiet, stubborn Nicholas; and anxious, dutiful George—and their lives, foibles and obsessions, from tantrums to uniforms to stamp collecting
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King, Kaiser, Tsar: Three Royal Cousins Who Led the World to War

Catrine Clay


The extraordinary family story of George V, Wilhelm II, and Nicholas II: they were tied to one another by history, and history would ultimately tear them apart. Known among their families as Georgie, Willy, and Nicky, they were, respectively, the royal cousins George V of England, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, and Nicholas II of Russia--the first two grandsons of Queen Victoria, the latter her grandson by marriage. In 1914, on the eve of world war, they controlled the destiny of Europe and the fates of millions of their subjects. The outcome and their personal endings are well known--Nicky shot with his family by the Bolsheviks, Willy in exile in Holland, Georgie still atop his throne. Largely untold, however, is the family saga that played such a pivotal role in bringing the world to the precipice. Drawing widely on previously unpublished royal letters and diaries, made public for the first time by Queen Elizabeth II, Catrine Clay chronicles the riveting half century of the ro
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Introducing Timothy Findley's The Wars

Lorraine York


Canadian Fiction Studies are an answer to every librarian's, student's, and teacher's wishes. Each book contains clear information on a major Canadian novel. Attractively produced, they contain a chronology of the author's life, information on the importance of the book and its critical reception, an in-depth reading of the text, and a selected list of works cited.
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A Collection of First World War Military Handbooks of Arabia 1913-1917 10 Volume Set Including Boxed Maps (Cambridge Archive Editions) (Vol. 1)

Great Britain


Intelligence handbooks were compiled for the use of British officers for military purposes. The handbooks were compiled partly on the basis of existing authorities such as Lorimer«s Gazetteer, earlier travel records and recent military intelligence, and partly from what was called "native information". They provide detailed descriptions of the regions, settlements, routes and inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula and Gulf. Originally all these documents were classified secret. They are now made available to historians and researchers as richly detailed surveys of a land and a culture.
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OTHER SIDE OF THE WIRE VOLUME 2, THE: The Battle of the Somme With the German XIV Reserve Corps, 1 July 1916

Ralph Whitehead


Volume 1 of 'The Other Side of the Wire' told the story of the German XIV Reserve Corps from the initial invasion of the Somme in Northern France in 1914 to the final hours before the momentous battle of 1 July 1916. Volume 2 covers the epic Battle of the Somme and takes the reader through the story of 1 July 1916 as seen from the German defenders. Each part of the great battle, from Gommecourt in the north to Curlu on the bank of the River Somme, is presented from the German perspective of the men who defended their sectors against the British and French offensive. The story of the Germans fighting on the Somme on 1 July 1916 is presented using first hand accounts and regimental histories to provide the reader with a part of the battle long ignored in most histories written since the war.Hundreds of illustrations of the men who fought on the Somme on 1 July are presented to the reader, many previously unpublished from the author's personal collection. Numerous maps provide additional
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A Military Atlas of the First World War [MILITARY ATLAS OF THE 1ST WW] [Paperback]

Arthur Banks


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Rags: The Dog Who Went to War

Jack Rohan


This is a true story from the First World War, about the amazing clever terrier who was adopted by a soldier and became a war hero, saving many men's lives.
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We Shall Not Sleep (World War One Series)

Anne Perry


After four long years, peace is finally in sight. But chaplain Joseph Reavley and his sister, Judith, an ambulance driver on the Western Front, are more hard pressed than ever. Behind the lines, violence is increasing: Soldiers are abusing German prisoners, a nurse has been raped and murdered, and the sinister ideologue called the Peacemaker now threatens to undermine the peace just as he did the war. Matthew, the third Reavley sibling and an intelligence expert, suddenly arrives at the front with startling news: The Peacemaker’s German counterpart has offered to go to England and expose his co-conspirator as a traitor. But with war still raging and prejudices inflamed, such a journey would be fraught with hazards, especially since the Peacemaker has secret informers everywhere, even on the battlefield. For richness of plot, character, and feeling, We Shall Not Sleep is unmatched. Anne Perry’s brilliantly orchestrated finale is a heartstopping tour de force, mesmerizing and totally sat
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Aircraft of World War I 1914-1918 (Essential Aircraft Identificat)

Jack Herris


Illustrated with detailed artworks of combat aircraft and their markings, 'The Essential Aircraft Identification Guide: Aircraft of WWI' is a comprehensive study of the aircraft that fought in the Great War of 1914-18. Arranged chronologically by theater of war and campaign, this book offers a complete organizational breakdown of the units on all the fronts, including the Eastern and Italian Fronts. Each campaign includes a compact history of the role and impact of aircraft on the course of the conflict, as well as orders of battle, lists of commanders and campaign aces such as Manfred von Richtofen, Eddie Rickenbacker, Albert Ball and many more.Every type of aircraft is featured, including the numerous variations and types of well-known models, such as the Fokker Dr.I, the Sopwith Camel and the SPAD SVII, through to lesser-known aircraft, such as the Rumpler C.1, and the Amstrong Whitworth FK8. Each aircraft profile is accompanied by exhaustive specifications, as well as details of in
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The Scribner Library of Modern Europe: Since 1914

John Merriman


This set presents Europe's major historical events between 1914 and 2005 and explores the political, military, social, cultural, and technological transformations of this period. Additionally, the encyclopedia examines Europe's global influence and European unification. Edited by two professors of history at Yale University, it is the companion to Europe 1789 to 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of Industry and Empire (2006). The scope of the encyclopedia is extensive. It contains 920 alphabetically arranged articles, beginning with Abortionand ending with Zyklon B.Entries range in length from approximately one to seven pages. Articles are signed and include cross-references. A bibliography concludes each entry. Contributors are primarily academics from Europe and North America. As demonstrated by the "Systematic Outline of Contents," found in volume 5, entries fall under 15 broad categories, including "Concepts and Ideas," "Law, Justice, and Crime," "Philosophy and Intellectual Life," an
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Air Aces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, 1914-1918


Complete biographies of all 49 courageous aces of the Dual Monarchy.
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The Idea of Europe Since 1914: The Legacy of the First World War

Menno Spiering & Michael Wintle (Editorsr)


This book is about the history of Europe in the 20th century and concentrates on two particular aspects. First, it examines the impact of the Great War on Europe; secondly it is concerned with European civilization and with ideas of what is meant to be "European". The approach is interdisciplinary, including integrated analyses from politics, international relations, political ideas, literature, and the visual arts. The common focus, which links all the chapters, is the effect of the Great War on a European mentality, or European identity.
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AVIATION AWARDS OF IMPERIAL GERMANY IN WORLD WAR I: Volume I - The Aviation Awards of the Kingdom of Bavaria [ Inscribed and SIGNED by the author Neal W. O'connor ]

Neal W. O'connor


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Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War I

Peter Grosz & George Haddow & Peter Schiemer


Here is the most comprehensive, detailed and accurate story of these exotic aircraft ever written. It covers all manufacturers and their planes and provides important information on armament, flying units and more. Line iIlustrations in standard scales (1/48 and 1/72) make this a must purchase for modelers as well.
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Surrender be Damned: History of the 1/1st Battalion the Monmouthshire Regiment, 1914-18

Les Hughes & John Dixon


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Surrender be Damned: History of the 1/1st Battalion the Monmouthshire Regiment, 1914-18

Les Hughes & John Dixon


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Reading Study Guide: Answer Key (Creating America: A History of the United States, Beginnings through World War I)

McDougal Littell


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A Concise History of the Participation of the Greek Army in the First World War 1914-1918

Hellenic Army General Staff - Army History Directorate


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Major and Mrs.Holt's Battle Map of the Somme (No. 1)

Valmai Holt Tonie Holt (


This is one of a series of unique maps drawn and published by Major and Mrs Holt the well-known experts on touring the battlefields of the First and Second World Wars. The maps are accurately drawn and double sided and have a consistent map reference and colour coding system across the series that enables precise location of memorials, cemeteries, museums, battle lines, places of particular interest. The maps not only enable the user to find a particular spot on a battlefield but also make it possible to plan a route for a visit.
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Nelson County North Dakota in the World War

The Petersburg Record (Editor)


In preparing this History of Nelson County, North Dakota, in The World War [World War I], the object has been to honor the dead, to record the services of those who returned, to give an account of the work accomplished by Home activities, and to put these things in such form that it will be preserved for future generations.
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The Warhorse in the Modern Era: The Boer War to the Beginning of the Second Millennium

Ann Hyland


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Movements and supply of the German First Army during August and September, 1914

H. von Kuhl


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The First World War: A Concise Global History (Exploring World History)

William Kelleher Storey


In a compact but comprehensive and clear narrative, this book explores the First World War from a genuinely global perspective. Putting a human face on the war, William Kelleher Storey takes into account individual decisions and experiences as well as environmental and technological factors such as food, geography, manpower, and weapons. He argues that the war profoundly changed the ways in which people imagined the landscape around them and thought about technology and the environment. Before the war, Europe and its colonies generally regarded industrial technology as an instrument of modernity; the landscape existed to be conquered, divided, and ruled. During and after the war, the costs of conquest became much higher, raising significant doubts about the value of progress. Soldiers experienced profound personal degradation, physical injuries, and mental collapse in the midst of nightmarish, technologically induced environmental conditions, which they vividly remembered when they for
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Civilians in a World at War, 1914-1918

Tammy M. Proctor


World War I heralded a new global era of warfare, consolidating and expanding changes that had been building throughout the previous century, while also instituting new notions of war. The 1914-18 conflict witnessed the first aerial bombing of civilian populations, the first widespread concentration camps for the internment of enemy alien civilians, and an unprecedented use of civilian labor and resources for the war effort. Humanitarian relief programs for civilians became a common feature of modern society, while food became as significant as weaponry in the fight to win. Tammy M. Proctor argues that it was World War I—the first modern, global war—that witnessed the invention of both the modern “civilian” and the “home front,” where a totalizing war strategy pitted industrial nations and their citizenries against each other. Civilians in a World at War, 1914-1918, explores the different ways civilians work and function in a war situation, and broadens our understanding of the civi
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The Great War in Africa: 1914-1918

Byron Farwell


General readers will enjoy this comprehensive narrative of operations against imperial Germany's African colonies, including Togo, the Cameroons, and Southwest Africa, as well as the more familiar East African campaign. Its anecdotes convey the flavor of war in theaters dominated by disease and logistics. But in contrast to his works on the Victorian army, Farwell limits his perspective to the battlefield. Overwhelmed by the number of good stories at his disposal, he eschews systematic discussion of the polyglot forces engaged, or of the war's impact on subsaharan Africa's fragile colonial structures. The tales of bush fighting become repetitive, adding little to such earlier works as Charles Miller's Battle for the Bundu (1974), and limiting the book's value for specialists. Dennis E. Showalter, History Dept., Colorado Coll., Colorado Springs
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Warrior: The Legend Of Colonel Richard Meinertzhagen

Peter H. Capstick


Peter Hathaway Capstick died in 1996. At the time of his death, the world-renowned adventure writer was putting the finishing touches on this, a stirring and vivid biography of Colonel Richard Meinertzhagen, a man with whom he felt he had much in common. Edited and prepared for publication by his widow, Fiona Capstick, this riveting book is Capstick's farewell to his fans and the final addition to the bestselling Peter Capstick Library. Colonel Richard Meinertzhagen was one of those rare men whom fate always seems to cast in the dramas that shape history. As a young officer, he served in India and Africa during the glory days of the British Empire, defending the crown's dominions and exploring its darkest reaches. His exploits in the bloody colonial wars of turn-of-the-century East Africa earned him a reputation as one of the most fierce and ruthless soldiers in the Empire, yet it was during those years spent roaming the silent places of the Serengeti, hunting its game and learning
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The Legacy of the Great War: Ninety Years on

Jay Winter (Editor)


Ages 18 & up. In late 2007 and early 2008, world-renowned historians gathered in Kansas City for a series of public forums on World War I. Each of the five events focused on a particular topic and featured spirited dialogue between its prominent participants. In spontaneous exchanges, the eminent scholars probed each other's arguments, learned from each other, and provided insights not just into history but also into the way scholars think about their subject alongside and at times in conflict with their colleagues. Representing a fourth generation of writers on the Great War and a transnational rather than an international approach, prominent historians from Britain, Germany, Ireland, Canada, and the United States, all of whom have studied that war over decades, brought to the proceedings an exciting clash of ideas. The forums addressed topics about the Great War that have long fascinated both scholars and the educated public: the origins of the war and the question of who was respons
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The Usborne Introduction to the First World War (Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction To...)

Ruth Brocklehurst


Ages 9 & up.
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The Penguin Book of First World War Prose

Jon Silkin & Jonathan Glover (Editors)


Selections from the letters, memoirs, autobiography and fiction of the World War I. Edmund Blunden, Vera Britain, Oskar Kokoschka, Hasek, Paul Klee and Hemingway are among the contributors to this anthology, which contains several specially translated pieces. Nearly all the authors participated in the Great War, whether in battle, or like Rebecca West, on the home front.
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World War I (First Books--America at War)

Tom McGowen


Ages 9 & up.
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Germany's Aims in the First World War

Fritz Fischer


Fritz Fisher "Germany's War Aims in the First World War" dwells on the tremendous amount of material collected primarily from the archives of the Central powers. It deals with one topic, and deals with it in methodical and exhaustive manner - a continuation of policy of War Aims of the Imperial Germany during the period immediately preceding and throughout the First World War. Germany, only united within the memory of the generation of 1914, was fighting the war not only for its rightful place as a European Great Power, but for a leading, pre-eminent place in the European and by extension the World balance of power. Germany was aiming to displace Britain as a traditional power broker in Europe, unite Austria-Hungary and other Central European powers in the economic and geo-political unit known as MittleEuropa, dominate Russia on its Eastern border and France on its Western. Bethman-Hollweg's (Chancellor for most of the War) vision of the post-war World was Germany dominating continenta
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The Origins of the War of 1914 (3 Volume Set)

Luigi Albertini


Luigi Albertini wrote this monumental investigation into the origins of the First World War in the 1930s, when many participants were still alive to be interviewed about their recollections of those tragic moments. This is in fact the best and by far the most authoritative study of how the war began and why.
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Origins of the First World War (Foundations of Modern History)

L. C. F. Turner


I found this book interesting for it's viewpoint but unconvincing. I was suprised by a Germany that did not want and even feared the coming war, and a France that seemed absolutely hungry for war, manipulating a somewhat pathetic Russia into fighting the central powers. It was a viewpoint different than I'd seen in the past and I appreciate the questions it has raised for me. However, I felt the author did a poor job of proving his points. While it is probably impossible to measure and describe the popular feeling of an era decades in the past, I thought Turner's haphazard quoting from memoirs (some written after the war) was remarkably unconvincing. I believe he could have proven just about any thesis imaginable using that technique. I felt he left out some important aspects of the Franco-Russian perspective that would make their actions seem less irrationally agressive. All in all, I'm glad I read the book as it opened my eyes to another line of thinking. I'm not sure I'll end up agr
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The Origins of Major War (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs)

Dale C. Copeland


One of the most important questions of human existence asks what drives nations to war--especially massive, system-threatening war. Much military history focuses on the who, when, and where of war; in this riveting book, Dale C. Copeland brings attention to bear on why governments make decisions that lead to, sustain, and intensify conflicts. Copeland presents detailed historical narratives of several twentieth-century cases, including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. He highlights instigating factors that transcend individual personalities, styles of government, geography, and historical context to reveal remarkable consistency across several major wars usually considered dissimilar. The result is a series of challenges to established interpretive positions and provocative new readings of the causes of conflict. Classical realists and neorealists claim that dominant powers initiate war. Hegemonic stability realists believe that wars are most often started by rising states
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With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918

David Stevenson


With so much at stake and so much already lost, why did World War I end with a whimper—an arrangement between two weary opponents to suspend hostilities? After more than four years of desperate fighting, with victories sometimes measured in feet and inches, why did the Allies reject the option of advancing into Germany in 1918 and taking Berlin? Most histories of the Great War focus on the avoidability of its beginning. This book brings a laser-like focus to its ominous end—the Allies’ incomplete victory, and the tragic ramifications for world peace just two decades later. In the most comprehensive account to date of the conflict’s endgame, David Stevenson approaches the events of 1918 from a truly international perspective, examining the positions and perspectives of combatants on both sides, as well as the impact of the Russian Revolution. Stevenson pays close attention to America’s effort in its first twentieth-century war, including its naval and military contribution, army recr
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Gallipoli

Peter Hart


One of the most famous battles in history, the WWI Gallipoli campaign began as a bold move by the British to capture Constantinople, but this definitive new history explains that from the initial landings--which ended with so much blood in the sea it could be seen from airplanes overhead--to the desperate attacks of early summer and the battle of attrition that followed, it was a tragic folly destined to fail from the start. Gallipoli forced the young Winston Churchill from office, established Turkey's iconic founder Mustafa Kemal (better known as "Ataturk"), and marked Australia's emergence as a nation in its own right. Drawing on unpublished eyewitness accounts by individuals from all ranks--not only from Britain, Australia and New Zealand, but from Turkey and France as well--Peter Hart weaves first-hand stories into a vivid narrative of the battle and its aftermath. Hart, a historian with the Imperial War Museum and a battlefield tour guide at Gallipoli, provides a vivid, boots-
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The Somme: The Darkest Hour on the Western Front

Peter Hart


On July 1, 1916, the British Army launched the “Big Push” that was supposed to bring an end to the horrific stalemate on the Western Front between British, French, and German forces. What resulted was one of the greatest single human catastrophes in twentieth century warfare. Scrambling out of trenches in the face of German machine guns and artillery fire, the Allied Powers lost over twenty thousand soldiers that first day. This “battle” would drag on for another four bloody months, resulting in over one million causalities among the three powers. As the oral historian at the Imperial War Museum in London, Peter Hart has brought to light new material never before seen or heard. The Somme is an unparalleled evocation of World War I’s iconic contest—the definitive account of one of the major tragedies of the twentieth century. 32 b&w illustrations
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Bloody April: Slaughter in the Skies Over Arras, 1917

Peter Hart


As the Allies embarked upon the Battle of Arras, they desperately needed accurate aerial reconnaissance photographs. But by this point the Royal Flying Club were flying obsolete planes. The new German Albatros scouts massively outclassed them in every respect: speed, armament, ability to withstand punishment and manoeuverability. Many of the RFC's pilots were straight out of flying school - as they took to the air they were sitting targets for the experienced German aces. Over the course of 'Bloody April' the RFC suffered casualties of over a third. The average life expectancy of a new subaltern on the front line dropped to just eleven days. And yet they carried on flying, day after day, in the knowledge that, in the eyes of their commanders at least, their own lives meant nothing compared to the photographs they brought back, which could save tens of thousands of soldiers on the ground. In this book Peter Hart tells the story of the air war over Arras, using the voices of the men who
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Aces Falling: War Above the Trenches, 1918

Peter Hart


Relive the final days of the great aces of World War I! By 1918, the war was nearing its end and the legendary knights of the sky—names like Richthofen, Edward Mannock, Herman Goering, Billy Bishop, among others—were writing its bloody final chapters. Author Peter Hart, the Oral Historian at Britain’s Imperial War Museum, was granted unprecedented access to the museum’s archives; through these rare manuscripts and firsthand accounts, he provides a riveting perspective on the first true “air war.” From the swirling dogfights to the bombing missions that became ever more deadly, the book reveals the terrible scope of aerial combat and commemorates the men who fought, killed, and died in the clouds above.
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Winged Victory

V Yeates


There is no bitter snarl nor self-pity in this classic novel about the air war of 1914-1918, based very largely on the author's experiences. Combat, loneliness, fatigue, fear, comradeship, women, excitement - all are built into a vigorous and authentic structure by one of the most valiant pilots of the then Royal Flying Corps.returncharacterreturncharacter returncharacterreturncharacter REVIEWS returncharacterreturncharacter'Beautifully written with a poet's eye as well as a pilot's eye.' Southern Evening Echo'The only book about flying that isn't flannel.' Anonymous Fighter Pilot'Not only one of the best war books...but as a transcription of reality, faithful and sustained in its author's purpose of re-creating the past life he knew, it is unique.' Henry Williamson, author of Tarka the Otter.
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SAGITTARIUS RISING

Cecil Lewis


'Classic . . . the definitive account of aerial combat - full of passion and poetry' - Max Arthur, Independent 'Magical evocation of the lonely battle fought in the clouds' - The Daily Telegraph 'This is a book everyone should read. It is the autobiography of an ace, and no common ace either. The boy had all the noble tastes and qualities, love of beauty, soaring imagination, a brilliant endowment of good looks . . . this prince of pilots . . . had a charmed life in every sense of the word' - George Bernard Shaw Sent to France with the Royal Flying Corps at just seventeen, and later a member of the famous 56 Squadron, Cecil Lewis was an illustrious and passionate fighter pilot of the First World War, described by Bernard Shaw in 1935 as 'a thinker, a master of words, and a bit of a poet'. In this vivid and spirited account the author evocatively sets his love of the skies and flying against his bitter experience of the horrors of war, as we follow his progress from France and the bat
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LADY UNDER FIRE ON THE WESTERN FRONT: The Great War Letters of Lady Dorothie Feilding MM

Andrew Hallam & Nicola Hallam (Authors)


When Britain went to war in 1914 many people rallied to the cause, determined to join the colours or be useful in some other way. Lady Dorothie Mary Evelyn Feilding was one of the latter. 'Lady D' spent almost three years on the Western Front in Belgium driving ambulances for the Munro Motor Ambulance Corps, an all-volunteer unit. During her time in Flanders her bravery was such that she received the Belgian Order of Leopold, the French Croix de Guerre and was the first woman to be awarded the British Military Medal. She wrote home to Newnham Paddox, near Rugby, almost daily. Her letters reflect the mundane, tragedy and horror of war and also the tensions of being a woman at the front contending with shells, gossip, funding, lice, vehicle maintenance and inconvenient marriage proposals. Though Dorothie was the daughter of an Earl and from a privileged upbringing she had an easy attitude that transcended social boundaries and that endeared her to all that she came in to contact with w
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FLYING FURY: Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps

James McCudden


The day-to-day insights of a brilliantly daring World War I ace that only ends with his death at the age of 23 . . .James McCudden was an outstanding British fighter ace of World War I, whose daring exploits earned him a tremendous reputation and, ultimately, an untimely end. Here, in this unique and gripping firsthand account, he brings to life some of aviation history's most dramatic episodes in a memoir completed at the age of twenty-three, just days before his tragic death. During his time in France with the Royal Flying Corps from 1914 to 1918, McCudden rose from mechanic to pilot and flight commander. Following his first kill in September 1916, McCudden shot down a total of fifty-seven enemy planes, including a remarkable three in a single minute in January 1918. A dashing patrol leader, he combined courage, loyalty, and judgment, studying the habits and psychology of enemy pilots and stalking them with patience and tenacity.Written with modesty and frankness, yet acutely percept
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KNIGHT OF GERMANY: Oswald Boelcke German Ace

Johannes Werner


The story of the fighter pilot the Red Baron himself sought to emulate . . . German air ace Oswald Boelcke was a national hero during World War I, and was the youngest captain in the German air force, decorated with the Pour Ie Merite while still only a lieutenant and with 40 aerial victories at the time of his death. He became a pilot shortly before the outbreak of the war, and when he was tragically killed in a flying accident during combat less than two-and-a-half years later not only was his name known all over the world but the whole of Germany mourned his passing. He established his reputation on the Western front first in reconnaissance, then in scouts, and, with Max Immelmann, he became the best known of the early German aces. After Immelmann' s death, he was taken off flying and traveled to the Eastern front where he met a young pilot called Manfred von Richthofen. Transferred back to the Western Front in command of Jasta 2, when new small fighting units were formed he remem
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IMMELMANN THE EAGLE OF LILLE

Frantz Immelmann


The story of one of Germany's pioneers in aerial combat . . . Max Immelmann was born in Dresden, the son of a container factory owner. When World War I started, Immelmann was recalled to active service, transferred to the Luftstreitkafte and was sent for pilot training in November 1914. He was initially stationed in northern France as a reconnaissance aviator. On June 3, 1915 he was shot down by a French pilot but managed to land safely behind German lines. He was decorated with the Iron Cross, Second Class for preserving his aircraft. Later in 1915, he became one of the first German fighter pilots, quickly building an impressive score of victories as he became known as The Eagle of Lille (Der Adler von Lille). Immelmann was the first pilot to be awarded the Pour le Me'rite, Germany's highest military honor. The medal became colloquially known as the "Blue Max" in the German Air Service in honor of Immelmann. His medal was presented by Kaiser Wilhelm II in January 1916. Oswald Boelck
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BLACK FOKKER LEADER

Peter Kilduff


One of the most noteworthy German fighter pilots of World War I was Leutnant der Reserve Carl Degelow, whose squadron of mostly black Fokker D.VII fighters posed a formidable threat to some of Britain's most celebrated air units on the Western Front. Degelow had a unique approach to aerial combat which fascinated the author, Peter Kilduff, so much that in 1979 he wrote Germany's Last Knight of the Air about his exploits, a book long out of print. During the intervening 30 years Kilduff has obtained new information and original photos, plus copies of significant German archival material and documentation which shed much new light on this legendary ace. Black Fokker Leader is a completely new work with unpublished material about Degelow and his comrades - how he was almost court-martialled; how his career was saved by Carl Josef Jacobs; how Degelow helped Willy Rosenstein escape from Nazi Germany, and much more. Plus new insights into men like Field Marshal Erhard Milch, Degelow's wing
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HERMAN GORING FIGHTER ACE

Peter Kilduff


Over the last 70 years, in countless books and essays, Hermann Goring has been defined by his crimes and excess during the Third Reich and the Second World War. But his activities as a young career military officer in World War I have invariably been glossed over - until now. 'Hermann Goring - Fighter Ace' is the first in-depth look at Goring's role as a military flyer and air combat leader from 1914 through the end of The Great War, and how those experiences shaped the personality that came to the world's attention in 1939. At the outset of the First World War, Goring was eager to prove his value to his fatherland in initial skirmishes with French troops. When struck by severe rheumatoid arthritis in September 1914, the twenty-one-year-old officer's burning ambition and ego could not tolerate being sidelined and the following month he forced himself out of a sick bed to begin a new career as an aviation observer. Goring went on to become a fighter pilot with twenty-two downed enemy a
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Jasta 18 - The Red Noses (Aviation Elite Units)

Greg Vanwyngarden


The history of Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel (or Jasta) 18 is one of the more unique and complex of German fighter squadrons of World War I. In fact, the unit could be said to have had something of a split personality. Formed in Flanders at the end of October 1916, the Jasta was first commanded by Oblt von Grieffenhagen, who led it to 35 victories in nine months. In August 1917, the aggressive and demanding Oblt Rudolf Berthold took over the Staffel and brought a cadre of seasoned pilots with him from his former command. Berthold molded his new unit into a dedicated group of hunters, and left his stamp on the unit with a striking color scheme of red-nosed Pfalz and Albatros fighters with dark blue fuselage and tail surfaces. This book tells the complete story of the unit: its victories, defeats, and the great aces who flew the red-nosed fighters
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Jagdgeschwader Nr II Geschwader 'Berthold' (Aviation Elite Units)

Greg Vanwyngarden


After struggling with inadequate supplies of aircraft and matériel, the veteran pilots of the Geschwader would go on to enjoy incredible successes against French and American opponents in September 1918. Aces who flew the famous blue-fuselaged Fokkers of JG II included such stalwarts as Josef Veltjens (35 kills), Georg von Hantelmann (25 kills), Franz Büchner (40 kills) and Ulrich Neckel (30 kills). This volume contains many first-hand accounts by these and other notable aces, which reveal the esprit de corps and camaraderie these airmen displayed in their struggles against superior numbers up to the war’s final grim days.
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No 56 Sqn RAF/RFC (Aviation Elite Units)

Alex Revell


By the autumn of 1916, with the formation of the new Jagdstaffeln, the pendulum of aerial supremacy had once again swung in favor of the German Air Force. The battle of the Somme in 1916 saw the RFC suffer losses of nearly 400 aircrew between September and November, and British casualties were to reach a zenith in the 'Bloody April' of 1917 when 319 aircrew were lost, killed or taken prisoner of war. This was the situation when No 56 Squadron arrived in France at the end of April 1917. Equipped with the superb new SE 5, it was the first fighter squadron of the RFC to be able to meet the Albatros and Halberstadt fighters of the Jagdstaffeln on equal terms. The squadron's pilots won an incredible tally of decorations, and by the end of the hostilities many famous fighter pilots had passed through its ranks - Albert Ball VC, Canadian Hank Burden and American Robert Caldwell to name but a few. In this fascinating study, Alex Revell uncovers the early days and development of No 56 Squadron,
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BRIEF GLORY: The Life of Arthur Rhys Davids DSO MC

Alex Revell


Arthur Rhys Davids was shot down and killed in October 1917. He was just twenty and had been flying over the Western Front with 56 Squadron for six months. He had entered the Royal Flying Corps direct from Eton College. In his brief operational career he was awarded the Military Cross twice and the Distinguished Service Order once. In the opinion of the commanding officer of his squadron he deserved the Victoria Cross. He came to public fame through shooting down the German ace Werner Voss. Rhys Davids was more than an outstanding fighter pilot, he was a man of thought as well as a man of action. Coming from an intellectual family, he was a brilliant classicist and popular with his fellow pilots in the RFC including James McCudden. Alex Revell has written a sensitive and deeply moving biography. It is based on letters from Rhys Davids early boyhood days at Eton to his last letter written on the night before he died.returncharacterreturncharacter returncharacterreturncharacter REVIEWS r
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MANNOCK: The Life and Death of Major Edward Mannock VC, DSO, MC, RAF

Norman Franks


Arguably the highest scoring R.A.F. fighter pilot of the First World War, Edward 'Mick' Mannock's life, and most particularly his death, are still shrouded in mystery. Did he achieve as many victories as are sometimes ascribed to him? How did he die? Where did he die, and more pertinently, where do his remains now lie? Respected investigative historians Norman Franks and Andy Saunders have assessed all the evidence and cut through the speculation to build up a complete picture of the man and his achievements as a fighter pilot. Having unearthed much new and enlightening information, they present herein, perhaps the first truly balanced overview of his life. Vitally, they now also reveal exactly where Mannock VC fell in battle ninety years ago, and have now begun a quest to persuade the Commonwealth War Graves Commission to accept their findings, published here for the first time, along with numerous original photographs.returncharacterreturncharacter returncharacterreturncharacter REVI
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Albert Ball VC

Chaz Bowyer


In the 1st World War the daring exploits of pilot Albert Ball caught the imagination of the British public like no other. Ball acquired his wings in the RFC in January 1916 and was first posted to France in February of that year. Then he joined No 13 Squadron and for a six-week period in March 1916 saw almost constant action flying the Squadron's Bristol Scout. Moving to No 11 Squadron in May 1916, Ball's score quickly accumulated. He had acquired a reputation as a tenacious scout pilot, often flying alone in his Nieuport and invariably returning to base with a near empty fuel tank. In August he returned to No 11 Squadron and soon after became the highest scoring scout pilot of the time. Waging his solitary aerial war, Ball became a true inspiration to the RFC when its squadrons were being mauled. But his life was to prove tragically short and he was killed in action just before his 21st birthday leading a patrol of SE5's. He had accounted for forty-four German aircraft and was posthum
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The Frightful First World War

Terry Deary


It's history with the nasty bits left in! Want to know: • What the ‘Fat King' did with food scraps and dead horses? • How sniffing your own pee could save your life in a gas attack? • Why a pair of old socks gave away top German secrets? Discover all the foul facts about the Frightful First World War - all the gore and more. 'The Frightful First World War tells you all the horrors and hardships of the war that was meant to last for four months...but ground on for four grim years.' The usual Deary humour flows through the 136 pages packed with facts, written in a variety of fonts and full of black and white illustrations and cartoons, from Martin Brown. 'Want to know how sniffing your own pee could save your life in the First World War?' Read on! Split into 5 chapters:- 1914 - The year of the first shot 1915 - The year of total war 1916 - The year of the Somme 1917 - The year of the mud 1918 - The year of exhaustion with an introduction, a `Test Your Teacher' se
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The Trenches: A First World War Soldier, 1914-1918 (My Story)

Jim Eldridge


It's 1917 and Billy Stevens is a telegraph operator stationed near Ypres. The Great War has been raging for three years when Billy finds himself taking part in the deadly Big Push forward. But h is shocked to discover that the bullets of his fellow soldiers aren't just aimed at the enemy... This book while based on historical events is not portrayed as a normal history book. As it follows the character Billy Stevens, a fictional character through his experiences of WW1, serving in the British army. Basing his story on facts of the time and how he dealt with them, it really does bring home the sacrifices the men made in WW1. All in all a good read, and you dont have to like history to like this book, it is more about human endurance. BUY IT!!
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The First World War

Conrad Mason


In 1914, the murder of Archduke Franz Ferdinand sparked off the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen. This is the story of the First World War, and the people who lived and died fighting in it. Told for children ready to tackle longer and more complex subjects, this title is part of the Usborne Reading Programme developed with reading experts from the University of Roehampton.
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World War I

DK


DK Eyewitness World War 1 is an exciting and informative guide to the Great War that centred on Europe between 1914-1918. Stunning real-life photographs, illustrating the people, places and stories, offer a unique "eyewitness" view of the conflict dubbed the 'war to end all wars'. From disaster to victory, show your child what life was like as a soldier and how they survived in the muddy trenches. They'll also discover all about the world-changing events that led to the start of the conflict. Then use the giant pull-out wall chart to decorate their room. Great for projects or just for fun, make sure your child learns everything they need to know about World War 1. Find out more and download amazing clipart images at www.dk.com/clipart.
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Aeroplanes of World War I

Gordon C. Davies


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Archie's War

Marcia Williams


What was it like to be a child growing up in an ordinary family during the First World War? Organised like a scrapbook, this exciting book tells of the big shapes of the conflict and the way the war years were experienced by thirteen-year-old Archie and his family in London. There is a broadly chronological organisation: the events and privations of the early stages of the war and how these impacted on Archie and his family; Uncle Teddy's experiences in the trenches; the bombing of London; the final stages of the conflict, and then peace. These are conveyed and made credible for young readers by the main linking narrative in Archie's `voice'. Marcia Williams shows that the comic strip form can convey the full range of human situations and emotions - not least in her depiction of the moving story of Nurse Edith Cavell. The book's powerful visual impact makes it original and boundary breaking. Cartoons, photographs, visual jokes, mementoes, drawings and diagrams combine to provide a d
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The Best Christmas Present in the World

Michael Morpurgo


Echoes of Christmas 1914 in the trenches call to the present day when a letter found by chance in an antique desk brings one soldier's experience hauntingly to life. Heart-warming and spine-tingling, this is a perfect story to curl up with on a winter's night. This is what this author, the current children's laureate, does best. He has taken a familiar story - in this case Christmas Day in the trenches of 1914 - and given it a contemporary twist which delivers poignance and pathos. It all begins when an old letter is discovered in an antique desk... If you already know Morpurgo's work then you won't be disappointed. And if you don't yet know his writings, which run to over 100 published books, then this little gem is as good a place as any to begin.
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One Boy's War

Lynne Huggins-Cooper


Ages 7 & up Sixteen-year-old Sydney is overwhelmed by the excitement of the 1914 recruitment campaigns and the bravado of men leaving for the Great War. Bursting with enthusiasm, he runs away to join up but soon finds himself a long way from home in a frontline trench where reality — and the rats — begin to bite. Told through Sydney's optimistic letters home and his journal, this is a frank portrayal of the realities of life and death in the trenches of World War I. Atmospheric art and realistic but restrained storytelling bring this remote time and place to life for young readers. When his dad heads off to fight in the Great War in 1914, Sydney, 15, also wants to leave his small town in England and join up. After running away from Ma, he lies about his age and is soon in the trenches. Sydney’s first-person narrative is mainly composed of letters to his family that are excited and hopeful at first (Don’t worry . . . |we’ll be home by Christmas) but soon become scared and depresse
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The Battlefields of the First World War

Peter Barton


This is a truly remarkable book. --Warbooksoutnow.co.uk I bought this shortly before a trip to the battlefields late in 2008, thinking it would make suitable reading while away. I was wrong, not least since this is a very big, very heavy book. Definitely one to be sat before at a table and considered seriously. So, no field-spotter's guide, but an amazingly revealing and informative reference book which has captivated me for many hours since my return. It is almost impossible to envisage what that part of the world was like during the war by visiting it today, even on a cold, damp and misty November. However, this book and the panoramas it contains help you mentally overlay the contemporary scene and glimpse into the alien world millions of men fought and died in. As with so much about the First World War, it comes as a shock, especially driving across today's customs-less borders, to think that so much effort and life was wasted doing little more than moving mud about.
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Holt's Pocket Battlefield Guide to Ypres and Passchendaele

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


Covering the important WW1 Battles of Ypres, including the notorious Passchendaele, this guidebook takes readers on a historic trip through some of the well-known and most important sites of the area. This book, part of a new series of guides, is designed conveniently in a small size, for those who have only limited time to visit, or who are simply interested in as an introduction to the historic battlefields, whether on the ground or from an armchair. They contain selections from the Holts' more detailed guides of the most popular and accessible sites plus hand tourist information, capturing the essential features of the Battles. The book contains many full colour maps and photographs and detailed instructions on what to see and where to visit.
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Battlefields of the First World War: A Traveller's Guide

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


Mons, Ypes, Passchendaele, Vimy Ridge, the Somme...The names are no less poignant three-quarters of a century on, and the emotional pull of the physical reminders of the First World is undiminished. This book covers all the major battlefields of the Western Front, including Mons, where the British Expeditionary Force under Sir John French went into action for the first time to halt the German advance through Belgium; Le Cateau, scene of the last of the old style one-day battles; Verdun, the fiercely defended stronghold which came to symbolize the fighting spirit of France; the Somme, where the British suffered a scarcely credible 60,000 casualties on the opening day of the five-month battle; St Mihiel, the first all-American action and a striking success for Pershing's Doughboys; as well as Cambrai, the Kaiser's Offensive and the British and American breakthrough on the Hindenburg Line. At each historic site the book describes the events leading up to the battle, the aims and tactics o
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Major and Mrs. Holt's Concise Guide to the Western Front - North

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


Mons; Le Cateau; 1st Ypres, Neuve Chapelle, 2nd Ypres; Loos; Aisne/Chemin des Dames; Verdun, The Somme, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele; Cambrai; Kaiser's Offensive; St Mihiel/Meuse-Argonne; Hindenburg Line Following in the Holts' series of five best-selling Battlefield Guides comes this Guide to 15 of the First World War's most significant battles of the Western Front. Whether travelling on the ground or in the mind the reader is carefully and concisely guided through the Western Front with a mixture of succinct military history, cameo memories, poetry and informed opinion - as well as careful travel directions. Each battlefield has a brief Summary of the Battle, the Opening Moves, a description of What Happened and a Battlefield Tour of the most salient features, accompanied by a sketch map and photographs of the battlefield today. There are sections on Tourist Information and War Graves Organisations and a sketch map on the end papers puts the battlefields in Perspective. This book conti
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Major and Mrs Holt's Battlefield Guide to the Somme

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


We have been visiting the Somme for over 25 years. The Somme is to the British what Gettysburg or Yorktown are to the Americans. We know them all well and have conducted hundreds of tourists around each of them. If you are visiting the Somme in mind or body this book gives you the answers to the questions that we have been asked by hundreds of people. It has over 130 colour photos and comes complete with a separate four colour map showing battle lines, bunkers, cemeteries, memorials and grid references linked to the book entries. You learn how to get to places, how long it will take and how long to stay as well as what happened. There are suggested itineraries and tourist information.We use the book ourselves!
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Major and Mrs Holt's Battlefield Guide to the Somme

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


We have been visiting the Somme for over 25 years. The Somme is to the British what Gettysburg or Yorktown are to the Americans. We know them all well and have conducted hundreds of tourists around each of them. If you are visiting the Somme in mind or body this book gives you the answers to the questions that we have been asked by hundreds of people. It has over 130 colour photos and comes complete with a separate four colour map showing battle lines, bunkers, cemeteries, memorials and grid references linked to the book entries. You learn how to get to places, how long it will take and how long to stay as well as what happened. There are suggested itineraries and tourist information.We use the book ourselves!
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Before Endeavours Fade

Rose E.B. Coombs


From the Belgian coast, across the fields of Flanders, over the valley of the Somme and down the line to the Argonne: all the major battlefields of the First World War - Ypres, Arras, Cambrai, Amiens, St. Quentin, Mons, Le Cateau, Reims, Verdun and St. Mihiel - are criss-crossed in this book over more than thirty different routes, each clearly shown on a Michelin map. Every significant feature is described in detail. Indispensable for anyone contemplating a tour of the battlefields in Belgium and France, this book combines the years of knowledge, travel and research of its author, Rose Coombs, who worked at the Imperial War Museum in London for nearly forty years. Since her death in 1991, "After the Battle's" editor, Karel Margry, has travelled every route, checking and revising the text where necessary, as well as re-photographing every memorial. Many new ones have been added, including the new cemetery at Fromelles inaugurated in July 2010, yet we have striven to keep true to the fla
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World War One: A Very Peculiar History

Jim Pipe


With the centenary of the outbreak of the The Great War coming in 2014, World War One, A Very Peculiar History commemorates the events of the time by looking at some of the incredible lengths, no matter how risky or bizarre, people went to to defend their country. From Front pigs to hairy beasts, author Jim Pipe looks at the nicknames coined at the time, while providing mind-boggling lists and figures about the battles, the equipment used and the harsh conditions the troops faced. Laced throughout this chronological description of the events leading up to and during the war are tales of human endeavour, charity and daring some scary, some quirky, and some truly unbelievable. So take time to take in the sheer scale of sacrifice, destruction and political tension that World War One resulted in, because we won t be able to ask, first-hand, what it was like to fight in World War One for much longer.
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Causes and Consequences (World War One)

S ADAMS


This series provides a detailed examination of one of the most disasterous wars in history. Packed with information, photographs and maps. Timelines and quotes put events in context and help to personalise them. For ages 10-16 years. A deep and important book on the 1st World War. Concentrating on the final stages, it gives an excellent picture of the shortages of munitions, artillery, manpower and communications, particularly of railways. In addition it provides a means of understanding the problems of the Austro-Hungarian empire and the aspirations of the minorities it contained.
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The Way it Was - 1st World War drama on the homefront

Margaret Hurdman


Kindle edition This is children's story, full of passion and drama, and written by well known medium, spiritualist and stage performer Margaret Hurdman, about the drama of family life on the home front, with the father of the house serving King & country in the First World War. Author Margaret is also known for her poems and other nostalgic children's stories which have spanned the generations and inspired many of today's youngsters. This latest story is taken from a batch of perviously unpublished stories that have lain dormant in her office for decades.
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The Donkey of Gallipoli: A True Story of Courage in World War I

Mark Greenwood


Ages 6 & up Often cheerless, this tribute to a WWI foot soldier and the donkey he used to evacuate the wounded doesn't shy away from representing the grimness of war. The husband-and-wife Greenwood (The Legend of Moondyne Joe) and Lessac (Caribbean Alphabet) tell of Englishman Jack Simpson, who, while fighting for Australia, stumbled upon a donkey. Greenwood matter-of-factly relates Simpson's brave deeds: "They made twelve to fifteen trips each day, carrying water to thirsty troops and returning with a soldier straddled over the donkey's back." Spreads showing the bandaged and bloodied are tempered by the naïve styling of the gouache illustrations. Only close examination of the dramatic scene of army boats going ashore under a barrage of Turkish gunfire will reveal the dead body floating in blood-tinged water. This account pays homage to the fallen of Gallipoli and one soldier's unique heroics in particular, though colorful folk art and a furry animal don't make the content any easi
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The Kid's Book of World War I: A Project and Activity Book

Kathi Oram Peterson


Ages 9 & up Revealing the causes, battles, and key players behind the Great War, this exploration provides a variety of hands-on activities for children, guaranteed to foster an appreciation for this complex period. Topics covered include Morse code, life in the trenches, the race for naval superiority, and tips on visiting museums and memorials. Featuring a collection of intriguing real-life wartime stories, biographies of notable world figures, and details on the food, music, and atmosphere of World War I, this educational book provides a deeper investigation into this historical era, spotlighting the United States’ emergence onto the international stage.
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The Emperor's Coloured Coat: In Which Otto Prohaska, Hero of the Habsburg Empire, Has an Interesting Time While Not Quite Managing to Avert the First World War

John Biggins


This book follows the hapless Lieutenant Otto Prohaska in the waning years of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and finds Otto taking an ill-considered break from duties to engage in a mad fling with a Polish actress. After a desperate attempt to elude his lover's husband, he finds himself mistaken by anarchists as one of their own. Otto soon masters their code names and secret handshakes, but when he also learns of their plans to assassinate the Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo, his duty is clear. He must alert his superiors—now, if only he can find someone who will believe him! From Publishers Weekly In this robust sequel to A Sailor of Austria, young Lieutenant Otto Prohaska of the Austro-Hungarian navy continues to narrate his adventures during the early years of this century, as he careens across Eastern Europe and parts of Asia, buffeted by lovely ladies, tyrannical lords and world events. Prohaska volunteers for flight training only to be shot down over a royal picnic, allowing him
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Locating World War I Military Records

Jennifer Holik-Urban


Kindle edition Locating World War I service records can be difficult because of the National Personnel Records Center Fire in 1973. This quick reference guide will give you ideas on places to search for additional records.
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Alexander Arnot's World War 1 Letters

Jeremy and Helen Rawson (Editor)


Kindle. A series of letters written home from the Front in the First World War offer a fascinating insight into life for the ordinary soldier caught up in that conflict.
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Over There War Scenes on the Western Front

Arnold Bennett


Kindle The book gives a poignant insight into 'life' in France on the Western Front in 1915. Easy to read,very informative and a brilliant author. This is a fairly short book. It appears to be a series of essays written by an American journalist on a visit to the Western Front. There is mention of the sinking of the Lusitania which was in May of 1915, but no references to events in early 1916 that would have been appropriate in context; so it would seem likely to have been written in the latter part of 1915. It could be argued that the book is propaganda; the text shows that the author clearly sympathises more with the allies than with the Germans. It is quite possible that the book was destined to be used to make the American public more aware of the conflict, and the nature of the combatents, and to encourage the US to provide support for the allies, but that doesn't detract from the quality of the writing which is really superb. I found the book truly fascinating. It con
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Aircraft of World War 1

Kenneth Munson


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The Last Fighting Tommy: The Life of Harry Patch, The Only Surviving Veteran of the Trenches

Harry Patch & Richard Van Emden


'An extraordinary biography by the very last witness of a devastating four years in British history .. 'Patch is unique - living history on legs, articulate, with wonderfully vivid recall' ' Daily Mail 'Patch was not unique among millions of his comrades who endured that prolonged and supreme test of nerve and courage. But, uniquely, as the last survivor, he embodies them all' Sunday Express 'This articulate, modest and outspoken man not only remains one of the last living links with a traumatic event that has become part of the national consciousness, but is an unassailable witness of what the war was like for those who fought in it' Daily Telegraph 'A wonderful book' Andrew Motion, Poet Laureate Book Description Poignant and fascinating memoir from one of the the last veterans of the trenches. I had seen Harry interviewed on TV, as the world suddenly became aware that the old WW1 soldiers were fading away. He stood out from the rest as being sharp, witty and engaging. I felt I c
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Diary of a Prisoner in World War I

Josef Sramek


Kindle An authentic diary of Josef Šrámek, a Czech soldier drafted to the Hungaro-Austrian army to fight from the beginning of World War 1. He was captured by Serbs. He survived and describes a series of death marches through Serbia and Albania. He was then confined in a concentration camp at the italian island of Asinara which comprises an important part of his story. Later he was transfered to a more humanly captivity in France where his diary ends.
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World War 1

A.G. Armstrong (Editor)


Kindle Contents: World War I Causes of World War I African theatre of World War I Asian and Pacific theatre of World War I Naval warfare of World War I Italian Campaign (World War I) Eastern Front (World War I) American entry into World War I Hundred Days Offensive Weapons of World War I Aviation in World War I Ottoman casualties of World War I Rape of Belgium Opposition to World War I French Army Mutinies (1917) Aftermath of World War I
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The Bridge Carpenter: memories of the 1st World War

Neville W Tickner


Kindle. The First World War was an overpowering event for Australia. Almost every family in the country had a member who served and every family in the country would have known someone who was killed or wounded. In his Short History of Australia, Manning Clark used the term “the fiery furnace” to aptly describe what Australian servicemen had endured, adding that some of those who had experienced it “had been uplifted by it, not beyond good and evil, but beyond the mean, the petty, the trivial and the unworthy”. This is the story of one such man. The son of English parents, Arthur and Mary Ann Goodwin, who immigrated to Australia in 1888, Edward (Ted) Goodwin was the eldest of two brothers who volunteered to serve in 1915. After over sixty years of keeping his memories to himself, he finally decided to record them before, like his eyesight, they too began to fade. This manuscript largely owes its existence to Mr Goodwin’s daughter-inlaw Niree, who patiently wrote down
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Edexcel GCSE Modern World History Unit 1 Peace and War: International Relations 1900-91 Student Book

Mr Nigel Kelly, Robin Bunce & Laura Gallagher (Authors)


Peace and War: International Relations 1900-1991 Student Book has been written by a team of experienced examiners and subject experts and is designed to build students' historical skills, understanding and knowledge. For me I'm not exactly one for individual revision and so I sat down with my sister and went through all the important dates in the back and I told her all about it as she flicked back and told me if I was wrong or right. This book helped me 100% and so with all the help from the book it got me an A.
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A Companion to World War I

John Horne (Editor)


Selected as CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title for 2011 – 3.01.12 ′The recipe for this volume′s success is simple: take 30 or so of today′s leading specialists, provide them with five broad categories in which to articulate their understanding of this conflict, insist that bibliography be a priority, and oversee the project with a scholar who is himself a respected, widely published authority. The book′s 38 essays are grouped to treat five aspects of the struggle: origins, conduct, culture, a survey of the major individual states involved, and a finale that treats the peace conference and the war′s aftermath....[A] superb one–stop portal into the period.′ Choice ′Horne is to be congratulated for editing such a disparate group of essays into a cohesive whole′. Reviews in History ′This substantial and comprehensive work is an important contribution to the literature of a conflict central to the history of the modern world
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1st Bedfordshires: Mons to the Somme Pt. 1

Steven Fuller


In August 1914 the 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment were amongst the small professional British Army who gathered and prepared for a war that would `be over by Christmas'. With a long and proud history, dating back to 1688, the regiment's fighting men had already served through numerous wars and rebellions over and above long periods on garrison duties in the `Fever Isles', the New World, and throughout the expanding British Empire. So when war was declared the `Old Contemptibles' of the 1st Battalion would find themselves heavily engaged in more intense fighting during the first three months of the Great War, as it came to be known, than many of the newly raised `Service' battalions would experience during their entire existence. Despite heavy casualties, atrocious conditions, and a steep learning curve, they remained professional and stoic through the early fire and movement battles and then the stagnant, arbitrary nature of trench warfare. They endured pitched battles, heavy she
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The Impact of World War 1:AA312:Total War and Social Change Europe 1914-1955

J. Chapman, Clive Emsley, David Englander, A. Marwick, Mark Pittaway, Bernard Waites (Authors)


The second in a series of five books, "The Impact of World War I" examines how far World War I was a total war and the military and technological imperatives of the war. The nature of the war itself is explored, in conjunction with its geopolitical and social effects. A comparative study of the collapse of the Hapsburg empire and the Russian and German revolutions is also included.
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Royal Navy Roll of Honour - World War 1, By Name: Part 1

Don Kindell


World War 1 Roll of Honour of Royal Navy, Royal Marines and Royal Naval Division men and women lost, 1914-18. Listed by Name. Compiled from original sources including Admiralty Death Ledgers and Admiralty Communiques. Foreword by Capt Christopher Page, RN, Rtd, Head, Naval Historical Branch of the Naval Staff. Downloaded version, available from www.naval-history.net, is searchable.
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Nice Girls and Rude Girls: Women Workers in World War 1

Deborah Thom


Drawing on official records, contemporary writing and oral history, the author examines the myth and reality of women's "experience of war" and shows that before 1914 they were often supporting dependants, had acquired considerble industrial experience, and how women's trade acitivity was growing. She studies the effect of "dilution and substitution" in making good the loss of industrial workers, the effect of "patriotic fervour", the industrial roles of women, wages, the effect on health and family life and demobilization in 1918-19. The war showed that women were capable of a variety of tasks and they made great sacrifices and contributions massively to the war effort. The effect of war-work has underlined women's posistions by their gender; they had changed but not improved their working lives. In 1916, Jennie Randolph Churchill wrote in her book Women's War Work, 'It is one of the virtues of war that it puts the light which in peacetime is hid under a bushel in such prominence t
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Forgotten Voices Of The Great War: A New History of WWI in the Words of the Men and Women Who Were There

Max Arthur


Max Arthur's compilation of First World War memories, Forgotten Voices of the Great War, offers a reminder of the scale of human experience within the 1914-18 conflict. Arthur, a military historian best known for his history of the RAF and his account of the Falklands campaign in 1982, has assembled hundreds of excerpts from the sound archives of the Imperial War Museum. Officers, rank-and-file troops, Australians, Americans, war widows, women in the munitions factories, and German soldiers too, all left oral testimony of their experiences, and these interviews provide the basis of the book. Arthur has put them in chronological and campaign order, and provided a general commentary, but beyond that, has left the rich and moving record to speak for itself. The sheer humdrum ordinariness of modern warfare--the mud and rain, the relentless loss of life and inevitability of death, the pointless routine of attrition--come over in the matter-of-fact recollections of so many. But so too does
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Albatros Aces of World War 1 Part 2: v. 2

Greg VanWyngarden


"Almost every page of the book has interesting black & white photographs of either the pilots, the airfields or the Albatros itself. The author does discuss each of the plane's strengths and weaknesses as expressed by the pilots themselves, as well as the factories which produced the aircraft. Being an Osprey book, there is also an eleven-page set of color plates of various Albatros showing the paint schemes used by specific aces - some from the side and some from the top. These are a nice reference for those looking to make their own counters for the game of Dawn Patrol." -Earl Leyda, "Aerodrome" "Part 2 deliberately avoids repeating coverage found in Part 1 (No 32 in the series), written several years previously by Norman Franks. Franks' book is organized by unit, while VanWyngarden takes a chronological approach. Both contain the usual color profiles and planform drawings. Chris Savaglio's technique for presenting natural wood in small scales...is ideal for the varnished wood Pro
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They Called it Passchendaele: The Story of the Battle of Ypres and of the Men Who Fought in it

Lyn MacDonald


The third battle of Ypres, culminating in a desperate struggle for the ridge and little village of Passchendaele, was one of the most appalling campaigns in the First World War. In this masterly piece of oral history, Lyn Macdonald lets over 600 participants speak for themselves. A million Tommies, Canadians and Anzacs assembled at the Ypres Salient in the summer of 1917, mostly raw young troops keen to do their bit for King and Country. This book tells their tale of mounting disillusion amid mud, terror and desperate privation, yet it is also a story of immense courage, comradeship, songs, high spirits and bawdy humour. They Called It Passchendaele portrays the human realities behind one of the most disastrous events in the history of warfare.
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Somme

Lyn MacDonald


This book looks at the Battle of the Somme, which was planned as "The Big Push" that would at last break the long stalemate on the Western Front in World War I. However the 18 divisions that went over the top between Arras and St-Quentin on the morning of 1 July 1916, walked into a battle that has gone down in the annals of human conflict as the slaughterhouse of a generation. The author has written other books about the history of World War I, including, "They Called it Passchendaele" and "The Roses of No Man's Land". To add to the other reviews (and it *is* a triumph of research, and tells you pretty much all you need to know about the campaign), one thing puzzled me. The book doesn't seem to cover the first day of the battle, the day which most people think of when they think of the Somme. One moment, the troops are about to leap over the trenches - and then we're at the next chapter, and we've skipped several hours into the future. I assume Ms MacDonald is trying to replicate t
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The Roses of No Man's Land

Lyn MacDonald


'On the face of it,' writes Lyn Macdonald, 'no one could have been less equipped for the job than these gently nurtured girls who walked straight out of Edwardian drawing rooms into the manifest horrors of the First World War ...' Yet the volunteer nurses rose magnificently to the occasion; in this book they get a chance to tell their own stories. In leaking tents and draughty huts they fought another war, a war against agony and death, as men lay suffering from the pain of unimaginable wounds or diseases we can now cure almost instantly. It was here that young doctors frantically forged new medical techniques – of blood transfusion, dentistry, psychiatry and plastic surgery – in the attempt to save soldiers shattered in body or spirit. And it was here that women achieved a quiet but permanent revolution, by proving beyond question they could do anything. All this is superbly captured in The Roses of No Man's Land, a panorama of hardship, disillusion and despair, yet also of enduran
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Somme Mud

E P F Lynch


SOLDIER Magazine, March 2008 'His observations on life in the line and of his emotions in battle strike a chord. Difficult to put down - it has the feel of being written by a soldier for soldiers' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. BIRMINGHAM POST, 8 March 2008 'This vivid first-hand account of the experiences of an ordinary infantryman, Somme Mud reaches us as the voice of an ordinary, but highly literate, private soldier who simply endured the horrors that surrounded him and got on with his job' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. I bought this book as it sounded an interesting read. At first the way it is written takes a bit of getting used to, it isn't written after all by a professional story teller - the original text was penned by a soldier, Private Lynch, on returning from the Great War where, as an Australian infantryman, he fought in the front line and acted as a 'runner' for his CO. On hi
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1915 : The Death of Innocence

Lyn MacDonald


By the end of 1914, the battered British forces were bogged down, yet hopeful that promised reinforcements and spring weather would soon lead to a victorious breakthrough. A year later, after appalling losses at Aubers Ridge, Loos, Neuve Chapelle, Ypres and faraway Gallipoli, fighting seemed set to go on for ever. Drawing on extensive interviews, letters and diaries, this book brilliantly evokes the soldiers' dogged heroism, sardonic humour and terrible loss of innocence through 'a year of cobbling together, of frustration, of indecision'. Over two decades' research puts Lyn Macdonald among the greatest popular chroniclers of the First World War. Here, from the poignant memories of participants, she has once again created an unforgettable slice of military history. This is an excellent account of 1915, the year when gas was used for the first time, Gallipoli became infamous and time and again thousands of men died, on both sides, for little gain. The interleaving of first hand acc
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Forgotten Voices of the Somme: The Most Devastating Battle of the Great War in the Words of Those Who Survived

Joshua Levine


1916. The Somme. With over a million casualties, it was the most brutal battle of the First World War. It is a clash that even now, over 90 years later, remains seared into the national consciousness, conjuring up images of muddy trenches and young lives tragically wasted. Its first day, July 1st 1916 - on which the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - is the bloodiest day in the history of the British armed forces to date. On the German side, an officer famously described it as 'the muddy grave of the German field army'. By the end of the battle, the British had learned many lessons in modern warfare while the Germans had suffered irreplaceable losses, ultimately laying the foundations for the Allies' final victory on the Western Front. Drawing on a wealth of material from the vast Imperial War Museum Sound Archive, Forgotten Voices of the Somme presents an intimate, poignant, sometimes even bleakly funny insight into life on the front line: from the day-t
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Forgotten Voices of the Victoria Cross

Roderick Bailey & The Imperial War Museum


Forgotten Voices of the Victoria Cross by Roderick Bailey, is one of the finest books about Victoria Cross recipients published in the last five years. Based on interviews held at the Imperial War Museum, some sixty-odd recipients are dealt with in either eye-witness accounts of the VC deed, accounts by the recipients themselves, or by men who knew the recipient. The period covered dates from the First World War up to the Korean War, and the illustrations are excellent. As a researcher who has been interested in the Victoria Cross for well over thirty years,I strongly recommend this book to all - even those with just a passing interest. for me, it was a great revelation of 'the man behind the medal.' Roderick Bailey has done an excellent job, and after reading the book, I felt very humbled by what I had read. Highly recommended.
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On Her Their Lives Depend: Munitions Workers in the Great War

Angela Woollacott


In this evocative book, Angela Woollacott analyzes oral histories, workers' writings, newspapers, official reports, and factory song lyrics to present an intimate view of women munitions workers in Britain during World War I. Munitions work offered working-class women--for the first time--independence, a reliable income, even an improved standard of living. But male employers and trade unionists brought them face-to-face with their subordination as women within their own class, while experiences with middle-class women co-workers and police reminded them of their status as working class. Woollacott sees the woman munitions worker as a powerful symbol of modernity who challenged the gender order through her patriotic work and challenged class differences through her increased spending power, mobility, and changing social behavior.
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The Deluge: British Society and the First World War

Arthur Marwick


Praise for the book when it first appeared in 1965: 'Mr Marwick has ingeniously discovered a new approach: away from strategy and battles to the home front. He draws efficiently on the abundant sources, from memoirs to official papers, and brings them together in a clear narrative.' - A.J.P. Taylor, Observer 'He writes well, without over-writing; the result is a piece of social history, well conceived and well executed, which deserves the rank as a permanent addition to the historical literature of the First World War.' - Max Beloff, The Listener Product Description Almost continuously in print for 40 years, The Deluge is widely recognised as one of the classics of post-1960 British historical writing, and as the book which initiated the systematic study of the social consequences of modern war. Arthur Marwick describes life on the home front during the first total war in history, analysing the social changes that made Britain of the 1920s a vastly different place from the Brit
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Over the Top: Great Battles of the First World War

Martin Marix Evans


Kindle The early battles of the First World War during the autumn and winter of 1914 were open, mobile affairs of the kind long familiar to professional soldiers. By early 1915, however, a new type of war had emerged – trench warfare. Modern artillery and machine-guns had been employed in the Boer War only a decade or so previously, but the perfection of their use led to the creation of a static front: the Western Front. Attempts to circumvent this Front, notably at Gallipoli in 1915, only succeeded in perpetuating the same form of warfare. Over the Top offers an innovative examination of trench warfare on the Western Front and Gallipoli during 1914-18 in the major battles that influenced the outcome of the First World War.
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An Introduction to World War One

David Kaufman


Kindle Do you want to gain a better understanding of the key events of the First World War? Do you want to understand the reasons behind the conflict and who was to blame? Do you want to understand the consequences of the ‘war to end all wars’? Would you like to discover the impact on those involved? The Beginners Guide to the First World War is a compelling and accessible introduction to a conflict that was fought on a scale not seen before. The First World War is often only seen in terms of the narrow confines of the trenches on the Western Front, but this book places the reader in the global picture, taking them from the more familiar fields of northern France and Belgium to the Italian Alps, the wide open spaces of European Russia, the Atlantic Ocean and the Middle East. Learn how victories and defeats on one front affected others. Learn how the pressures of war led to the fall of the great multi-national empires in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia and Ottoman Turkey and s
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The First Day on the Somme: 1 July 1916

Martin Middlebrook


Kindle On 1 July, 1916, a continous line of British soldiers climbed out from the trenches of the Somme into No Man's Land and began to walk slowly towards dug-in German troops armed with machine-guns and defended by thick barbed wire. By the end of that day, as old tactics were met by the reality of modern warfare, there had been more than 60,000 British casualties - a third of them fatalities. Martin Middlebrook's classic account of the blackest day in the history of the British army draws on official sources, local newspapers, autobiographies, novels and poems from the time. Most importantly, it also takes in the accounts of hundreds of survivors: normal men, many of them volunteers, who found themselves thrown into a scene of unparalleled tragedy and horror. Compelling and intensely moving, it describes the true events behind the sacrifice of a generation of young men - killed as much by the folly of their commanders as by the bullets of their enemies. I have just finished
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The Soldier's War: The Great War Through Veterans' Eyes

Richard Van Emden


'Thousands of books have been written about the Great War, but perhaps none so vividly evocative as The Soldier's War an extraordinary homage to a lost generation' Daily Mail 'In The Soldier's War, Richard van Emden has toiled in archives and hunted down caches of letters to tell the story of the war chronologically through the eyes of the Tommies who fought it' The Times 'Not the least remarkable aspect of Van Emden's trawl through the memories of these survivors is that they are accompanied by around 100 unpublished photos Since original images from the war's sharp end are rarities, these pictures - blurred and fuzzy though many of them are - are themselves worth the price of the book' Literary Review 'Van Emden manages to establish in an immediate empathy with these ordinary men of Britain, thrown into such horrendous conditions. They hope, moan, laugh, grieve, despair and pray their way through the four years of the 'war to end all wars" Time Out Review `Profoundly moving ... ext
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Major and Mrs Holt's Pocket Battlefield Guide to the Somme 1916/1918

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


The Somme is the epicentre for most people in the study of the First World War from a UK and Commonwealth perspective. Today the landscape and terrain are dedicated to the soldiers that fought and died there and Major and Mrs Holt's Pocket Guide to the Somme has been put together to take you around the area. This book, part of a new series of guides, is designed conveniently in a small size, for those who have only limited time to visit, or who are simply interested in as an introduction to the historic battlefields, whether on the ground or from an armchair. They contain selections from the Holts' more detailed guides of the most popular and accessible sites plus hand tourist information, capturing the essential features of the Battles. The book contains many full colour maps and photographs and detailed instructions on what to see and where to visit. Major & Mrs Holt are the Formost experts on battlefield touring. Their previous guides books including the Somme, Ypres, Gallipo
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Only A Dog - The True Story of a Dog's Devotion to His Master During World War 1

Bertha Whitridge Smith


Kindle This was the first book I purchased after I bought my Kindle. Its a great little book with some nice illustrations and its an easy read format. It was written during the first world war so there are plenty of references to the ' Beastly Hun'. Its written through the eyes of the little dog and I recommend it to any animal lover or reader of war books.
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1914-1918: The History of the First World War

David Stevenson


Sunday Times, September 2004 ' the most thorough account of the war human hand has yet assembled' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Independent, 3rd September, 2004 'this history of the 1914-1918 conflict surpasses all others. It is tough, erudit and comprehensive' I thought this a magnificent book. Its 600 pages are written in crystal clear English, covering the political, economic and military aspects of the War. The major campaigns of this global conflict are all well described, as is life on the home fronts of the Allies and the Central Powers. The origins are well described, while the chapters on the aftermath are particularly helpful. I recommend it strongly to those wishing to read a comprehensive history of the conflict for the first time, while those who have read other works on the War will find many new perspectives here. This book is superb value.
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World War I Trench Warfare: 1916-1918 Pt.2

Stephen Bull


"Once again a winner in my opinion. No, it still hasn't made me an expert on World War I, but has increased the knowledge base a little in a simple, easy to understand format. Osprey is to be commended for their continued coverage of this neglected period. I highly recommend this to any figure modeler or painter with an interest in this time period, for a general overview, and some interesting figure/vignette ideas. For those interested in a more detailed study of various countries uniforms during WWI, be sure to see some of Ospreys other offerings." -Dave O'Meara," Historicus Forma "(August 2005) Product Description The years from 1914 to 1918 saw a whole series of complex and very rapid changes in infantry tactics, which fundamentally altered the way wars had been fought for 150 years. This two-part study describes and illustrates the development: of infantry equipment and weapons; of support weapons; of field fortifications; and, most importantly, exactly how these items and techn
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World War I Trench Warfare: 1914-1916 Pt.1

Stephen Bull


"I've never been disappointed by any of the Osprey Elite Series of books and I certainly wasn't with this one. It rekindled an area of history for me I've always enjoyed... Has this book turned me into a WWI expert? No, it hasn't. Has it increased my knowledge of the era and refreshed an aging mind? Yes. Would I recommend this book to someone else? Without a doubt or second though about it, especially if they have the slightest interest in World War I and wished to increase their knowledge a little more." -Dave O'Meara, "Historicus Forma "(June 2005)
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Fortifications of the Western Front 1914-18

Paddy Griffith


Following the early battles of 1914 along the Marne and in the Ypres salient. World War I rapidly transformed from a war of movement into one of attrition, with the opposing sides entrenching themselves in a line of fortified positions from the Flanders coastline to the Swiss border. This title details the different styles of fortification used on the Western Front throughout the course of the war, from the early ditches of 1914 to the complicated systems of 1918. It explains the development of the 'defence in depth' German system and the British reaction to it, as well as illustrating the importance of the forts around Verdun and how they were defended.
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Oxford Student Texts: Wilfred Owen

Helen Cross


One of a series designed to provide a new, accessible approach to the works of great poets and playwrights. Each text includes general notes on the text; discussion of themes, issues and context; and suggestions for further reading. I bought this book for my English lit AS level, and found it extremely useful. It contains a comprehensive selection of Owen's poems and letters to his mother, background about Owen's life and WW1 and also notes on all of the works included. The notes are most useful as a supplement to notes learnt in school, as they are quite obscure but contain fascinating ideas and references which most other students would probably not know about. Although I was only studying poetry, the letters were also indispensable as a source of information on Owen's life, thoughts, and most of all the experiences which inspired his poetry. Overall, a must-buy for A level english and also for anyone interested in WW1 poetry as it makes a very interesting read!
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York Notes on Selected Poems of Wilfred Owen


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The Poems of Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen


In his draft Preface, Wilfred Owen includes his well-known statement 'My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity'. All of his important poems were written in just over a year, and Dulce et Decorum Est, S.I.W., Futility and Anthem for Doomed Youth still have an astonishing power to move the reader. Owen pointed out that 'All a poet can do today is to warn. That is why all true Poets must be truthful'. His warning was based on his acute observation of the soldiers with whom he served on the Western Front, and his poems reflect the horror and the waste of the First World War. This volume contains all Owen's best-known poems, only four of which were published in his lifetime. He was killed a week before the Armistice in November 1918.
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The War Poems Of Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen


A much needed selection of Wilfred Owen WAR poems, with a new introduction by Jon Stallworthy. This selection of Wilfred Owen's war poems is being published partly to provide an ideal edition of the poems for schools, who essentially read the war poems and need a short, thorough edition. It contains a new introduction by Jon Stallworthy, which is aimed at a general audience, but will be thorough and academic enough to work for schools as well. Constable have a similar edition planned, but Chatto's will be out first, and contains copyright material unavailable to other editions.
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The War Poems

Siegfried Sassoon


Sassoon, who lived through Word War One and who died in 1967, was, as the introduction to this book tells us, irritated in his later years at always being thought of as a "war poet". Understandable perhaps from the point of view of the poet: readers on the other hand might wish to demur. The poems gathered here and chronologically ordered, thereby tracing the course of the war, are an extraordinary testimony to the almost unimaginable experiences of a combatant in that bitter conflict. Moving from the patriotic optimism of the first few poems (" ... fighting for our freedom, we are free") to the anguish and anger of the later work (where "hope, with furtive eyes and grappling fists / Flounders in mud ... "), there comes a point when the reality of trench-warfare and its aftershocks move beyond comprehension: Sassoon knows this, and it becomes a powerful element in his art. As a book, the images have a cumulative relentlessness that make it almost impossible to read more than a few poem
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Wilfred Owen: A Biography

Jon Stallworthy


Surely one of the finest biographies of our time. (Graham Greene, The Sunday Times ) a worthy memorial to its subject (Kingsley Amis, Observer ) Lovely, well researched biography, with good and full information from childhood to death. Numerous photographs also accompany the text. It contains many useful quotes from Wilfred Owen's younger brother, as well as poems and excerps from letters by Wilfred Owen. The volume is finished off beautifully with an amazing afterward.
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Undertones of War

Edmund Blunden


An established classic ... accurate and detailed in observation of the war scene and its human figures (D. J. Enright ) n what is one of the finest autobiographies to come out of the First World War, the distinguished poet Edmund Blunden records his experiences as an infantry subaltern in France and Flanders. Blunden took part in the disastrous battles of the Somme, Ypres and Passchendaele, describing the latter as 'murder, not only to the troops, but to their singing faiths and hopes'. In his compassionate yet unsentimental prose, he tells of the heroism and despair found among the officers. Blunden's poems show how he found hope in the natural landscape; the only thing that survives the terrible betrayal enacted in the Flanders fields.
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Her Privates We

Frederic Manning


First published privately in 1929 as The Middle Parts of Fortune, Her Privates We is the novel of the Battle of the Somme told from the perspective of an ordinary private. This edition now restores all the 'prunings and excisions' that were made to the first edition because the bluntness of language was thought to make the book unfit for public distribution. An undisputed classic of war writing and a lasting tribute to all who participated in the war, Her Privates We was originally published as written by 'Private 19022'. Championed by amongst others Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, TS Eliot and TE Lawrence, it has become recognised as a classic in the seventy years since its first publication. Now republished, with an introduction by William Boyd, it will again amaze a new generation of readers. First published in 1929, Her Privates We is an extraordianry novel of World War 1. When it first came out, the novel was censored and its language which was considered too crude was cleaned up
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Fear

Gabriel Chevallier


A rediscovered, controversial classic of war literature with a new introduction by John Berger The author's Clochemerle is possibly my favourite book of all time (close run thing with Treasure Island) and I'd never heard of this book. Being a bit of a Chevallier completist I bought this though, and was first of all struck by how sparse and serious this book is, certainly compared to clochemerle. I suppose this is inevitable given the subject matter but it is quite a departure none the less. Yes there are elements of humour present and much of the "seriousness" is expressed through irony and sarcasm (think Blackadder without the belly laughs) but on the whole this is a doughty work which I believe has to be at least partly if not wholly autobiographical. It is very readable however and has been beautifully translated so that the nuances of the French language have been preserved but English idioms have been used where appropriate. I would put this on a par with "Under Fire" by Henri
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Six Weeks: The Short and Gallant Life of the British Officer in the First World War: The Life and Death of the British Officer in the First World War

John Lewis-Stempel


Best research resource ever. Beautiful book (Dan Stevens (Downton Abbey) ) Compelling (Julian Fellowes ) This well researched book tells the harrowing story of the men - or adolescents, many of them -who unhesitatingly answered the call by War Minister Lord Kitchener for volunteers, and continued to answer it even after it became clear that the life expectancy of a subaltern in the trenches averaged only six weeks... Lewis-Stempel is excellent on life in the trenches... for all the horror and pity of their struggle, their legacy is our freedom. (Andrew Roberts MAIL ON SUNDAY ) It is only rarely that a book deserves to be recommended unreservedly but John Lewis-Stempel's Six Weeks falls firmly into that category...This is a book that should be read by every young man who aspires to serve as an officer in the Army; it will educate him about how to behave in command of soldiers and about how to face the perils of war. (GUARDS MAGAZINE ) woven with great narrative skill...prese
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They Shall Not Pass: The French Army on the Western Front 1914-1918

Ian Sumner


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A Chaplain at Gallipoli: The Great War Diaries of Kenneth Best

Gavin Roynon (Editor)


Many chaplains were not permitted to go near the Front in the First World War - others insisted on doing so, like Kenneth Best in the Gallipoli Campaign. Best had no military training before the war but he felt that he could only fulfil his pastoral role by getting close to the front line and working with the troops under fire. Best was attached to the 42nd East Lancastrians - the first Territorial Army Division to serve overseas in the conflict, so arguably the least experienced in the ways of war. In his diary we follow his progress through his initial training in Egypt and on to his arrival in Gallipoli in May 1915. Gallipoli has become notorious, even by the standards of the First World War. After a naval campaign to open up a supply route to Russia through Turkey failed, some 480,000 Allied troops were drawn into a land invasion in which hundreds of thousands were injured or killed. In his diary, Best records his efforts to encourage frightened men before they go over the top, to
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Retreat and Rearguard 1914: The BEF's Actions from Mons to the Marne

Jerry Murland


Jerry Murland is an ex soldier, mountaineering instructor and teacher. He is also the and author of the recent, and highly regarded Aristocrats Go To War. He brings the all rounder's approach to his analysis and history of wahat Basil Liddel Hart called "that thing apart", the regular British Army of 1914. This is a period and a subject in which I have a particular interest; Murland's book is one I opened with particular relish and closed without finding disappointment. Like the best of current military historians the author has the ability to knit his narrative of events with truly apposite personal stories and accounts. Drawn from published and unpublished papers and accounts, they both colour his work and inform the reader. Absurdly, the Pen and Sword's publicity release for the book describes the account of the 12 day, 200 mile, retreat from Mons as a "near rout, "over blood drenched miles". Murland gives the lie to such half baked blurb. Certainly, there was poor, broken, co
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Under Fire

Henri Barbusse


A graphic account of the First World War from the perspective of the French trenches. It powerfully evokes the mundane degradations of trench life as well as the drama and trauma of military action, showing how ordinary men responded to one of the greatest horrors mankind has inflicted upon itself. This was a great book. I have read many, to try to understand and remember what my recent ancestors endured. This is one of the four definitive memoirs or autobiographical novels I have read on the subject. The others are All quiet, Storm of Steel and Her Privates We. Storm of Steel, whilst having a certain melancholy, could not be described as anti-war! Her Privates We takles the position that warfare is sometimes necessary. All Quiet is famously anti-war. Under Fire is anti war, anti capitalist, anti class system, in some ways anarchic. Barbusse was already a recognised author when he started this novel, and he wrote much of it whilst still in the Trenches. In my opinion, the charac
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The Return Of The Soldier

Rebecca West


Every now and then I will read a novel that makes me wonder why I don't try to cut down on the other things in my life and dedicate more time to reading. The Return of the Soldier is one such book. It is to be frank a masterpiece which will greatly affect how you look upon the world and reflect on your own attitudes to life and love. The story is simple but the book is far from a simple story. It tells of a shell shocked soldier Chris who escapes the horrors of Flanders by blotting out the last fifteen years of his life and returning to a passionate love affair of the past. He has no recollection of what has occurred since, of his marriage to the gloriously shallow and vain Kitty, of his having to take on the responsibilities of providing the wealth to allow his family to continue their affluent existence, to furnish Baldry Court with beautiful things, of the death of his father and of his own son. But the story is not his; it belongs to the three women of his life: Kitty his wife,
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The British Tommy 1914-18

Martin Pegler & Mike Chappell


World War I (1914-1918) was a watershed in British military and social history, and even now the repercussions can still be felt. No town or village in the British Isles escaped casualty, and the creative genius of a generation was wiped out, at an incalculable loss to society. This book looks in detail at how the British soldier lived, fought and died during the traumatic war years. Enlistment, training and all aspects of life on active service are carefully examined, including discipline, relaxation and even the type and quality of food that soldiers ate. The analysis of the British infantryman's experience is greatly aided by the memories of old soldiers, which provide an interesting and often vivid account of life on the Western Front.
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The German Army in World War I: v. 3: 1917-18

Nigel Thomas


."..beautifully illustrated and the eight color plates show off a variety of WWI uniforms/equipment that are appropriate for armies that fought in the RCW...fills a very necessary spot in my wargaming library... As always, Osprey books form the first line of any 'attack' on a new period of study!" -"HMG Reviewing Stand" Product Description This third volume of a mini-series covering the German forces in World War I examines the troops that fought during the climax of the war on all fronts: the last great battles of attrition in the West (Arras, Messines, 3rd Ypres - Passchendaele/Langemarck - and Cambrai, 1917) and the collapse of Russia in the East. The 'Kaiserschlacht' campaign is covered, as are the German operations in Italy, the Balkans, and in support of Turkey in the Middle East. Uniform changes during this period reflected the introduction of new tactics and weapons and new types of troops, such as tanks and assault battalions.
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German Stormtrooper, 1915-18

Ian Drury


he first official German stormtroop unit was authorized on 2 March 1915 when the Supreme Command of the field army ordered the VIII Corps to form a detachment for the testing of experimental weapons and the development of approximate tactics that could break the deadlock on the Western Front. By the summer of 1915, stormtroop units were springing up throughout the German armies in the west, and by the end of 1916 official stormtroop battalions were established throughout the western armies, providing a deadly new threat for the Allies. This book examines the uniform, equipment and tactics of Germany's feared elites of World War I (1914-1918).
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The German Army in World War I: 1914-15 Pt. 1

Nigel Thomas


."..beautifull illustrated and the eight color plates show off a variety of WWI uniforms/equipment that are appropriate for armies that fought in the RCW...fills a very necessary spot in my wargaming library... As always, Osprey books form the first line of any 'attack' on a new period of study!" -"HMG Reviewing Stand" Product Description This is the first of three books that study the German Army of World War I in great detail. They give a comprehensive study of the organisation, uniforms, insignia and equipment of the Imperial German army - in practice the combined armies of Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony and Wurttemberg. This first volume covers the troops who fought at Mons, Arras, and 1st Ypres in 1914; in winter 1914; at Neuve Chappelle, 2nd Ypres, Artois and the Argonne, 1915; and in East Prussia and Poland, 1914-15. It reflects the impact of the first period of trench warfare on the uniforms worn at the outbreak of war.
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The French Army, 1914-18

Ian Sumner


.,."beautifull illustrated and the eight color plates show off a variety of WWI uniforms/equipment that are appropriate for armies that fought in the RCW...fills a very necessary spot in my wargaming library... As always, Osprey books form the first line of any 'attack' on a new period of study!" -"HMG Reviewing Stand" Product Description Initially the strongest of all the Allied armies, France's metropolitan and colonial units bore the greatest burden during the first two years of the Great War, and made a great contribution to the final victory. In common with most European countries, the pre-war French Army was based on a system of national military service providing conscripts who could be subject to recall as reservists for several years after. However, the advent of war, the crisis in manpower, and the development of new tactics and weapons brought radical changes. The influence of these factors on the organisation, equipment, uniforms and tactics of the French Army during Worl
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Somme 1 July 1916: Tragedy and Triumph

Andrew Robertshaw


"This brief account of that day, the first of a battle that would drag on for several months, sets the Somme in its larger context of World War I history. It explains the reasons for the disaster and discusses the British and German successes of that day. The book includes orders of battle for the BEF, French, and German units engaged, brief bibliography, and a description of the battlefield today." -Thomas R. Kailbourn, "Military Trader Magazine" Product Description Somme is still on record as the largest number of deaths in any one day in any war. This book explores the myths of this infamous battle and explains the underlying causes of the conflict, as well as the use of mines, tunnels, gas and flame throwers by the British in combination with innovative tactics such as smoke. Covering the first day of the Somme, Andrew Robertshaw analyses the battle through November, explaining how British battle tactics developed as a result of the experience of the Somme. He provides an overvie
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Cambrai 1917: The Birth of Armoured Warfare

Alexander Turner


This title, the latest offering from Osprey's Campaign series, covers the action so dear to all armoured enthusiasts, the Battle of Cambrai. It was an action which history tells us included the first use of armoured vehicles in the role for which they had been conceived. Commonly believed to be the world's first tank battle, Cambrai has a unique position in the battle honours of the British Army, claiming to be the birth of what we now know as armoured warfare. Alexander Turner's book is an intriguing study on the use of armour as an operational shock weapon, for the appearance of tanks on the battlefield changed the practice of war for ever. He also demolishes some of the myths surrounding the action and places the emerging role of the tank into its historical perspective. Cambrai was not the first appearance of tanks on the battlefield - they had taken part in the Somme offensive at Flers-Courcelette in September 1916 to support the infantry - but it was the first time that they were
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The German Army, 1914-18

R.J. Marriot & D.S.V. Fosten


The Imperial German Army began the Great War (World War I) as the most professionally impressive conscript force in the world. This fascinating book by Donald Fosten and Robert Marrion explores in great detail the organization, tactics, weapons, uniforms, equipment and origins of this army that fought in World War I from its start in 1914 to their ultimate defeat in 1918. Numerous contemporary photographs serve to illustrate this engaging and informative text which covers such wide-ranging topics as conscription, artillery and the army veterinary service. Eight full page colour plates by military artist Gerry Embleton, together with extensive commentaries provide a wealth of information concerning the uniforms and equipment of troops from a variety of services.
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First Ypres, 1914

David Lomas


Osprey's overview of the First Battle of Ypres of World War I (1914-1918). In the autumn of 1914 the original British Expeditionary Force faced a heavily reinforced German drive. Field Marshal Sir John French, the British Commander-in-Chief, had sent his men north in an attempt to take the fight into Flanders, so they could fight across open ground. History tells us that this was not to be the case. David Lomas chronicles the first of the trench-warfare battles, where lines that would remain almost static for the rest of the war were established. Although the Germans failed to reach the channel ports, the death knell had rung for the BEF, which was virtually wiped out in this brave defence.
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Trench

Stephen Bull


This book would serve both the amateur and seasoned historian well in their ongoing acquisition of knowledge regarding the Great War. --The Western Front Association 'Stand to!' Product Description 'Going up Beek trench on a dark night was no picnic. You started along a long narrow alley winding uphill, your hands feeling the slimy sandbag walls, your feet wary for broken duck boards round corners you dived under narrow tunnels two or three feet high, finally emerging into the comparative open of the front line trench' - Soldier, 1/4th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 1916. Stephen Bull provides a complete picture of trench warfare, from the construction of the trenches and their different types, to the new weaponry and tactics employed in defence and attack. Alongside his compelling narrative of the campaigns fought in the trenches from 1914 to 1918, annotated trench maps highlight particular features of the trenches, while photographs, documents, and first-hand accounts
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The German Army in World War I (2): 1915-17

Nigel Thomas


This book is the second volume in a three part series reviewing the organisation, uniforms and insignia of the German Army between 1915 and 1917. In particular it covers the uniforms and organisation of German Army during the period between the introduction of the German M1915 uniform on 21 September 1915 and the day before the opening of the British offensive at Arras on 8 April 1917. The text itself consists of 48 pages (including plates)and it is divided into 4 principal sections and an index. The type itself is compact and dense and requires careful attention while reading. This is very much a technical book dealing with both the broad strokes and the minutiae of the uniforms of the German Army of the period. The first section 1 deals with the German Empire and Army in 1915 and covers the High Command and higher formations of the German Armies, Corps, Divisions and Divisional establishments. Its value is mostly historic. The second section deals (briefly) with German strat
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The Red Baron: Beyond the Legend

Peter Kilduff


This is the first clear, fully-documented history of Manfred von Richthofen's short but glorious career as the greatest First World War fighter ace. The making of a legend The Red Baron: dashing airman, gallant gentleman, killer ace Written and researched by Peter Kilduff, First World War aviation expert and acclaimed authority on Richthofen Lead title in the Cassell Military Paperback series, firm favourites in the bookshops
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The Red Baron: The Life and Death of an Ace

Peter Kilduff


"Red Baron: The Life and Death of an Ace" tells the story of Manfred von Richthofen - from awkward 11-year-old cadet to fearless aerial combatant and charismatic leader."Red Baron" is not just a biography of an extraordinary hero, it also takes a wider look at the times in which he lived: the equipment, his enemies and comrades, the battles, the political climate that led to his eventual disenchantment and new evidence about the controversial circumstances of his death.Containing previously unpublished photographs and accounts from Richthofen himself, his 'circus' and his adversaries, this book is the most up-to-date reference on the life and times of the legend.
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Duel 7: Sopwith Camel vs Fokker Dr I: Western Front 1917-18

Jon Guttman


"In one of the book's best sections, Guttman compares the training and operational capabilities of British and German pilots. It's a topic too seldom addressed, especially in WWI literature, since manned flight was barely out of its infancy at that point. With more than 50 photos plus a dozen or more excellent profiles, cockpit views and action scenes, "Sopwith Camel vs Fokker Dr I" maintains the Osprey series' visual appeal. Its 80 pages represent a taut, well-conceived treatment of a topic that could easily fill three times that volume." -Barrett Tillman, "Aviation History "(May 2009) .."."Sopwith Camel vs Fokker Dr I" describes the challenges of establishing aerial superiority over the trenches in 1917... the two aircraft were a good match for one another, which makes them an excellent subject for the Duel Series... [A] great companion to other titles detailing the specific aircraft and can become an important part of any aviation reference library." -Chris Banyai-Riepl, "Int
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Under the Guns of the Red Baron: The Complete Record of Von Richthofen's Victories and Victims in Graphic Detail

Norman L.R. Franks & Hal Giblin


A superb addition to Grub Street Publications World War One aviation histories, this book covers, in detail, the Allied combat pilots and observers who were the crews of the 80 aircraft claimed as shot down by Manfred Von Richtofen. The book itself is thoroughly well researched,the authors having combed both British and German records to authenticate MvR`s claims. The result is probably the definitive listing of the 80 victories. However, it goes further by giving the biographies, and wherever possible, the photographs of each of the RFC/RNAS/RAF crewmen. This I found to be extremely moving.Looking at the faces and reading the life stories of the men from all parts of the British Commonwealth and aged from 18 to 38, you get a sense of the sacrifice made during WW1.
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Under the Guns of the Kaiser's Aces: Bohme, Muller, Von Tutscher and Wolff - The Complete Record of Their Victories and Victims

Norman L.R. Franks & Hal Giblin


Following their approach to identifying and describing all the airmen who were claimed by Manfred von Richthofen in "Under the Guns of the Red Baron", and by Immelmann, Voss, Goring and Lothar von Richthofen in "Under the Guns of the German Aces", air historians Franks and Giblin have put four more equally distinguished German aces of World War I under the microscope. In doing so, they profile not only the aces themselves, all of whome received the "Blue Max" - Germany's highest award for bravery in action - but also the Allied airmen they fought and downed. By extensive research into records, and studying maps, timings and intelligence reports - contemporary and retrospective - as full a picture as possible is revealed with photographic coverage of the many protagonists involved. All four of the aces, Bohme, Muller, von Tutschek, and Wolff were unit leaders at different times, one commanded a Jagdesgeschwader, the others commanded Jagdstaffels. All four were destined to die in actions
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Fighter Heroes of WWI: The untold story of the brave and daring pioneer airmen of the Great War

Joshua Levine


‘A vivid, moving story of the men who fought the Great War in the Air. Quite superb.’ Max Arthur ‘Those magnificent men in their flying machines recount in their own words just how mad and magnificent it was to be an air-ace in World War One. Joshua Levine's compilation is enthralling and breathtaking’. Chris Powling, Classic FM Guestlist ‘This is a superior example of the genre from a writer at the top of his game.’ Air Marshal Stuart Peach The first heroes of the air. Rewriting the rules of military engagement and changing the course of modern history as a result, the pioneering airmen of the First World War took incredible risks to perform their vital contribution to the war effort. Fighter Heroes of WWI is a narrative history that conveys the perils of early flight, the thrills of being airborne, and the horrors of war in the air at a time when pilots carried little defensive armament and no parachutes. The men who joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1914 were the
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Spad VII Vs Albatros D Iii: 1917-18

Jon Guttman


"Authoritatively researched, documented, and presented... Students of Albatrosen or SPADs in particular, and WWI air combat in general should be thrilled by this book." - Frederick Boucher, AeroScale "As with all Duel volumes, this one features helpful maps, rare photos and superb artwork. Five Stars." -Barrett Tillman, "The Aerodrome" ."..this 80-page work contains all that most readers would ever want to know about comparing these two fabled fighters." -Peter Kilduff, "Between the Bookends" When originally conceived, the French SPAD VII and German Albatros D II represented steps away from an emphasis on manoeuvre in aerial combat in favour of speed and durability. At the end of 1916, however, Albatros tried to have the best of both worlds. The result combined the better downward view and manoeuvrability of the Nieuport with the power and twin machine guns of the Albatros D II. At the same time, the French worked to improve the SPAD VII with more power and a more reliable coo
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Aces High: War in the Air Over the Western Front, 1914-18

Alan Clark


Aces High serves to remind us that, if not an entirely scrupulous politician, nor a perfect husband, Alan Clark really was a superb military historian. There has evolved something of a myth about the war in the air between 1914-1918. The myth goes that, while in the filth and gore of the trenches below, any idealism and chivalry quickly sputtered and died in the purer air above; the last noble heroes battled with each in one-to-one dogfights like knights of old. It is a myth that Clark shoots down in flames, with characteristic iconoclasm. One of the great RFC aces was Mick Mannock, famed for his encounter with a training instructor, out in a formation of six with five of his very green-horned pupils. Mannock first shot down the instructor and then ruthlessly pursued each of the novices and shot them down one by one. This wasn't chivalry, it was war, and although more elegant to watch, it was every bit as lethal as Passchendaele. The book is also superbly illustrated; there is a photog
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German Fighter Aces of World War One

Terry C. Treadwell & Alan C. Wood


The story of the legendary pilots and their daring exploits. World War One was the first truly modern war fought with modern equipment and for the first time the new-fangled aircraft were to play their part. The war created a new breed of men: brave, resourceful and skilled at piloting the new fighter aircraft. Many became household names and their exploits became legendary. At a time when, for some, their flying time could be counted in hours before they were shot down, the war inspired a group of elite pilots - the Aces. Those that fought on the German side included Frieherr Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron), Ernst Udet and Herman Goering (later to play a prominent part in the Second World War).
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Spad XIII Vs. Fokker D VII: Western Front 1916-18

Jim Laurier, Mark Postlethwaite & Harry Dempsey


""SPAD XIII vs Fokker D VII "is the gripping story of two of the best fighters produced in World War I-the SPAD XIII and the Fokker D-VII-as they dueled in the skies above the trenches in the closing months of the war. Never before published artwork, including fascinating cockpit illustrations, reveal several dramatic clashes between the two foes while diary entries and first-hand accounts from the pilots bring this classic World War I duel to life with intimate detail." -"Flying Models "(August 2009) "In this book, the author, Jon Guttman, discusses the development of both aircraft as well as their technical specifications and deployments to the front. Pilot training and tactics are also part of the story and one will find quite a few 'I was there' stories to add some spice to the book... In all, a superlative inclusion to this series. It is a book that I thoroughly enjoyed reading and is one that I know you will find a delight as well." -Scott Van Aken, "Modeling Madness www.mode
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The Red Fighter Pilot: The Autobiography of the Red Baron

Manfred Von Richthofen


The autobiography of the "Red Baron", Manfred von Richthofen, written shortly before his death in April 1918. New introduction gives a brief history of the birth of aerial combat. Of course everyone has heard of the myths about the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, but this book tells the real story, in his own words. Richthofen tells us about his early life, how he joined the army as a cavalry officer before going to flight school, and his experiences as the top-scoring fighter ace in World War One. This version of Richthofen's autobiography also has a number of interesting photos which illustrate the world in which the Red Baron flew, fought, and died. It also includes a very nice introduction which gives a short historical background of the First World War and the development of the airplane as a military weapon. Richthofen's accomplishments are placed in the context of earlier air aces like Roland Garros, Max Immelman, and Oswald von Boelcke, the German ace who took the y
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Jagdgeschwader II Geschwader 'berthold'

Greg VanWyngarden


After struggling with inadequate supplies of aircraft and materiel, the veteran pilots of the Geschwader would go on to enjoy incredible successes against French and American opponents in September 1918. Aces who flew the famous blue-fuselaged Fokkers of JG II included such stalwarts as Josef Veltjens (35 kills), Georg von Hantelmann (25 kills), Franz Buchner (40 kills) and Ulrich Neckel (30 kills). This volume contains many first-hand accounts by these and other notable aces, which reveal the esprit de corps and camaraderie these airmen displayed in their struggles against superior numbers up to the war's final grim days. There are warriors and then there are WARRIORS. Rudolf Berthold, a WWI Jagdflieger, fell into the latter category. Berthold first flew combat in 1914 in primitive Fokker Eindeckers. Repeatedly wounded, Berthold's fierce nationalism drove him on. Running up 20-odd kills, by 1918 he was a respected Jasta leader. His greatest glory came in March 1918 when he assume
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Fokker D VII Aces of World War I

Norman L.R. Franks & Greg Van Wyngarden


"With Sopwith Camel Aces of World War I "and "Fokker Dr I Aces of World War I: ""The prolific Norman Franks is the author of all three of these books, though he shares the credit with color expert Greg Van Wyngarden for the two German tomes. Franks is a highly regarded aviation historian, and Van Wyngarden is recognized as one of the top authorities on World War I aviation markings, so you can bet that what you see is a fair representation of historical hues. I recommend these books, and you will find the entire series to be worthwhile additions to your library." -Mike Corr, "Aerodrome" Designed in a great rush at the end of 1917 just in time to take part in the German standard fighter competition held in January/February 1918, the D VII easily walked away with first prize. As Germanys premier fighter unit, von Richthofens JG I (led by Hermann Goring in the wake of the 'Red Baron's' recent death) received the first examples of the D VII to reach the frontline in late April. Built to
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Goshawk Squadron

Derek Robinson


World War One aviators were more than just soldiers they were the knights of the sky, and the press and public idolised the gallant young heroes. But for Stanley Woolley, commanding officer of Goshawk Squadron, the romance of chivalry in the clouds is just a myth. There are two types of men up there: victims and murderers, and the code he drums into his men bans any notion of sport or fair play. This produces better killers but, even so, Wolley believes the whole squadron will be dead within three months. Derek Robinson quietly builds the day-to-day details of these mens lives and deaths into a powerful indictment of war. But this classic of war literature is also very funny, often painfully so; Shortlisted for the Booker Prize, this is Derek Robinson's masterly novel of the war in the air over the Western Front in 1918. Robinson writes excellently here and in his other books about fliers in WW1 and WW2. Dark, funny and best of all unsentimental. I've just finished "A Damned Good Sh
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Diary of a Young Soldiers World War I: Yound Soldiers in World War 1

Dennis Hamley


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The Great War: Opening Moves 1

H.W. Wilson (Editor)


If you are lookng for the definitive history of the First World War, keep lookng. This series of books are re-prints of Circa 1920 British home front popaganda. The photos though numerous have been reprinted using a cheap photo-static plate process which does not reproduce the quality of the original volumes. The dust jacket leeds one to beleive that the buyer is getting a moderen top quality book . Do not be fooled. I would expect an American to give a biassed opinion of history- the first history of the civil war was written 4 years after the event. This book is definitive history in the making -12 volumes of it- and if it is propoganda, it is history to us who know so little about the causes and injustices of the times. You won't get anything more factual if you are able to read behind the hype.
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The Great War: The Illustrated History of the First World War, Vol.2: Digging In

H.W. Wilson (Editor)


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British Postcards of the First World War

Peter Doyle


If there is one area of ephemera which captures the social history of the First World War, it must be the picture postcard, and Peter Doyle's book explores the subject thoroughly in a well researched and illustrated volume. Despite being a fairly new phenomenon (the current format of the picture-postcard dates from less than twenty years before the outbreak of the war), the postcard was quickly adopted as the ideal medium for expressing patriotism, keeping up the spirits, and conveying information. Doyle's book shows how the card was used to reinforce morale, as a recruiting medium, to share experiences of the Home Front, and to make fun of the enemy. Perhaps the most iconic are the silk-embroidered cards, sewn in sheets by French and Belgian civilians, and sold individually to soldiers, to be sent home in envelopes. Each of these, with designs ranging from birthday wishes to regimental crests, cost usually more than a shilling, representing a day's pay, itself a symbolic figure.
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Postcards from the Trenches: Images from the First World War

Andrew Roberts (Introduction)


For both Trenches and Russian Revolution: "With introductions by historian Andrew Roberts, these attractive books will interest the casual reader and bear close inspection by the specialist. Viewed from the angle of their postcards, the Russina Revolution and World War I become accessible and multifaceted on a human level, allowing readers a glimpse into aspects of those turbulent times that most will not have seen before."-Army This book is disappointing. It's postcard-sized--which is alright as a gimmick--but has hardly any content to make for it. Nevertheless, we are told in a short, tiny-fonted introduction, it was assembled from a collection of thousands amassed since boyhood by someone named John Fraser. There are a few good images but most are bland. I've started collecting WWI postcards in the last year and even I own some found in the book. There are no German postcards at all--and they produced the best ones! Wait for Postcards From the Trenches to hit the bargain table, t
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Women in the First World War

Neil R Storey & Molly Housego


At first,I was slightly disappointed to find that this book is only 62 pages long as I had thought given the title of the book, it would be much longer. The chapters cover nursing, munition work, on the land, uniform and demob. There is a good selection of old black and white photos, together with war posters and memorabilia from that era. This book is probably best suited to a GCSE student who is looking for some background information. This book is fabulous! I never really knew much about the first world war because I find all wars really saddening anyway I read this book about the women in WW1 and its amazing how much they did not just for our country, but for our businesses and for women today - for example women were only allowed to wear trousers during WW1 because of the women who took over the mens jobs in factories and farms. Ladies - can you imagine not being able to wear whatever you wanted? It's crazy! But this book is a fabulous read and if you want to learn a bit
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British Campaign Medals, 1914-2005

Peter Duckers


This book surveys the medals awarded to British personnel for military service around the world and in two world wars. The campaign medals awarded for the military actions have become a popular field for collectors, since the majority of British awards were officially named, thus making it possible to research the military career of an individual or regiment. This second edition has been extended to include the operations of the British forces in the opening years of the twenty-first century. OK, we are not talking about a book for experts here, but £4.99 wont buy a lot these days, however if you are a collector or researcher with even the slightest interest in British medals, this is one book you should certainly buy. It is a splendid and invaluable source of reference covering the war and campaign medals awarded to British service personnel between 1914 and the present day. It is smack up to date, it is very readable, handy in size and provides more than enough information to c
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British Army Cap Badges of the First World War

Peter Doyle


The fascination with the British involvement in the First World War extends to all aspects of the conflict. The battles and their outcomes; the armies and their leaders; the conditions of trench warfare; and the controversies form part of the growing literature examining every aspect of a war that was to cast a shadow over the rest of the twentieth century, the effects of which are still being felt today. For the British army, the cap badge is the most easily identifiable form of insignia. It represents a distillation of the pride of the regiment, its various battle honors and symbols borne proudly on the metallic emblem that was worn on all headdress, even within the trenches. Identification of the cap badge on old photographs is a first, important step in unraveling the military service of an individual. Cap badges have been collected avidly since they were first thought of in the nineteenth century. Cap-badge collecting is as popular now as it has ever been; yet with a growing n
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Arras: The Spring 1917 Offensive in Panoramas Including Vimy Ridge and Bullecourt

Peter Barton


"'Astonishing ... made my heart sigh' Independent 'An extraordinary set of panoramic photographs that reveal the battlefields of the Western Front as never before.' The Times 'Hauntingly magnificent' Navy News 'His works are widely regarded as milestones in the gaining of a balanced understanding of the First World War.' Soldier magazine" This title features unseen panoramas of the most dangerous battle of the First World War. In spring 1917, Allied troops on the Western Front began the largest ever artillery barrage on German positions, using over 2.7 million shells. During the battle they succeeded in capturing the famous Vimy Ridge. But the ultimate cost of fighting was immense, with a daily casualty rate 40 per cent greater than the Somme and almost double that of Passchendaele - making it hour for hour the most dangerous major campaign of the First World War. In this major new account of the conflict, Peter Barton showcases over 50 re-discovered British and German panoramic pho
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The Great War Handbook

Geoff Bridger


Geoff Bridger's The Great War Handbook answers many of the basic questions newcomers ask when confronted by this enormous and challenging subject - not only what happened and why, but what was the Great War like for ordinary soldiers who were caught up in it. He describes the conditions the soldiers endured, the deadly risks they ran, their daily routines and the small roles they played in the complex military machine they were part of. His comprehensive survey of every aspect of the soldier's life, from recruitment and training, through the experience of battle and its appalling aftermath, is an essential guide for students, family historians, teachers and anyone who is eager to gain an all-round understanding of the nature of the conflict. His authoritative handbook gives a fascinating insight into the world of the Great War - it is a basic book that no student of the subject can afford to be without.
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British Campaign Medals of the First World War

Peter Duckers


Today, with a growing interest in British military history and particularly in family history and genealogy, more and more people want to trace their ancestors' past. This book looks in detail at the origin, types and varieties of the British medals awarded for general war service between 1914 and '18, and gives advice on researching the awards and their recipients.
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British and Commonwealth War Cemeteries

Julie Summers


In 1917 a remarkable organisation came into being. Its brief was vastly ambitious: to commemorate the 1,100,00 men of the British Empire who lost their lives in the First World War. The Imperial War Graves Commission was the creation of one man, Sir Fabian Ware, whose energy and determination brought together some of the greatest designers and architects of the early twentieth century. This book looks at the history of the war graves for British and Commonwealth servicemen and women, and examines how modern remembrance has been shaped by the work of Ware and his contemporaries after the First World War.
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Home in Time for Breakfast: A First World War Diary

Stuart Chapman


The shells are nothing in comparison to the everlasting torture of lice and the loathsome mud. To see me trudging along one would take me for an old man of sixty. Stuart Chapman was one of the lucky ones. A young soldier suffering staunchly through the nightmare of trench life in World War One, he returned to his native shores after the Armistice in one piece, unlike so many of his generation, many of whom never reached majority age. Chapman faithfully recorded his day-to-day life in France from 1916 to 1919, touching upon not only the squalor, violence, sheer exhaustion and astonishing discomfort but also the valour, comradeship and sacred moments of frivolity. This diary offers a unique perspective - of one who felt, lived and saw what history books can only recount from much-repeated facts. The fight was for the greater good, but set the tone for a century that darkened from there onwards. I highly recommend this book. This is a day to day diary evoking all the smells, horror and
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An Officer's Manual of the Western Front 1914-1918

Edited by Dr Stephen Bull


Many people have the idea that the 'Great War' on the Western Front was simple, if ghastly, to fight -- with few tactics, and unbroken, monotonous, trench lines as the main feature of the battlefield. In such a scenario soldiers with rifles and bayonets charging each other in blind obedience to stupid repetitious orders are imagined as archetypal of battle. Though undeniably bloody the war was in fact a ferment of new ideas and new weapons. Gas, flame throwers, super-heavy artillery, concrete bunkers, tanks, aircraft and other innovations were all introduced, whilst older notions such as barbed wire, machine guns and armour took on a new lease of life. If you are fascinated by this time period or have an interest in the military, I would definately recommend this book. It gives a compelling insight into the beuracracy behind a war that not only changed the direction of World affairs but also brought with it a modernised, mechanised style of warfare. It's filled with tactical info
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The Somme

Peter Barton


"* Astonishing... made my heart sigh' Independent * 'An extraordinary set of panoramic photographs that reveal the battlefields of the Western Front as never before. 'The Times * 'The book is a magnificent effort and most impressive - one could almost say unique' Lyn Macdonald" Not only does this book contain period photographic panoramas of the battlefields with 'present day' views (which are superbly done) it also gives the reader a 'blow by blow' account of the Somme battle by using numerous eyewitness reports and detailed photographs, beautifully detailed maps and illustrations. This is a gem of a book and out of all the books I've read on the subject ( too many to mention!) this is unbeaten for generating the atmosphere of the battle, complete with all its horrific detail. If you are planning to visit the battlefield, this book will prove to be a 'must have' companion. Simply one of the best books available on the subject. Buy it and I can guaratee you won't be disappointed.
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Old Soldiers Never Die

Frank Richards


Frank Richards served in the 2/ Royal Welch Fusiliers along with (at one time or another) Robert Graves and Siegfried Sassoon, and Dr Dunn (compiler of the amazing 'The War That The Infantry Knew'- possibly THE best battalion history of WW1- and a good companion to this book as its interesting to cross reference small incidences somtimes...). Anyway, Richards was slightly different to his literary contemporaries in that he was 'Other Ranks', and a miner by trade. He was recalled to the colours in 1914 after several years on the reserve, and served as a Private right through to 1918. He writes his story as one would imagine he spoke- and for me as I read it, it was a style as if he was telling me his war history in anecdotes down the pub or something, supping over a pint of mild: theres no deep soul searching here, but plenty of bitterness, a lot of detail, and what an experience he had... So if you don't have this in your collection then get it now- one of the very few 'OR' books (I
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Walking Arras

Paul Reed


As is always the case with Paul Reed's books, the subject is extremely well researched and makes for an interesting read. The battlefields of Arras have largely been overshadowed by those of the Somme and Ypres. This guide goes a long way to fill the void and helps to give the battlefield walker a view of the terrible events which took place there. At last- a guide to the neglected battlefields of Arras! Paul Reed has again done an excellent job in collecting information and writing this guide to the Arras area. I have visited War Cemeteries in the area many times, but have always wanted to know more about what happened there, and what still survives to be seen in the area, and this book covers it all, and will be put to good use on my next visit. Well done Paul, this book is a must for anyone visiting the area, and I can't wait to try it out.
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World War I in Cartoons

Mark Bryant


"Bryant follows up his magisterial Second World War volume... brilliantly realised and often revelatory... a wonderful book." In an age before TV and radio the impact and importance of cartoon art was immense, especially when the only sources of information were silent cinema newsreels, posters, newspapers and books - all largely black and white. The cartoon had an immediacy and universal accessibility, giving a message words could not convey. So, not surprisingly, the Great War proved an extraordinarily fertile time for cartoonists. When Zeppelins blackened the sky and U-boats challenged the Royal Navy's supremacy at sea, it was Heath Robinson's crazy cartoons and the antics of Bairnsfather's immortal 'Old Bill' that kept the British upper lip resolutely stiff. And who could take Kasier Bill, the Red Baron and all the mighty Prussians at all seriously when H.M. Bateman and Bert Thomas cocked a snook at all they held dear and the pages of "Punch", "Bystander", "London Opinion", "Le
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Warrior: The Amazing Story of a Real War Horse

General Jack Seely


December 2011 sees the premier of Steven Spielberg's much anticipated film, 'War Horse', which is the most popular piece of fiction ever written about horses in war. 'My Horse Warrior', first published in 1934 is equally wondrous fact. It is told by Winston Churchill's great heroic friend, Jack Seely, about the thoroughbred horse he took to France in 1914 surviving five years of bombs and bullets to lead a cavalry charge in 1918 before returning home where they rode on together until 1938, their combined ages (70 + 30) totalling 100. The book tells the whole history of Warrior from his birth in an Isle of Wight field, to his amazing life as a famous war horse and how a combination of both the horse's extraordinary character and some unbelievable twists of fate, helped him survive a war which claimed the lives of 8 million horses. This new edition is introduced by Jack Seely's grandson Brough Scott, a well-known broadcaster and journalist. It includes the original illustrations which eq
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Trench Art

Nicholas J. Saunders


This is not a catalogue of the different types of 'Trench Art' available to the collector. Nicholas Saunders has taken a more academic approach to the subject, looking into the reasons for the 'Trench Art' in the first place, as well as suggesting methods of classification rather than just by type of item. Covering methods, location and era of manufacture this is a book not only for the 'Trench Art' collector and 'militaria' buff, but also for anyone with an interest in the social history of the period 1914-1939. Written in an easy style, with many superb photos this book is sure to become a definitive work on the subject. In this book Nicholas Saunders has answered most, if not all, of my questions on this subject. He has exhaustively researched this much ignored field of militaria and the book includes some astounding photographic records of trench art being crafted 'in the field' and even contemporary adverts for having your 'souvenirs of the war' professionally mounted etc ! Th
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The German Army at Ypres 1914

ack Sheldon


This book will be the first complete account of the operations of the German army in the battles north of Lille in the late autumn of 1914. The main emphasis will be placed on the battles around Ypres against the Old Contemptibles of the BEF, but the fighting against the French and Belgian armies will also be featured, thus providing fresh, broader, insights into a campaign. There are those who consider that the BEF was all that saved world civilisation as the first year of the Great War drew to its end. The book uses the comprehensive histories of the participating German regiments found in the Kriegsarchiv in Munich and the Hauptstaatsarchiv in Stuttgart. Their use adds authority and authenticity to the book. The narrative adopts a chronological approach. The book focuses on some of the most bitterly disputed battles of the first three months of the war, when the Germans strained to achieve a breakthrough and the BEF resisted heroically, at the price of its own destruction. The book
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A Very Unimportant Officer: Life and Death on the Somme and at Passchendaele

Captain Alexander Stewart & Cameron Stewart


The immediacy, candour and sheer literary merit of his journals make this an important new source for the Great War . . . a very remarkable man.' (Evening Standard ) 'something unusual and fresh on the subject of the Great War . . . edited sympathetically and unobtrusively by his grandson.' (The Times ) 'A vivid account of an infantry officer's war on the Western Front . . . should be required reading for those who really want to understand the war.' (Richard Holmes, author of Tommy: The British Soldier on the Western Front ) 'His trench diaries show a different aspect of World War I from the usual images of industrial massacre.' (Time Out ) Rediscovered after 80 years gathering dust on a family bookshelf and first brought to public attention on BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, A VERY UNIMPORTANT OFFICER is a detailed and intimate account of the experience of Captain Stewart, an ordinary officer in the front line in France and Flanders throughout 1916 and 1917. Recruited t
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When This Bloody War is Over: Soldiers' Songs of the First World War

Max Arthur


The songs of the First World War represent the ascendancy of the human spirit over the cruel inhumanity of the war itself.' --Lyn Macdonald The haunting songs of the First World War still have a powerful emotional impact. These are the funny, bitter, sad and romantic words the soldiers actually sang on the march, in the dug-outs and trenches. Amidst the appalling carnage of the battlefield, the stoic courage and endurance of the ordinary soldiers shines through in songs like No More Soldiering for Me and It's a long, long way to Tipperary. This attractive and evocative book cannot fail to delight and move anyone with an interest in the First World War.
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Memorial to the Missing of the Somme

Gavin Stamp


To Great War enthusiasts, military historians and battlefield tour guides, architects and family history researchers, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme at Thiepval needs little if any introduction, as this most impressive monument which bears the names of 73,000 British Commonwealth servicemen whose bodies were never identified, not only stands out magnificently in the French countryside for miles around, but is also known by thousands worldwide. The first time I saw this structure, I was awestruck and although I have visited it many times since, I never cease to be amazed at both the incredible loss of life and the creativity of the architect who designed this imposing structure. Thiepval is an iconic memorial to the Great War and as such, it attracts thousands of visitors each year. A large number visit it out of curiosity, however the vast majority visit it during a battlefield tour or on a side trip to see the name of a long lost ancestor who died fighting for King and co
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The Virago Book of Women and the Great War

Joyce Marlow (Editor)


Another contribution to the growing body of work on women's experience of war, Joyce Marlow's anthology collects a broad spectrum of women's writings on the First World War. Extracts from diaries--published and unpublished--autobiographies, letters, newspapers, and memoirs jostle for the reader's attention, carrying the voices of an equally diverse range of women from Britain, the USA, France, Germany, and Russia. Nurses, train drivers, bank clerks, munition workers, policewomen, a "woman diplomatist", patriots, campaigners for peace: the list could go on, and the strength of this book is the scope and interest of the material it makes available (notably, extracts from previously untranslated German anthologies). Marlow includes a general introduction, together with brief notes to each section (one for each year of the war) and a guide to contributors-- some well known, others apparently unknown beyond their fleeting, if sometimes vivid, appearance here. There is some attempt to ar
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Shots from the Front: The British Soldier 1914-18

Richard Holmes


Praise for ‘Tommy’: ‘Holmes is one of our foremost military scholars and a skilled writer who knows his audience well. This is excellent popular history: scholarly, highly readable and utterly absorbing.’ Daily Telegraph ‘Monumental…Every page of this is worth reading.’ Time Out A handsomely illustrated photographic account, by the bestselling author of 'Tommy' (2003), of the human experience of war as directly witnessed by British soldiers in the First World War. Richard Holmes, one of Britain's best-known military historians (and President of the British Commission of Military History), has selected over 200 photographs taken for the most part by officers and men rather than by official photographers – mostly unfamiliar ones located in archive collections, regimental museums and private sources. There will also be specially taken photographs by Mike Sheil, one of the best battlefield photographers working today. The book will deal with the whole of the British Army's e
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In Search of a Better 'Ole: A Biography of Captain Bruce Bairnsfather

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


Couldn't think what to give to a friend who was retiring after 36 years in the British Army. This book was perfect. I remember the image from my young days but didnt know about the book. It was received with great pleasure and interest. This book is the original and only biography of Bairnsfather. The edition here is out of print. It has now been updated by the same authors and republished in 2001 in hardback by Pen and Sword Books with additional information about the original Old Bill. A memorial to Bairnsfather will be unveiled on 13 December 2003 at St Yvon in Belgium where he drew his first cartoons
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The Last Great War: British Society and the First World War

Adrian Gregory


'Adrian Gregory has provided the best brief account we have of the history of the Great War. Using an astonishing array of sources uncovering wartime life at the front and at home, Gregory tells the story of the war in a manner which is engaging, combative, and authoritative. Here is an original, tough-minded and thoughtful book, written by an historian unafraid of exploding the myths which still surround the 1914–18 conflict.' Jay Winter, Yale University 'In a series of brilliant, well-argued and powerfully humane thematic chapters, Gregory transforms our understanding of how Britons went to war, how they persevered despite growing anger at unequal 'sacrifices', and, crucially, how victory allowed them to transcend the traumas and the hatreds of war by embracing the lie that bereavement and sacrifice had been universal. Throughout, Gregory places experience of life on the home front, in all its rich diversity, centre-stage.' Jon Lawrence, Emmanuel College, Cambridge 'The Last Gr
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There's a Devil in the Drum

John F. Lucy


A classic. Lucy enl, with his brother in the RIR 1912, 2nd Bn. in France & gives a very fine account of the 1914-1915 campaign.His brother was killed at the Aisne & Lucy was eventually sent home for a rest: ?My leave... was a nightmare.My sleep was broken The simple cover and unusual title do not do this splendid book any favours, for I can honestly say that this is one of the most eloquent and most interesting accounts of the Great War I have read in recent years! This excellent volume tells the fascinating story of John Lucy, a young man from Cork, who shortly after leaving school, was, along with his brother locked out of their home by their Father one evening and told to stay out. They therefore traveled to Dublin and being full of life and spirit and seeking adventure, joined the Royal Irish Rifles in January 1912. After training at the depot and subsequent postings to both Dover and Tidworth, they joined the 2nd Battalion as it moved to France. Sadly his brother was kill
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First World War Tanks

E. Bartholomew


Although tanks have become a symbol of military power, the first tanks were created as a temporary solution to the deadlock created by trench warfare. The early designs were unsophisticated and had little success when they were first used by the British Army on the Somme in 1916. The battle of Cambrai, however, proved that tanks were effective, and they were used extensively in the final year of the war. By 1918 over 2,700 tanks had been built in Britain, while France, Germany, the United States, Italy and Russia had all produced tanks of their own. This book covers the design and development of tanks during the First World War, describing the types that were used in action and the most important battles in which they fought. It is illustrated with photographs from the archives of the Tank Museum, at Bovington in Dorset.
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The Road Home: The Aftermath of the Great War Told by the Men and Women Who Survived It

Max Arthur


'Arthur's easily digestible anthology of poignant memories and personal testimonies is as moving as it is important.' (BIG ISSUE IN THE NORTH ) 'A deeply poignant and thought provoking read.' (SOUTH WALES ARGUS ) 'Fascinating and highly readable. Now that no one is around to tell these stories it is invaluable that they have been put into print -- especially in such an accessible form.' (CATHOLIC HERALD ) 'This fascinating and sensitive accuont shows how veterans coped with war wounds, work and memories of those lost.' (HUDDERSFIELD DAILY EXAMINER ) 'A poignant and profound collection of memories, it provides essential reading for all.' (GOOD BOOK GUIDE ) 11am, 11.11.1918: the war is finally over. After four long years Britain welcomed her heroes home. Wives and mothers were reunited with loved ones they'd feared they'd never see again. Fathers met sons and daughters born during the war years for the very first time. It was a time of great joy - but it was also a time
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The Other Side of the Wire Volume 1: With the German XIV Reserve Corps on the Somme, September 1914-June 1916: With the German XIV Reserve Corps on ... on the Somme, September 1914-June 1916 v. 1

Ralph J. Whitehead


... author brings to life this little-known period..... and brings a sense of humanity to the story of the war using the words of the men who fought there... --Cross & Cockade International "The Other Side of the Wire" brings to life a period long forgotten in the decades that have passed since the Great War ended in 1918. Until recently most books written on the Battle of the Somme concentrated almost exclusively on the British effort with only a brief mention of the period before 1 July 1916 and the German experience in the battle. Most simply ignore the nearly two years of warfare that preceded the momentous offensive. By focusing on one of the principal German formations involved in the Somme fighting, author Ralph Whitehead brings to life this little-known period, from the initial German advance on the Somme in September 1914 through the formation of the front that became so well known almost two years later.The book covers the early fighting around villages that took on such
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The Battle for Flanders: German Defeat on the Lys 1918

Chris Baker


Chris Baker occupies an iconic status in the world of Great War historians. Few can have done more for their fellow travellers: a former chair of the Western Front Association, founder of the Great War Forum and the man behind the outstanding Long Long Trail website. Now he has produced his first book and I was eager to review it! I purchased a copy from the man himself - then lost it! As at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915 delays multiplied and it is only now that I have bought a replacement copy from the good folks at Amazon! So here goes! First impressions are good! The assessment of the lead up to the German attacks in the Spring of 1918 is well-judged and reflects Baker's sound grasp of the realities of warfare on the Western Front. When the storm bursts on the Portuguese sector he avoids casual racism and points out why they did so badly - it wasn't anything to do with national characteristics or culture, but was rather more to do with men trapped in an unpopular war
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The Chief: Douglas Haig and the British Army

Gary Sheffield


Douglas Haig is the single most controversial general in British history. In 1918, after the armies he commanded had played such an important part in helping to win the First World War, he was feted as the saviour of his country. On his death in 1928 he was mourned as a national hero. But within ten years his reputation was in ruins. It has never fully recovered. His name has become a byword for military incompetence, a callous and brutal ‘donkey’ who led the ‘lions’ of the British Army to their deaths in the trenches. Haig has been mercilessly lampooned by TV shows such as Blackadder and even recent academic studies depict him as a serial blunderer who learned nothing from his mistakes. In this fascinating biography, Professor Gary Sheffield reassesses Hague’s reputation, and demonstrates the crucial role he played in leading British forces to victory in the First World War. Using extensive research into primary sources, many of which have been ignored or misinterpreted by other histo
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Gallipoli: The Ottoman Campaign

Edward J. Erickson


Edward J. Erickson's book is an extremely important one that looks at the Gallipoli campaign from the Turkish point of view, something few western historians have done. He uses the Turkish official history, which is three volumes in length, as well as memoirs and other published accounts (in Turkish) from Turkish officers. Since 1916 we have heard largely a one sided version of the battle from the British/ANZAC/French point of view, with a little from some German officers. The book details how and why the Ottoman Army beat the British, ANZAC, and French forces during the battle, from the naval bombardment to the final evacuation. Erickson frequently stops to discuss western views of certain aspects of the battle, then contrasts them to what the Turkish were doing, which gives us a much better understanding of events. Erickson believes that the Turks out performed the British and others because they had superior reporting systems that allowed Turkish officers to know what was going o
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German Soldiers in the Great War: Letters and Eyewitness Accounts

Bernd Ulrich


This vivid selection of first-hand accounts and other wartime documents sheds new light on the experiences of German frontline soldiers during the First World War. It reveals in authentic detail the perceptions and emotions of ordinary soldiers that have been covered up by the smokescreen of official wartime propaganda with its talk of heroism and patriotic sacrifice . Over 200 mostly archival documents are featured in the selection, including wartime letters, military despatches and orders, extracts from diaries, newspaper articles and booklets, medical reports and photographs. This fascinating primary source material provides the first comprehensive insight into the German frontline experiences of the Great War published in English. As somebody who rarely gives five stars I must have been pretty impressed with this one - and indeed it is a very good read keeping you fully engaged as you go along. Attempting to be dispassionate however I can see that part of the appeal is the novel
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The German Army on Vimy Ridge 1914-1917

Jack Sheldon


Vimy Ridge is indelibly linked in popular memory to the exploits of the Canadian Corps. There, on 9 April 1917, all four Canadian divisions fought alongside one another for the first time. Battling through snow squalls and deep mud, they took and held the ridge, in the teeth of desperate German resistance, becoming the first Allied soldiers for two and a half years to see the view over the Douai plain. It was a triumph of arms for Canada and fundamental to its future sense of nationhood but, at the same time, April 1917 was simply the final act in a drama which had begun with the German seizure of the ridge in October 1914. Bitter fighting for the Lorette Spur, followed by two major French offensives in 1915 and months of incessant mining and minor operations, when British formations held the line in 1916, are as central to the story as the heroic tenacity of the German defenders. Drawing on the immense quantities of surviving archival material, dispelling myths and calling into qu
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The First World War: A New History

Hew Strachan


Hew Strachan is one of the world's foremost experts on the Great War of 1914-18. His ongoing three-volume history of the conflict, the first of which was published in 2001, is likely to become the standard academic reference work: Max Hastings called it 'one of the most impressive books of modern history in a generation', while Richard Holmes hailed it as a 'towering achievement'. Now, Hew Strachan brings his immense knowledge to a one-volume work aimed squarely at the general reader. The inspiration behind the major Channel 4 series of the same name, to which Hew was chief consultant, "The First World War" is a significant addition to the literature on this subject, taking as it does a uniquely global view of what is often misconceived as a prolonged skirmish on the Western Front. Exploring such theatres as the Balkans, Africa and the Ottoman Empire, Strachan assesses Britain's participation in the light of what became a struggle for the defense of liberalism, and show how the war sha
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Forgotten Victory: The First World War: Myths and Realities

Gary Sheffield


'Sheffield...sets out the arguments for an interpretation not based exclusively on the war poets, Alan Clark and Blackadder...One can only hope that his compassionate, clearly argued book will displace the [mythical] version' (David Horspool, Guardian ) 'This is revisionist history at its best - thought provoking and original' (Trevor Royle, Sunday Herald ) 'An important book that shatters many myths about the First World War' (Richard Holmes ) 'Amongst the most important books to have been published on the Great War for some years. Very strongly recommended' (Stand To! ) So often thought of in the ideal of poets such as Owen and Sassoon, Gary Sheffield argues that this was hardly the typical view of the British soldier in the Great War. The old line of the British Army being an archaic institution of incompetant officers and disillusioned soldiers is refuted as a myth of post-war pacifist literature. In reality, the BEF experienced the greatest learning curve of all the ar
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The Great War: 1914-1918

Ian F.W. Beckett


The course of events of the Great War has been told many times, spurred by an endless desire to understand 'the war to end all wars'. However, this book moves beyond military narrative to offer a much fuller analysis of of the conflict's strategic, political, economic, social and cultural impact. Starting with the context and origins of the war, including assasination, misunderstanding and differing national war aims, it then covers the treacherous course of the conflict and its social consequences for both soldiers and civilians, for science and technology, for national politics and for pan-European revolution. The war left a long-term legacy for victors and vanquished alike. It created new frontiers, changed the balance of power and influenced the arts, national memory and political thought. The reach of this acount is global, showing how a conflict among European powers came to involve their colonial empires, and embraced Japan, China, the Ottoman Empire, Latin America and
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Bloody Victory: The Sacrifice on the Somme

William James Philpott


'Required reading ... A thoughtful and important book by a first-rate historian ... It is a proper history of the battle, not simply an agonising account of its first day ... He is supremely skilful in charting what he terms the battle's "shifting history and enduring memory" ... There is something about the Somme that is imprinted onto my heart, and I am grateful that this book has helped me put it into a context that goes beyond time, place, courage and suffering' Richard Holmes, 'A sweeping and authoritative re-examination of the battle ... Bloody Victory is a magnificent and powerful book, destined to become the standard work on the subject' Christopher Silvester, Daily Express 'Comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and vividly written ... His new findings and his provocative conclusions will be of exceptional importance' David Stevenson 'Philpott argues that nearly everything we think we know about the Somme ... is either wrong or a misinterpretation of events ... After reading th
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The First World War: An Illustrated History

A J P Taylor


'The most readable, sceptical and original of modern historians' - Michael Foot 'Remarkable ... Taylor here manages in some 200 illustrated pages to say almost everything that is important for an understanding and, indeed, intellectual digestion of that vast event' Observer 'It is unlikely that there will be a more satisfactory compact survey of that Armageddon' Newsweek 'What makes Taylor's book outstanding is his capacity to penetrate through the undergrowth of controversy and conflicting interpretation to the central truth' New York Review of Books 'Probably the most controversial historian in the English-speaking world' The Times A. J. P. Taylor was one of the most acclaimed and uncompromising historians of the twentieth century. In this clear, lively and now-classic account of the First World War, he tells the story of the conflict from the German advance in the West, through the Marne, Gallipoli, the Balkans and the War at Sea to the offensives of 1918 and the state of Europe
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The Western Front

Richard Holmes


Best known for his BBC series presentations in War Walks and War Walks II, military history buff Richard Holmes chronicles the bloodiest days of World War I in The Western Front. This detailed compendium covers everything from how the front was created and the British Army in France, to the battle of Verdun and the last Hundred Days of the war. Those put off by lengthy historical accounts will find comfort in Holmes' concise layout and heartfelt narrative. What's more, it's filled with photos, illustrations, diagrams, maps and quotations that give needed imagery to a highly complex and inhuman four years of history. As in the words of one French solider who was not able to distinguish "if the mud were flesh or the flesh were mud." Of the 947,000 allied soldiers who died during the war, 750,000 died on the front; 128 000 are missing. Holmes captures the scale and intensity of the Great War and never lets you forget the human price: "As we now are, so once were they; as they now are, so
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Paths of Glory: The French Army, 1914-18

Anthony Clayton


Anthony Clayton is an acknowledged expert on the French military and his book is a major contribution to the study and understanding of the First World War. He reveals why and how the French army fought as it did. He profiles its senior commanders - Joffre, Petain, Nivelle and Foch - and analyses its major campaigns both on the Western Front and in the Near East and Africa. PATHS OF GLORY also considers in detail the officers, how they kept their trenches and how men from very different areas of France fought and died together. He scrutinises the make-up and performance of France's large colonial armies and investigates the mutinies of 1917. Ultimately, he reveals how the traumatic French experience of the 1914-18 war indelibly shaped a nation. Most books on the Western Front are Anglo-Centric. It is therefore corrective to read a book which describes the war fought by 8.7 million Frenchmen, over fifty percent of whom suffered death or injury. Equally painful is having to read the
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The First World War

John Keegan


Despite the avalanche of books written about the First World War in recent years, there have been comparatively few books that have concentrated on delivering the big picture--a comprehensive account of the war and its campaigns from start to finish--and this book fills the gap superbly. As readers familiar with John Keegan's previous books, such as the The Face Battle, Six Armies in Normandy, and The Second World War, will know, Keegan is a historian of the old school. He has no earth-shattering new theories to challenge the status quo, no first-person accounts to tug on the emotions; what he does have, though, is the gift for talking the lay person through the twists and turns of a complex narrative in a way that is never less than accessible or engaging. Keegan never tries to ram his learning down your throat. Where other authors have struggled to explain how Britain could ever allow itself to be dragged into such a war in 1914, Keegan keeps it practical. The level of communications
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The Face Of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo and the Somme

John Keegan


"'This without any doubt is one of the half-dozen best books on warfare to appear in the English language since the end of the Second World War.' Michael Howard, Sunday Times 'In this book, which is so creative, so original, one learns as much about the nature of man as of battle.' J. H. Plumb, New York Times Book Review" This is a great work. I've always been facinated by the Human elements of war making. What posseses people to endure battle? What were the experiences of the various types of combatants through the ages? This book looks at all of this and much more. Be warned, this is not light reading and nor shoul it be. Keegan employs complex structure in his language. This adds value for me. I've read this over and over and derived new thoughts each time. If you are interested in military history this is essential.
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The Price Of Admiralty

John Keegan


Kindle edition Keegan (The Mask of Command, 1987); Six Armies in Normandy, 1982; The Face of Battle, 1976; etc.) here offers a bravura appreciation of naval power down through the ages. In aid of his era-spanning study, the former Sandhurst lecturer (who points out that no Briton lives more than 80 miles from tidal waters) examines four landmark naval engagements, each of which featured different types of warship. First off, he analyzes 1805's battle of Trafalgar, in which England's wooden-wall vessels under the command of Lord Horatio Nelson defeated a French/Spanish fleet in atypically decisive fashion. More than a century later, in 1916, Germany's dreadnoughts achieved a Pyrrhic sort of victory over the Royal Navy off Jutland - the first clash of ironclads. With his customary economy and flair for telling detail, the author also recounts the battle of Midway, where US carrier forces slugged it out with a similar Japanese flotilla to gain an upper hand in WW II's Pacific theater. La
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World War I

HP Willmott


... beautifully produced and illustrated, an everything you need to know compendium (Daily Mail ) Published to coincide with the 90th anniversary of the armistice, this dramatic account of World War I combines emotive photography with personal accounts to evoke both the futility and spirit of the Great War. Every aspect of World War I – sea, land and the home front – are explored giving you a complete picture of the conflict. Re-live major campaigns through timelines and examine the decisions and military actions which decided each outcome. Compelling eyewitness accounts of soldiers and civilians paint a vivid picture both of crucial battles and day-to-day routines. Plus, letters home and haunting war poetry highlight the most important aspect of "the war to end all wars" – its appalling human cost. With a special anniversary guide to battlefield sites, memorials, cemeteries and visitor centres at Verdun, the Somme, Ypres and other locations commemorating the fallen of World W
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War

DK


Take a guided tour of every major conflict through the ages Trace the epic 5,000-year story of warfare from the earliest battles to the War on Terror. Explore the campaigns and conflicts, the warriors and commanders and the tactics, weapons and technology that have shaped human warfare. With fascinating features on topics including; the role of infantry, siege warfare, military tactics and the treatment of wounded soldiers. Combining a clear and compelling historical narrative with a wealth of fascinating supporting features, this is a definitive visual guide to this brutal, intense and often heroic dimension of the human story.
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World War I

Simon Adams


This book really brought World War I to life. I was surprised at how little I really knew about this war. This may be billed as a kid's book, but people of all ages will enjoy it. It's a great source for learning a lot about the war in a short period of time. The entire Eyewitness series is worth checking out. I bought this for my 7 year old son. He loved it!!, He loves to read about all the different wars, and this series has everything. The pictures are great, and it gives alot of info. I highly recommend it, and all of the books in this series. History is fun, and photos help a person understand the past. Thus, I enjoy photos, because I analyze them in detail. Using a magnifying glass I actually look closely to spot interesting items normally unseen by the casual reader. Since I have done some intel analysis in the past, based on photos, I know good photos tell a story about what is going on. However, a book needs to be more than good photos. Unfortunately that is about all
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The Somme: Then and Now - A Visual History with DVD

Duncan Youel


If there was a single day during World War I that illustrates the absolute stupidity of the high level brass it was the opening day of the Somme, July 1st, 1916. The commanders of the British forces had seen what modern weapons would do. They had had observers at the American Civil War and seen the results of frontally attacking dug in defenders. They ignored the reports because they were only colonials and the British red coats had more spirit, training, elan and everything else. They had seen the Boar War, and should have confirmed for themselves that modern equipment favored the defense. At the Battle of Colenso the British suffered 1,126 casualties to the Boar's 40. Anyway at the Somme the British charged into the German machine guns and British suffered 57,470 casualties in the first day. This book covers the Battle of the Somme. It wtarts with a prelude explaining how the battle came about. Then about half the book covers the battle itself. And the final quarter shows wh
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A Nurse at the Front: The Great War Diaries of Sister Edith Appleton

Ruth Cowen


This book, the second in a series of four unique War Diaries produced in conjunction with the Imperial War Museum, will tell a story that is rarely heard: the experiences of a nurse working close to the Western Front in the First World War. Incredibly, Edith Appleton served in France for the whole of the conflict. Her bravery and dedication won her the Military OBE, the Royal Red Cross and the Belgian Queen Elisabeth medal among others. Her diary details with compassion all the horrors of the 'war to end wars', including the first use of poison gas and the terrible cost of battles such as Ypres, but she also records what life was like for nurses and how she spent her time off-duty. There are moments of humour amongst the tragedy, and even lyrical accounts of the natural beauty that still existed amidst all the destruction.
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A War Nurse's Diary: Sketches From A Belgian Field Hospital

A World War 1 Nurse


A British Nurse's experiences working on the Belgian Front during the First World War I found this title particuarly interesting as my Aunt served as a nurse during World War One, winning a Red Cross medal for her bravery, and as I was reading about this author's experiences I kept asking myself, 'I wonder if she and my aunt ever met?' This is a very moving account and I loved the story about the little dog 'Bombe' the nursing staff found amongst the ruins and adopted. I also liked the fact that this nurse was a bit of a rebel, and didn't always do as she was told..she had a mind of her own and confessed she and a friend were sometimes 'naughty' and sneaked off to ride on the officer's horses! You go, girl! I loved the account of the nurses continuing to play hide and seek amongst the ambulances on Christmas day, despite heavy shelling by the Germans - I guess they wanted to be caught by the ambulance drivers who were chasing them waving bits of mistletoe!
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A War Nurse's Diary

World War I Nurse


The Shelf2Life WWI Memoirs Collection is an engaging set of pre-1923 materials that describe life during the Great War through memoirs, letters and diaries. Poignant personal narratives from soldiers, doctors and nurses on the front lines to munitions workers and land girls on the home front, offer invaluable insight into the sacrifices men and women made for their country. Photographs and illustrations intensify stories of struggle and survival from the trenches, hospitals, prison camps and battlefields. The WWI Memoirs Collection captures the pride and fear of the war as experienced by combatants and non-combatants alike and provides historians, researchers and students extensive perspective on individual emotional responses to the war.
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The Forbidden Zone: A Nurse's Impressions of the First World War

Mary Borden


'...remains an unsettling collection of stories and fragments that record the experiences of a Chicago-born millionaire s daughter who became an unlikely nurse in WWI France.' --Open Letters Monthly '...a slim but very moving volume...It was Mary Borden s supreme achievement not only to save as many men as she did and nurse the others gently to the end but to put down on paper some of what it felt like to be there, living and dying in the mud.' --Booktrust website '...a flawless gem of a book, a beautifully written account of horrific tragedy.' --dovegreyreader May Borden worked for four years in an evacuation hospital unit following the front lines up and down the European theatre of the First World War; this beautifully written book is a collection of her memories and impressions of that experience. Describing the men as they march into battle, engaging imaginatively with the stories of individual soldiers, and recounting procedures at the field hospital, the author offers a
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Nurse at the Trenches: Letters Home from a World War I Nurse

Agnes Warner


This is a very interesting account of a Red Cross Nurse's experiences during World War One. Although they are 'letters', they read just like an account of the action. Certainly Miss Warner's obvious love for the French troops in the trenches or the 'Poilus' as she calls them, shines through every page. I have read quite a few nurse war books, but I found this to be quite an eye opener, as I had not realised some of the nurses worked quite so hard as they did. Well recommended! Agnes Warner, a Red Cross Canadian nurse on the French front in World War I, shared her experiences in letters she wrote to her close circle of friends and relatives. Not written for publication, the letters were genuine and descriptive. Also, they were eye-witness reports that put the reader at the front with Warner. I could see the field hospital's many huts and sheds, the sky glowing with flashes from shells, the air battle between the German and French aeroplanes. I could hear the guns roaring like
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Nurse at the Trenches: Letters Home From A World War One Nurse

Agnes Warner


Written from the French Front by a brave Red Cross nurse, these home letters were hurriedly penned amidst the incessant roar of mighty guns and surrounded by the wounded and the dying. Shivering at times with cold, and wearied almost to the point of exhaustion from working every day from 5.30am to 9pm, they give a fascinating glimpse into the life of a nurse at war. This is a very interesting account of a Red Cross Nurse's experiences during World War One. Although they are 'letters', they read just like an account of the action. Certainly Miss Warner's obvious love for the French troops in the trenches or the 'Poilus' as she calls them, shines through every page. I have read quite a few nurse war books, but I found this to be quite an eye opener, as I had not realised some of the nurses worked quite so hard as they did. Well recommended!
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Nurses at the Front: Writing the Wounds of the Great War

Margaret R. Higonnet (Editor)


Very few war books are written by women. This book is one of those, and, next to Tim O'Brien's 'The Things They Carried' and 'Going After Cacciato,' it's absolutely among the very best. Based on the women's experiences as nurses at the front during the First World War, it is spare, unflinching, horrifying - and at the same time, poetic, elegiac, and beautiful. Not an exclamation point anywhere, no attempt to dramatize or sensationalize the death and maiming injuries they saw daily. Read it, and prepare to be overwhelmed.
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Elsie and Mairi Go to War: Two Extraordinary Women on the Western Front

Dr Diane Atkinson


The true story of best friends Elsie Knocker and Mairi Chisholm ... This biography is a fitting tribute to their role on the frontline --Daily Express The extraordinary and moving story of two women whose courage and charisma made them the most famous women in the First World War.
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Women in the War Zone: Hospital Service in the First World War

Anne Powell


In our collective memory, the First World War is dominated by men. The sailors, soldiers, airmen and politicians about whom histories are written were male, and the first half of the twentieth century was still a time when a woman's place was thought to be in the home. It was not until the Second World War that women would start to play a major role both in the armed forces and in the factories and the fields. Yet there were some women who were able to contribute to the war effort between 1914 and 1918, mostly as doctors and nurses. In "Women in the War Zone", Anne Powell has selected extracts from first-hand accounts of the experiences of those female medical personnel who served abroad during the First World War. Covering both the Western and the Eastern Fronts, from Petrograd to Basra and from Antwerp to the Dardanelles, they include nursing casualties from the Battle of Ypres, a young doctor put in charge of a remote hospital in Serbia and a nurse who survived a torpedo attack, alb
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Not So Quiet...: Stepdaughters of War

Helen Zenner Smith


Helen Zenna Smith is the pseudonym of Evadne Price who served as an ambulance driver in France during the FWW. This totally compelling fictionalised account of a woman's experience of the War should be ranked alongside E. M. Remarque's 'All Quiet on the Western Front', Siegfried Sassoon's 'Memoirs of an Infantry Officer' or Edmund Blunden's 'Undertones of War'. The value of the experiences of women who saw active service during the FWW are beginning to be recognised in academic circles thanks to the work of feminist critics, but it is time that such recognition came from the general public as well, and this book is one of many that is capable of bringing those experiences to wider attention. A wonderfully written book that is worth reading. Highly recommended !! This semi-autobiography, moulded in the style of All Quiet on the Western Front (hence the pun on "Quiet" which also connotes the supposed passivity of women during wartime), is a merciless but utterly gripping account of fe
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Last Voices of World War I

Nick Maddocks (Director)


This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe Winner of the Royal Television Society Documentary Award What was it really like to be a British Tommy fighting in the trenches of the First World War? How did it feel to face the wire, the machine guns, the artillery barrages, and the poison gas cloud? To see your friends and comrades dying all around you day after day? This award-winning factual series available for the very first time on DVD - draws on a unique collection of one hundred interviews with World War One veterans in which the soldiers and their loved ones relive all the heroism and heartbreak of the years from 1914 to 1918. Most of these men had never been interviewed before or since . It features the first ever interview with Harry Patch and the only ever interview with Henry Allingham, the two last surviving veterans of the war who died last year aged 111 and 113. All the voices are now silent. Powerful, moving and important, Last Voices Of The Great War provides the m
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A V.a.D. in France

Olive Dent


Publisher: London, G. Richards Publication date: 1917 Subjects: World War, 1914-1918 -- Personal narratives World War, 1914-1918 -- War work Voluntary aid detachments World War, 1914-1918 -- Civilian relief Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there. This book contains 15 pictures eg: doing night duty surrounded by rats, struggling in a collapsed tent in a rainstorm, a patient off to 'blighty', convalesecent military horses recieving medical treatment etc --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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From Narromine to the Nile: Jessie Tomlins- An Australian Army Nurse - World War One

Ruth Rae


Kindle Edition There is an abundance of historical and anecdotal information relating to the Australian soldier during World War One but very little which specifically deals with Australian nurses who served in the same conflict. 'From Narromine to the Nile' is about one ordinary Australian nurse, Jessie Tomlins, who trained at Sydney Hospital and then enlisted with the Australian Army Nursing Service in 1916. She spent the war attached to the 14th Australian General Hospital in Egypt and nursed the casualties of the present day Middle East campaign. Her two brother, Fred and Will, served in the First Australian Light Horse and their story (see 'To all at home ... letters from a Lighthorseman') forms a backdrop to the experiences of Jessie Tomlins. This is no sanitised view of the war but brings to light the social history of one Australian family within the context of the Desert Campaigns. Jessie was transferred to 3 Australian Auxiliary Hospital, Dartford, England after the peace
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Scarlet Poppies: The army experience of Australian nurses during World War One (2nd ed)

Ruth Rae


Kindle edition Scarlet Poppies includes the international political situation which culminated in the most brutal war of the twentieth century. This war involved hand to hand combat and the wounds which ensued were catastrophic to the soldier and the nurse who witnessed them. The ability of the nurses to deal with the impact of mustard gas, gangrene, shell-shock, amputations and the entire spectrum of communicable diseases ranging from venereal disease to the influenza pandemic with little more than their expertise is graphically illustrated in Scarlet Poppies. Antibiotics were unheard of and basic diagnositic tools such as x-rays were only beginning to be widely used. This book relies heavily on the first hand accounts of the nurses themselves and their honesty demonstrates that those who suffered in the First World War and those who witnessed their pain should be more than a statistic - each soldier and each nurse has a story. The Australian nurses who served overseas in the 1914-
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Waiting for Sunrise

William Boyd


'Boyd is English fiction's master storyteller' Independent '[Boyd] has probably written more truly classic books than any of his contemporaries' Sunday Telegraph 'A novel by William Boyd carries its own recommendation. To read one of his novels is like stepping into an expertly made and rather expensive motor vehicle' Philip Hensher, Daily Telegraph 'One of our top-notch novelists' The Times Vienna, 1913. It is a fine day in August when Lysander Rief, a young English actor, walks through the city to his first appointment with the eminent psychiatrist Dr Bensimon. Sitting in the waiting room he is anxiously pondering the particularly intimate nature of his neurosis when a young woman enters. She is clearly in distress, but Lysander is immediately drawn to her strange, hazel eyes and her unusual, intense beauty. Her name is Hettie Bull. They begin a passionate love affair and life in Vienna becomes tinged with a powerful frisson of excitement for Lysander. He meets Sigmund Freud in a
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Notes: A Soldier's Memoir of World War 1

Clifton, J. Cate & Charles, Cameron Cate


Uniquely personal WW I account of an American youth's extraordinary experience in the Canadian artillery describing camp life, overstayed leaves, combat, hospitalization, shattered friendships and his poignant return to civilian life. I felt like I was there too at times, though I wasn't even born yet. I also know more about where my own grandfather was after being wounded. Fact are really coming out. Need to know the truth, read this book!
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Life Class

Pat Barker


Pat Barker's sensitive exploration of the devastating effects of The Great War on a group of artists from the Slade School of Art complements her similar exploration of the Great War from the point of view of the poets Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon in her Regeneration Trilogy, for which she won the 1995 Booker Prize. Examining the lives of art students Paul Tarrant, Elinor Brooke, and Kit Neville as they learn their craft, celebrate life by partying in the days leading up to the war, and eventually make life-altering decisions when war breaks out, Barker creates three worlds, the Before, During, and After of the war. The superficiality of life Before, the horrors of During, and the disillusionment of After develop here through the interactions of these three characters with each other as the world around them changes--war as a Life Class. When Germany invades Russia and advances on France, Neville and Paul volunteer to drive ambulances for the Belgian Red Cross, and when Richar
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All Quiet on the Western Front

Erich Maria Remarque


This book is so moving and yet, despite the horrors endured on the frontline during WW1, a sense of humour (however grim) is retained throughout, almost to the last few paragraphs. The story is written in the first person narrative, by a young German soldier, Paul Bauer. He is only eighteen when he is pressured by his family, friends and society in general, to enlist and fight at the front. He enters the army, along with 6 other lads he was at school with, each one filled with fresh, lively, optimistic and patriotic thoughts, but within a few months they are all as old men, in mind if not completely in body. Paul and his friends witness such horrors and endure such severe hardship and suffering, that they are unable to even speak about it to anyone but each other. This is a very moving and poignant novel, and the reader is made even more aware of its poignancy in knowing that its author is writing from experience, having suffered greatly as a young man on the frontline, whilst fighting
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We That Were Young

Irene Rathbone


This fierce antiwar novel by Irene Rathbone (1892-1980) is told from the perspectives of a cultured former suffragist and several of her friends - young women who work at rest camps just behind the lines in France and as nurses of the severely wounded in hospitals in London. When Joan loses both her brother and lover to the war, she volunteers for work in a munitions plant - but by the end, she is a confirmed pacifist. This book is semi-autobiographical fiction based on Irene Rathbone's experiences as a volunteer worker during the Great War. It tells of life both as a VAD nurse and as a YMCA canteen worker in France, and includes a wealth of interesting detail not found elsewhere. Her story is one of loss and grief - both she and her friends lose many loved ones during the course of the war, but it's also a tale of strong family ties and lifelong friendships. It's longer than most of its genre, and although the language is rather stilted by today's standards, the story bowls along a
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Beneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers War 1914-1918

Peter Barton & Peter Doyle & & Johan Vandewalle


Whilst the war raged across Flanders fields, an equally horrifying and sometimes more dangerous battle took place underground. "Beneath Flanders Fields" tells the story of the tunnellers' war, which still remains one of the most misunderstood, misrepresented and mystifying conflicts of the Great War. A wealth of personal testimonies reveal the engineering, technology and science behind how this most intense of battles was fought - and won. They speak of how the tunnellers lived a relentless existence in the depths of the battlefield for almost two and a half years, enduring physical and mental stresses that were often more extreme than their infantry counterparts. Their lives were reduced to a complex war of silence, tension and claustrophobia, leading up to the most dramatic mine offensive in history launched on 7 June 1917 at Messines Ridge. Yet, Messines was not the end of their story, which continued with the crafting of a whole underground world of headquarters, cookhouses and hos
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Cheerful Sacrifice

Jonathan Nicholls


Tells the story of the spring offensive of April - May 1917, otherwise known as the Battle of Arras. The author gives the Battle of Arras its proper place in the annals of military history, enhancing his text with a wealth of eye-witness accounts.
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Walking the Somme

Paul Reed


This is an excellant contribution to the Somme books as published by Pen and Sword. Covers some well-known areas, and other areas which have been badly neglected such as Gommecourt and Flers where tanks were used for the first time. What is good about this edition are the well mapped routes and suggestions for the first time visitor. Good photos too, particularly of the devastation the battle caused. Good all round account of what was perhaps the greatest battle of World War One.
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The Quick and the Dead: Fallen Soldiers and Their Families in the Great War

Richard Van Emden


At the end of the First World War more than 192,000 wives had lost their husbands, and nearly 400,000 children had lost their fathers. A further half a million children had lost one or more siblings. Appallingly, one in eight wives died within a year of receiving news of their husband's death. Few people remained unscathed and the effects of the conflict are still with us. The Quick and the Dead will pay tribute to the families who were left to suffer at home while their husband, fathers and sons went off to fight, and the generations that followed. Through the stories in this groundbreaking history, we realise not just what became of our grandfathers but how their experiences influenced the children, grandchildren and great grandchildren of a generation that they left at home. Against all the odds some stories ended happily - missing fathers did return, men thought to be dead returned from prisoner of war camps to a joyous reunion. For others the loss, while difficult to bear at the t
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Artillery in the Great War

Paul Strong & Sanders Marble


The book delivered what I had expected; an explanation of how artillery was used and evolved through the Great War. I was not looking for a book showing description after description of every gun used during the war. However, I think the book would be much improved, if at the beginning, the characteristics of some of the principle guns of the war, shell types and gun usage were laid out. Then as the book describes the evolution of tactics during the war, the role of the guns usage would be easier to understand.
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Horsemen in No Man's Land: British Cavalry and Trench Warfare 1914-1918

David Kenyon


I would recommend this book to anyone who has even a cursory interest in the history of the First World War, regardless of previous knowledge or interest in this specific subject, this work has enough data to keep the scholar happy whilst at the same time explaining things enough so anyone (at any level of knowledge) can follow the narrative and enjoy the journey. This book stands alone in its subject matter, and like many books on the First World War which have come out in the last 10 years or so, it will stop and make people re-evaluate there previous conceptions on the conflict. Kenyon obviously has a keen affinity with the mounted wing of the BEF, and along with his encyclopaedic knowledge of the subject in question it would be easy to believe that he would have a specific agenda and bias his evidence accordingly. Yet, he shows a picture of the cavalry in a believable and colourful manner, 'Warts and all' explaining the faults as well as the good, and presenting evidence and arg
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Bullecourt 1917: Breaching the Hindenburg Line

Paul Kendall


The assault upon the formidable Hindenburg Line at Bullecourt in April and May 1917 by three British Divisions - the 7th, 58th and 62nd - and three Australian Divisions was initially designed to assist Allenby's Third Army break out from Arras. This book tells the full story of a battle that can be seen as an archetype of the horrors of trench warfare. The controversial first Bullecourt battle of 11th April came to be regarded as the worst Australian defeat of the War, when Australian infantry assaulted without artillery and tank support. They were badly let down by the British tanks - but the British tank crews were let down in their turn by their own commanders, who put them in the forefront of the attack in Mark II training tanks, prone to malfunction and not armour-plated. Significant numbers fought their way into the German lines at Bullecourt against all odds, including legendary ANZAC soldiers Major Percy Black, Captain Albert Jacka and Captain Harry Murray. The Australians achi
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The Confusion of Command: The Memoirs of Lieutenant-General Sir Thomas D'Oyly 'Snowball' Snow 1914 -1918

Dan Snow & Mark Pottle


The enemy has got to be fought everywhere and hard... Everything is going very well indeed and no one minds the losses as long as we are moving. The never-before-published papers of General Sir Thomas D Oyly Snow provide a remarkable insight into the mindset of the Great War commanders. Despite being severely injured during the first Battle of the Marne when his horse fell and rolled over him, cracking his pelvis Snow served at some of the most important battles of the Western Front. His memoirs include the battle of Loos, the second battle of Ypres, the battles of Arras and Cambrai, the retreat from Mons and was responsible for the diversionary attack on Gommecourt on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Somme. This volume is comprised of vivid extracts from contemporary notes that only an eyewitness can offer coupled with frank postwar reflections that show the wisdom of hindsight and perspective, which brings an open awareness of military folly. D Oyly Snow died in London, aged 82, on
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Ghosts on the Somme: Filming the Battle, June-July 1916

Alastair H. Fraser & Andrew Robertshaw Steve Roberts


The Battle of the Somme is one of the most famous, and earliest, films of war ever made. The film records the most disastrous day in the history of the British army - 1 July 1916 - and it had a huge impact when it was shown in Britain during the war. Since then images from it have been repeated so often in books and documentaries that it has profoundly influenced our view of the battle and of the Great War itself. Yet this book is the first in-depth study of this historic film, and it is the first to relate it to the surviving battleground of the Somme. The authors explore the film and its history in fascinating detail. They investigate how much of it was faked and consider how much credit for it should go to Geoffrey Malins and how much to John MacDowell. And they use modern photographs of the locations to give us a telling insight into the landscape of the battle and into the way in which this pioneering film was created. Their analysis of scenes in the film tells us so much abou
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Ypres: The First Battle 1914

Ian F.W. Beckett


First Ypres was a devastating battle for the British and a turning point for all four of the major armies involved. Ypres: The First Battle draws on a wide range of British, French, German and Belgian sources in order to reconstruct the battle from all sides. Many of these personal papers and public accounts have never been published before. Through a shrewd analysis of the most recent secondary works as well as archival materials, Ian F.W. Beckett appraises the significance of First Ypres as a key moment in the Great War marking the transition from war as it had been to war as it would become. This book is suitable for undergraduate students studying World War One and is the perfect companion to Beckett’s The Great War.
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Major and Mrs.Holt's Battlefield Guide to Ypres Salient

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


This is an invaluable guide for anyone looking to tour the battlefields of Flanders. A useful, if brief, intoduction to the history of the battles, bags of practical suggestions, a useful but complicated pull-out map. Great colour photography, with some well-planned itineries.
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Highlander: The History of The Legendary Highland Soldier

Tim Newark


'Highlanders have long been among the most feared soldiers in the world and Tim Newark's book admirably tells their stirring tale. A great read!' - Bernard Cornwell. On the fields of Waterloo, the deserts of Sudan, the Plains of Abraham and the mountains of Dargai, the trenches of Flanders and the jungles of Burma - the great Highland regiments made their mark. The brave kilted troops with their pipes and drums were legendary, whether leading the charge into the thick of battle or standing fast, the last to leave or fall, fighting against the odds. Acclaimed historian Tim Newark tells the story of the Highlanders through the words of the soldiers themselves, from diaries, letters and journals uncovered from archives in Scotland and around the world. At the Battle of Quebec in 1759, only a few years after their defeat at Culloden, the 78th Highlanders faced down the French guns and turned the battle. At Waterloo, Highlanders memorably fought alongside the Scots Greys against Napoleon's
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Pillboxes on the Western Front: Guide to the Design, Construction and Use of Concrete Pillboxes, 1914-18

Peter Oldham


When the First World War froze into a static line of trenches stretching from the North Sea to the Swiss border, the most obvious means of protection against the murderous machine-gun fire which both sides inflicted upon each other was some form of shell-proof shelter which from which fire could be returned in safety, hence the development of the pill box. The idea was certainly not new but the technology required to build them under the prevailing circumstances presented problems hitherto undreamed of. In this remarkably absorbing study of what at first seems a somewhat arcane study of what at first seems a somewhat arcane subject, Peter Oldham, himself a concrete technologist, examines the problems of the design and construction of the pill boxes of the Western Front. He describes how the innumerable difficulties involved in what might to the untrained eye seem to be a fairly simple structure, were gradually overcome. Containing as it does, a gazetteer of the remaining pill boxes and
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The War The Infantry Knew: 1914-1919: A Chronicle of Service in France and Belgium

Captain J.C. Dunn


Sometimes, through word of mouth and shared enthusiasm, a secret book becomes famous. The War the Infantry Knew is one of them. Published privately in a limited edition of five hundred copies in 1938, it gained a reputation as an outstanding account of an infantry battalion's experience on the Western Front (DAILY TELEGRAPH ) John Keegan ('A remarkably coherent narrative of the battalion's experiences in diary form ...a moving historical record which deserves to be added to the select list of outstanding accounts of the First World War’ )
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Monchy le Preux - Arras

Colin Fox


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The Somme: Then and Now

John Giles


Drawing on eyewitness accounts as well as contemporary and modern photographs, this book explores the conditions and conflicts endured by the men who marched through to the fateful battleground.
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To End All Wars: How the First World War Divided Britain

Adam Hochschild


'World War I remains the quintessential war -- unequalled in concentrated slaughter, patriotic fervor during the fighting, and bitter disillusion afterward, writes Hochschild. Many opposed it and historians mention this in passing, but Hochschild, winner of an L.A. Times Book Award for Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves, has written an original, engrossing account that gives the war's opponents (largely English) prominent place. These mostly admirable activists include some veteran social reformers like the formidable Pankhursts, who led violent prosuffrage demonstrations from 1898 until 1914, and two members of which enthusiastically supported the war while one, Sylvia, opposed it, causing a permanent, bitter split. Sylvia worked with, and was probably the lover of, Keir Hardie, a Scotsman who rose from poverty to found the British Labour party. Except for Bertrand Russell, famous opponents are scarce because most supported the war. Hochschild
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1918: A Very British Victory


The story of the huge mobile battles of 1918, which finally ended the Great War.
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Tommy's Ark: Soldiers and Their Animals in the Great War

Richard Van Emden


'A terrific book. If ever you are in doubt about the devastation and universal suffering that war brings to us, and to all creatures, great and small, then read Tommy's Ark' Michael Morpurgo, author of War Horse Praise for 'The Soldier's War' 'In The Soldier's War, Richard van Emden has toiled in archives and hunted down caches of letters to tell the story of the war chronologically through the eyes of the Tommies who fought it' The Times 'Thousands of books have been written about the Great War, but perhaps none so vividly evocative as The Soldier's War ... an extraordinary homage to a lost generation' Daily Mail For soldiers in the Great War, going over the top was a comparatively rare event; much more frequently, they were bored and lonely and missing their families at home. Needing an outlet for their affection, many found it in the animal kingdom. "Tommy's Ark" looks at the war through the eyes of the soldiers who were there, and examines their relationship with a strange and u
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The Unending Vigil


One million, one hundred thousand men and women lost their lives in the service of the British Empire during the First World War; in the Second, another six hundred thousand from all parts of the Commonwealth made the same sacrifice. The First World War, which began as a war between professional armies, was very soon to be fought by millions of ordinary citizens turned soldier. Those who died could no longer be "shovelled into a hole ... and so forgotten" as had happened, to Thackeray s indignation, at Waterloo, and in May 1917 a new organization, the Imperial War Graves Commission, was founded to provide permanent care for their graves and commemoration for the missing. The Unending Vigil tells the story of the Commission of its beginnings on the Western Front, with the efforts of one extraordinary man who conceived and directed it through to the conclusion of the Second World War, and of its work since then. Renamed in 1960 the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, its operations today
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The Beauty And The Sorrow: An intimate history of the First World War

Peter Englund


'A richly complex and rarely heard account of the First World War that lingers in the memory ... Immensely powerful.' --Juliet Gardiner, author of The Blitz 'One of the finest writers of our time on the tactics, the killing and the psychology of war' --Simon Sebag Montefiore, author of Jerusalem 'He conjures up the atmosphere over and over again with just a few stark words ... inspiring' --Margaret Forster 'A wonderfully wide and rich mosaic of personal experience from the First World War.' --Antony Beevor 'Englund introduces each new character with perfect timing, arranging them as a composer might bring in a new instrument. *****' --Toby Clements, Telegraph 'It deserves its success because it is perceptive, humane and elegantly written. It never fails to keep the reader's interest.' --Tony Barber, Financial Times 'Englund writes in a telegraphic present tense alive with detail.' --Ian Jack, Guardian 'Peter Englund has created a work of unconventional brilliance.'
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Remembering Fromelles: A New Cemetery for a New Century

Julie Summers, Louise Loe, Nigel Steel


At 96 pages, a masterpiece of conciseness in explaining the Battle of Fromelles and the subsequent discovery, recovery, identification and re-interment of the 250 men at Pheasant Wood Cemetery. Every aspect is covered, in layman's language where necessary, so that the reader can understand the problems faced at each stage. The book is very well illustated, each picture complementing the text. For me the important 'first step' was to see the map of the battlefield as it was perceived in the official history of the war, and from there, one can understand subsequent stages leading to the dedication ceremony on the 19th july, 2010. I had a number of questions that had not been answered through TV programmes and press articles on Fromelles. This book provided those answers and it is now a welcome addition to my bookshelf! Well done to all of those involved in the Pheasant Wood project, regardless of role!
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Twelve Days on the Somme: A Memoir of the Trenches, 1916

Sidney Rogerson


Sidney Rogerson has put down, plainly and simply, the experiences of his battalion. There is no attempt to compass drama by any device of selection or exaggeration --The Observer A more genuine and unbiased account of trench warfare would be hard to find --The Sunday Times Memoirs of a British subaltern first published in 1933; vivid descriptions without embellishment of life on the front lines written by a survivor of the 1916 Somme offensive. Unabashedly intended as an antidote to the usual downbeat 1930's war memoir. --Western Front Association A joint operation between Britain and France in 1916, the Battle of the Somme was an attempt to gain territory and dent Germany s military strength. By the end of the action, very little ground had been won: the Allied Forces had made just 12km. For this slight gain, a more than a million lives were lost. There were more than 400,000 British, 200,000 French, and 500,000 German casualities during the fighting. Twelve Days on the Somme
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Gallipoli

Peter Hart


'Superb... a serious and important work on Gallipoli. It is written in Peter Hart's increasingly excellent style.' --David McLoughlin, Press Association 'An impressive and timely reminder of the futility of war.' --Morning Star '[A] stirring account' --Irish Examiner 'A perceptive and refreshingly candid study of a doomed campaign.' --Peter Simkins 'A tremendous book and for anyone interested in this campaign or the political direction of the war' --Chris Baker, The Long, Long Trail 'Gallipoli by Peter Hart is one of the most refreshing books written about this campaign.' --Martin Hornby, Western Front Association 'All good history books should be an assault on myth, and in 'Gallipoli' Peter Hart mounts a supremely effective attack' --Mail on Sunday 'A marvellous, ghastly book...vivid and compelling' --The Economist 'An account filled with insight and poignancy' --Craig Gibson, TLS A gripping, revisionist account of an epic tragedy
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Boiselle, La: Somme

Michael Stedman


A volume in the BATTLEGROUND EUROPE series, a battlefield guide which draws upon material in national and local archives, documentary evidence, personal reminiscence and British and German unit histories of the Somme battlefield during World War I. The battles for the centre of the Somme front of July 1916 is well covered in this remarkable account. La Boiselle and Ovillers were bitterly fought for between 1 July and 19 July 1916 with terrible losses on both sides. Contains good photos and maps. Recommended for first time visitors using the guide maps contained within. A must buy.
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Underground Warfare 1914-1918

Simon Jones


Simon Jones's graphic history of underground warfare during the Great War uses personal reminiscences to convey the danger and suspense of this unconventional form of conflict. He describes how the underground soldiers of the opposing armies engaged in a ruthless fight for supremacy, covers the tunnelling methods they employed, and shows the increasingly lethal tactics they developed during the war in which military mining reached its apotheosis. He concentrates on the struggle for ascendancy by the British tunnelling companies on the Western Front. But his wide-ranging study also tells the story of the little known but fascinating subterranean battles fought in the French sectors of the Western Front and between the Austrians and the Italians in the Alps which have never been described before in English. Vivid personal testimony is combined with a lucid account of the technical challenges - and ever-present perils - of tunnelling in order to give an all-round insight into the extraord
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Fort Vaux: Verdun

Christina Holstein


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Gavrelle: Arras

Kyle Tallett & Trevor Tasker


During the Battle of Arras 1917, the village of Gavrelle was captured by the Royal Naval Division; the Royal Marines suffered their highest casualties of their history at Gavrelle Windmill. Four VCs were awarded for actions around Gavrelle.'
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Major and Mrs. Holt's Concise Guide to the Western Front - South: The First Battle of the Marne, the Aisne 1914, Verdun, the Somme 1916

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


I have just completed a two week visit to the battlefield sites of northern France and southern Belgium. This particular Holts' guide is one of a pair covering the region that we used (and I understand there is a separate tome on the Somme itself), and has a tremendous amount of detail. The maps and illustrations are excellent, and the guide is very comprehensive, with a personal touch provided by the comments of Major and Mrs. Holt. While very comprehensive, I must admit to finding this guide difficult at times to extract the appropriate information from. This is probably because I simply didn't have the time to spend reading it before setting off on our trip, but the problem comes from the difficulty in combining chronological and geographical history. The static nature of the conflict on the western front meant that events in time happened on the same sites, while the expanse over which the conflict took place saw offensives on a single date occur over a great distance. The reali
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Major and Mrs. Holt's Concise Guide to the Western Front - South: The First Battle of the Marne, the Aisne 1914, Verdun, the Somme 1916

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


I have just completed a two week visit to the battlefield sites of northern France and southern Belgium. This particular Holts' guide is one of a pair covering the region that we used (and I understand there is a separate tome on the Somme itself), and has a tremendous amount of detail. The maps and illustrations are excellent, and the guide is very comprehensive, with a personal touch provided by the comments of Major and Mrs. Holt. While very comprehensive, I must admit to finding this guide difficult at times to extract the appropriate information from. This is probably because I simply didn't have the time to spend reading it before setting off on our trip, but the problem comes from the difficulty in combining chronological and geographical history. The static nature of the conflict on the western front meant that events in time happened on the same sites, while the expanse over which the conflict took place saw offensives on a single date occur over a great distance. The reali
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The Wipers Times: The Complete Series of the Famous Wartime Trench Newspaper

Malcolm Brown (Editor)


In early 1916, Captain F.J. Roberts and Lieutenant J.H. Pearson salvaged an abandoned printing press from the ruins of Ypres in Northern France and started their own trench newspaper, written by and for the British Infantry. The initial title, 'The Wipers Times', says a lot about the audience they were pitching for - Wipers being the classic tommy's mispronunciation of the French town of Ypres. That informality is continued throughout the paper, which set out to cast a satirical eye at the war and those who were (mis)running it. No target was sacred as the number of the paper's contributors grew. Every issue was chock full of limericks, humourous poems, fake advertisments and short stories that cocked a thumb at the Generals, at the public back home, at the Kaiser and the Germans. There is a tendency to assume that the experiences of the British during the First World War were unrelentingly grim, but as the introduction in this collection says, we have become so convinced of the
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The Kensington Battalion: Never Lost a Yard of Trench

G.I.S Inglis


Can there be any more Kitchener infantry battalions, especially the locally raised "pals", waiting to have a history written? Surely there can not be many. This one, the 22nd (Service) Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers - raised, as the title suggests, in Kensington in London - already has a good if rather short published history in Christopher Stone's "Short history of 22nd Royal Fusiliers in the Great War". So was Geoff Inglis' work necessary and is it a worthwhile purchase? In my view, a resounding yes on both counts. This battalion benefits from having an unusually extensive archive and a good deal of published work covering its activities. This provides an excellent background for compilation of a detailed history. But "Never lost a yard of trench" goes further, not least due to the fact that the author met several battalion veterans, as the work on the book began many years ago and was interrupted for a long spell. The personal touch, as well as the author's evident expertise an
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Shooting the Front: Allied Air Reconnaissance in the First World War

Terrence J. Finnegan


'The definitive reference work - There is no chance that the work will ever be surpassed' - David R. Mets, Professor Emeritus, School of Advanced Air and Space Studies 'Truly a pathbreaking book' - Ernest R. May, Charles Warren Professor of American History, Harvard University 'The sourcebook in its field' - Col Scott A. Willey, USAF (Ret.), Book Review Editor, Air Power History 'This is a benchmark in World War I aviation history' - Walter J. Boyne, former director of the National Air & Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution 'Finnegan has done a remarkable job - He incorporates the previously neglected dimension of photographic interpretation and its comprehensive battlefield application, from front lines to rear echelons' - Dennis Showalter, Professor of History, Colorado College --Dennis Showalter, Professor of History, Colorado College A massive, expertly written and richly illustrated history . . . based on meticulous archival research . . . Finnegan's prose is precise and
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Tommy's War: British Military Memorabilia, 1914-1918

Peter Doyle


The First World War has left an almost indelible mark on history, with battles such as the Somme and Passchendaele becoming watchwords for suffering unsurpassed. The dreadful fighting on the Western Front, and elsewhere in the world, remains vivid in the public imagination. Over the years dozens of books have been published dealing with the soldier's experience, the military history and the weapons and vehicles of the war, but there has been little devoted to the objects associated with those hard years in the trenches. This book redresses that balance.
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Fatal Avenue: A Traveller's History of the Battlefields of Northern France and Flanders 1346-1945

Richard Holmes


A unique work, combining military history and travel, studying the most fought-over area on earth.
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The German Army at Passchendaele

Jack Sheldon


Even after the passage of almost a century, the name Passchendaele has lost none of its power to shock and dismay. Reeling from the huge losses in earlier battles, the German army was in no shape to absorb the impact of the Battle of Messines and the subsequent bitter attritional struggle. Throughout the fighting on the Somme, the German army had always felt that it had the ability to counter Allied thrusts, but following the shock reverses of April and May 1917, much heart searching had led to the urgent introduction of new tactics of flexible defence. When these in turn were found to be wanting, the psychological damage shook the German defenders badly. But, as this book demonstrates, at trench level the individual soldier of the German Army was still capable of fighting extraordinarily hard, despite being outnumbered, outgunned and subjected to relentless, morale-sapping shelling and gas attacks. The German army drew comfort from the realisation that, although it had had to yield g
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Bygone Pilgrimage - The Somme 1914-1918: First Battle of the Somme 1916-1917 v. 1

Michelin


The first thirty pages provide an overview of the offensive, the objectives, the theory, methods and tactics adopted and the part played by each arm in the different phases of the attack. In this preamble, which takes the reader up to the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in February/March 1917, Gough is mistakenly referred to as commanding Second Army (page 2) instead of Fifth (Reserve Army till 30 October1916). Then follows an illustrated guide to the battlefield which covers both French and British operations with maps and photos, focussing on the area Albert-Bapaume-Peronne and the valley of the Somme, taking in all the battles in which the BEF was involved during the four and a half months' campaign.
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The First World War

John Keegan


Despite the avalanche of books written about the First World War in recent years, there have been comparatively few books that have concentrated on delivering the big picture--a comprehensive account of the war and its campaigns from start to finish--and this book fills the gap superbly. As readers familiar with John Keegan's previous books, such as the The Face Battle, Six Armies in Normandy, and The Second World War, will know, Keegan is a historian of the old school. He has no earth-shattering new theories to challenge the status quo, no first-person accounts to tug on the emotions; what he does have, though, is the gift for talking the lay person through the twists and turns of a complex narrative in a way that is never less than accessible or engaging. Keegan never tries to ram his learning down your throat. Where other authors have struggled to explain how Britain could ever allow itself to be dragged into such a war in 1914, Keegan keeps it practical. The level of communications
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The Pity of War

Niall Ferguson


If someone less distinguished than Niall Ferguson--a fellow and tutor in Modern History at Jesus College, Oxford--had written The Pity of Waryou could be forgiven for thinking that he was a man in search of a few cheap headlines by contradicting almost every accepted orthodoxy about World War I. Ferguson argues that Britain was as much to blame for the start of the war as was German militarism, and that had Britain sacrificed Belgium to Germany, the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution would never have happened, Germany would have created a united European state, and Britain could have remained a superpower. He also contends that there was little enthusiasm for the war in Britain in 1914, but equally he claims that it was not prolonged by clever manipulation of the media. Instead, he purports that the reason men fought was because they enjoyed it. He also maintains that it wasn't the severity of the conditions imposed on Germany at Versailles in 1919 that led inexorably to World War II; rather i
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Blighty: British Society in the Era of the Great War

Gerard J. DeGroot


'well worth reading'.The Times 'well written and very readable...can be highly recommended'African History 'an important contribution to our knowledge of the background to British policy-making in 1918 and 1919'English Historical Review "The author's skill in blending social history with a narrative of the main political developments makes Blighty well-suited for student use. In many respects it provides a model of what this genre should be like."Albion An analytical survey of Britain in the era of the Great War (focusing particularly on the period 1907-1922), which questions the common assumption that, because the war had a devastating impact on the British people, its social consequences must therefore have been equally apocalyptic and lasting. Dr. De Groot argues that prewar social structures and attitudes proved surprisingly resilient, and the innate conservatism of all classes in Britain ensured that postwar Britain was as little changed as new economic and technological circ
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The First World War

Martin Gilbert


"Written by one of our generation's most respected historians, it charts the Great War from its inception with a rigorous attention to dates, facts and statistics but coloured in with human perspective and poetry" (BIG ISSUE IN THE NORTH ) It was to be the war to end all wars, and it began at 11.15 on the morning of June 28, 1914, in an outpost of the Austro-Hungarian Empire called Sarajevo. It would end officially almost five years later. Unoffically, it has never ended: The horrors we live with today were born in the First World War. It left millions - civilians and soldiers - maimed or dead. And it left us with new technologies of death: tanks, planes, and submarines; reliable rapid-fire machine guns, poison gas and chemical warfare. It introduced us to unrestricted war on civilians and mistreatment of prisoners. Most of all, it changed our world. In its wake, empires toppled, monarchies fell, whole populations lost their national indentities as political systems and geographic b
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The First World War: Germany and Austria-Hungary 1914-1918

Holger Herwig


Full of fascinating detail, strongly argued, and lucidly written, Herwig's study is certain to force a re-evaluation of the origins and course of World War One. (Choice ) a comprehensive study...we have needed for some time...one cannot but admire the breathtaking scope of [Herwig's] scholarship. A brilliant work by one of the real giants in the field. An absolute must read for anyone with even a passing interest in the subject. (New York Military Affairs Symposium ) In making extensive use of achive material in Germany and Austria... [Herwig] is able to destroy effectively the myth of a well-run German war machine. (The Times Literary Supplement ) ...the most thorough and readable one-volume history of the war so far available. (History ) The Great War toppled four empires, cost the world 24 million dead, and sowed some of the seeds of another worldwide conflagration 20 years later. Yet, until now, there has been no comprehensive treatment of how Germany and Austria-Hungar
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Tommy: The British Soldier on the Western Front

Richard Holmes


Tommy is Richard Holmes's tribute to the ghosts of the millions of ordinary soldiers who fought in the First World War. The book also reflects the dissatisfaction he feels at the way we still remember it. Too often we approach World War I through the literature it inspired. The poems of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon and others have their own truths to offer, but Holmes would dispute the assumption that they represent the experiences of the majority of those who endured the trench warfare of the Western Front. To discover new voices and new perspectives on the war he has trawled through the rich archives of letters, diaries and memoirs that still exist, most of them written while the fighting still continued. From these he has constructed an extraordinarily vivid and moving picture of what it felt like to be one of the millions of men who served in the British army during the four years between August 1914 and the armistice on November 11, 1918. From Private Albert Bullock rejoicing
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Battle Tactics of the Western Front: British Army's Art of Attack, 1916-18

Paddy Griffith


Historians have portrayed British participation in the Great War as a series of tragic debacles, with lines of men mown down by machine guns, untried new military technology and incompetent generals who threw their troops into improvised and unsuccessful attacks. In this book Paddy Griffith, a renowned military historian, examines the evolution of British infantry tactics during the war and challenges this interpretation, showing that while the British army's plans and technologies persistently failed during the improvised first half of the war, the army gradually improved its technique, technology and, eventually, its self-assurance. By the time of its successful sustained offensive in the autumn of 1918, he argues, the British army was demonstrating a battlefield skill and mobility that would rarely be surpassed even during the Second World War. Evaluating the great gap that exists between theory and practice, between textbook and bullet-swept mudfield, Griffith argues that many batt
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The Somme

Peter Hart


'Peter Hart pays handsome tribut to the 'ordinary soldiers...' ... one could not wish for a more appropriate testimony to that generation for which the Somme was much more than a topic for academic research or a source of poignant reflection.' (LITERARY REVIEW ) 'A monumental feat of research, his book is also a memorial of the most compelling kind to the hundreds of individuals whose diaries, letters and recollections are presented so vividly here.' (THE SCOTSMAN ) '[Hart] has produced a remarkably even-handed account... and the first-person accounts he has unearthed are rich in vivid images...' (SUNDAY TIMES ) 'Hart has succeeded in presenting his massive subject with objective clarity... the material gives it curious immediacy... brilliantly well-written extracts... Prepare to be enlightened, but prepare to feel respect for all the men involved.' (SOLDIER MAGAZINE ) 'Excellent' (TLS ) 'Hart is an accomplished author of anecdotal histories and here he is on top form...
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The Donkeys: A History of the British Expeditionary Force in 1915

Alan Clark


On 26 September 1915 twelve British battalions - a strength of almost 10,000 men - were ordered to attack German positions at Loos in north-east France. In the three-and-a-half hours of the actual battle, they sustained 8,246 casualties. The Germans suffered no casualties at all. The Donkeys is a study of the Western Front on 1915, a brilliant exposé of a key stage of the Great War, when the opposing armies were locked in trench warfare. Alan Clark scrutinizes the major battles of the year. He casts a steady and revealing light on those in High Command - French, Rawlinson, Watson and Haig among them- whose orders resulted in the virtual destruction of the odd professional British Army. Professor Michael Howard summed this book up as "a worthless history", Dr John Bourne; the University of Birmingham justly cites it as "preserving historical writing about the Great War in its ridiculously protracted adolescence". This is generous. Clark is an agenda driven politician with an appal
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The Last Fighting Tommy: The Life of Harry Patch, The Only Surviving Veteran of the Trenches

Harry Patch & Richard Van Emden


'An extraordinary biography by the very last witness of a devastating four years in British history .. 'Patch is unique - living history on legs, articulate, with wonderfully vivid recall' ' Daily Mail 'Patch was not unique among millions of his comrades who endured that prolonged and supreme test of nerve and courage. But, uniquely, as the last survivor, he embodies them all' Sunday Express 'This articulate, modest and outspoken man not only remains one of the last living links with a traumatic event that has become part of the national consciousness, but is an unassailable witness of what the war was like for those who fought in it' Daily Telegraph 'A wonderful book' Andrew Motion, Poet Laureate Harry Patch, 110 years old, is the last British soldier alive to have fought in the trenches of the First World War. From his vivid memories of an Edwardian childhood, the horror of the Great War and fighting in the mud during the Battle of Passchendaele, working on the home front in the S
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The Last of the Last: The Final Survivor of the First World War

Claude Choules


Written from memoirs penned more than two decades ago, together with further interviews and recollections from Claude Before his death at the age of 110 in May 2011, Claude Choules was the last man alive who had served in both world wars. Claude learned life's lessons during a rural childhood in England and later in the Royal Navy as a boy sailor, before graduating to become an explosives expert in the Australian navy. In his 80s, Claude began working on his memoirs with the help of his daughters, and The Last of the Last is a riveting account of his lifetime that vividly mirrors how the last century unfolded. Claude had the insight of an ordinary man thrust to the forefront of international furore. He was opposed to the glorification of war, but his charming anecdotes honour a generation called upon to serve not once but twice. This engaging, wryly humorous autobiography reflects the amiable nature of a truly unique man.
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Kitchener's Last Volunteer: The Life of Henry Allingham, the Oldest Surviving Veteran of the Great War

Henry Allingham & Denis Goodwin


Henry Allingham is the last British serviceman alive to have volunteered for active duty in the First World War and is one of very few people who can directly recall the horror of that conflict. In Kitchener's Last Volunteer, he vividly recaptures how life was lived in the Edwardian era and how it was altered irrevocably by the slaughter of millions of men in the Great War, and by the subsequent coming of the modern age. Henry is unique in that he saw action on land, sea and in the air with the British Naval Air Service. He was present at the Battle of Jutland in 1916 with the British Grand Fleet and went on to serve on the Western Front. He befriended several of the young pilots who would lose their lives, and he himself suffered the privations of the front line under fire. In recent years, Henry was given the opportunity to tell his remarkable story to a wider audience through a BBC documentary, and he has since become a hero to many, meeting royalty and having many honours bes
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Sapper Martin: The Secret Great War Diary of Jack Martin

Richard Van Emden


Praise for The Soldier's War 'Thousands of books have been written about the Great War, but perhaps none so vividly evocative as Richard van Emden's The Soldier's War ... an extraordinary homage to a lost generation' Daily Mail 'A remarkably distressing yet uplifting book ... these descriptions from a Tommy's eye-view have a gut-wrenching immediacy' Daily Mail 'In The Soldier's War, Richard van Emden has toiled in archives and hunted down caches of letters to tell the story of the war chronologically through the eyes of the Tommies who fought it, recording their days of tedium and moments of terror' The Times Jack Martin was a thirty-two-year-old clerk at the Admiralty when he was called up to serve in the army in September 1916. These diaries, written in secret, hidden from his colleagues and only discovered by his family after his return home, present the Great War with heartbreaking clarity, written in a voice as compelling and distinctive as Wilfred Owen or Siegfried Sassoon and
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The Reluctant Tommy

Duncan Barrett & Ronald Skirth


`Different from the hundreds of other memoirs about the Great War ...What he has to say was hard come by and should be heard' --Daily Mail `Superb' --Daily Telegraph ``An important contribution to the literature of the war ... whenever I get too misty-eyed about officer-man relationships I shall reread it to remind me of how badly things could go wrong.' Richard Holmes, Evening Standard --Richard Holmes, Evening Standard 'In the middle of No Man's Land, in the aftermath of the battle of Passchendaele young Tommy Ronald Skirth saw the body of a dead German and resolved never to help take a human life...In his retirement he finally, and controversially, unburdened memories held secret for some 50 years and these have just been published in paperback...' --Choice Magazine ‘One of the most extraordinary First World War memoirs you will ever read; an instant classic … absolutely perfect’ James Delingpole, Mail on Sunday
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Britain's Last Tommies

Richard Van Emden


A deeply moving tribute to the courage and suffering of all who took part, and to the fallen (THE TIMES ) A remarkable new book (MAIL ON SUNDAY ) A compelling and moving history of the the First World War in the words of the last suriviving soldiers to have fought in it
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Soldier's War: The Great War Through Veterans' Eyes

Richard Van Emden


`...tells the story of the war chronologically through the eyes of the Tommies who fought it' --The Times `How much more vivid is this account of the Great War from letters and diaries than any orthodox history ... A rich haul of unpublished snapshots reinforces a compelling work' --Independent I don't normally feel compelled to comment on any books I read, however this new book by Richard Van Emden is so good that I couldn't resist making my views known. The book progresses year by year through the duration of the war, each chapter is full of amazing personal accounts most of which have never previously been published, through these Mr Van Emden sets out not just to tell us of the utter horror of the war, but also of the everyday experiences of the troops out of the line. However it is not just the superb text that makes this book a must buy, the book also contains many truely excellent unpublished photos that I have never seen before. Most of these photos were taken by troo
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From Geordie Land to No Mans Land


In writing his `one and only' book, George Elder, a proud Geordie, detailed many of his experiences endured whilst serving in the British Army during World War 1. Many of his tales would not have been appreciated by his peers, but they actually happened and would have been recognised by the common soldier. From Geordie Land to No Mans land was written to inform his family, friends and anyone buying his book of the real life events that occurred. How an ordinary man survived 4 years in the front line experiencing the horrors of war that most of us could not imagine, enduring many privations such as mud, cold, hunger, thirst and fear of imminent death all around him. George maintained his spirit by forming a close bond with his fellow Geordies even refusing to be transferred to Hospital in case he could not return to his original unit. His description of the intensity of shell fire that we have seen in pictures of the battlefields of Flanders and the Somme bring to life how men endured t
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The First Casualty

Ben Elton


"A work of formidable imaginative scope the writing is so good, the language so surprisingly subtle and the characters so beautifully delineated." --"Daily Telegraph ""Riveting action scenes bristle with a queasy energy unputdownable and disgustingly realistic." --"Sunday Telegraph" I must confess that I have not read a Ben Elton novel for sometime (Blast From the Past being the last), which is odd as it was Ben that inspired me to have a go at writing. Having read an article on The First Casualty I gave it a go... and loved it. Yes, like many I picked up on the obvious Blackadder 4 links, but as a period project obviously close to the author's heart this works on all levels, i.e. great characters, intrigue, history and comical observation. Against the backdrop of murder investigation there is a touching and poignant account of life in the trenches which really hits home - the cramped train journey, the march to the front and the appalling sanitation. It is observed from all
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Strange Meeting

Susan Hill


John Hilliard, a young subaltern returning to the Western Front after a brief period of sick leave back in England, finds his battalion tragically altered. His commanding officer finds escape in alcohol, there is a new adjutant and even Hilliard's batman has been killed. But there is David Barton. As yet untouched and unsullied by war, radiating charm and common sense, forever writing long letters to his family. Theirs is a strange meeting and a strange relationship: the coming together of opposites in the summer lull before the inevitable storm. The theme of this novel is friendship, a friendship between two English soldiers, set against a background of the atrocities of the battlefield during the First World War. John Hilliard, a young officer, returns to his battalion in France, after a period of sick leave in England. In the mean time a new officer has arrived. It's David Barton, 21 years old and slightly younger that Hilliard. Hilliard, who is rather stiff and reserved and
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Letters from the Trenches: A Soldier of the Great War

Bill Lamin


..as a chronicle of life for an ordinary foot soldier this is an excellent, easy read which gives a human face to the incomprehensible scale of the slaughter that was thought to be the war to end all wars. -- Daily Express 1st May 2009 I won't spoil the suspense of whether Harry survives to be reunited with his family. But as a chronicle of life for an ordinary foot soldier this is an excellent, easy read which gives a human face to the incomprehensible scale of the slaughter that was thought to be the war to end all wars. --Daily Express, May 1, 2009 ...this selection, edited by Harry's grandson, provides a rare insight into the everyday experiences of the war's unsung heroes.
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First World War Army Service Records: A Guide for Family Historians

William Spencer


This revised, expanded and fully updated edition of the longstanding bestseller explains the vast First World War holdings at The National Archives and the British Library's India Office. Expert advice for all those exploring the First World War or tracing relatives who served in it. It covers material already released and some soon to come on subjects such as service records, war diaries, medals, the WAAC, London Gazette and overseas records. This is an expanded and updated edition of William Spencer's already excellent book, which is indispensible for anyone researching their ancesters who fought in the British army (it doesn't cover navy) and wants to go beyond the medal-cards and fatality records that can be easily viwed via Ancestry. William Spencer has a thorough knowledge of the National Archives, and systematically describes the War Office archives available at Kew, and crucially gives the War Office WO reference numbers of each. If you are serious about tracing Britis
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Army Service Records of the First World War

Simon Fowler, William Spencer, Stuart Tamblin


This revised edition offers an introduction to the surviving service record for World War I non-commissioned officers and ordinary soldiers. It includes the 1998 release of service records for officers, with detailed explanations and illustrations of the most common forms to be found among the records. It reveals how to search the Medal Rolls for awards for gallantry and for service, as well as describing other sources that can be used to track and illuminate an individual's war service, notably war diaries, trench maps and major collections outside the Public Record Office. The records are brought to life by case studies of two ordinary soldiers and one notable officer - Lieutenant Siegfried Sassoon. Fowler has done his work thoroughly.From my own point of view,Fowler could have included the social consequences of having, "upper" and "the rest" rankings, and thier non inter-reaction, during WW1, and the causes and results of this. Why have so many Officers survived, to longlevity,
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Army Service Records of the First World War

William Spencer


A guide to the records relating to army personnel during World War I. This third edition is published to coincide with the transfer to the Public Record Office in early 2001 of the British Army Nurses and Indian Army Records. There are five new chapters covering: Army Nurses records; WAAC records; Indian Army records of service; Indian Army operational records; and casualties. It also provides more details on pension records; personnel files on selected officers, including General Haig; how to use the "London Gazette" to piece together a service record; expansion of the material on honours and awards; and information on service records contained within WO76. Researching a soldier of the British Army of 1914-1918 is no easy task. The records that survive are incomplete and full of military jargon that is difficult for the uninitiated. Most of the records are held at the National Archives in Kew, London, and this book gives good guidance to what is available and how to make effective
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Army Service Records of the First World War (Paperback)

Simon Fowler, William Spencer, Stuart Tamblin


This short guide offers a preliminary introduction to the surviving records for both non-commissioned and ordinary soldiers of World War One. The original records were badly damaged during bombing in 1940, so a second collection was compiled from duplicates held by the Ministry of Pensions. The book is designed to aid the researcher, illustrating common forms to be found amongst the records, including attestation forms, medical histories and regimental conduct reports. It also examines other military material held in the PRO, such as war diaries, maps and photographs, and such external sources as newspapers and war memorials.
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The Great War: A Guide to the Service Records of All the World's Fighting Men and Volunteers

Christina K. Schaefer


The Great War covers information on all WWI combattants. The Great War was a challenge to write, because I broadened the scope of the book to include the service records of all the countries who had forces which fought in WWI. Consequently, although the focus is on records of that time period, a researcher could use this book to locate military records from other wars, in many countries. I have identified the repositories for military records in the U.S., , the U.K., Australia and New Zealand, Austria (and the former Austro-Hungarian Empire), Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia (and former states of the USSR), Serbia, South Africa, and Turkey, There is a wealth of information available if you know where to look. This book tells the kinds of records which are available for the nations which participated in World War One and research tips. Methods of organization, military units, and ships are listed for
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Tracing Your Army Ancestors

Simon Fowler


Provides a comprehensive introduction to researching army history. This book shows how to trace the careers of individual soldiers from 1760. It explains army organization and regimental histories and covers information on the major archives and museums, including the National Archives.
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Tracing Your First World War Ancestors

Simon Fowler


A comprehensive guide for those researching their ancestors in all three armed services - the Army, the Royal Navy and the Royal Flying Corps.
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The Animals' War: Animals in Wartime from the First World War to the Present Day

Juliet Gardiner


Published in association with the Imperial War Museum, to coincide with their major exhibition, and including an introduction by Jilly Cooper. From the First World War to the present day, animals have played a key part in warfare - and many have suffered and died as a result. Juliet Gardiner's book is a moving tribute to their efforts and sacrifice - illustrated with hundreds of evocative photographs and paintings. Many different animals have played a role on the battlefield - horses and mules carrying supplies and munitions; dogs, like Buster in Iraq, seeking out ammo dumps; canaries trained by tunnellers to detect gas; carrier pigeons sending messages, like Gustav who flew back with the first reports of the D-Day landings; camels used in the Arab Revolt in the First World War; and dolphins trained to protect submarines. Having seen the exhibition at The Imperial War Museum, I decided to buy the book. It has amazing stories of the valuble contributions and sacrifices that animals h
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Art from the First World War

Various


Showcasing art from the extensive collection of the Imperial War Museum, this book includes works from the major artists of the time such as John and Paul Nash, Orpen, Bomberg, Spencer and Sargent as well as other artists who are less familiar to us today. With an introductory essay by Roger Tolson, Head of Art at the Imperial War Museum, this book offers an insight into the huge range and power of wartime art during the First World War.
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"A Terrible Beauty": War, Art and Imagination 1914-1918

Paul Gough


In-depth survey of artists of the Great War, including Paul Nash, Muirhead Bone, Nevinson, Orpen, Stanley Spencer and Wyndham Lewis. I bought "A Terrible Beauty." my brother in law who is is obsessed with first world war war graves so it was a perfect birthday present. However, having bought it, I couldn't put it down so bought myself a copy . It's a brilliant anthemic tapestry to so many forgotten and necessary wonders.
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Women War Artists

Kathleen Palmer


Women war artists have acted as witnesses to many of the major conflicts of the twentieth century, from the First and Second World Wars to the current engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. Some have been commissioned through Official War Art schemes; others have worked independently, bringing an unofficial and independent perspective to our view of conflict. Until recently, their treatment and their access to front-line battle situations has been markedly different to that of their male counterparts. Given these constraints, their achievement in creating works of power, authority and insight deserves far greater recognition. Rather than being an exhaustive survey, this book takes the cases of individual artists and examines both their stories and their art. In the First World War, Olive Mudie-Cooke was a pioneer, gaining access via medical service at the front. In the Second World War Dame Laura Knight, the first woman to be made an RA, was officially commissioned, as was Mary Kessell.
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Modern Art, Britain and the Great War: Witnessing, Testimony and Remembrance

Sue Malvern


This fascinating book examines how the British state recruited artists to produce official art as part of propaganda during World War I and how their compelling work affected twentieth-century art and British modernism. '...an important and provocative book which is sure to be influential in directing debate...'
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Drawing Fire: The diary of a Great War soldier and artist

Len Smith


"I wish I could have met him - a sniper's rifle in one hand and an artist's brush in the other." Christy Campbell A vivid and powerful diary of life in the trenches The horrors of war in the trenches are brought to life with a rare immediacy and power through the diary of soldier and artist Len Smith. Enduring battles such as those at Loos and Vimy Ridge, Len survives with a mixture of whimsical humour, bravery and sheer good luck. Len enlisted as an infantryman in the City of London Regiment on his 23rd birthday, 22 September 1914. During the war years he kept a journal on scraps of paper which he hid in his trousers to smuggle home at the end of the war. At the same time, he added to his thoughts with colour sketches of the people and places he encountered. His drawing skills were also put to good use to gather and record intelligence on German army positions which he did under great personal risk; they were later used to help plan military strategy. One of his many ingen
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Undertones of War

Edmund Blunden


An established classic ... accurate and detailed in observation of the war scene and its human figures (D. J. Enright ) In what is one of the finest autobiographies to come out of the First World War, the distinguished poet Edmund Blunden records his experiences as an infantry subaltern in France and Flanders. Blunden took part in the disastrous battles of the Somme, Ypres and Passchendaele, describing the latter as 'murder, not only to the troops, but to their singing faiths and hopes'. In his compassionate yet unsentimental prose, he tells of the heroism and despair found among the officers. Blunden's poems show how he found hope in the natural landscape; the only thing that survives the terrible betrayal enacted in the Flanders fields.
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Women in the First World War

Neil R Storey & Molly Housego


At first,I was slightly disappointed to find that this book is only 62 pages long as I had thought given the title of the book, it would be much longer. The chapters cover nursing, munition work, on the land, uniform and demob. There is a good selection of old black and white photos, together with war posters and memorabilia from that era. This book is pr This book is fabulous! I never really knew much about the first world war because I find all wars really saddening anyway I read this book about the women in WW1 and its amazing how much they did not just for our country, but for our businesses and for women today - for example women were only allowed to wear trousers during WW1 because of the women who took over the mens jobs in factories and farms. Ladies - can you imagine not being able to wear whatever you wanted? It's crazy! But this book is a fabulous read and if you want to learn a bit of history about women's rights get this book!
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The Reluctant Tommy: An Extraordinary Memoir of the First World War

Ronald Skirth


'An important contribution to the literature of the war. I would certainly buy this book even if I had not been sent a review copy, and whenever I get too misty-eyed about officer-man relationships I shall reread it to remind me of how badly things could go wrong. And of just how vital it is, for any democratic society seeking to use war as an instrument of policy, to ensure that the connection between war's means and its political ends is crystal clear.' -- Richard Holmes, The Evening Standard I have spent a considerable time checking the statements made in this book, comparing them with battery and brigade war diaries and soldier's records. Barely a line stacks up. I am afraid that "The reluctant Tommy" can only be considered at best a well-meant work of fiction or at worst some kind of personal attempt to embarrass individuals with which the author served. It's an interesting and even absorbing read, but a fairy tale. UPDATE: on the basis of this and other research, the Imperi
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Call to Arms: The British Army 1914-18

Charles Messenger


'... illuminating... Charles Messenger has provided us with a lesson in excellence.' (SCOTTISH LEGION NEWS ) 'detailed and comprehensive... also fascinating to read... Thoroughly reccommended.' (MILITARY ILLUSTRATED ) 'comprehensive... based on years of research, this will become the standard work of reference' (MILITARIA MART ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. I like books of two types. Firstly, those that take a subject apart and push it back together again, adding to what you know, and secondly those that you can dip into, and learn a little that may be you didn't know before. This book is of the latter type. Covering many different aspects of the war, the book is well written and ideal for that longish train journey, or sit in the garden. For the casual reader, there is much of interest and yet for the 'in depth' reader there'll be much new or unmet stuff too.
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An Illustrated History of the First World War

John Keegan


John Keegan's The First World War was everywhere praised, and became the definitive account of the war that created the modern world. The New York Times Book Review acclaimed Keegan as "the best military historian of our day," and the Washington Post called the book "a grand narrative history [and] a pleasure to read." Now Keegan gives us a lavishly illustrated history of the war, brilliantly interweaving his narrative--some of it derived from his classic work and some of it new--with a brilliant selection of photograps, paintings, cartoons and posters drawn from archives across Europe and America, some published here for the first time. These images take us into the heart of battles that have become legend: Ypres, Gallipoli, Verdun, the Somme. They show us the generals' war and the privates' war--young soldiers, away from home for the first time, coming of age under fire. We see how a civilization at the height of its power and influence crippled itself as the faith in progress,
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Fear

Gabriel Chevallier


'Has bite and poignancy and deserves to be recognised next to 'All Quiet on the Western Front'' --Patrick Neale, Jaffe and Neale in Bookseller's Choice 'A work of great intensity, comparable to such great literary masterpieces of the period as Henri Barbusse's Under Fire' --Daily Mail 'There are enough flashes of intense colour and incident to make this translation a worthwhile exercise' --Sunday Telegraph 'Chevallier's pen is as sharp as a bayonet' --Herald 'Excoriating ... A bravura work, fearless from start to finish, pitiless in its targets, passionate in its empathy' --Times Literary Supplement The author's Clochemerle is possibly my favourite book of all time (close run thing with Treasure Island) and I'd never heard of this book. Being a bit of a Chevallier completist I bought this though, and was first of all struck by how sparse and serious this book is, certainly compared to clochemerle. I suppose this is inevitable given the subject matter but it is quite a d
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Famous: 1914-1918

Richard Van Emden & Vic Piuk


Famous tells the Great War stories of twenty of Britain's most respected, best known and even notorious celebrities. They include politicians, actors, writers, an explorer, a sculptor and even a murderer. The generation that grew up in the late 19th Century enlisted enthusiastically in the defence of the country. Many would become household names such as Basil Rathbone, the definitive Sherlock Holmes, AA Milne, creator of Winnie the Pooh, and John Laurie and Arnold Ridley who found fame and public affection as the dour Scotsman Fraser, and the gentle and genial Godfrey, in Dad's Army. From politicians such as Harold Macmillan and Winston Churchill to writers includsing JB Priestley, and JRR Tolkein, from sculptors like Henry Moore, to composers such as Ralph Vaughan Williams, their fame and influence continue even into the 21st Century. The authors Richard van Emden and Vic Piuk have discovered the exact locations where these celebrities saw action. They tell the story of how JRR Tolke
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The Old Lie: The Great War and the Public-school Ethos

Peter Parker


Long unavailable, this acclaimed book traces the history of an ideal and examines its effect on the lives of those caught up in the First World War. Rupert Brooke's apparent enthusiasm for the War in 1914 was echoed throughout England, particularly by young men who had been educated in a gentlemanly tradition of patriotism, chivalry and sportsmanship at their public schools. These codes had also trickled down through society thanks to the school stories that appeared in popular boys' magazines, and to the missions and boys' clubs run by the schools and universities in the poorer parts of the country. Drawing upon a wealth of material, Peter Parker's fascinating book traces the growth and dissemination of what Wilfred Owen dismissed as 'the old lie' in his poem Dulce Et Decorum Est. It also explores the wide variety of responses to the war ? from celebration to denigration, from patriotic acquiescence to bitter rebellion ? as they were reflected in the poetry, plays and prose of the per
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Playing the Game: The British Junior Infantry Officer on the Western Front 1914-18

Christopher Moore-Bick


... this is a groundbreaking work; a detailed examination of the platoon and company commanders who had to make the plans of their seniors work. It is scholarly but immensely readable … an essential addition to the library of any military historian, whether professional or interested amateur. --Gordon Corrigan, author of Mud, Blood and Poppycock: Britain and the Great War and The Second World War - A Military History A valuable contribution to our knowledge of the British Army in the First World War. --Dr Stephen Badsey, University of Wolverhampton The strength of Moore-Bick's work is that it is accessible to the enthusiast as well as to the academic; thankfully, the familiar subjects are covered succinctly and freshly, including a lot of original research alongside discussion of the conclusions that other researchers have drawn. --Birmingham 'On War' - the unofficial blog of the War Studies research students at the University of Birmingham Product Description The British Army
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The Great War: Myth and Memory

Dan Todman


"Former military history teacher and current lecturer in modern British history Dan Todman presents The Great War: Myth and Memory, a close examination of how perceptions of World War I have changed over the past ninety years, arguing that a distorted image of the war- one focusing too heavily upon its miseries- has dominated its understanding in present-day culture. The Great War debunks myths and reveals the astutely professional capabilities of its generals. From questioning the prevalence of mud and donkeys in popular perception of WWI, to examination of primary sources revealing differing views among veterans, The Great War: Myth and Memory is a welcome addition to history shelves for its counterbalance upon the enormous influence popular culture (from comics to war movies) has upon collective historical memory." Internet Bookwatch--, Product Description The First World War, with its mud and the slaughter of the trenches, is often taken as the ultimate example of the futility of
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A Long Long Way

Sebastian Barry


'The story grips, shocks and saddens; but most importantly refuses to be forgotten.' --The Times 'A stunning achievement... Barry has written one of the most moving fictional accounts of war that surely must rank alongside those real-life testimonies of Owen and Sasson.' --Sunday Tribune 'A deeply moving story of courage and fidelity.' --J. M. Coetzee Sunday Times 'A beautifully written book with human value.' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. I read this book a few months ago and when I finished it I felt I had to read it again to capture some of the powerful descriptions of human feelings, love, fear, confusion, betrayal, disappointment, compradeship, etc., I picked it up again last week and have enjoyed reading every page of it a second time. In this book Sebastian Barry has dealt with a subject rarely even talked about until recently in Ireland. That is, the dilemna of 1916 when Irishmen were fighting against Britain in Dublin
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Memoirs of an Infantry Officer

Siegfried Sassoon


It is my own story I am trying to tell, and as such it must be received; those who expect a universalization of the Great War must look for it elsewhere.' Memoirs of an Infantry Officer, first published in 1930, is Siegfried Sassoon's fictionalized autobiography of the period between the early spring of 1916 and the summer of 1917. The narrative moves from the trenches to the Fourth Army School, to Morlancourt and a raid, then to and through the Somme. The mind of the narrator turns from unquestioning acceptance of the war and of the standards which it set up, to doubting the necessity of the seemingly endless slaughter.
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Regeneration

Pat Barker


A brilliant novel. Intense and subtle (Peter Kemp Sunday Times ) Product Description Craiglockhart War Hospital, Scotland, 1917, where army psychiatrist William Rivers is treating shell-shocked soldiers. Under his care are the poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, as well as mute Billy Prior, who is only able to communicate by means of pencil and paper. Rivers’s job is to make the men in his charge healthy enough to fight. Yet the closer he gets to mending his patients’ minds the harder becomes every decision to send them back to the horrors of the front … Regeneration is the classic exploration of how the traumas of war brutalised a generation of young men. The first book in the Regeneration trilogy
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Journey's End

Robert Cedric Sherriff


Set in the First World War, Journey's End concerns a group of British officers on the front line and opens in a dugout in the trenches in France. Raleigh, a new eighteen-year-old officer fresh out of English public school, joins the besieged company of his friend and cricketing hero Stanhope, and finds him dramatically changed ... Laurence Olivier starred as Stanhope in the first performance of Journey's End in 1928; the play was an instant stage success and remains a remarkable anti-war classic.
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Up the Line to Death: War Poets, 1914-18

Brian Gardner


Times Education Supplement 'To read through this anthology is ... to live the years 1914-1918, adding to the images of battle which most of us have already, the actual feelings expressed by the soldier poets who lived, and died, through trench warfare' Illustrated London News 'It is all here, the mud and rats of the trenches, the hellish noise of the bombardment, the insane waste of life, the high heroism and the bitter cynicism'
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The Accrington Pals

Peter Whelan


The Accrington Pals is a poignant and harrowing play set in the early years of the First World War, as the country's jingoistic optimism starts to wane and the true terror of warfare gradually becomes clear. The play looks at both the terrifying experiences of the men at the front and the women who were left behind to face social changes, deprivation and the lies of propaganda. While often comic vignettes portray the everyday life of a town denuded of men, the men face the terror that is the Battle of the Somme. This compassionate play portrays the devastating effects of war on a typical Lancashire mill town and the suffering of everyday people. This Modern Classic edition includes a new preface by the author, plus a full introduction exploring the themes, social/historical context and characters. The edition will also include a chronology of key events mentioned in the play and classroom activities. This is a play that can be read on so many levels, its a touching tale of the trial
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Testament Of Youth: An Autobiographical Study of the Years 1900-1925

Vera Brittain


In 1914 Vera Brittain was 21 years old, and an undergraduate student at Somerville College, Oxford. When war broke out in August of that year, Brittain "temporarily" disrupted her studies to enrol as a volunteer nurse, nursing casualties both in England and on the Western Front. The next four years were to cause a deep rupture in Brittain's life, as she witnessed not only the horrors of war first hand, but also experienced the quadruple loss of her fiancé, her brother, and two close friends. Testament of Youth is a powerfully written, unsentimental memoir which has continued to move and enthral readers since its first publication in 1933. Brittain, a pacifist since her First World War experiences, prefaces the book with a fairy tale, in which Catherine, the heroine, encounters a fairy godmother and is given the choice of having either a happy youth or a happy old age. She selects the latter and so her fate is determined: "Now this woman," warns the tale, "was the destiny of poor Cather
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Not about Heroes

Stephen MacDonald


"Dulce et decorum est/Pro patria mori", facetiously penned British poet Wilfred Owen, who was soon to die in the Great War. It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country. This moving play is about the poetic life and the inter relationship between two of the finest Great War poets: Owen who died and Siegfried Sasson who didn't. Told by means of letters and poetry, Not About Heroes paints a vivid picture of the war. It was staged to great acclaim at the Williamstown Theatre Festival and had an Off Broadway run. This play presents the tale of two men who are both, in their different ways, broken by their experiences of war, and the effecst that this has on their art. Owen and Sassoon, especially the former, have become symbols of the doomed youth of the Great War, and it is to them that we turn in order to discover the true realities of war today. We can no longer listen seriously to the solemn, romantic young heroism of the likes of Rupert Brooke, as we know that his perspective w
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"Oh What a Lovely War"

Theatre Workshop" and Joan Littlewood


" ""Joan Littlewood--one of our truly great theatre visionaries and an unsung hero." --"British Theatre Guide" Product Description Oh What a Lovely War is a theatrical chronicle of the First World War, told through the songs and documents of the period. First performed by Joan Littlewood's Theatre Workshop at the Theatre Royal, Stratford East, London in 1963, it received the acclaim of London audiences and critics. It won the Grand Prix of the Theatre des Nations festival in Paris that year and has gone on to become a classic of the modern theatre. In 1969 a film version was made which extended the play's popular success. The play is now on the standard reading list of schools and universities around the UK and was revived by the Royal National Theatre in 1998. This new version of the play, as edited by Joan Littlewood, returns the script to its original version. Includes a new photo section of the original production, and an Afterword by Victor Spinetti. A great piece of writing
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Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History

Jay Winter


Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural history of the twentieth century. Dr Winter looks anew at the culture of commemoration and the ways in which communities endeavoured to find collective solace after 1918. Taking issue with the prevailing 'modernist' interpretation of the European reaction to the appalling events of 1914–18, Dr Winter instead argues that what characterised that reaction was, rather, the attempt to interpret the Great War within traditional frames of reference. Tensions arose inevitably. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning is a profound and moving book of seminal importance for the attempt to understand the course of European history during the first half of the twentieth century. Book Description Jay Winter's powerful study of the 'collective remembrance' of the Great War offers a major reassessment of one of the critical episodes in the cultural histo
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AQA English Literature A AS: Literature of World War One: Student Book

Stella Canwell


AQA English Literature A is the only set of resources to have been developed with, and exclusively endorsed by, AQA, making them the first choice to support the new AQA specification for AS and A2. It isn't to long and gets straight to the point - which is a plus when you have a lot of revision to be getting on with. Gives a lot of useful tips on essay writing, the prose to be studied etc without being bombarding. I recommned this, especially if your struggling a bit with the course and need a few helpful hints.
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The Great War in British Literature

Adrian Barlow


Critical introductions to a range of literary topics and genres. The Great War of 1914-18 continues to fascinate readers and writers. This book aims to explore the different ways in which this war has featured both as a genre and as a theme in British literature of the past century; it asks what actually is the literature of the Great War, and looks at different ways in which people have read this literature, reacted to it and used it. Book Description The Great War of 1914-18 continues to fascinate readers and writers. This book aims to explore the different ways in which this war has featured both as a genre and as a theme in British literature of the past century; it asks what actually is the literature of the Great War, and looks at different ways in which people have read this literature, reacted to it and used it.
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The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the First World War

Vincent Sherry


'With its up-to-date scholarship, this book would be a very useful acquisition for serious research into the literature of the period, for undergraduate level-students and beyond.' Reference Reviews 'This outstanding volume is a welcome corrective to tired truisms surrounding Great War history, culture, and literature. Vincent Sherry's introduction argues for a literary history more attuned to the Zeitgeist of the war's early days … Sherry and his collaborators graciously acknowledge the primacy of these tropes in our cultural memory but also demonstrate new ways of reading and teaching literary representations of the Great War.' Yearbook of English Studies Product Description The Great War of 1914–1918 marks a turning point in modern history and culture. This Companion offers critical overviews of the major literary genres and social contexts that define the study of the literatures produced by the First World War. The volume comprises original essays by distinguished scholars of
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The Eye in the Door

Pat Barker


Gripping, moving, beautifully constrcted and profoundly intelligent (Independent on Sunday ) Product Description London, 1918. Billy Prior is working for Intelligence in the Ministry of Munitions. But his private encounters with women and men – pacifists, objectors, homosexuals – conflict with his duties as a soldier, and it is not long before his sense of himself fragments and breaks down. Forced to consult the man who helped him before – army psychiatrist William Rivers – Prior must confront his inability to be the dutiful soldier his superiors wish him to be … The Eye in the Door is a heart-rending study of the contradictions of war and of those forced to live through it. The second book in the Regeneration trilogy
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The Ghost Road

Pat Barker


An extraordinary tour de force. I'm convinced that the trilogy will win recognition as one of the few real masterpieces of late 20th-century British fiction (Jonathan Coe ) Product Description 1918, the closing months of the war. Army psychiatrist William Rivers is increasingly concerned for the men who have been in his care – particularly Billy Prior, who is about to return to combat in France with young poet Wilfred Owen. As Rivers tries to make sense of what, if anything, he has done to help these injured men, Prior and Owen await the final battles in a war that has decimated a generation … The Ghost Road is the Booker Prize winning account of the devastating final months of the First World War. The third book in the Regeneration trilogy
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The Hell They Called High Wood: The Somme 1916 (

Norman Terry


The Somme was surely one of the bloodiest rendezvous for battle of all time. High Wood, dominating the Bazentin Ridge, was the fiercely contested focal point of the battle. The Germans showed great determination and sacrifice defending the feature and it was not until September that it finally fell to the attackers. Ironically the successful divisional commander was rewarded with dismissal for "wanton waste of men". This exceptional book not only paints a graphic and gruesome picture of the fighting but sheds light on the problems of high command.
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Women's Writing on the First World War

Agnès Cardinal (Editor), Dorothy Goldman (Editor), Judith Hattaway (Editor)


ground-breaking anthology ... wide array of perspectives on WW1, from both sides of the fighting (B. Adler, Choice ) a very fine anthology (Times Literary Supplement )
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Letters From A Lost Generation: First World War Letters of Vera Brittain and Four Friends

Mark Bostridge (Editor), Alan Bishop (Editor)


The events set in motion by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 changed many lives irrevocably. For Vera Brittain, an Oxford undergraduate who left her studies to volunteer as a nurse in military hospitals in England and France, the war was a shattering experience; she not only witnessed the horrors inflicted by combat through her work, but she lost the four men closest to her at that time--her fiancé Roland Leighton, brother Edward, and two close friends, Geoffrey Thurlow and Victor Nicholson, who all died on the battlefields. Letters from a Lost Generation, a collection of previously unpublished correspondence between Brittain and these young men--all public schoolboys at the start of the war--chronicles her relationship with them, and reveals "the old lie"--the idealised glory of patriotic duty which was soon overtaken by the grim reality of the Flanders trenches. The letters are lively, dramatic, immediate and, despite the awfulness of war, curiously optimistic: "..somehow
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The First World War

Hew Strachan


A significant addition to the literature on World War I, which takes a global view of what has frequently been misperceived as a prolonged skirmish on the Western Front. Exploring such theatres as the Balkans, Africa and the Ottoman Empire, this single-volume work assesses Britain's participation in the light of what became a struggle for the defence of liberalism, and shows how the war shaped the "short" 20th century that followed it. Published to tie in with a television series, "The First World War" accompanies 10 one-hour episodes to be shown on Channel 4 during the autumn of 2003. From the Inside Flap The popular view of the First World War is dominated by cliché. Young British soldiers, many of them budding poets, were led to early and ghastly deaths in muddy wastes by incompetent generals for reasons that were seemingly futile. And although clichés are not necessarily lies, they are at best a selective view of the truth. Building on his ongoing research for his mammoth three-
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British And German Cartoons As Weapons In World War I: Invectives And Ideology Of Political Cartoons, A Cognitive Linguistics Approach

Wolfgang K. Hunig


he book provides 352 descriptions and interpretations of propaganda cartoons, but it ONLY INCLUDES ABOUT A DOZEN ACTUAL CARTOONS which are printed so small they might as well not ne there. A book on visual works with almost no pictures of the works in question. If I wasn't holding it in my hand, I wouldn't believe it. Truly the most useless reference ever.
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The Great War, 1914-1918: The Cartoonists' Vision

Spencer Tucker


"This book, likely to appeal most to educated general readers with a special interest in modern wars, has a simple but generally effective structure." -Marvin Rintala, Boston College, May 1996 An up-to-date and concise account of WWI for teachers and students looking for a balanced introduction. It details both the military operations as well as the development of war aims, alliance diplomacy and the war on the home front.
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Mr. Punch's History Of The Great War


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Best of Fragments from France

Bruce Bairnsfather


Bruce Bairnsfather (BB) was the most famous cartoonist of the First World War and his soldier characters Old Bill, Bert and Alf, faced with sardonic good humour everything that the Germans, the mud and their officers could throw at them. However, Bruce (known by some as The Man Who Won the War ) never received the acclaim that he deserved for the morale boost that his cartoons gave to the troops at the front and to the people back at home. The 50th Anniversary of Bairnsfather s death on 29 September 2009 offered an opportunity to redress the balance, and acknowledging it in combination with raising funds for Help for Heroes (H4H) seemed to be most appropriate. The cartoons reproduced in this collection were originally drawn for The Bystander, a popular weekly magazine, in which they appeared each Tuesday throughout most of the Great War. Their effect on the public was totally unexpected, and so dramatic that Bystander sales soared. The organisation, with unerring good judgement, decide
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The 2nd Bairnsfather Omnibus: The Bairnsfather Case / Fragments from His Life / Somme Battle Stories

Bruce Bairnsfather


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The Bairnsfather Omnibus: "Bullets and Billets" and "From Mud to Mufti"


Bruce Bairnsfather is now little remembered, yet he had a major effect on morale in WW1. His cartoons showed the reality behind life in the trenches and were appreciated by both officers and men. He later wrote a superb account of his life in the army that was a bestseller at the time. This omnibus edition of his work contains his books and his cartoons, together with an excellent introduction by Mark Marsay. This book will appeal to all interested in the First World War.
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Bullets and Billets

Bruce Bairnsfather


The best-selling autobiography from the British soldier, illustrator, author and creator of 'Old Bill' - the cartoon character who perhaps best illustrated the practical philosophy of the British private soldier during World War I. Beautifully illustrated with the author's own drawings.
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Happy Days!


This collection of cartoons by Captain Alban B. Butler is a seldom-seen look at the humor of the American doughboy who fought on the Western Front in the last year of the war, specifically those soldiers of the 1st Infantry Division (the Big Red One). The artwork he produced was first-rate and his sense of humor clearly moulded by the experiences of trench warfare. The only criticism I have is that the smallish format makes it very hard to read some of the balloons in the cartoons. Otherwise, I consider it a unique example of WWI cartoon art.
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Up to Mametz - and Beyond

Llewelyn Wyn Griffith


Llewelyn Wyn Griffith s Up to Mametz, published in 1931, is now firmly established as one of the finest accounts of soldiering on the Western Front. It tells the story of the creation of a famous Welsh wartime battalion (The Royal Welch Fusiliers), its training, its apprenticeship in the trenches, through to its ordeal of Mametz Wood on the Somme as part of 38 Division. But there it stopped. General Jonathon Riley has however discovered Wyn Griffith s unpublished diaries and letters which pick up where Up to Mametz left off through to the end of the War. With careful editing and annotation, the events of these missing years are now available alongside the original work. They tell of an officer s life on the derided staff and provide fascinating glimpses of senior officers, some who attract high praise and others who the author obviously despised. The result is an enthralling complete read and a major addition to the bibliography of the period. Llewelyn Wyn Griffiths was born into a Wel
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Major and Mrs.Holt's Battle Map of the Ypres Salient

Tonie Holt & Valmai Holt


The only map to show all memorials, cemeteries, forts and ramparts of the battle at the Ypres Salient. These include the battle lines of the first Ypres, the gas attack, second Ypres, Messines and the third Ypres, as well as the sites of the British and German bunkers and museums. The map is drawn accurately to scale and may be used for navigation. Road numbers are clearly indicated. To achieve maximum clarity, only roads, towns, villages, woods, etc that feature regularly in battle accounts, or are essential for orientation, have been included. All roads shown are suitable for family cars.
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The War Horses: The Tragic Fate of a Million Horses Sacrificed in the First World War

Simon Butler


TheWar Horses concentrates upon those groups of animals who were requisitioned rather than those `professionally' employed by the cavalry, in other words the horses, mules and donkeys who took on the drudgery of heaving rations, guns and munitions up to the front line, returning with wounded and maimed men. The author draws upon over 200 photographs and eye-witness accounts to illustrate the actuality of war and the vital role played by the horse on the Western Front. Poignant memoirs reveal the bond formed between the fighting men and the animals in their care; remarkable stories of compassion and kindness set against the harrowing background of `TheWar to End AllWars'.
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Fricourt and Mametz: Somme

Michael Stedman


The fighting at Fricourt and Mametz was freq uently punctured by the denotation of mines. This series is designed for both the battle field visitor and the armchair traveller. The historical significance is described with the aid of maps and photographs. '
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IWM Western Front Experience

Gary Sheffield


Ninety years after the Armistice of 1918, we are still fascinated with the First World War. "The Western Front Experience" describes the development of the fighting from 1914-1918, spotlighting some of the obscure but important actions and as well as the major battles. From the ordinary soldiers in the trenches, to the generals commanding the action, this book combines a vivid narrative informed by recent research, and brings to life one of the most terrible periods of warfare the world has ever known. It provisionally includes: Diaries, letters and telegrams; Maps and orders; and, Propaganda.
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Walking the Salient: Ypres

Paul Reed


Following on from Walking on the Somme, Reed has produced this remarkable voyage around the Ypres Salien t, which saw some of the most memorable campaigns of WW1. Il lustrated throughout, this book gives an insight for visitor s & armchair travellers. '
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Montauban: Somme

Graham Maddocks


Montauban was the southernmost of the Somme villages attacked by the British Army on 1st July 1916 and i t was where there was the most success. Illustrated througho ut, this book details the memorials, cemeteries and museums, plus gives general advice. '
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Forgotten Voices of the Somme: The Most Devastating Battle of the Great War in the Words of Those Who Survived

Joshua Levine


The definitive oral history of the most infamous and bloody conflict of the Great War 1916. The Somme. With over a million casualties, it was the most brutal battle of the First World War. It is a clash that even now, over 90 years later, remains seared into the national consciousness, conjuring up images of muddy trenches and young lives tragically wasted. Its first day, July 1st 1916 - on which the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - is the bloodiest day in the history of the British armed forces to date. On the German side, an officer famously described it as 'the muddy grave of the German field army'. By the end of the battle, the British had learned many lessons in modern warfare while the Germans had suffered irreplaceable losses, ultimately laying the foundations for the Allies' final victory on the Western Front. Drawing on a wealth of material from the vast Imperial War Museum Sound Archive, Forgotten Voices of the Somme presents an intimate, p
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Beaumont Hamel

Nigel Cave


On the first day of the Somme, July 1st 1916, the VIII Corps lost 14,000 officers and men trying to capture this village, the high ground surrounding it, and the neighbouring village of Serre. Beaumont Hamel was not captured until November 13th 1916. This excellent book covers both battles of July and November. It contains excellent maps, and some amazing aerial pictures of the battlefield as it was in 1916. There are many stories of the men who fought and died there. There is also an excellent guide to the numerous battlefield cemeteries which abound in the area. A must read for the serious student of the Great War, and also an excellent guide for the visitor. A muist buy.
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Walking Verdun: A Guide to the Battlefield

Christina Holstein


On 21 February 1916 the German Fifth Army launched a devastating offensive against French forces at Verdun and set in motion one of the most harrowing and prolonged battles of the Great War. By the time the struggle finished ten months later, over 650,000 men had been killed or wounded or were missing, and the terrible memory of the battle had been etched into the histories of France and Germany. This epic trial of military and national strength cannot be properly understood without visiting, and walking, the battlefield, and this is the purpose of Christina Holstein's invaluable guide. In a series of walks she takes the reader to all the key points on the battlefield, many of which have attained almost legendary status - the spot where Colonel Driant was killed, the forts of Douaumont, Vaux and Souville, the Mort Homme ridge, and Verdun itself.
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The Middlebrook Guide to the Somme Battlefields: A Comprehensive Coverage from Crecy to the World Wars

Martin Middlebrook & Mary Middlebrook


While best known as being the scene of the most terrible carnage in the WW1, the French department of the Somme has seen many other battles from Roman times to 1944. William the Conqueror launched his invasion from there; the French and English fought at Crecy in 1346; Henry V's army marched through on their way to Agincourt in 1415; the Prussians came in 1870. The Great War saw three great battles and approximately half of the 400,000 who died on the Somme were British - a terrible harvest, marked by 242 British cemeteries and over 50,000 lie in unmarked graves. These statistics explain in part why the area is visited year-on-year by ever increasing numbers of British and Commonwealth citizens. This evocative book written by the authors of the iconic "First Day on the Somme" is a thorough guide to the cemeteries, memorials and battlefields of the area, with the emphasis on the fighting of 1916 and 1918, with fascinating descriptions and anecdotes.
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The Imperial War Museum Book of the Western Front

Malcolm Brown


'An unrivalled and readable introduction to the years of Trench Warfare' TES 'A blockbuster... as near as anyone is likely to get to the authentic life of the trenches' Yorkshire Post The First World War was won and lost on the Western Front. Covering the whole war, from the guns of August 1914 to the sudden silence of the November 1918 Armistice, the IWM Book of the Western Front reveals what life was really like for the men and women involved. With first-hand accounts of off-duty entertainments, trench fatalism, and going over the top, this is an extremely important contribution to the continuing debate on the First World War. Malcolm Brown has updated this edition, introducing new evidence on sex and homosexuality executions, the treatment or mistreatment of prisoners and shell shock.
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Digging the Trenches: The Archaeology of the Western Front

Andrew Robertshaw & David Kenyon


Modern research methods - archaeological, historical, forensic - have transformed our view of the past. This is especially true of the history of the Great War. In this, the first comprehensive survey of this exciting new field, Andrew Robertshaw and David Kenyon introduce the reader to the techniques that are employed and record, in vivid detail, many of the remarkable projects that have been undertaken. They show how archaeology can be used to reveal the position of trenches, dugouts and other battlefield features and to rediscover what life on the Western Front was really like. And they show how individual soldiers are themselves part of the story, for forensic investigation of the war dead is now so highly developed that individuals can be identified and their fate discovered.
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Somme: The Heroism and Horror of War

Martin Gilbert


The Battle of the Somme, fought between July and November 1916, was among the bloodiest conflicts of all time. The aim was to end the stalemate on the Western Front - the result was carnage. In a total of just over a hundred days of fighting, the death toll reached 310,459. Half the bodies were never recovered. At the close of the battle, the British and French forces had not even reached the line they set themselves for the first day. Yet, despite its horrific destruction, the fighting at the Somme was characterised by incredible individual bravery. In commemoration of the 90th anniversary of the battle, Martin Gilbert, one of Britain's most distinguished historians, graphically recreates the tragedy. He interweaves individual stories, wartime documents, letters and poetry in a deeply moving, succinct narrative. From gripping descriptions of struggles on the battlefield to poignant evocations of the memorials and cemeteries that stand there today, this is a definitive guide to
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The Complete War Walks: From Hastings to Normandy

Richard Holmes


This one-volume edition comprises both Richard Holmes' "War Walks" and "War Walks 2". Dates such as 1066 and names such as Dunkirk often strike a chord of nostalgia, but the details of the historic events associated with them are forgotten. In "The Complete War Walks" Richard Holmes takes us on a journey through time to visit 12 battlefields throughout Britain, Northern France and Belgium that mark crucial moments in Britain's bloody and turbulent history. From Hastings to Dunkirk, Agincourt to The Somme, Richard vividly recreates the atmosphere of these key battles in our history. With his expert knowledge of weapons and warfare and using specially commissioned maps, Richard Holmes provides a clear picture of the events which led up to each battle, the conflicts themselves, and the people who fought them. Using practical "views of the field", he travels the battlefields as they exist today, pointing out their places of interest, paying tribute to the men who fought there, and bringing
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The Somme

Lyn Macdonald


To add to the other reviews (and it *is* a triumph of research, and tells you pretty much all you need to know about the campaign), one thing puzzled me. The book doesn't seem to cover the first day of the battle, the day which most people think of when they think of the Somme. One moment, the troops are about to leap over the trenches - and then we're at the next chapter, and we've skipped several hours into the future. I assume Ms MacDonald is trying to replicate the 'fog of war' that existed at the time - nobody in charge knew what had happened until several days later, and the people at home had to wait for months - but it's unsatisfying, somehow. Still, it's a superb book, and you can't fault the sheer hard work MacDonald has put into it - not only did she interview many of the surviving British soldiers (this was back in 1983, so there were more of them), she actually visited the battlefield. One other flaw, though, is that whilst she interviewed lots of British people, we don
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The First Day on the Somme

Martin Middlebrook


A thorough and detailed survey of the events of the first of July 1916 including not only official records and information gleaned from regimental histories but also using first hand accounts from both German and British survivors.
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World War 1 An Illustrated History

Lloyd Clark


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THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF AIRFORCES OF WORLD WAR 1 AND WORLD WAR 2

Chris. Chant


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Zeppelins: German Airships 1900-40

Charles Stephenson


On 2 July 1900 the people of Friedrichshafen, Germany, witnessed a momentous occasion - the first flight of LZ 1, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's first airship. Although deemed a failure, a succession of better craft (LZ2 to 10) enabled the Zeppelin to expand into the consumer market of airship travel, whilst also providing military craft for the German Army and Navy. The years of the Great War saw the Zeppelins undertake strategic bombing missions against Great Britain. This title covers the post-war fate of the Zeppelins, including the crash of the Hindenburg, and their use by the Luftwaffe at the beginning of World War II.
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Campaign 193: London 1914-17: The Zeppelin Menace

Ian Castle


"The book is a fascinating read into the initial hopes and expectations, the campaign itself and the results of that campaign. A book I am sure you will enjoy as much as did I and one that I can highly recommend to you." -Scott Van Aken, "Modeling Madness" (September 2008) "Ian Castle's "London 1914-17: The Zeppelin Menace" reveals the Zeppelin raids on London which fostered a new kind of warfare and German successes." -"California Bookwatch "(May 2008) "All of the raids are described here in considerable details, with their results on the ground and the losses inflicted upon them. Individual maps show the course of each airship that reached London, and where its bombs hit, and there are many contemporary photographs as well as good colour plates." -John Prigent, "Internet Modeler "(April 2008) Product Description The first Zeppelin attack on London came in May 1915 and with it came the birth of a new arena of warfare, the home front. German airships attempted to raid London on 2
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London 1917-18: The bomber blitz

Ian Castle


"This book is the companion to the 2008 Campaign title London 1914-17 ... [it] tells the story of the Gotha and the massive Staaken 'Giant' bomber raids against London, the first bomber blitz. These raids were attempts at destroying British morale, especially for those living in the capital. As a result, London quickly overhauled its defenses providing the basis for Britons' defense during World War II." - www.mataka.org (October 2010) "Ian Castle takes us through these raids with precise information on not only the aircraft involved, but also the flight path of each one and where each bomb was dropped. It is this level of detail that ... makes this book such a superb read." - Scott Van Aken, "Modeling Madness "(November 2010) ..".provides a fine, in-depth survey of the strategies and results of the bomber blitz in London during World War I. Military and British history are illustrated with color battle scenes, maps, and modern photos to enhance a collection perfectT Product Des
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British Airships 1905-30

Ian Castle


This book reveals the fascinating story of the cat and mouse duel between the airship and another pioneering form of technology - the submarine during World War 1. Detailed cut-away drawings reveal the design and development of the airship, during and after the war, whilst full-colour illustrations depict the airship in dramatic action shots. A tragic accident in 1930 brought the airship's military service to an end, resulting in a tiny window in which they were used and little acknowledgement over the years. Ian Knight gives deserved attention to an aeronautical wonder that for a short amount of time played a crucial service to the defence of Britain.
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First Blitz

Neil Hanson


Praise for The Unknown Soldier: "One of the best books I've read on the insanity of life in the trenches."-"Daily Mail" "From the Hardcover edition." Time Out Using first-hand witnesses plus government war records, Hanson draws a powerful picture of the impact of these first air raids
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Albatross Aces of World War 1

Norman L.R. Franks


The Albatros family of fighters were amongst the most effective aircraft employed by the Idlfieg (Imperial German Air Service) for much of World War 1, with the D.III and D.Va being flown by most of the 363 pilots who qualified as aces at some point in their often brief careers. The Albatros was the scourge of the RFC on the Western Front in 1916-17, with pilots of the calibre of von Richthofen, Boelke and Schleich cutting swathes through their opponents. Well over 4000 Albatros scouts were built between 1916 and 1918, and they were also extensively used by the Austro-Hungarians against Russian, Italian and British aircraft until war's end.
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New Vanguard 145: British Submarines of World War I

Innes McCartney


Review "This delightful little book is one of the publisher's New Vanguard series... It manages to pack into a mere 48 pages an incredible amount of detail and infromation written in an easy style that does not descend to over-simplification... All in all, this is quite a remarkable book, both as a good historical summary of an often-overlooked aspect of the war and also as an important technical reference." -Michael Young, "The Northern Mariner / Le Marin Du Nord" "This book covers the various classes of submarine used by the Royal Navy as well as a considerable amount of detail in their usage during WWI. We are blessed with a superb variety of period photographs of these ships and this is further enhanced by the excellent illustrations and cutaways of artist Tony Bryan."- Scott Van Aken, "Modelingmadness.com" (June 2008) "As the major engaged in an arms race in the early years of the 20th century, the Admiralty was tasked with developing the sbumarine. Covering all classes Pro
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Zeppelin Over Suffolk: The Final Raid of L48

Mark Mower


Zeppelin Over Suffolk tells the remarkable story of the destruction of a German airship over East Anglia in 1917. The drama is set against the backdrop of Germany's aerial bombing campaign on Britain in the First World War, using a terrifying new weapon, the Zeppelin. The course of the raid on that summer night is reconstructed in vivid detail, moment by moment - the Zeppelin's take off from northern Germany, its slow journey across the North Sea, the bombing run along the East Anglian coast, the pursuit by British fighters high over Suffolk, and the airship's final moments as it fell to earth in flames near the village of Theberton in the early morning of 17 June 1917. Mark Mower gives a gripping account of a pivotal episode in the pioneering days of the air war over England.
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Royal Naval Air Service Pilot 191418

Mark Barber


Review "Whether you are a historian or modeler, "Royal Naval Air Service Pilot 1914-18" offers good information of interest for anyone. I recommend this book." -Frederick Boucher, "Model Shipwrights" Product Description In 1914, the Naval Wing of the Royal Flying Corps was subsumed into the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). With the bulk of the Royal Flying Corps engaged in France, the aircraft and seaplane pilots of the RNAS protected Britain from the deadly and terrifying Zeppelin menace. In 1915, the RNAS sent aircraft to support the operations in the Dardanelles, and also gave increasing support to the Royal Flying Corps units engaged on the Western Front, conducting reconnaissance, intelligence gathering and artillery spotting, bombing raids, and aerial combat with German pilots. This book explores all of these fascinating areas, and charts the pioneering role of the RNAS in military aviation.
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In Search of the Zeppelin War: The Archaeology of the First Blitz

Neil Faulkner & Nadia Durrani


This book comprises a full introduction to the history and archaeology of the first strategic bombing campaign in history - the Zeppelin raids over Britain in 1915-1918 - based on pioneering new excavations and archive research. This is the story of the first Blitz and the first Battle of Britain, featuring a full report on the first ever excavation of a Zeppelin crash site and also covering airfields, gun sites, searchlights, and radio listening posts. This illustrated book features contemporary accounts as well as the accounts and photographs from the excavations including Hunstanton, Monkhams, Chingford and North Weald Basset, the Lea Valley, Potters Bar and Theberton. Written in a collaboration between academic archaeologists and aviation enthusiasts/metal detectorists, this fascinating project is the subject of a BBC2 "Timewatch" documentary to be shown this autumn.
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DH 2 vs Albatros D I/D II

James F. Miller


Flown by Victoria Cross recipient Lanoe Hawker and the members of No 24 Sqn, the ungainly yet nimble DH 2 helped the Allies attain air superiority over the Somme in early 1916 and hold it through the summer. With its rotary engine 'pusher' configuration affording excellent visibility and eliminating the need for a synchronized machine gun, the DH 2 was more than a match for anything the Germans could put in the air. That is, until the arrival of the Albatros D II, a sleek inline-engined machine built for speed and with twin-gun firepower. Thus, the later part of 1916 saw an epic struggle in the skies above the Somme pitting the manoeuvrable yet under-gunned DH 2s against the less nimble yet better armed and faster Albatros D IIs. In the end the Germans would regain air superiority, three squadron commanders - two of whom were considered pinnacles of their respective air forces - would lose their lives, and an up-and-coming pilot (Manfred von Richthofen) would triumph in a legendary dog
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The Grand Fleet: Warship Design and Development 1906-1922

D. K. Brown


This is the third book in the author's series charting the design and development of British warships since 1815. It is said that old wines improve with age and it is evidently true of authors as well since, in this reviewers opinion, this rates as David Brown's best book yet. "The Grand Fleet" charts the development of RN design from the Dreadnought of 1905 to the Washington Conference of 1921, and falls neatly into three main parts. Part 1 sets the scene, with discussions on the resources, what is a good design, design drivers, pre-war development in naval architecture, marine engineering, armour schemes and armament. The extensive series of pre-war trials (armament, armour, shell design, propellant) is well covered - and indicates the gaps in the trials programmes which may have led to serious flaws being missed. Part 2 examines pre-war ship designs in more detail, with chapters on battleships cruisers, destroyers and early aviation vessels, and submarines. Part 3 goes o to covers
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Mark V Tank

David Fletcher


Although, to the casual eye, all British tanks of World War I look much the same, the Mark V is quite outstanding and has a strong claim to be the tank that won the Great War. In this title, renowned tank expert David Fletcher examines the technological developments that made this tank excel where others had failed, and the reasons why it gave the British the upper hand over the Germans on the battlefield and why it was adopted by the US Tank Corps. Accompanied by detailed artwork showing the design changes that allowed the Mark V to breach the widest German trenches, this title is an excellent resource for the study of the armour of World War I.
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British Mark I Tank 1916

David Fletcher


Review "In typical fashion, the author's text is extremely lively and informative... The photographic content of the book... is very comprehensive... [This book is] reliable, ready and inexpensive... Highly recommended." -Frank DeSisto, "missing-lynx.com ""A thoroughly useful new book on a largely-neglected subject. Good photographic coverage and excellent colour plates...An excellent contribution to the study of WW1 tanks, highly recommended." -David Maynard, "Armorama "(August 2007) " ""In line with other Osprey titles, the superb choice of period photographs and the excellent illustrations of Tony Bryan make this a must have for any armor or WWI enthusiast." -Scott Van Aken, "modelingmadness.com "(May 2007) Product Description In 1915 a machine christened Little Willie changed the way that wars were fought. Little Willie was a fully tracked armoured vehicle that could break a trench system. Its development was completed in December 1915, but by then it had already been sup
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Road to War - a First World War Girl's Diary 1916 - 1917

Valerie Wilding


It's 1917 and the Great War rages in Europe. When Daffy Rowntree's brother goes missing in action she refuses to sit safely in England, and determines to do something to help win the war. Soon she finds herself in the mud and horror of the battlefields of France, driving an ambulance transporting the wounded of the trenches...
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The First World War

Henry Brook


Contains stories of heroism, bravery and battling the odds. This title includes maps, line drawings and notes on sources and further reading.
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World War I

DK


DK Eyewitness World War 1 is an exciting and informative guide to the Great War that centred on Europe between 1914-1918. Stunning real-life photographs, illustrating the people, places and stories, offer a unique "eyewitness" view of the conflict dubbed the 'war to end all wars'. From disaster to victory, show your child what life was like as a soldier and how they survived in the muddy trenches. They'll also discover all about the world-changing events that led to the start of the conflict. Then use the giant pull-out wall chart to decorate their room. Great for projects or just for fun, make sure your child learns everything they need to know about World War 1. Find out more and download amazing clipart images at www.dk.com/clipart.
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Private Peaceful

Michael Morpurgo


Longer novels from Children's Laureate Michael Morpurgo are always a particular treat, and Private Peaceful is no exception. Tragic, surprising and engaging in equal measures, Morpurgo's novel charts both the childhood of young Thomas Peaceful in the early years of the 20th century, and his eventual underage enlistment in the British army to help fight the First World War. It is, above all, a poignant story of war and about all of its many life-changing effects on those involved--also the brutality of the commanding regimes and the relentless squalor of trench warfare. It's not for the squeamish--Morpurgo tells it like it was and his honest insight is on every page for all to appreciate. "Tommo" Peaceful is recalling his childhood from those terrible battlefields. He remembers his big brother Charlie taking him to his first day of school, the death of his father, his mum working hard to keep a roof over their heads and food on their table. He remembers his brother Joe, who some cal
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Biggles Learns to Fly

W E Johns


Biggles is back! And with new retro-style covers he'll be bigger than ever! Product Description He tilted the machine on to its side, holding up his nose with the throttle, and commenced to slip wing-tip first towards the ground. Whether he was over British or German territory he neither knew nor cared; he had to get on to the ground or be burnt alive. This is the story of the very beginning - of the Air Service and of Biggles. It's the First World War and Biggles is just 17; the planes are primitive; combat tactics are non-existent; and pilots and their gunners communicate by hand signals and have no contact with the ground. This is where Biggles learns his craft and finds he has a certain aptitude for flying in battle...
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Birdsong

Sebastian Faulks


Readers who are entranced by sweeping historical sagas will devour Birdsong, Sebastian Faulks' drama set during the first world war. There's even a little high-toned erotica thrown into the mix to convince the doubtful. The book's hero, a 20-year-old Englishman named Stephen Wraysford, finds his true love on a trip to Amiens in 1910. Unfortunately, she's already married, the wife of a wealthy textile baron. Wrayford convinces her to leave a life of passionless comfort to be at his side, but things do not turn out according to plan. Wraysford is haunted by this doomed affair and carries it with him into the trenches of the war. Birdsong derives most of its power from its descriptions of mud and blood, and Wraysford's attempt to retain a scrap of humanity while surrounded by it. There is a simultaneous description of his present-day granddaughter's quest to read his diaries, which is designed to give some sense of perspective; this device is only somewhat successful. Nevertheless, Birdso
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World War One Source Book

Philip Haythornthwaite


Provides the facts, figures and guidance about World War I required by students of all levels. The book features each nation involved, all battles and campaigns, the weaponry and the commanders, and is arranged in an easy-access, highly-illustrated format. This book belongs in the library of every World War One researcher or enthusiast as an invaluable reference work with a variety of information - but it is not without shortcomings. A greater variety of easily accessible information would have been welcome, in the form of a wider range of statistics and tables. For example, I could not easily find a list of casualty numbers for the various nations; the information WAS there, it was just that it was incorporated into text when a table may have made finding it much easier. However, having said that, this book certainly has a wealth of information and there are number of useful tables, lists, maps et cetera among the blocks of text. Also, to go back to the earlier example, the casualt
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True World War 1 Stories

Jon E. Lewis


This is a collection of nearly 60 personal accounts of the war to end all wars, including the first gas attack, life in the trenches, Gallipoli, the war at sea, aerial dogfights and life as a prisoner of war. It is a record by those who were there at some of the bloodiest battles of the conflict including Loos, Mons, Ypres and the Somme, from the opening moves through to the day that peace was signed.
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Boy Soldiers of the Great War

Richard van Emden


Engaging, well-written and balanced study' -- The Times I have read many books on the First World War and have awaited this book with eager anticipation following the Channel 4 TV programme on the same subject. I was certainly not disappointed by this work as it packed so much information into its pages. Richard van Emden has unearthed some incredible research on the boys that joined up, trained, fought and sadly died for our country in the First World War. I find it extraordinary that no one had ever thought to write about such a poignant subject. This book covers the story with great detail, highlighting some amazing cameos. Most incredible was the story of 15 year old Jack Pouchot who won the DCM for bravery. Imagine a 15 year old doing that today! Another gem unearthed was that of an officer of the Accrington Pals commissioned at the tender age of 15 years old. To be in command of men at that age defies description, yet he still led his men over the top on 1st July 1916, th
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On the Front Line: True World War I Stories

Jon E. Lewis


In the words of Malcolm Brown ‘a rediscovered classic’. Sixty first-hand accounts of what life was really like in the Great War. Product Description In 1930, the editor of Everyman Magazine requested entries for a new anthology of Great War accounts. The result was a revolutionary book unlike any other of the period; for as Malcolm Brown notes in his introduction ‘I believe it might fairly be described as a rediscovered classic’. It was the very first collection to reveal the many dimensions of the war through the eyes of the ordinary soldier and offers heart-stopping renditions of the very first gas attack; aerial dogfights above the trenches; the moment of going over the top. Told chronologically, from the first scrambles of 1914, the drudgery of the war of attrition once the trenches had been dug, to the final joy of Armistice.
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Fromelles 1916

Paul Cobb


At Fromelles in July 1916 two divisions - one British and one Australian - within a few weeks of arriving in France - went into action for the first time. Their task was to prevent the Germans from moving troops to the Somme where a major British offensive was in progress, but the attack on 19/20 July was a disaster with nearly 7,000 casualties in a few hours. This account explores this battle which for many epitomises the futility of the Great War. In those few hours many heroic deeds were done but the battle caused a souring of Anglo-Australian relationships and truly was a baptism of fire for these British and Australian troops. This is their history. In a new section, Paul Cobb explores the recent discovery in 2008/09 of a mass war grave on the battlefield and includes details of the findings of the archaeological dig, the recovery of 250 bodies and the creation of a new military cemetery.
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Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front

Edward Rowbotham


Mud, Blood and Bullets is a useful and still rare addition to the ordinary soldier's experience of the Machine Gun Corps in World War I. --War Books Review Likely to be one of the last first-hand accounts to come to light, this book offers an ordinary soldier's viewpoint of WWI. --Best of British Magazine Product Description It is 1915 and the Great War has been raging for a year, when Edward Rowbotham, a coal miner from the Midlands, volunteers for Kitchener's Army. Drafted into the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps, he is sent to fight in places whose names will forever be associated with mud and blood and sacrifice: Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele. He is one of the 'lucky' ones, winning the Military Medal for bravery and surviving more than two-and-a-half years of the terrible slaughter that left nearly a million British soldiers dead by 1918 and wiped out all but six of his original company. He wrote these memoirs fifty years later, but found his memories of life in the trenc
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Riding The Retreat: Mons to the Marne 1914 Revisited

Richard Holmes


"His ride, like the campaign of August 1914, took place in scorching weather, passing through still-recognizable battlefields and cemeteries of distracting sadness. The author tells two stories in parallel: that of his own journey and a first-rate account of what happened eighty years before." - Max Egremont, "Evening Standard" .,."an effortless blend of past and present." -"Independent on Sunday" Product Description The retreat of the British Expeditionary Force from Mons in the early months of the First World War is one of the great dramas of European history. Blending his recreation of the military campaign with contemporary testimony and an account of his own ride over the route, Richard Holmes takes the reader on a unique journey - to glimpse the summer the old world ended.
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Last Post

Max Arthur


'Nostalic photographs add to the book's flavour, lighting up a time when generations predating the modern, pervasie 'me' culture lived and worked for each other.' (TRIBUNE ) "For their devotion to King and Country and for Mr Arthur's work we should all be grateful" (CONTEMPORARY REVIEW ) "one you will want to add to your collection" (THE GREAT WAR ) Product Description FORGOTTEN VOICES OF THE GREAT WAR was the surprise best-seller at Christmas 2002, selling over 60,000 copies in hardback alone. The formula was simple: Max Arthur interviewed some of the 30 surviving British soldiers from the First World War and combined their stories with other interviews in the Imperial War Museum and various private collections. LAST POST is very consciously the last word from the handful of survivors left alive in 2004. When they die, our final human connection with the First World War will be broken: after this book, we will have only recordings or diaries. We will never be able to ask a que
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The Old Contemptibles

Robin Neillands


'Neillands has given us a worthy tribute to their sacrifice' -- Sunday Times 'The book stands as a tribute to the bravery of an army that never really had a chance' -- History 'Tells the story of the BEF's first weeks of war neatly, cirsply and clearly' -- Literary Review 'Informed and explicit, this is military history at its best' -- Western Daily Press 20040731 'Brings to life the horrific experiences of ... the British Expeditionary Force of 1914' -- Soldier Magazine 20040731 'Fascinating detail' -- The Times 20050826 'Fascinating account' -- The Sunday Times 20050904 Soldier magazine 'Brings to life the horrific experiences of ... the British Expeditionary Froce of 1914'
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We Will Remember Them: Voices from the Aftermath of the Great War: Memories of Our First World War Soldiers

Max Arthur


'It's a winning formula, and his books have enjoyed much success... there is also much that is arresting.' (LITERARY REVIEW ) 'poignant... Today's youngsters should read this so they never forget the sacrifices of their forefathers.' (NEWS OF THE WORLD ) 'a seamless patchwork of memories and recollections which, perhaps for the first time, tell us exactly how it was for the men returning to 'a land fit for heroes'... essential reading... A simply superb work' (THE GREAT WAR ) Product Description For Britain and her empire, the human cost of the First World War was worse than any other conflict in history. Almost a million British people died in the war, with a further quarter of a million from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, India and Africa. Almost twice as many again were injured in battle, and forced to live the rest of their lives with missing limbs, damaged lungs and mental disorders. The legacy of the Great War was just as deeply felt as the war itself, and much longer la
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A Crisis of Brilliance

David Haycock


'Haycock manages the drama in this tale with such skill that his story unfolds like a well-plotted novel. Never before have the private vicissitudes in these artists' lives been made so real or their exuberance so vivid' Frances Spalding, Daily Mail 'Haycock's narrative of this entangled, war-defined group is so strong that it often has the force of a novel, hard to put down . . . We should call for a joint exhibition of [their] work, to complement the moving portrayal of their lives in this engrossing and enjoyable book.' Jenny Uglow, Guardian BOOK OF THE WEEK 'A lucid study of the lives behind the art . . . What gives Haycock's book its freshness is that, through skilful use of letters and memoirs left by his five subjects, he injects it with the anxiety, ambition, self-doubt and jealousy that possessors of youth and talent are fated to feel' John Carey, Sunday Times 'What a fascinatingly tangled mess of human lives! Haycock tells the whole story engagingly and unprete
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Paul Nash: The Elements

David Fraser Jenkins


This book examines the career of Paul Nash, official war artist and one of the great pioneers of British Modernism. David Fraser Jenkins interprets the artist's work in terms of theme and visual symbolism, bringing together paintings from different periods, and considering how the artist took elements from the visual world and recreated them within the terms of modern art, developing reoccurring themes such as conflict, refuge and harmony. There are additional essays by David Boyd Haycock on the influence of Thomas Browne and by Simon Grant on Nash's legacy in the contemporary art world. "Paul Nash: The Elements" will accompany an exhibition, curated by Jenkins, at Dulwich Picture Gallery, which begins in February 2010. It includes over sixty paintings and watercolours as well as a group of Nash's own photographs, accompanied by descriptions by both the artist and his critics, which are often remarkable in their disparity.
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Stanley Spencer: Journey to Burghclere

Paul Gough


Stanley Spencer was one of Britain's greatest twentieth-century artists. He became famous for two things: his celebration and immortalisation of his home town of Cookham in Berkshire - his 'heaven on earth' as he lovingly called it - and the fusion in his paintings of sex and religion, the heavenly and the ordinary. In 1915, Spencer left home to serve as a medical orderly in the Beaufort Military Hospital in Bristol. Aged 24, he had rarely stayed away overnight from home. For ten months he scrubbed floors, bandaged convalescent soldiers and carried supplies around the vast, former lunatic asylum. In 1916, he signed up for overseas duty in Macedonia, where he saw violent action up to the eve of the Armistice. Five years after the war, Spencer started making large drawings of a possible memorial scheme based on his wartime experiences. So extraordinary were his sketches, and so committed was he to realising them in paint, that the Behrend family became his patrons, funding a purpose-buil
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Strange Meetings: The Poets of the Great War

Harry Ricketts


`This fascinating book gives a realistic and very human account of the lives and works of these brave poets...' --Financial Times, Tom Paulin `Ricketts offers a brilliantly original perspective on the lives and works of the First World War poets...' --Waterstone's Book Quarterly `Affecting, illuminating and immediate' --History Today, Juliet Gardiner Ricketts tells the story of their friendships so as to highlight mutual influences, envies, admirations and disgruntlements. It makes the poems seem linked to one another as well as their circumstances, and adds a sense of intimacy as well as common purpose. --Guardian Rickett's approach shows that the poetry of the war did not simply emerge from the carnage-harrowed minds of individual poets, but through mutual encouragement and rivalry. --New Statesman merits the attention of anyone who cares about poetry. --The Tablet `will appeal to those who love the work of the Great War poets and want to know a little more about th
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Images of Wartime: British Art and Artists of World War I

Nigel Viney


Taken from the Imperial War Museum's collection, this selection of paintings aims to capture the drama, the courage and the suffering of World War I. It features the work of almost 70 artists who became involved in the war effort either officially or unofficially. Many of these men produced some of their finest work in response to the appalling events they witnessed, both at home and on the Western Front. The book's text examines the artists in the context of their times, and in particular of the great propaganda machine which ground into action as hostilities broke out and which was responsible for commissioning much of their work.
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Now All Roads Lead to France: The Last Years of Edward Thomas

Matthew Hollis


'One of the many subsidiary delights of this exceptionally fine biography is its melancholy, and often very funny, evocation of the literary life ... Now All Roads Lead To France is a beautiful biography, an unfussy, clear-headed study of the making of a poet, and perhaps above all, a gentle reminder that poetry can be almost as essential to the human spirit as breathing.' --Mail on Sunday ~ Book of the Week 'Now All Roads Lead to France tells a story so delicate, tragic and inevitable, and which contains examples of such searingly perfect poetry, that all I can say is that this is a beautiful book. Read it.' --Tribune 'Hollis is [Thomas's] perfect biographer.' --New Statesman Reimagining [Thomas s] life might seem impossible but that is what Matthew Hollis has done ... an exquisitely perceptive account of Thomas s late turn to poetry and the complex inner currents that led him to enlist in the army and die from the blast of a shell in northern France. --John Gray, New Statesm
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The Red Sweet Wine of Youth: The Brave and Brief Lives of the War Poets

Nicholas Murray


'THE RED SWEET WINE OF YOUTH is a fine account of the poetic sensibility of the period, which makes a sprightly case for several poets who run the risk of being forgotten' --Thomas Marks, Daily Telegraph Book Description * A group portrait of the poets of the First World War, seen in their full historical, military and biographical context, out now in paperback. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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William Orpen: An Onlooker in France

Angela Weight (Author), Robert Upstone (Author)


...the book is a memorable and beautiful reminder of the outstanding abilities of this truly great Irish artist. --Bruce Arnold, The Irish Independent Product Description William Orpen was the only official war artist to publish an extensive memoir of his experiences in the Great War. This compelling narrative was first published in 1921 and is a classic of war literature. In this fully revised edition, Orpen s war paintings and drawings have been reproduced in colour and keyed to the narrative, resulting in a perceptive and moving account by an artist who moved easily between all levels of the military, from Generals to Tommies. A witness not only to the War but to the greed and self-interest of the national delegates at the Peace Conference in Versailles in 1919, Orpen s text contains some astute comments on the personalities of his sitters. Published on the 90th anniversary of the end of the First World War, and of Orpen s War Pictures exhibition at Agnew s in 1918, this edition c
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The Annotated Collected Poems

Edward Thomas


Edna Longley's definitive new edition of Edward Thomas's Collected Poems makes a case for the enduring, essential relevance to the 21st century of this English poet who died in World War I. The book is a crowning achievement by Thomas's best advocate, approachable by the beginner and invaluable to the specialist, with a critical apparatus which is at once a biography tracing the growth of the poet's mind and an engrossing anthology of his vivid, melancholy prose. --Seamus Heaney, Sunday Business Post (Dublin) Product Description Edward Thomas wrote a lifetime's poetry in two years. Already a dedicated prose writer and influential critic, he became a poet only in December 1914, at the age of 36. In April 1917 he was killed at Arras. Often viewed as a 'war poet', he wrote nothing directly about the trenches; also seen as a 'nature poet', his symbolic reach and generic range expose the limits of that category too. A central figure in modern poetry, he is among the half-dozen poets
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British Culture and the First World War

George Robb


'Excellent student text - easy to understand summaries of main issues. Brilliant on arts and memory of the war. A great read, too!' - Professor J. Bourke, Birkbeck College Product Description A brief but comprehensive survey of British society and culture during the First World War. George Robb concentrates not on military campaigns and battle strategies, but on the lives of ordinary Britons - how they responded to and were affected by the war, how they attempted to understand the conflict and to explain it to others, and how they have dealt with the war's legacies in the years since. Robb synthesizes the most recent work on the social and cultural history of the war, as well as reclaiming many forgotten popular cultural sources such as films, cartoons, advertisements and pulp novels.
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A War Of Nerves: Soldiers and Psychiatrists, 1914-1994

Ben Shephard


War is often described as long periods of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror. Reactions to those who have been psychologically traumatised by war have often been equally polarised between "pull yourself together, man" psychiatrists and those of the touchy-feely "It must be post-traumatic stress disorder" persuasion. And as Ben Shephard points out in this well-researched and nicely observed book, both approaches are highly flawed. Given that since the Second World War half of the world has been training to be a counsellor while the other half has been trying to kill each other, you might ask why our understanding of war-related stress is still in its infancy. The answers are complex, not least because the relationship between psychiatrists and the military has been hopelessly confused, if not compromised, over the years. Put simply, the armed forces have often looked to minimise the problem; all they want are their personnel back on active duty in the shortest possible time
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Silent Heroes:The Bravery & Devotion of Animals in War: An Animals' Roll of Honour

Evelyn Le Chene


An account of the many courageous animals who went beyond the bounds of training and duty to display selfless acts of devotion in war. These animals have been the silent heroes of many wars over the last 150 years, from the Afghan Wars of 1879 to Rob, Britain's most decorated animal hero, who served with the SAS during World War Two. With new research and eye witness accounts Evelyn le Chene places each animal's heroism in the context of the battle or campaign in which they served, including maps and a wealth of archive photographs (many published for the first time) to evoke the valiant deeds of the brave animals to have served their country.
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Animals In War

Jilly Cooper OBE


How animals have helped mankind in time of war. Product Description Pigeons carrying vital messages to and from the beleaguered city during the Siege of Paris; horses and mules struggling through miles of fetid mud to bring ammunition to the front in the Great War; dogs sniffing out mines for the British invasion force in the Second World War - countless brave animals have played their part in the long, cruel history of war. Some have won medals for gallantry - like G.I. Joe, the American pigeon who saved 100 British lives in Italy, and Rob, the black and white mongrel who made over twenty parachute jumps with the SAS. Too many others have died abandoned, in agony and alone, after serving their country with distinction. Jilly Cooper has here written a tribute to the role of animals in wartime. It is a tragic and horrifying story - yet it has its lighter moments too: a hilarious game of musical chairs played on camels during the Desert Campaign; and the budgie who remarked, when carri
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Beyond the Call of Duty: Heart-warming stories of canine devotion and bravery

Isabel George


'If you want to read uplifting stories about positive contributions made by dogs to humans under stress, I’d heartily recommend it.' - The Daily Telegraph 'This is a touching tribute to some of our faithful, four-legged friends in the darkest days of war.' - MOD Defence Focus magazine ‘These stories are sensationally good, and brilliantly written.’ - www.booksmonthly.co.uk Product Description A second collection of incredible and heart-warming canine stories from around the world, from the bestselling author of The Dog That Saved My Life. Animals have accompanied man into battle since war first waged. Since those times, many stories have been told of the bears, camels, cats, dolphins, monkeys, mules, rats and other creatures that have served with the Armed Forces during both world wars and beyond. The five stories in this book represent the devotion and unquestioning loyalty of the canine companion in the darkest days of war. From the stub-tailed Bull Terrier that becam
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Animals at War: In Association with the Imperial War Museum

Isabel George & Rob Lloyd Jones


This brand new addition to the "Usborne Young Reading" series focuses on animals and the roles they have played in conflict, both modern and ancient. Find out how elephants helped Hannibal attack Rome, why pigeons saved hundreds of lives in World Wars 1 and 2 and how a little donkey called Murphy came to the rescue of wounded soldiers in World War One, along with many other stories of heroism and courage. Usborne's "Young Reading" series was developed in conjunction with experts from Roehampton University and is designed to encourage independent reading. Each title has clear, engaging text and is accompanied by original illustrations.
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Totally Un-English?: v. 7: Britain's Internment of Enemy Aliens in Two World Wars

Richard Dove (Editor)


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Capital Cities at War: Volume 2, A Cultural History: Paris, London, Berlin 1914-1919

Jay Winter (Editor), Jean-Louis Robert (Editor)


'For anybody interested in the history of the Great War from a non-military perspective, for historians of modernity and modernism, or urban historians of the early twentieth century, these two volumes will constitute a major work of reference for many years to come.' Journal of Urban History Product Description Second volume of a two-volume pioneering comparative history of the capital cities of Britain, France, and Germany during the Great War. Leading historians explore these wartime cities, from the railway stations where newcomers took on new identities to the streets they surveyed and the pubs, cafes and theatres they frequented, and examine notions of identity, the sites and rituals of city life, and wartime civic and popular culture. The volume offers the first comparative cultural history of London, Paris and Berlin and reveals the great affinities and similarities between cities on both sides of the line. It shows the transnational character of metropolitan life and the dif
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From Gallipoli to Gaza: The Desert Poets of World War I

Jill,Duchess of Hamilton


It is almost ninety years since the Great War came to an end, and in that time there has never been a collection of poetry written by the men who fought in Gallipoli, Egypt, Palestine, Mesopotamia and Syria. Countless anthologies, however have been inspired by the horrors of the trenches on the Western Front. This is probably because the battles of the Near and Middle East have always been seen as a side-show, despite the fact that the number of casualties was enormous. To address this imbalance, Jill Hamilton has delved into various archives around the world and brought to light 101 poems. Not only are these poems written by Australian, English, Irish and Scottish soldiers, but there are also poems by Turks and Arabs. Accompanying the poems is a commentary that builds up a picture of the different armies, the bloodshed, the privations and sacrifice of the men, ultimately revealing that each poem is the product of war. Poets include Banjo Paterson, Leon Gellert, Rupert Brooke, Siegfrie
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Art from the Trenches: America's Uniformed Artists in World War I

Alfred Emile Cornebise


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The Blasphemer

Nigel Farndale


`This is a fine novel; strange and unforgettable.' --The Times `The writing is beautiful... Farndale's elegant prose, his storytelling ability and the wise tolerance with which he views the vagaries of... characters lend his exhilarating novel a tenderly redemptive afterimage.' --The Sunday Telegraph `He does suspense exceptionally well, and it's a book that won't leave your fingernails intact. This is a terrifically exciting and thought-provoking must-read.' --The Daily Mail `A constantly engaging and witty novel from a tremendously clever writer.' --Daily Telegraph Farndale's evocation of the minutiae of trench warfare surpasses Sebastian Faulks's Birdsong... Exquisite and luminous...a master class in the power of literature to illuminate the physical world and the human soul.' --The Australian Book Description Shortlisted for the 2010 Costa Novel Award, an astonishing, ambitious and masterful new novel, with echoes of Birdsong, that reads at the pace of a thriller.
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The Return Of Captain John Emmett

Elizabeth Speller


'The new BIRDSONG - only better' --INDEPENDENT 'This fabulously enjoyable novel has absolutely everything. Speller's writing is gorgeous, her research immaculate and very lightly worn. Sheer bliss' --Kate Saunders, THE TIMES `With its portrait of a war-blighted nation, Elizabeth Speller's gripping first novel shares territory with Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy . . . This is a remarkable piece of storytelling . . . Equally impressive is Speller's portrait of a fearful and class-ridden England after the armistice' --FINANCIAL TIMES Book Description * London, just after WW1, but the men and women caught up in the battle have not yet found peace * 'Covering death, poetry, a bitter regimental feud and a hidden love affair, it's set to be the new BIRDSONG - only better' INDEPENDENT
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Letters from a Lost Generation - First World War Letters of Vera Brittain and Four Friends: Roland Leighton, Edward Brittain, Victor Richardson, Geoffrey Thurlow

Alan Bishop (Author), Mark Bostridge (Author)


The events set in motion by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 changed many lives irrevocably. For Vera Brittain, an Oxford undergraduate who left her studies to volunteer as a nurse in military hospitals in England and France, the war was a shattering experience; she not only witnessed the horrors inflicted by combat through her work, but she lost the four men closest to her at that time--her fiancé Roland Leighton, brother Edward and two close friends, Geoffrey Thurlow and Victor Nicholson, who all died on the battlefields. Letters from a Lost Generation, a collection of previously unpublished correspondence between Brittain and these young men--all public schoolboys at the start of the war--chronicles her relationship with them and reveals "the old lie": The idealised glory of patriotic duty which was soon overtaken by the grim reality of the Flanders' trenches. The letters are lively, dramatic, immediate and, despite the awfulness of war, curiously optimistic: "... somehow
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"Oh What a Lovely War"

Theatre Workshop"


" ""Joan Littlewood--one of our truly great theatre visionaries and an unsung hero." --"British Theatre Guide" Product Description Oh What a Lovely War is a theatrical chronicle of the First World War, told through the songs and documents of the period. First performed by Joan Littlewood's Theatre Workshop at the Theatre Royal, Stratford East, London in 1963, it received the acclaim of London audiences and critics. It won the Grand Prix of the Theatre des Nations festival in Paris that year and has gone on to become a classic of the modern theatre. In 1969 a film version was made which extended the play's popular success. The play is now on the standard reading list of schools and universities around the UK and was revived by the Royal National Theatre in 1998. This new version of the play, as edited by Joan Littlewood, returns the script to its original version. Includes a new photo section of the original production, and an Afterword by Victor Spinetti.
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Rabbits: a short story of the First World War

D. M. Mitchell


Kindle edition From the bestselling author of 'Max', a psychological thriller and mystery - over 30,000 copies downloaded in four weeks. Two First World War veterans stare daily out across a contemporary wasteland at each other, both from different social classes, both bound by their wartime experiences. 'Rabbits' is a small window onto the ties that bind and the things that divide. Approx 3,720 words.
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Experiences of a Dug-out, 1914-1918 (World War I) includes a new annotated bibliography and research guide

C. E. Callwell


Kindle edition This digital book includes a new annotated bibliography and research guide to World War I works (added 2011)
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Brave Men: Allied Trench Raiding in the First World War

Nicholas E. Efstathiou


Kindle Edition A review of the methods of trench raiding that left me with the distinct impression the author knew nothing of the subject apart from what he had gleaned from a training manual. Don't read this book if you want to know more than the theory. When I purchased this I did not realise how short it was.This was my first Kindle purchase.It really is a quite short essay based on secondary sources & unfortunately lacking in depth & details.It would have been good to have first person accounts of trench raids & the German response.There are no illustrations of trench raiding weapons or for that matter anything else.The author concludes that trench raids were ultimately not worthwhile but fails to provide cogent evidence to substantiate his view.Certainly both sides did trench raids right to the end of the war & there was a perceived need to dominate the battlefield.It is an easy read which took me only a couple of minutes but ultimately I found this work unsatisfying.
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Gallipoli-a bastard of a place

David Wray


Kindle Edition It is 1914, Perth, Western Australia. There is great excitement throughout the country as Germany launches its attack in Europe. Thousands of Australians flock to join up in the armed forces to help the 'Mother Land', Britain, resist the attack. Among these are David, Bert and Bluey all young men eager to join the 10th Light Horse Brigade. They succeed and after an eventful training period find themselves sent not to Europe to fight the 'Hun' but to the peninsula of Gallipoli via Egypt to fight the German allies, the Turks. It is a killing ground, barren, cut through by deep ravines and high ridges,where the opposing sides are often only a few yards away from each other in trenches living in atrocious conditions, a poor diet, and the ever present stink of the dead when death can come at any moment.The innocence of the three young men is short lived when they encounter the horror that is Gallipoli!
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The Defense of Gallipoli

George S. Patton Jr.


Kindle Edition Could the British have won at Gallipoli? This is a Study but the future four Star General George S. Patton Jr. Written while he as a Lieutenant Colonel. This study of the failures at Gallipoli led to the successful conquest of Europe in 1944.
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The War in the Air - The Part Played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force - includes a new annotated bibliography and research guide to World War I works

Walter Alexander Raleigh


Kindle Edition
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A Foreign Field

Ben Macintyre


In A Foreign Field Ben MacIntyre has found another story from history's margins In two previous books, Forgotten Fatherland and The Napoleon of Crime, he focused on characters from the footnotes of history, creating compelling narratives from the stories of Nietzsche's sister and of a Victorian master criminal, brought it centre stage and constructed a very powerful drama of love, war and death around it. Robert Digby was a well-educated, middle-class private in the British Expeditionary Force at the beginning of World War I. In the very first month of the war, as the British, French and German armies surged back and forth across tracts of northern France, he became isolated behind enemy lines. When the fluid front lines of the war's first phase rapidly hardened into the murderous stalemate of the trenches, Digby and other British soldiers were permanently trapped in German-occupied territory. Seven, including Digby, took refuge in the small village of Villeret and were given shelter a
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War Girls: The First Aid Nursing Yeomanry in the First World War

Janet Lee


War Girls reveals the fascinating story of the British women who volunteered for service in the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry during the Great. Examining their experiences on the Western Front with the Belgian, British and French Armies, this book shows how the FANY worked as nurses and ambulance driver-mechanics, inspiring stories of female heroism and solidarity. The FANY created skilled gendered performances against the cultural myths of the time, and in concert with their emerging legend. Coming from privileged backgrounds, they drew upon and subverted traditional arrangements, crafting new and unconventional identities for themselves. The author shares the stories of the FANY - a fascinating, quirky and audacious group of women - and illustrates the ways the Great War subverted existing gender arrangements. It will make fascinating reading for those working in the field of gender and war, as well as those who wish to find out more about this remarkable group of women
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Retreat and Rearguard 1914: The BEF's Actions from Mons to the Marne

Jerry Murland


The British action at Mons on 23 August 1914 was the catalyst for what became a full blown retreat over 200 blood drenched miles. This book examines eighteen of the desperate rearguard actions that occurred during the twelve days of this near rout. While those at Le Cateau and Nery are well chronicled, others such as cavalry actions at Morsain and Taillefontaine, the Connaught Rangers at Le Grand Fayt and 13 Brigades fight at Crepy-en-Valois are virtually unknown even to expert historians. We learn how in the chaos and confusion that inevitably reigned units of Gunners and other supporting arms found themselves in the front line.
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Great War Camps On Cannock Chase - A Town For Four Winters

C.J. and G.P. Whitehouse


An original study of military camps on Cannock Chase during the Great War, 1914-19. Full of numerous photographs & maps.
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A Strange War

C P Mills


A Strange War, by C.P.Mills, covers the History of the 2/5th Battalion Somerset Light Infantry.
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Surrender be Damned: History of the 1/1st Battalion the Monmouthshire Regiment, 1914-18

Les Hughes & John Dixon


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A Major Soldier

Ted Bailey


A Major Soldier is part journey of discovery for the author and part history of the 1st Essex Battalion in the First World War. Frank Bailey was typical of many veterans of the era in that he never spoke of his exploits, despite having a long army career predating the war and being awarded the DCM. The author, his grandson, only found out the full details of his military service after his death. The author reminisces about his memories of his Grandfather before detailing his research into his life and military career, a journey that ultimately uncovered a hitherto unknown brother who had died in the war. The book then moves on to the actions of the 1st Essex battalion in the war, focusing on Gallipoli, the Somme, and Cambrai.
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Tim's Wars

Robin Gregory


This book highlights a remarkable legacy and is surely unique in chronicling a continuous record spanning not just the whole of the Great War but also the inter-war years. The editor / author has done a fantastic job bringing to life the terse entries Tim scribbled in the trenches while the mortars fell around him and placing them into context with the bigger picture. This little book is a compelling Pandora's box showing at once the growth of an impetuous youth into a mature family man, of a society from imperial to modern and of the reality of life in both war and peace 100 years ago. The diary entries themselves start off being somewhat terse and I was grateful for Robin Gregory's witty and very personal narrative to knit it all together. Later on, starting around 1917, the diary entries are much longer (apparently Tim had a bigger notebook!) wise, and absolutely fascinating. Here is a man fresh from the trenches predicting that the treaty of Versailles will cause World War II.
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Belfast Boys: How Unionists and Nationalists Fought and Died Together in the First World War

Richard S Grayson


This is the story of men from either side of West Belfast's sectarian divide during the Great War. Richard S. Grayson follows the volunteers of the 36th and 16th divisions who fought on the Somme and side-by-side at Messines, recovering the forgotten West Belfast men throughout the armed forces, from the retreat at Mons to the defeat of Germany and life post-war. In so doing, he tells a new story which challenges popular perceptions of the war and explains why remembrance remains so controversial in Belfast today. 'Provocative, meticulously researched and referenced.' --Irish Times
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A Private's War

Ron James


This is the true life story of Private Frank James' life in the trenches during World War 1. He volunteered at the outbreak of war, aged 18, and saw much heavy fighting in battles at Neuve Chapelle, Aubers Ridge, Loos, The Somme, Flers-Courcelette, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele, Cambrai, The Sambre and the Retreat and Advance of 1918. During that time he was wounded four times and he only returned to his home town of Northampton once. Although he describes the horrors and hardships of trench warfare, this is an upbeat, well written account which gives a Private's view of life at the time and provides a brief history of events, with photographs.
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The Territorials 1908-1914: A Guide for Military and Family Historians

Ray Westlake


The Territorials 1908-1914 is a unique, comprehensive record of the part-time soldiers who made up the Territorial Force that supported the regular army in the years immediately before the outbreak of the First World War. Previously information on the history and organization of these dedicated amateur soldiers has been incomplete and scattered across many sources but now, in this invaluable work of reference, Ray Westlake provides an accessible introduction to the Territorial Force and a directory of the units raised in each county and each town.The origin, aims and organization of the Territorial Force are described as well as the terms of service, recruitment, equipment and training. But the bulk of the book consists of details of over 600 Territorial units plus a comprehensive account of every city, town or village associated with them. Essential information on the all the infantry formations is supplied, but also covered are the yeomanry, the artillery, the engineers, the Royal Ar
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Tracing British Battalions on the Somme

Ray Westlake


Ray Westlake has collated all the information so painstakingly gathered, to produce a comprehensive compendium of the exact movements of every battalion involved in the battle. This book is invaluable not only to researchers but to all those visiting the battlefield and anxious to trace the movements of their forbears.
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The Home Front in the Great War

David Bilton


The Great War was the first in our history to have a deep impact on every aspect of civilian life. In an overdue attempt to portray the real effect of the War on life at home, David Bilton examines all the major events of the period and charts their effect on everyday life for those trying to live a normal existence. Examples are the air raids by Zeppelins and aircraft, rationing and shortages, recruitment, changes in employment habits, censorship. Extensive use is made of personal accounts and the author draws on many photographs, newspaper and magazine material and ephemera to make this very informative and atmospheric.
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The Home Front: Civilian Life in World War One

Peter G. Cooksley


World War One continues to fascinate but little has been written on the civilian's war. From bombing to rationing, from civil defence to war work, the face of Britain was radically changed as a result of the conflict. More than once Britain was almost brought to its knees by unrestricted submarine warfare and by the end of the war German Zeppelins and Gotha bombers had managed to bomb many parts of Eastern England, while in 1914 the German High Seas fleet bombarded the East Coast destroying buildings in places as diverse as Hartlepool and Lowestoft. The First World War was the first war to have a huge impact on civilians and few were safe from attack. All endured hardship as rationing came into force. What was life like during the war for the civilian population? What hardships did they endure? How did they live? What was the feeling of those who stayed at home? Peter Cooksley tells us the true story of civilians at war on the Home Front.
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First World War Britain

Peter Doyle


The First World War profoundly changed British society. The armed forces' need for mass recruitment saw the workforce severely depleted, with women stepping up to shoulder the burden; but nobody could ignore the social upheaval or the strains put upon daily life. With poverty a major issue at the outbreak of war, the extra wages put more food on the table for many families, in spite of rationing and shortages, and away from the front the nation prospered. The war intervened in all aspects of home life, and attacks from the sea and the air meant that civilians were caught up in 'total war'. Peter Doyle explores how British citizens met these challenges, looking at such aspects of daily life as clothing restrictions and popular arts, alongside broader issues like food shortages and industrial unrest.
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Great War Fashion: Tales from the History Wardrobe

Lucy Adlington


Imagine stepping into someone else s shoes . Walking back in time a century ago, which shoes would they be? A pair of silk sensations costing thousands of pounds designed by Yantonnay of Paris or wooden clogs with metal cleats that spark on the cobbles of a factory yard? Will your shoes be heavy with mud from trudging along duckboards between the tents of a frontline hospital... or stuck with tufts of turf from a football pitch? Will you be cloaked in green and purple, brandishing a Votes for Women banner or will you be the height of respectability, restricted by your thigh-length corset? Great War Fashion opens the woman s wardrobe in the years before the outbreak of war to explore the real woman behind the stiff, mono-bosomed ideal of the Edwardian Society lady draped in gossamer gowns, and closes it on a new breed of women who have donned trousers and overalls to feed the nations guns in munitions factories and who, clad in mourning, have loved and lost a whole generation of men. Th
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Britain's Civilian Volunteers: Authorized Story of British Voluntary Aid Detachment Work in the Great War

Thekla Bowser


This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
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The Manchester Pals

Martin Steadman


Manchester proved able to raise eight Pals battalions. Initially, these battalions were composed of middle-class men who experience before the war years was within the commercial, financial and manufacturing interests which formed the foundations of Edwardian Manchester's life and prosperity. Manchester was undeniably proud of its pals battalions; that the area was capable of raising. Seven months after their arrival in France the battle of the Somme was launched, on the fateful 1st July, 1916. On the right of the British Army's extraordinary efforts that day, the Manchester Pals were part of one of the few successful actions, taking the villages of Montauban and Mametz and making a deep incursion into the German defences north of the River Somme.
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Sheffield City Battalion

Ralph Gibson & Paul Oldfield


On the 10th September 1914 the City of Sheffield officially raised its own battalion, named the 12th (Service) Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment (Sheffield City Battalion). Just three and half years later in February 1918, the Battalion was disbanded, never to be reformed. In this short space of time over 3,000 men passed through the ranks of the City Battalion. Of these almost 700 were killed or died of their wounds, and over 500 were commissioned.The book covers the raising of the battalion , training, Egypt, early days in France, preparations for the Somme, 1st July (over 248 men killed, over 300 wounded), the aftermath of the battle, Neuve Chapelle, Arras, Vimy Ridge and finally disbandment and post war.The book also has extensive appendices, listing decorations, army organisations and ranks, biographical list, The Reserves Companies, Documents. With a unique selection of photographs this book is a tribute to the men who served in the Sheffield City Battalion.
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Barnsley Pals

John Cooksey


A history of the two battalions raised by Barnsley and the story of the men who enlisted in them, culminating in their virtual destruction at Serre on 1st July 1916. A superbly researched work with many personal experiences of survivors, fascinating, contemporary photos and exceptionally fine maps.
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Bradford Pals

David Raw


The Comprehensive History of the 16th, 18th and 20th (Service) Battalions of the Prince of Wales Own West Yorlshire Regiment 1914-1918.
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Dorothea's War

Dorothea Crewdson


In April 1915, Dorothea Crewdson, a newly trained Red Cross nurse, and her best friend Christie, received instructions to leave for Le Tréport in northern France. Filled with excitement at the prospect of her first paid job, Dorothea began writing a diary. 'Who knows how long we shall really be out here? Seems a good chance from all reports of the campaigns being ended before winter but all is uncertain.' Dorothea would go on to witness and record some of the worst tragedy of the First World War at first hand, though somehow always maintaining her optimism, curiosity and high spirits throughout. The pages of her diaries sparkle with warmth and humour as she describes the day-to-day realities and frustrations of nursing near the frontline of the battlefields, or the pleasure of a beautiful sunset, or a trip 'joy-riding' in the French countryside on one of her precious days off. One day she might be gossiping about her fellow nurses, or confessing to writing her diary while on shi
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Lander's War: The War Diaries of Lt. Charles Herbert Lander 10th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Charles Herbert Lander


Written by a serving officer from 10th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment in WW1 on the Western Front. This book provides detailed accounts of the Officers view of the war.
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Die Hard, Aby!: Abraham Bevistein - The Boy Soldier Shot to Encourage the Others

David Lister


'Die Hard, Aby!' tells Aby's story, rather than that of the historic times through which he lived. If a well known battle rages while Aby sits in a trench several miles away, writing to his mum - we are with Aby. We follow him from the Russian occupied land of his birth, across Europe to his East End home, and then through school days and the events that led to the Great War. One of the first to join, we see him through training and on to duty at the Front. We are with him in the mud of the trenches and share his deprivations through the cold of the winter of 1915. After 10 months in France, we see what led him to leave the Front without authority. We are with Aby again when as a 17-year-old boy he walks to his fate on a cold, March dawn in 1916. Finally we examine the impact his short life had on his times and on ours.
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The 25th Division in France and Flanders

Lieut.-Col. M. Kincaid-Smith


A history of the 25th Division, completed in February and in July 1918. The book contains 429 pages of fairly detailed history, including many statistics such as casualties, promotions and awards. The main periods are the Somme in 1916, the various battles of 1917 and the German and British offensives of 1918. From Amazon.co.uk: New Army division formed in September 1914. To France in September 1915. Armentieres, Vimy Ridge (1916), Somme, Messines. Third Ypres and the Aisne (1918). 48,289 casualties (623 officers and 12,623 other ranks dead). Reconstituted in England June 1918.
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Somewhere in Blood Soaked France

Alasdair Sutherland


This book follows the life of a crofters son from the Highlands of Scotland to Edinburgh and beyond and is a very rare example of a Brave man who secretely kept a diary during his military service from the Campaigns in Dardenelles, Egypt, the Somme, Ypres and every other battle he fought in, most not as memorable and probably long forgotten but every bit as Bloody. Angus's diary gives a modest and unique version of events he lived through and also the horrific conditions which he had to face on a daily basis. The author Alasdair Sutherland paints a bigger picture of what really took place on those diary entry dates looking back in time to the battlefields filling in the detail and giving the diary more depth and perspective. This is a unique story brought to life by a very knowledgeable author who researched the subject in great detail.
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Reminiscences of a V.A.D.

Grace Pulvertaft


Grace Pulvertaft was born in Dublin of Irish parents. She was educated in London and at the out break of the Great War, aged 20, became a nurse by joining the Voluntary Aid Detachment. Working in busy hospitals in London and Brighton throughout the war, she kept a diary recording her experiences along with contributions from patients and colleagues. The daily round has its lighter moments never far removed from the shadow of a terrible war. 100 years later, edited by her son John Brunsdon, Grace's diaries are presented in this beautiful hard back, full colour book.
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The Irish Guards in the Great War: The First Battalion

Rudyard Kipling


This historical work by the great Kipling has all but been forgotten. As the title indicates, it covers the actions of the Irish Guards' First Battalion in World War I. Although Kipling was always a friend to the soldier, this book had special meaning to him since his son fought with and was killed in the unit. A towering piece of regimental history by one of our greatest writers.
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My Boy Jack?: The Search for Kipling's Only Son

Toni Holt


When noted author Rudyard Kipling pulled strings to get his son a commission in the Irish Guards at the beginning of World War I, he little realized he was sending the young man to his doom. Many years after Rudyard Kipling's own death in 1936, and after further decades of historical detective work, John Kipling's grave finally received a proper headstone in 1992.
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Irish Regiments in the World War

David Murphy


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Beneath a Turkish Sky: The Royal Dublin Fusiliers and the Assault on Gallipoli

Philip Lecane


It was the First World War's largest seaborne invasion and the Irish were at the forefront. Recruited in Ireland, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers were ordered to spearhead the invasion of Gallipoli in Turkey. Deadlocked in trench warfare on the Western Front, the British High Command hoped the assault would be Germany's ally out of the war. Using letters and photographs, this book tells the story of the 'Dubs' officers and men called from an idyllic posting in England. They then set off on what was presented as a great adventure to win glory and capture Constantinople. The book also gives the story of the Turkish defenders and the locality being invaded. Accomapnied by the Royal Munster Fusiliers, packed aboard the SS River Clyde, the 'Dubs' landed from boats on the fiercely defended beach at Sedd-el-Bahr. The song The Foggy Dew says, "It were better to die beneath an Irish sky than at Suvla or Sedd-el-Bahr." This book tells the story of the forgotten Irishmen who died beneath a Turkish
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Irishmen in the Great War 1914-1918

Tom Burnell, Editor


Twenty-seven Irish newspapers for the period covering the Great War have been trawled through to deliver the amazing stories of those years which changed the world for ever. These are the accounts of local men at the front; of torpedoed ships; drunken wives; final letters and requests from the trenches. Also eyewitness accounts of the slaughter as it was happening; battle reports from officers serving in Irish regiments; quirky snippets; chaplains' sympathetic letters; P.o.W reports of conditions and war poetry. Here are the tales of the Leinster’s, Munster’s, Connaught’s and Dublin Fusiliers serving in the Ulster Division, 10th and 16th Irish Divisions. We read of medical breakthroughs, paranormal occurrences and miraculous escapes from death. After the Irish Rebellion of April, 1916, these type of articles and casualty lists dwindled to very few as Irish hearts became divided.
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British Regiments at Gallipoli

Ray Westlake


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Somewhere in Blood Soaked France

Alasdair Sutherland


From the heat and dust of the Dardanelles to the mud of the Western Front, Corporal Angus Mackay had one constant companion, his diary. He wrote of the battles and campaigns he fought in, names that would go down in history: Gallipoli, the Somme, Ypres and Arras. Serving in the the 1st/5th Battalion (Queens Edinburgh Rifles) Royal Scots and later the 88th Brigade Machine Gun Corps, he left a record of one man's extraordinary and tragic war. In Somewhere in Blood Soaked France, Alasdair Sutherland reveals this previously unpublished account of the First World War, complete with historical context, orders of battle and extracts from official war diaries. This rare source - it was an offence to keep a record in a case of capture - offers a stirring insight into the bravery of Mackay and his companions, who were not afraid to die for their country. 'If I go under it will be in a good cause, so roll on the adventure.'
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Never so innocent again

Richard Llewellyn Davies


A narrative written from the notes and diary of Corporal Richard Llewellyn Davies of the 3rd Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment and the 9th Battalion The Royal Welch Fusiliers. He left his native village of Hollybush in the Sirhowy Valley Monmouthshire on the morning of the 5th of August 1914. Three times wounded and twice gassed he survived the whole of the main battles of the Western Front and returned home in January 1919. Of the nine volunteers that left the village with him, he was the only one to return home in 1919
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Remembrances of Hell

Norman Ellison


Writer, broadcaster and naturalist, Norman Ellison's diary of a soldier's life in the trenches of Flanders in World War I.
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"PI" in the sky: a history of No. 22 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps

Harvey, William Frederick James


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The Fighting Pioneers - The Story of the 7th Battalion DLI

Clive Dunn


Story of the 7th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. With the creation of the Territorial Force in 1908 the battalion was re-designated as the 7th Battalion. It went to France in April 1915 with the rest of the Northumbrian Division seeing action almost immediately at the Second battle of Ypres. In November 1915 the battalion was picked to become the divisional pioneers. The 1/7 Battalion suffered 600 fatalities. In 1920 when the Territorial Army was reformed it was re-raised in its original role as infantry. The story concludes on 10 December 1936 when the 7th Battalion Durham Light Infantry became the 47th (Durham Light Infantry) A.A. Battalion R.E. (T.A.), whose personnel went on to serve in the Second World War.
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Alnwick in the Great War: Stories from the Home Front in Alnwick and District

Ian Hall


Written at the request of the Alnwick and District Centenary Commemoration Group, this small book examines the effects of the First World War on the district. These include the implementation of little-known anti-invasion precautions, how people reacted in the first weeks of war, the army encampments around Alnwick and the threat of aerial bombardment from Zeppelins which led to the arrival of the Royal Flying Corps
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Elswick-Hopper of Barton-on-Humber: The Story of a Great British Cycle Maker

Nigel Lands


An accurate and well-researched history of a bicycle manufacturer, covering over a century from its small beginnings, to its position as probably the biggest producer of bicycles in the UK outside the Raleigh conglomeration, to its eventual demise in the face of foreign competition. Not only that, it is an interesting social history lesson about the place of a major employer within a small community. It records the diverse interests necessary for a manufacturer to succeed in an industry that is notorious for its peaks and troughs.
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The Flying Elephants

Chaz Bowyer


The History of No. 27 Squadron RFC/RAC 1915 to 1969
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Royal Flying Corps to the R.A.F., India, 1919: The 28 Squadron RAF

John Ross


Regency Press (London & New York) Ltd 1987
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Never so Innocent Again

Richard Llewellyn Davie


A narrative written from the notes and diary of Corporal Richard Llewellyn Davies of the 3rd Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment and the 9th Battalion The Royal Welch Fusiliers.He left his native village of Hollybush in the Sirhowy Valley Monmouthshire on the morning of the 5th of August 1914. Three times wounded and twice gassed he survived the whole of the main battles of the Western Front and returned home in January 1919. Of the nine volunteers that left the village with him, he was the only one to return home in 1919.
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Shot At Dawn

Julian Putkowski and Julian Sykes


The issue of military executions during the war has always been controversial and embargoes have made it difficult for researchers to get at the truth. Now these two writers give us a vast amount of information. They show that trials were grossly unfair and incompetent. Many of the condemned men had been soldiers of exemplary behaviour, courage and leadership but had cracked under the dreadful strain of trench warfare. This acclaimed book is the authority on this shameful saga
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Confound and Destroy

Martin Streetley


During WW2, the Royal Air Force 100 Group provided electronic warfare support for the nightly British bombing raids over occupied Europe. This book is something of a history of the group and it's operations. I say something of a history because really only part of the book is a history of the operations, and it's rather dull. The rest of the book is composed of numerous diagrams and drawings of radio equipment, antenna installations, maps, and all sorts of illustrations that would be very much at home in a technical manual. This is most definitely NOT a book for someone looking for some exciting WW2 "war in the air" action. It is a serious, scholarly, technical look at the functions of the group. Even then, the book is not for the faint of heart. If you really, really want to learn more about WW2 airborne electronic warfare then it would be worth your time. Still, it is about the only really in-depth book I've found on this particular subject.
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Defiance!: Withstanding the Kaiserschlacht

G H F Nichols


George Nichols was an artillery officer serving with the 82nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. He was wounded in 1917, and returned to the guns in March 1918, just in time to experience the fury of the Kaiserschlacht, the great German offensive designed to knock the British army out of the war. Nichols wrote a powerful account of the Kaiser's last great offensive battle from inside the eye of the storm, and it is one of the few primary source accounts which are told from the often overlooked perspective of the British artillerymen. Nichols, with wonderful British reserve, records how the men of the Royal Field Artillery steadfastly manned their guns. Nichols survived the onslaught and in 1919, was able to produce a full account of both the retreat and the British counter-attack which won back the lost ground. First published in 1919, while censorship was still in force, this wonderful primary source has long been out of print and it's welcome return makes for essential reading for anyon
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Plough & Scatter: The Diary-Journal of a First World War Gunner

J. Ivor Hanson & A Wakefield


J. Ivor Hanson's personal diary describes his experiences as a gunner on the Western Front in the First World War, which left a deep and lasting impression on him. He wrote about the officers and men with whom he served, and the horror and humour of trench life - all subjects of Hanson's intense scrutiny and incisive wit. He vividly describes the German Army's crushing Spring Offensive in March 1918, when the British Army on the Western Front was almost pushed back to the Channel coast. Imperial War Museum historian Alan Wakefield has edited the diaries and provides engaging explanatory narratives for each chapter to set them within the context of the First World War.
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The Young Gunner: The Royal Field Artillery in the Great War

David Hutchison


The Young Gunner describes the history of the Royal Field Artillery in France and Flanders in the Great War, including the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The book is based on the letters and journals of Second Lieutenant Colin Hutchison who joined the army aged 19 just before the war started. He found himself in command of a single gun in battle in 1914, a section of guns in 1915, a battery of six guns in 1916, and a brigade of 24 guns by the end of the war. He tells the story of front line action in thirteen battles on the Western Front, including Mons 1914, Ypres 1915, The Somme 1916, Passchendaele 1917 and Ypres 1918. His personal stories are inspiring, but more importantly his letters and journals describe, in a consistent style, not only life on the front line with the artillery, but also the details of his tactical deployment in battle.David explains, from his perspective, why so many men died unnecessarily in that war, and why the changes in tactical thinking he saw as necessary t
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No 60 Sqn RFC/RAF

Alex Revell


AVIATION ELITE UNITS 41, Osprey Publishing

When No 60 Sqn arrived in France in May 1916, partially equipped with the delightfully named Morane Bullet, there were only two dedicated single-seat fighter squadrons on the Western Front. In the opening weeks of the battles of the Somme in the summer of 1916, the squadron suffered heavy casualties and it was withdrawn from the front. Re-equipped with Nieuport scouts, the unit went on the offensive. Witnessing the exploits of pilots like Albert Ball, who scored 20 victories with the unit before his death, it rapidly became one of the most successful fighter units of the war. This book tells the complete story of the unit, from its humble beginnings to the end of the war.

More information on: No 60 Sqn RFC/RAF








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