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7th June 1917 - The Great War, Day by Day - The Wartime Memories Project

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The Wartime Memories Project - The Great War - Day by Day



7th June 1917

On this day:


  • Hill 60 retaken by 11th West Yorks   11th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment re-capture hill 60 from the Germans in the Battle of Messines.

  • 13th Middlesex in action at Messines Ridge   War Diary for the 13th Battalion Middlesex Regiment, 7th June 1917:

    The assembly trenches were reached about 2.0 a.m. At 3.10 a.m. the 41st Divn went over the top & captured the Red Line (1st objective) the same time several large mines were exploded. The intense bombardment lasted all the morning & during that time the Blue (Damm Strasse) & Black Lines (2nd & 3rd objectives) were taken by the 41st Divn. 11.30 a.m. The 13th Middx. Regt. Moved forward to Eclus Trench & Old French Trench. 1.30 p.m. The Bn. moved forward to the Black Line (present front line & jumping off line for 73rd Bde.) Within a few minutes of arrival the Bn. went over the top (3.10 p.m.) under an excellent barrage.

    Dispositions: - Right front COY B under Capt. R.S.Dove, Left front COY A under Capt. F.J. Stratten, Right support COY D under 2/Lt. Dawkins Left support COY C under Lt. Roberts. Moppers-up were commanded by 2/Lt. C.W. Wallis (D Coy) & 2/Lt. R.W. Phillips (B Coy).

    Our objective was known as the Green Line. It extended from the front edge of Ravine Wood on the right, via Olive Trench, to the Hollbeke Road on the left. The objective was gained without much difficulty, the Coy on the right consolidating well in front of Ravine Wood & Verhaest Farm. Owing to the Division on our left not coming forward with us, ‘A’ Coy was left with their flank in the air and had to perform a difficult movement to protect themselves. They were therefore unable to consolidate the left half of Olive Trench. ‘C’ Coy (Left Support Coy) had to be called on to assist ‘A’ Coy (Left Front) to form a defensive flank. During the first day the enemy’s artillery was erratic & the Bn. suffered more from lack of water than from anything else. During the attack about 100 unwounded & 20 wounded were captured, mostly in the Ravine – also 5 machine guns, 1 trench mortar & a large quantity of material. The prisoners included 2 officers.

  • Attack Launched   236th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery report Zero time for offensive by the II Army to take Hill 60, Wytschate and Messines Ridges at 0310. At that hour all artillery opened heavy barrage which continued to creep forward as infantry advanced for 10 hours until all objectives were joined and ridge remained in our hands. ‘C’ Group formed the centre of the six groups covering the Divisional front and the barrage crossed the canal south of which the final group protective barrage was placed. A large number of Neutralise Fire calls were received and D236 did resulting neutralisation of Batteries including firing at enemy troops on the march. At about 1800 barrage was carried out on SOS line, but no infantry action by the enemy.

  • 7th Jun 1917 36th Battalion AIF in action

  • 8th Yorks and Lancs in action   8th Yorks and Lancs are in action at the Battle of Messines from 7th to 14th June 1917

  • 7th June 1917 Exercise and inspections

  • June 1917 

  • 7th June 1917 

  • 7th June 1917 

  • 7th Jun 1917 In Action

  • 7th Jun 1917 In Action

  •    G.6.a NEAR ROCLINCOURT

    7th - 8th June. Battalion took over work on RED LINE from 16th WYR strength of party each night 450. Fine weather no casualties.

  • 7th Jun 1917 Into Support

  • The Battle of Messines   A letter from Captain Horace Lance Flint, Medical Officer for 7th Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment, written to his wife from a captured German dressing station describing the opening stages of the Battle of Messines Ridge, which began on 7th June 1917 with the explosion of 19 mines and a huge, accurate artillery bombardment.

    “I want to give you some idea of the first big “push” that I have taken any active part in. I see that it is described as “Haig’s Earthquake or Hurricane Attack”.

    “My division was in the front line of the attack, and we marched into the trenches on the evening of June 6th. Major _____, the second in command, spoke a few words to each company before it moved off, and wished them the best of luck, then the chaplain said a prayer, after which all the men joined in the Lord’s Prayer. It was very impressive, and one could not help wondering how many of those brave fellows would ever come back and imagining what most of them must be thinking of. Probably it was of home and of those they loved, for there was a certain quiet solemnity about our departure. I marched at the end of the battalion. It was quite dark when we entered the trenches, and each company took up its allotted position. We had taken about 1½ hours in reaching the trenches, and had lost only two men killed and one wounded, these casualties being due to the explosion of one of our own bombs as it was carried up.

    “I went to the headquarters’ dug-out of my battalion. We sat on the floor of the dug-out, but none of us could sleep. This was in the new reserve trenches. At about 3 a.m. the dug-out and the whole earth was violently shaken. The mine in Hill 60 had exploded. Two mines in our own front went off, and our artillery opened fire. The bombardment was 20 per cent heavier than on any previous occasion. A modern battle is the most appalling thing you can attempt to imagine and it is quite impossible to describe the awful shrieking of shell and rattle of machine guns. It was one continuous roar, and the whole air must have been filled with a shield of iron.

    “Dawn was just breaking as I look out, and I could see only about 50 yards ahead because of the smoke and dust. Our artillery was magnificent, and had the whole situation well in hand from beginning to end. After the first short bombardment they lifted the barrage slowly forward, and our men keen and impatient, went over the top, some going even too quickly and being hit by our own shells. Our casualties, fortunately, were few at this time, and those we had were chiefly caused by the men’s excessive eagerness, and a few were due to some of our shells bursting prematurely.

    “Our artillery was so splendid that very few of the German guns were able to shoot, because some of our own guns were specially took off for counter battery work, i.e., to fire on the position of the German guns. I had to wait until the men had advanced about 600 yards, before I went over with the medical officer of the battalion working in conjunction with ours to establish a medical aid post, our orderlies and some of the stretcher-bearers going with us to carry our equipment. We advanced under a deafening noise of guns and alarming shriek of shells, but these were soon forgotten in the excitement and amazement of our surroundings. The ground was one mass of shell holes, you could not put your foot down except on the rim of one hole or another; it was like walking on an empty honeycomb. I never imagined that such a picture of destruction and desolation could exist, the German trenches having totally disappeared.

    “The Huns retreated as fast as possible, and put up no fight at all, and very soon prisoners began to come in. It was quite impossible for any human being to face such artillery fire, and their only course was to run away. I saw a few of our tanks ahead, but I heard afterwards from a man who had been in one of them that they had no chance of doing anything because the enemy retreated faster than they could attack.

    “My object was to find shelter for an aid post, but this was very difficult, and it was a long time before I hit upon a dug-out. Then I found one with concrete walls 3 ft. 6in. thick, which had been used as a power-house for generating electricity for lighting the other dug-outs, most of which had disappeared, and it contained an engine and a considerable sized dynamo and switch board. Unfortunately, it was impossible to get the wounded down into the dug-out, so we dressed them all out in the open, and then stretcher-bearers carried them back.

    “In view of what really occurred during this attack on what is supposed to be the strongest German position in the West, it is most amusing but utterly ludicrous to read the accounts in the German papers. They say that the British attack was repulsed with heavy loss, and that we were unable to advance any further. As a matter of fact, everything went like clockwork, and the programme was completely fulfilled. On our little bit of front we could have advanced much further than was allowed by our orders – we could, in fact, have gone right through, but it would have made a big salient, and caused disaster later on. Few people at home realise that in modern warfare everything is worked out to the smallest detail beforehand. An advance is planned to time, and there is an exact time at which each company or battalion has to take up a particular position. Should it reach such a position too soon, then it must wait and advance no further beyond that spot until the pre-arranged time for the next bit of advance. Warfare with our present masses of artillery is a very exact science, and so before any advance all enemy positions must be photographed, and their exact locality marked on maps. People should realise that after we have gained the objects of an attack our artillery must move forward and get the range of all further enemy positions, and these positions must first be ascertained by captured enemy trench maps, or by photographs taken by our aeroplanes. This is of course a long business in itself, and it is for this reason that progress on the Western front is slow, and that the war may last a long time should the Hun choose to fight it out to a finish. It is, however, only a matter of time and perseverance, with our masses of artillery. For given time and the necessary preparation of plans beforehand, nothing can stand and face our artillery. It is magnificent. It is amazing that the guns could advance so quickly over the shell-riddled ground, and that by the evening it was so well up that we forestalled an expected counter-attack from the Bosche, and he received instead from us an artillery barrage nearly as intense as the one in the beginning of the day.

    “About mid-day, I had to move forward to keep in touch with our wounded, and I found, after a night's search, another aid post. This was in a wood about 2½ miles in advance of our old front line. It was the former German dressing station, and consisted of a very fine 2 ft. concrete-walled dug-out, and here we captured a quantity of medical stores, two German doctors, and 30 Red Cross orderlies. It is from that dug-out that I have written all this, while the Huns are shelling us heavily. Nothing, fortunately, can penetrate the walls of this dug-out, the only danger being that a chance shell may come in at the door, which, of course, faces the German guns, as it was built as a protection against British fire. The Hun makes much more substantial du-outs than we. One of those in the wood here is almost a concrete palace and is fitted with electric light, water laid on, passage looking on the various rooms and comfortable furniture in the rooms.

    “We have now been at this business for eight days and have not had our boots off nor our clothes and we dare not even discard the anti-gas box respirators, which hand on our chests from the neck. The atmosphere is decidedly foggy considering the small space, and the incessant smoking, and sleep is practically impossible, as there are four me, i.e., my servant, two orderlies and myself, and there is no room for anyone to stretch his legs. We are, however, very lucky not to be obliged not to spend our time in a shell hole. The men in our division are very tired, and I hope they will soon be relieved. It is rather hard luck on them to have been kept here so long. It was owing to our having done so well and suffered so few casualties that we were not relieved. The division which was to replace us on the second day after our objective was gained has been sent elsewhere instead. The men are under a great strain. The first period of waiting before going into the trenches for an attack is trying to the nerves, and the period of waiting to go into the trenches before going over the top is worst still, and then, even after the attack has been made and the object gained, there is the greatest strain of all in holding the line against counter-attacks. Now that we have gained the ridge, we are holding out against very heavy shell fire from the Germans, and must always be prepared for counter-attacks. The Tommy is a great hero, few people at home realising in the least what he has to put up with through these advances and after them, when he is in the front line. The last two weeks seem like years.

    “I was up all last night dressing cases, some of them being very agonising to see. The sight of it all make one sick of the brutality of man to his fellow man; almost sick of life itself, and leaves a feeling of utter misery and loneliness. If only it were possible to live and let live and enjoy life in peace and love for our fellows. I do not know how our men have endured what they have gone through since June 7th, and especially the shelling yesterday. My experience of it has been when I have been out to attend to wounded in the open, that it must be awful to be in the open for long. Fortunately our total casualties have been comparatively small, but we have had as many in holding the ridge against counter-attacks as we had in the whole of the advance.

    “I cannot see any end to the war at present, but I suppose there is a limit to the Hun’s endurance, and he must be getting very tired of the war, to judge by what he had to endure here. I expect the poor blighter will be glad to chuck it when this sort of thing happens all along the line.

    “No one can appreciate what the British army has accomplished in three years of war, until he sees the things we are now looking at – absolute and complete destruction, and desolation; the whole ground is a mass of shell holes – and yet already roads are beginning to appear, tramways and water pipes are being laid down, artillery pushed up, and hundreds of miles carrying up ammunition and rations. More than ever do I fail to see what the German has to gain by prolonging the war. I am certain he will never beat our armies. One has only to look at the ground here on what was the German side ten days ago and see the devastating effect of our guns, and compare the number of shell holes on his side to those of ours, to be convinced of the terrible things he has to endure, and that we cannot fail to beat him in the end.”

  • 7th Jun 1917 Tanks in Action





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There are:15 articles tagged with this date available in our Library

  These include information on officers service records, letters, diaries, personal accounts and information about actions during the Great War.




Remembering those who died this day.

  • Pte. William Frederick Abbott. London Regiment 1st/22nd Btn.
  • Pte. Maurice Abell. Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards) 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Herbert Ackroyd. Middlesex Regt 23rd Btn. C Coy
  • 2nd Lt. Gordon William Acworth. London Regiment 15th Btn
  • Pte. John Edward Adams. Northumberland Fusiliers 11th Btn.
  • Lance Sjt. John Albert Adams. Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards) 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Leonard Adams. Sherwood Foresters 11th Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Winstanley Adams. 34th Btn.
  • Pte. Robert Addison. Royal Army Medical Corps 108th Field Ambulance Read their Story.
  • Rfm. George Robert Aggas. Royal Irish Rifles 9th Btn.
  • Cpl. Harold Akers. Yorkshire Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Pte. John W. Alderson. Durham Light Infantry 20th Btn.
  • Pte. Frederick Lionel Alexander. 3rd Australian Pioneer Bn.
  • Cpl. Henry Furner Allen. London Regiment 1st/7th Btn.
  • Cpl. Henry James Olaf Allen. London Regiment 1st/6th Btn.
  • Cpl. Henry James Olaf Allen. DCM. London Regiment 1/6th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. James Edward Allen. 49th Infantry Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Josiah Allen. 49th Infantry Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Allison. Machine Gun Corps 56th Coy.
  • Pte. David Allum. Royal Fusliers 26th Btn.
  • Pte. Ernest Thomas Ames. Royal West Kent Regiment 11th Btn.
  • Rfm. Harry Amos. London Regiment 1st/21st Btn.
  • Rfm. Stanley Orme Anderson. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn.
  • Rfm. Thomas Edward Anderson. Kings Royal Rifle Corps 18th Btn.
  • Pte. William Charles Anderson. London Regiment 1st/22nd Btn. D Coy.
  • Rfm. W. Andress. London Regiment 8th Btn.
  • L/Cpl. William Horace Andrews. London Regiment 1/21st Btn.
  • Pte. J. H. Angel. Durham Light Infantry 2nd Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Angel. Durham Light Infantry 20th Btn.
  • Pte. George Anscombe. Middlesex Regt 23rd Btn.
  • Pte. James Hartley Antcliff. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. James Antcliffe. 36th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Robert Archer. Middlesex Regt 23rd Btn.
  • Pte. B. V. Archie. 40th Btn
  • Pte. John Arney. East Surrey Regt. 12th Btn.
  • Rfm. Harry Aronow. London Regiment 1/8th Btn.
  • Pte. H. W. Ashford. London Regiment 24th Btn.
  • Sjt. William Aston. London Regiment 1/8th Btn.
  • Pte. John Atha. West Yorkshire Regiment 11th Btn.
  • Sjt. Charles Octave Aucourt. East Surrey Regt. 12th Btn.
  • Pte. James Hodgson Austerfield. Northumberland Fusiliers 11th Btn.
  • Pte. G. E. Austin. East Surrey Regt. 12th Btn.
  • Pte. Cecil Wallace Ayling. London Regiment 7th Btn.
  • Pte. Albert Ayres. Royal Fusiliers 26th Btn.
  • Pte. George Thomas Ayres. Royal Fusiliers 32nd Btn.
  • William Henry Bacon. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • 2nd Lt. James Chester Badgley. Wiltshire Regiment 6th Btn. att. 58th Trench Mortar Bty. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. W. J. Baker. Royal Irish Rifles 9th Btn.
  • William Ingram Baker. Machine Gun Corps 70th Coy.
  • Pte. J. A. Barker. 35th Btn.
  • Rfm. Robert Henry Barnett. Royal Irish Rifles 8th Btn.
  • L/Cpl. William E. Barrett. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Reginald Bartley. 33rd Btn. B Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. George Barton. Hampshire Regiment 15th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. W. J. Bath. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Danile Baziere. Royal Dublin Fusiliers 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • 2nd Cpl. R. Beeby. Royal Engineers 121 Field Coy
  • Rfm. Robert William Bennett. Royal Irish Rifles 10th Btn.
  • Pte. Thomas Newbon Bennett. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. J. D. Benson. Cheshire Regiment 7th Btn.
  • L/Cpl. Joseph Henry Bentley. Border Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Sjt. Riley Biggadike. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn. A. Coy.
  • Rfm. Alfred Thomas Bird. Royal Irish Rifles 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Frank Blackhurst. Cheshire Regiment 10th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Charles Blanch. Royal Irish Fusiliers 7/8th Btn.
  • Rfm. Arthur Henry Bloomfield. Royal Irish Rifles 9th Btn.
  • Pte. William Richard Blundell. 47th Btn.
  • Cpl. J. Bonner. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th Btn.
  • Rfm. Frank Thomas Boulding. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn.
  • Pte. Robert William Bowden. 33rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. V. Brettle. Worcestershire Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Rfm. Thomas Hutchinson Brians. Royal Irish Rifles 8th Btn.
  • Spr. Herbert Briers. Royal Engineers 155th Field Coy
  • Rfm. Patrick Brooks. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn.
  • Pte. H. J. Brough. Cheshire Regiment 7th Btn.
  • Rflmn. Walter Brough. Royal Irish Rifles 7th Btn.
  • Pte. Fred Brown. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Pte. G. E. Brown. Cheshire Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Rifleman James Brown. Rifle Brigade 3rd Battalion Read their Story.
  • Lance Sjt. John Brown. Royal Irish Rifles 9th Btn. A Coy.
  • L/Cpl. R. Brown. Lancashire Fusiliers 9th Btn.
  • Pte. William Brown. Durham Light Infantry 12th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Brown. Durham Light Infantry 12th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. James Bruce. Royal Irish Rifles 8th Btn.
  • 2/Lt. William Buckle. Green Howards 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Buckle. Yorkshire Regiment 4th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Wilfred John Bucknell. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Wilfred John Bucknell. 33rd Battalion Read their Story.
  • L/Cpl. Corry Burnett. Royal Irish Rifles 8th Btn.
  • Pte. Alfred Alexander Burns. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. W. Butler. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Percy Clarence Cant. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. Herbert Cathcart. Royal Irish Rifles 2th Btn.
  • Pte. Herbert Cathcart. Royal Irish Rifles 2nd Battalion Read their Story.
  • Lance Sgt. George Albert Cawkwell. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Ralph Charlton Chadwick. 11th Australian Field Ambulance
  • Pte. Clifford William Chaffey. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Frank David Chambers. Royal West Kent Regiment 10th Battalion, "C" Company Read their Story.
  • Pte. John Ernest Chapman. 33rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • L/Cpl. Robert Chesnutt. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th Btn. B Coy.
  • 2nd Lt. Joseph Alfred Child. Yorkshire Regiment 9th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Joseph Christie. Yorkshire Regiment 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Leslie Ernest Church. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. A. Clark. Gloucestershire Regiment 8th Btn.
  • Pte. Joseph Clark. 45th Btn.
  • 2nd Cpl. W. J. Clarkson. Royal Engineers 106th Field Coy
  • Pte. Kenneth Cliffe. London Regiment 1/7th (City of London) Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Ernest John Coles. 33rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Cpl Frederick George Collinson. MM. Yorkshire Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Rfm. Robert Colvin. Royal Irish Rifles 12th Btn.
  • Pte. William Joseph Connolly. London Regiment 1/7th Btn.
  • Pte. William Joseph Connolly. London Regiment 1/7th Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Leonard Cook. 1st Canterbury Btn.
  • Rfm. H. W. Cornwell. London Regiment 1/17th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Rfmn. Harry Walter "Henry" Cornwell. London Regiment 1/17th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Manus Alexander Costello. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 7th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Spr. Peter Coyle. Royal Engineers 155th Field Coy
  • Rfm. Thomas Craig. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn.
  • Rfm. David Currie. Royal Irish Rifles 8th Btn.
  • Pte. George Davidson. Border Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. J. Davies. Welsh Fusiliers 9th Btn.
  • Pnr. John George Edgar Davis. Royal Engineers 47th Signal Coy
  • Pte. Dennis Bernard Day. 33rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Lance Corporal Jesse Dean. North Staffordshire Regiment 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Spr. Robert Dickson. Royal Engineers 130th Field Coy.
  • Pte. Robert Henry Dine. Yorkshire Regiment 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Matthew Hall Dix. Durham Light Infantry Read their Story.
  • Sjt. M. Dixon. Connaught Rangers 6th Btn.
  • 2nd Lt. Sydney James Livingston Downey. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Battalion Read their Story.
  • L/Cpl. Sidney Driscoll. London Regiment 1st/22nd Btn. A Coy Read their Story.
  • Pte. Maurice Duggan. Royal Irish Regiment 6th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. J. R. Edwards. The Rifle Brigade 3rd Btn.
  • Pte George Erriottis. Welsh Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Pte David John Evans. Welsh Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Spr. Fred Evans. Royal Engineers 105th Field Coy.
  • Pte. Ferdinand Albert Faithfull. Royal Fusiliers 32nd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Joseph Fernee. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Pte. David Gray Findlay. 47th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. John Browitt Fisher. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn. A. Coy.
  • Pte. Walter Fleming. 36th Btn.
  • Rfm. T. Ford. The Rifle Brigade 3rd Btn.
  • Pte. Thomas Foye. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Francis Bede Froy. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Frederick George Fulbrook. Machine Gun Corps 69th Coy
  • Pte. E. C. B. Fuller. 36thBtn.
  • Pte. Charles Henry Gamble. Sherwood Foresters 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Sidney James Game. 40th Battalion. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Alfred George Gardner. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. W. Gill. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 8th Btn.
  • 2nd Lt. O. C. Gillott. Royal Engineers 68th Field Coy.
  • Pte. Robert William Grant. Machine Gun Corps 69th Coy
  • Pte. Henry Green. Sherwood Forresters 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Sergeant James Greenan. DCM. Border Regiment 6th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. F. Greenwood. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Cpl. Horace Fennel Griffin. Rifle Brigade 2nd Battalon, F Company Read their Story.
  • Pte. George Herbert Guest. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Pte. F. G. Gussin. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • L/Cpl. Graverra Haggas. York & Lancaster Regiment 8th Btn.
  • L/Cpl. Traverra Haggas. West Riding Regiment 3rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Capt. Owen Hairsine. MC. Royal Army Medical Corps 71st Field Ambulance Read their Story.
  • Capt. Owen Hairsine. MC. Royal Army Medical Corps 71st Field Ambulance Read their Story.
  • Pte. Walter Sidney Hall. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Spr. John Walter Hallatt. Royal Engineers 23rd Signal Coy
  • Pte. H. C. Halliday. 33rd Btn.
  • 2nd Lt Morrice Frederick John Halliday. 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Alfred Phelps Hancock. Welsh Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Pte. John Thomas Hanks. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. T. H. Hanson. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Townley Harden. Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment 7th Btn.
  • Pte. Charles Archibald Harris. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Rfmn. Woolf Hart. London Regiment 1/17th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Cpl. H. Harvey. London Regiment 1/19th Btn.
  • Cpl. John Henry Hassall. 33rd Btn.
  • Cpl. Robert Robinson Heap. Border Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. B. Hedge. Royal Munster Fusiliers 1st Btn.
  • Pte. William Henry Ernest Hemus. Worcestershire Regiment 3th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. John Albert Hennessy. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Walter Fergus Herrett. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn. D. Coy.
  • Rfm. A. W. F. Herrmann. The Rifle Brigade 3rd Btn.
  • Pte. Alfred Edward Hewitt. Royal Army Medical Corps 71st Field Ambulance
  • Pte. John Heywood. Cheshire Regiment 13th Battalion
  • Pte. Hemi Hill. Pioneer Battalion Read their Story.
  • Sjt. R. Hillman. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Thomas William Hindmarsh. Durham Light Infantry 2nd Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Hodgkiss. Sherwood Foresters 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Abraham Norman Holloway. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Abraham Norman Holloway. 33rd Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas William Holloway. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Young Hoswell. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Arthur Howard. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. R. S. Howard. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Spencer Howard. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment 10th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Cpl Howlett. Royal Field Artillery 103rd Brigade Read their Story.
  • Rfmn. Samuel Hoy. Royal Irish Rifles 10th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas Richard Hubbard. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Herbert Hunt. Durham Light Infantry 12th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas Evan Hyde. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Henry Foster Jackson. Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards) 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Alexander Fowler James. Royal Army Medical Corps. 71st Field Amb.
  • Sjt. Albert Charles Jennings. 2nd Canterbury Btn. Read their Story.
  • Capt. Harold Walter Joel. London Regiment 1/21st Btn. Read their Story.
  • 2nd Lt. C. G. Johnson. Royal Field Artillery 149th Bde. A Bty. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Frederick William Johnson. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Claude Saul Jones. York and Lancaster Regiment 9th Btn
  • Pte. G. P. Kable. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. George William Kendall. 49th Btn.
  • 2nd Lt. Hamilton Boyd King. London Regiment 1/22nd Btn.
  • Spr. L. J. Knowles. Royal Engineers 47th Signal Coy
  • Pte. John William Lambert. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. F. R. Lee. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Sjt Mjr. S. A. J. Lee. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Pte. William Lee. Durham Light Infantry 12th Btn.
  • Pte. James Archibald Lennard. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Cpl. Joseph Cyril Lennon. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Spr. Lewis Lewis. Royal Engineers 155th Field Coy
  • Pte. Charles Leyland. MM. Royal Army Medical Corps 76th Field Ambulance
  • Pte. Albert James Lovejoy. 33rd Btn.
  • 2nd Lt Ernest Henry Austin Lucas. The York & Lancaster Regiment 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • John Stannon Luff. 33rd Btn.
  • Cpl. Samuel Macaulay. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Sjt. Arthur Martin. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Sgt. Arthur Willis Martin. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas Milton "Hammie" Mason (John Davies). Royal Welch Fusiliers 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Alexander McDonald. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Joseph McDougall. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. E. G. McGregor. Wiltshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Henry Donald McKay. Wiltshire Regiment 1st Battalion
  • Pte. William Edward McKinery. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Daniel McLaughlin. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 7th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. F. McNally. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn.
  • Pte. Harold Allan McNamara. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte John McNamara. Royal Irish Rifles 2nd Btn.
  • Pte. Kenneth McRae. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Andrew McWilliam. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Leslie John Metcalf. 40th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Cpl. William Charles Mills. London Regiment 1/6th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pnr. Charles. Carew Mitchell. Royal Engineers 47th Signal Coy
  • Pte. J. Mitchell. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 9th Btn.
  • Pte. George William Montgomery. 33rd Btn.
  • Sjt. R. Montgomery. Royal Engineers 122nd Field Coy.
  • Pte. George Alfred Moore. Royal Fusiliers 26th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Harry Moore. Sherwood Foresters 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Richard Moore. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Harry Lawson Morse. Gloucestershire Regiment 8th Btn.
  • Pte. Aubrey Morton. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Joseph Cecil Mulhall. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Edward Mullins. Leinster Regiment 2nd Btn.
  • L/Cpl. Henry William Murphy. London Regiment 1/23rd Btn.
  • Pte. Tom Close Naylor. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Pte. J. Neal. Welsh Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Pte. J. Neely. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Nelson. Duke of Wellingtons West Riding Regiment 10th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Arthur Thomas Newton. Hampshire Regiment 15th Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas Alfred Nicholls. Royal Army Medical Corps 71st Field Ambulance
  • Pte. Thomas William O'Brien. London Regiment 1/7th Btn.
  • Pte. Henry Thomas O'Neill. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. William Wesley "Parney" Osland. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Joseph Henry Oxby. Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Joseph Henry Oxby. Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry Ã?Ã?  8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Major William Pain. Machine Gun Corps 69th Coy
  • L/Sjt. Edgar Richard Pallett. Royal Army Medical Corps 71st Field Ambulance
  • Pte. Albert Henry Parkinson. 36th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Henry Patten. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 8th Btn.
  • Pte. William Henry Patten. Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 8th Btn.
  • Pte. T. Pengelley. Royal Irish Fusiliers 7/8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • L/Cpl. J. Poole. South Wales Borderers 5th Btn.
  • Cpl. W. H. Pringle. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Cpl. Robert Boyd Rainey. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Walter Henry Rawson. Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas Reed. Northumberland Fusiliers 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. S. Reid. 35th Btn.
  • Cpl. S. J. Rickman. London Regiment 1/22nd Btn.
  • 2nd Lt. John Gilfillan Robertson. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 11th Btn.
  • Pte. Samuel Taylor Robertson. 33rd Btn. D Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. George Rockley. Sherwood Forresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. George Rockley. Sherwood Foresters 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Frederick Arthur Roper. 33rd Btn. D Coy, 5 Pltn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Alexander Ross. 36th Btn.
  • Pte. Richard Calo Ross. 10th Australian Machine Gun Coy Read their Story.
  • Cpl. John Rush. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Spr. Leonard Ryan. 1st Canadian Tunnelling Coy.
  • Pte. I. W. Sampson. 33rd Btn.
  • J. W. Sampson. 34th Btn.
  • Pte. Matthew Savage. York and Lancaster Regiment 8th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Michael James Scannell. 1st Canterbury Btn. 13th Company Read their Story.
  • Pte. Thomas John Schaefer. 33rd Btn.
  • Rflmn. James Herbert Scott. Royal Irish Rifles 14th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Cpl. Clifton Shephard. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Alexander Shields. Northumberland Fusiliers 11th Battalion
  • Pnr. Harry Shipley. Royal Engineers 101st Field Coy.
  • Pte. Arthur Short. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. John Sim. Border Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Patrick Simmons. 33rd Btn.
  • L/Cpl. Charles Henry Slater. Yorkshire Regiment 9th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Rfm. Samuel Sloan. Royal Irish Rifles 2nd Battalion Read their Story.
  • Pte. Felix Christopher Smith. Royal Army Medical Corps 70th Field Ambulance
  • Pte. Richard Snape. Royal Fusiliers 26th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. William Leslie "Rasso" Sneddon. 34th Btn. C Coy, 9 Pl Read their Story.
  • Pte. George W. Spence. Royal Inniskilling Fusilliers 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • G/8779 Ralph Abner Sprigge. Royal West Kent Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Pte. O. I. Stamm. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Maurice Stapleton. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Sgt. William John Stead. 36th Btn.
  • Sjt. Peter Stevenson. Royal Field Artillery 106th Brigade Read their Story.
  • Pte. Donald Stewart. Machine Gun Corps 69th Coy
  • Rfm. Kennedy Stinton. London Regiment 1/21st Btn. (First Surrey Rifles)
  • 2nd Lt. H. Stone. London Regiment 1/23rd Btn.
  • Pte. George Robert Sullivan. 34th Btn.
  • Pte. L. Sykes. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn.
  • Rfm. Robert Charles Syrett. The Rifle Brigade 3rd Btn.
  • Pte. G. T. Taylor. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. W. Thomson. Machine Gun Corps 142nd Coy.
  • Pte. James Tolmie. Royal Army Medical Corps 5th Field Ambulance
  • Rfmn. Samuel Torrans. Royal Irish Rifles A Coy,10th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte Thomas Torrens. 34th Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. W. T. Tramby. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Alfred Turner. The Green Howards (Yorkshire Regiment) 8th Battalion
  • Pte. Lance A. Turner. 34th Btn.
  • Pte. James Charles Waggett. Welsh Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Spr. William Harold James Want. Royal Engineers 155th Field Coy
  • Cpl. Percival Discombe Warren. MM. London Regiment 1/7th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Frank Morton Weare. London Regiment 1/24th Btn.
  • Pte. Alfred Webber. 33rd Btn.
  • Pte. Isaac Wells. Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment 10th Btn. A Coy.
  • Pte. Albert Joseph Wheatland. Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment 11th Btn. Read their Story.
  • Cpl. W. P. Whitehill. 33rd Btn.
  • Sjt. A. A. Whitlock. Royal Engineers 155th Field Coy
  • Pte. John Dickinson Wilerton. Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Btn.
  • Pte. Edwin Charles Wilson. 33rd Btn. A Coy. Read their Story.
  • Pte. Frank Owen Turner Wilson. 3rd Australian Pioneers
  • Pte. Ira Israel Wilson. Yorkshire Regiment 8th Btn.
  • Pte. John Robert Worgan. 33rd Btn.
  • Spr. G. A. Wright. Royal Engineers 25th Signal Coy
  • Pte. James Arthur Wright. Cheshire Regiment 9th Btn.
  • Pte. Frederick A Wyatt. East Surrey Regiment 12th Battalion
  • Lance Sgt. Robert Norman Young. 33rd Btn.
  • L/Sjt. Robert Norman Young. 34th Btn.
  • Capt. William Lancelot Young. MC. 45th Btn.

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