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Machine Gun Corps in the Great War - The Wartime Memories Project -

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Machine Gun Corps



   

Lewis Gun which replaced Machine Guns at Battalion

245th Machine Gun Company

Early developments in machine gun tactics in WW1 led to the withdrawal of the standard two machine gun sections from Battalions (4 guns), which were replaced by at least 8 lighter Lewis guns to still maintain the battalion's firepower and increase its flexibility. As a result and in pace with the availability of the Lewis guns, specialist Machine Gun Companies were formed for use at Brigade and Divisional level to maximise their more concentrated fire power.

One such company, the 245th MG Company was raised and trained in Grantham MG Training Base and moved to France joining the 50th (Northumberland) Division as part of the Divisional Troops on the 30 July 1917. It was later moved into the 50th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps on the 1 March 1918 as part of more tactic changes to further increase the concentration of Divisional firepower.

List of 50th Divisional Troops. (This was a separate support unit for the 149, 150 and 151 Brigades which formed the main front line fighting force in the Division)

  • 245th Machine Gun Company joined 30 July 1917, moved to 50th Bn MGC 1 March 1918
  • 1/7th Bn, the Durham Light Infantry joined as Divisional Pioneer Bn 16 November 1915, left 20 June 1918
  • 50th Battalion MGC formed 1 March 1918 (combining 245 MGC with 149, 150 and 151 Brigades Machine Gun Companies).
  • 5th Bn, the Royal Irish Regiment joined as Divisional Pioneer Bn 14 July 1918
  • A number of units joined the Division on a temporary basis during the reorganisation in mid 1918: 8th Border Regiment, 4th South Staffordshire Regiment and 9th Loyal North Lancashire. All had left by August 1918

Completion of Training and Move to France The newly formed 245 Machine Gun Company completed its training at Grantham in early July 1917 and awaited orders to go to war on the Western Front. They were in action during the Third Battles of Ypres.

They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 50th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   34th Company Machine Gun Corps served with 11th Division, in Egypt from 1st of March 1916. They amalgamated with 32nd & 33rd Companies to form No 11 Battalion, MGC on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 32nd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 32nd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division in March 1916 in Egypt whilst manning the Suez Canal defences. On the 17th of June 1916 the Division was ordered to France to reinforce Third Army on The Somme. They departed from Alexandria on with the last units leaving on the 3rd of July. By the 27th July, they were in the front line on the Somme and took part in The capture of the Wundt-Werk, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of Thiepval. In 1917 they were in action in Operations on the Ancre then moved north to Flanders for The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde and The Battle of Poelcapelle. They amalgamated with the other Machine Gun companies of the Division to form the 11th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 33rd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 33rd Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division in March 1916 in Egypt whilst manning the Suez Canal defences. On the 17th of June 1916 the Division was ordered to France to reinforce Third Army on The Somme. They departed from Alexandria on with the last units leaving on the 3rd of July. By the 27th July, they were in the front line on the Somme and took part in The capture of the Wundt-Werk, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of Thiepval. In 1917 they were in action in Operations on the Ancre then moved north to Flanders for The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde and The Battle of Poelcapelle. They amalgamated with the other Machine Gun companies of the Division to form the 11th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 1st Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 1st Guards Brigade, 1st Division on the 26th of January 1916 They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they saw action in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Third Battle of Ypres. They moved into 1st MG Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 10th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 10th Brigade, 4th Division on the 22 December 1915. In 1916 they were in action during the Battles of The Somme. In 1917 they were at Arras, in action during the The First and Third Battles of the Scarpe, before heading north for the Third Battle of Ypres, where they fought in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The First Battle of Passchendaele. On the 26th of February 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 4th Division to become the 4th Machine Gun Battalion.

   100th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 100th Brigade 33rd Division on the 28th of April 1916. They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they took part in the Arras Offensive, The actions on the Hindenburg Line, the Operations on the Flanders coast and the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 19th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 33rd Division and became 33rd Battalion MGC.

   101st Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 101st Brigade 34th Division on the 27th of April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the The Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in The Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek. On the 26th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 34th Division and became 34th Battalion MGC.

   102nd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 102nd Brigade 34th Division on the 27th of April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the The Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in The Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek. On the 26th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 34th Division and became 34th Battalion MGC.

   103rd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 103rd Brigade 34th Division on the 27th of April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture of Scots and Sausage Redoubts, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge and Pozieres Ridge. 103rd Brigade and the Divisional Pioneers also saw action in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and the The Battle of Arleux during the Arras Offensive. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in The Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek. On the 26th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 34th Division and became 34th Battalion MGC.

   104th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 104th Brigade, 35th Division in April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme at Bazentin Ridge, Arrow Head Copse, Maltz Horn Farm and Falfemont Farm. In 1917 they were in action during The pursuit to the Hindenburg Line, at Houthulst Forest and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 35th Division and became 35th Battalion MGC.

   105th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 105th Brigade 35th Division in April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme at Bazentin Ridge, Arrow Head Copse, Maltz Horn Farm and Falfemont Farm. In 1917 they were in action during The pursuit to the Hindenburg Line, at Houthulst Forest and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 35th Division and became 35th Battalion MGC.

   106th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 106th Brigade 35th Division in April 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme at Bazentin Ridge, Arrow Head Copse, Maltz Horn Farm and Falfemont Farm. In 1917 they were in action during The pursuit to the Hindenburg Line, at Houthulst Forest and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 35th Division and became 35th Battalion MGC.

   107th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 107th Brigade 36th Ulster Division on the 18th of December 1915. The 36th Ulster Division took over the front line in Spring. In 1916 they Division suffered heavily on the first day of the Battle of the Somme where they attacked at Thiepval. In 1917 They were in action at The Battle of Messines, capturing Wytschaete and in the The Battle of Langemarck during the Third Battles of Ypres and the The Cambrai Operations where the Division captured Bourlon Wood. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 36th Division and became 36th Battalion MGC.

The Ulster Tower, at Thiepval is a memorial to the men of the 36th (Ulster) Division, built as a copy of Helen's Tower at Clandeboye, County Down, where men of the 36th Division trained. There is a small visitor centre with a cafe behind the tower which is staffed by members of the Somme Association. Inside the tower is a small chapel with a number of paintings and plaques from Northern Ireland. Today Thiepval Wood is owned by The Somme Association and guided tours are available of a section of recently excavated trenches.

Please note that Thiepval Wood is not open the public, it is used by French huntsmen who use live ammunition and who will shoot, you are putting yourself at risk by entering without permission. Please go to the visitor centre at the Ulster Tower to arrange a guided tour.

A DVD is now available, released for the official opening of the wood for guided tours on the 1st of July 2006, follows the Community Archeology Project, undertaken by The Somme Association and No Man's Land, The European Group for Great War Archaeology.

You can order a copy on-line by clicking the image below:



 More info.

    108th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 108th Brigade 36th Ulster Division on the 26th of January 1916. The 36th Ulster Division took over the front line in Spring. In 1916 the Division suffered heavily on the first day of the Battle of the Somme where they attacked at Thiepval. In 1917 They were in action at The Battle of Messines, capturing Wytschaete and in the The Battle of Langemarck during the Third Battles of Ypres and the The Cambrai Operations where the Division captured Bourlon Wood. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 36th Division and became 36th Battalion MGC.

The Ulster Tower, at Thiepval is a memorial to the men of the 36th (Ulster) Division, built as a copy of Helen's Tower at Clandeboye, County Down, where men of the 36th Division trained. There is a small visitor centre with a cafe behind the tower which is staffed by members of the Somme Association. Inside the tower is a small chapel with a number of paintings and plaques from Northern Ireland. Today Thiepval Wood is owned by The Somme Association and guided tours are available of a section of recently excavated trenches.

Please note that Thiepval Wood is not open the public, it is used by French huntsmen who use live ammunition and who will shoot, you are putting yourself at risk by entering without permission. Please go to the visitor centre at the Ulster Tower to arrange a guided tour.

A DVD is now available, released for the official opening of the wood for guided tours on the 1st of July 2006, follows the Community Archeology Project, undertaken by The Somme Association and No Man's Land, The European Group for Great War Archaeology.

You can order a copy on-line by clicking the image below:



 More info.

   109th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 109th Brigade 36th Ulster Division on the 23rd of January 1916. The 36th Ulster Division took over the front line in Spring. In 1916 the Division suffered heavily on the first day of the Battle of the Somme where they attacked at Thiepval. In 1917 They were in action at The Battle of Messines, capturing Wytschaete and in the The Battle of Langemarck during the Third Battles of Ypres and the The Cambrai Operations where the Division captured Bourlon Wood. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 36th Division and became 36th Battalion MGC.

The Ulster Tower, at Thiepval is a memorial to the men of the 36th (Ulster) Division, built as a copy of Helen's Tower at Clandeboye, County Down, where men of the 36th Division trained. There is a small visitor centre with a cafe behind the tower which is staffed by members of the Somme Association. Inside the tower is a small chapel with a number of paintings and plaques from Northern Ireland. Today Thiepval Wood is owned by The Somme Association and guided tours are available of a section of recently excavated trenches.

Please note that Thiepval Wood is not open the public, it is used by French huntsmen who use live ammunition and who will shoot, you are putting yourself at risk by entering without permission. Please go to the visitor centre at the Ulster Tower to arrange a guided tour.

A DVD is now available, released for the official opening of the wood for guided tours on the 1st of July 2006, follows the Community Archeology Project, undertaken by The Somme Association and No Man's Land, The European Group for Great War Archaeology.

You can order a copy on-line by clicking the image below:



 More info.

   The 11th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 11th Brigade, 4th Division on the 23rd of December 1915. In 1916 they were in action during the Battles of The Somme. In 1917 they were at Arras, in action during the The First and Third Battles of the Scarpe, before heading north for the Third Battle of Ypres, where they fought in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The First Battle of Passchendaele. On the 26th of February 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 4th Division to become the 4th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 110th Machine Gun Company joined, 110th Brigade, 37th Division on the 4th of March 1916. On the 7th of July the brigade transferred to 21st Division. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras offensive, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 37th Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 111th Machine Gun Company joined, 111th Brigade, 37th Division on the 4th of March 1916. They went into action in The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They were in action during the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 37th Machine Gun Battalion on the 4th of March 1918.

   The 112th Machine Gun Company joined, 112th Brigade, 37th Division on the 4th of March 1916. They went into action in The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They were in action during the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 37th Machine Gun Battalion on the 4th of March 1918.

   The 113th Machine Gun Company joined, 113th Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division on the 19th of May 1916. In July 1916 they were in action at Mametz Wood on The Somme, suffering severe casualties. The Division did not return to major action for more than a 12 months. In 1917 they were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 38th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 114th Machine Gun Company joined, 114th Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division on the 19th of May 1916. In July 1916 they were in action at Mametz Wood on The Somme, suffering severe casualties. The Division did not return to major action for more than a 12 months. In 1917 they were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 38th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 115th Machine Gun Company joined, 115th Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division on the 19th of May 1916. In July 1916 they were in action at Mametz Wood on The Somme, suffering severe casualties. The Division did not return to major action for more than a 12 months. In 1917 they were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 38th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 116th Machine Gun Company joined, 116th Brigade, 39th Division on the 18th of May 1916. On the 30th June 1916 they were in action in an attack near Richebourg l'Avoue with the Sussex battalions suffered heavy casualties. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including, the fighting on the Ancre, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre heights and the capture of Schwaben Reddoubt and Stuff Trench as well as The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 39th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of March 1918.

   The 117th Machine Gun Company joined, 117th Brigade, 39th Division on the 18th of May 1916. On the 30th June 1916 they were in action in an attack near Richebourg l'Avoue with the Sussex battalions suffered heavy casualties. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including, the fighting on the Ancre, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre heights and the capture of Schwaben Reddoubt and Stuff Trench as well as The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 39th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of March 1918.

   The 118th Machine Gun Company joined, 118th Brigade, 39th Division on the 21st of March 1916. On the 30th June 1916 they were in action in an attack near Richebourg l'Avoue with the Sussex battalions suffered heavy casualties. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including, the fighting on the Ancre, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre heights and the capture of Schwaben Reddoubt and Stuff Trench as well as The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 39th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of March 1918.

   The 119th Machine Gun Company joined, 119th Brigade, 40th Division on the 19th of June 1916. They went into the front line near Loos and were later in action in The Battle of the Ancre on the Somme. In 1917 they saw action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The capture of Fifteen Ravine, Villers Plouich, Beaucamp and La Vacquerie abd The Cambrai Operations, including the capture of Bourlon Wood in November. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 40th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 12th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 12th Brigade, 4th Division on the 24th of January 1916. They were in action during the Battles of The Somme. In 1917 they were at Arras, in action during the The First and Third Battles of the Scarpe, before heading north for the Third Battle of Ypres, where they fought in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The First Battle of Passchendaele. On the 26th of February 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 4th Division to become the 4th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 120th Machine Gun Company joined, 120th Brigade, 40th Division on the 19th of June 1916. They went into the front line near Loos and were later in action in The Battle of the Ancre on the Somme. In 1917 they saw action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The capture of Fifteen Ravine, Villers Plouich, Beaucamp and La Vacquerie abd The Cambrai Operations, including the capture of Bourlon Wood in November. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 40th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 121st Machine Gun Company joined, 121st Brigade, 40th Division on the 19th of June 1916. They went into the front line near Loos and were later in action in The Battle of the Ancre on the Somme. In 1917 they saw action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The capture of Fifteen Ravine, Villers Plouich, Beaucamp and La Vacquerie abd The Cambrai Operations, including the capture of Bourlon Wood in November. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 40th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 122nd Machine Gun Company joined, 122nd Brigade, 41st Division in May 1916. They were in action at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. In 1917 they fought during The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road and took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast. In November the Division was ordered to Italy, moving by train to Mantua. The Division took the front line near the River Piave, north west of Treviso. In February they were summoned back to France and departed from Campo San Piero, travelling by train to concentrate near Doullens and Mondicourt. They were in action during The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume and The Battle of Arras They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 41st Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 123rd Machine Gun Company joined, 123rd Brigade, 41st Division in May 1916. They were in action at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. In 1917 they fought during The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road and took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast. In November the Division was ordered to Italy, moving by train to Mantua. The Division took the front line near the River Piave, north west of Treviso. In February they were summoned back to France and departed from Campo San Piero, travelling by train to concentrate near Doullens and Mondicourt. They were in action during The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume and The Battle of Arras They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 41st Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 124th Machine Gun Company joined, 124th Brigade, 41st Division in May 1916. They were in action at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. In 1917 they fought during The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road and took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast. In November the Division was ordered to Italy, moving by train to Mantua. The Division took the front line near the River Piave, north west of Treviso. In February they were summoned back to France and departed from Campo San Piero, travelling by train to concentrate near Doullens and Mondicourt. They were in action during The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume and The Battle of Arras They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 41st Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 125th Machine Gun Company joined, 125th (Lancashire Fusiliers) Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the 4th of March 1916. The division had just arrived on the Western Front having served in Egypt and Gallipoli. They went into the front line at Ephey, moved to Havrincourt then were withdrawn to Albert for rest and training during July and August. In September they moved north to Flanders and were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres at Iberian, Borry Farm, Beck House Farm and Sans Souci. At the end of the month they moved to the coast at Nieuport until November when they moved to La Bassee Canal at Givenchy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 42nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 25th of February 1918

   The 126th Machine Gun Company joined, 126th (East Lancashire) Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the 14th of March 1916. The division had just arrived on the Western Front having served in Egypt and Gallipoli. They went into the front line at Ephey, moved to Havrincourt then were withdrawn to Albert for rest and training during July and August. In September they moved north to Flanders and were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres at Iberian, Borry Farm, Beck House Farm and Sans Souci. At the end of the month they moved to the coast at Nieuport until November when they moved to La Bassee Canal at Givenchy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 42nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 23rd of February 1918.

   The 127th Machine Gun Company joined, 127th (Manchester) Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the 14th of March 1916. The division had just arrived on the Western Front having served in Egypt and Gallipoli. They went into the front line at Ephey, moved to Havrincourt then were withdrawn to Albert for rest and training during July and August. In September they moved north to Flanders and were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres at Iberian, Borry Farm, Beck House Farm and Sans Souci. At the end of the month they moved to the coast at Nieuport until November when they moved to La Bassee Canal at Givenchy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 42nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 23rd of February 1918

   The 12th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 12th (Eastern) Division. In March 1918 they moved by motor lorry from Busnes to Albert and were in action in The Battle of Bapaume and spent the spring engaged in heavy fighting a the enemy advanced across the old Somme battlefields. On the 1st of July 1918, they attacked Bouzincourt. but were repelled by the enemy. They were relieved on the 10th and moved to the area south of Amiens. They were in action in The Battle of Amiens and were engaged in heavy fighting from the 22nd pushing the enemy back and capturing Meaulte, Mametz, Carnoy, Hardecourt and Faviere Wood with in a week. In September they were in action in a successful attack on Nurlu and pursued the enemy back to Sorel Wood. They were in action during The battles of the Hindenburg Line, including The Battle of Epehy and The Battle of the St Quentin canal. In October they fought in The Final Advance in Artois reaching the Scheldt Canal by the 27th. They were withdrawn for rest on the 30th and after the Armistice moved to the area east of Douai and were engaged in battlefield salvage and sports until demobilisation began.

   The 13th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 13th Brigade, 5th Division on the 24th of December 1915. In March 1916 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras. They moved south in July to reinforce The Somme and were in action at, High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In October they moved to Festubertand remained there until March 1917 when they moved in preparation for the Battles of Arras. On 7 September 1917 the 5th Division moved out of the line for a period of rest before, being sent to Flanders where they were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres. 5th Division was sent to Italy and took up positions in the line along the River Piave in late January 1918. They were recalled to France to assist with the German Advance in late March 1918 and were in action during the Battles of the Lys. On the 26th of April 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 5th Division to become the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 137th Machine Gun Company joined 137th (Staffordshire) Brigade, 46th (North Midland) Division on the 7th of March 1916 in France. On the 1st of July 1916 they took part in The diversionary attack at Gommecourt. In 1917 they were in action during the Operations on the Ancre, Occupation of the Gommecourt defences, The attack on Rettemoy Graben, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The attack on Lievin and The Battle of Hill 70. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 46th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 138th Machine Gun Company joined 138th (Lincoln & Leicester) Brigade, 46th (North Midland) Division on the 22nd of February 1916 in France. On the 1st of July 1916 they took part in The diversionary attack at Gommecourt. In 1917 they were in action during the Operations on the Ancre, Occupation of the Gommecourt defences, The attack on Rettemoy Graben, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The attack on Lievin and The Battle of Hill 70. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 46th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 139th Machine Gun Company joined 139th (Sherwood Forester) Brigade, 46th (North Midland) Division on the 16th of February 1916 in France. On the 1st of July 1916 they took part in The diversionary attack at Gommecourt. In 1917 they were in action during the Operations on the Ancre, Occupation of the Gommecourt defences, The attack on Rettemoy Graben, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The attack on Lievin and The Battle of Hill 70. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 46th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 14th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 14th Brigade, 5th Division on the 27 December 1915, They were later renamed the 95th Brigade Machine Gun Company. In March 1916 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras. They moved south in July to reinforce The Somme and were in action at, High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In October they moved to Festubertand remained there until March 1917 when they moved in preparation for the Battles of Arras. On 7 September 1917 the 5th Division moved out of the line for a period of rest before, being sent to Flanders where they were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres. 5th Division was sent to Italy and took up positions in the line along the River Piave in late January 1918. They were recalled to France to assist with the German Advance in late March 1918 and were in action during the Battles of the Lys. On the 26th of April 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 5th Division to become the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 140th Machine Gun Company was formed in 140th (4th London) Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division on the 13th of December 1915 in France. In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 47th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 141st Machine Gun Company was formed in 141st (5th London) Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division on the 12th of December 1915 in France. In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 47th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 142nd Machine Gun Company was formed in 142nd (6th London) Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division on the 12th of December 1915 in France. In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 47th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 143rd Machine Gun Company was formed in 143rd (Warwickshire) Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division on the 8th of January 1916 in France. They were in action in the Battle of the Somme, suffering hevy casualties on the 1st of July in assaulting the Quadrilateral (Heidenkopf). They were also in action at The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, capturing Ovillers, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 the Division occupied Peronne during the The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line and were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 21st of November 1917 they entrained for Italy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 48th Machine Gun Battalion on the 22nd of March 1918.

   The 144th Machine Gun Company was formed in 144th (Gloucester & Worcester) Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division on the 23rd of January 1916 in France. They were in action in the Battle of the Somme, suffering heavy casualties on the 1st of July in assaulting the Quadrilateral (Heidenkopf). They were also in action at The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, capturing Ovillers, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 the Division occupied Peronne during the The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line and were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 21st of November 1917 they entrained for Italy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 48th Machine Gun Battalion on the 22nd of March 1918.

   The 145th Machine Gun Company was formed in 145th (South Midland) Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division on the 11th of January 1916 in France. They were in action in the Battle of the Somme, suffering heavy casualties on the 1st of July in assaulting the Quadrilateral (Heidenkopf). They were also in action at The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, capturing Ovillers, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 the Division occupied Peronne during the The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line and were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 21st of November 1917 they entrained for Italy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 48th Machine Gun Battalion on the 22nd of March 1918.

   The 146th Machine Gun Company was formed in 146th (West Riding) Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Division on the 27th of January 1916. They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were involved in the Operations on the Flanders Coast and the The Battle of Poelcapelle during the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 49th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 147th Machine Gun Company was formed in 147th (2nd West Riding) Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Division on the 26th of January 1916. They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were involved in the Operations on the Flanders Coast and the The Battle of Poelcapelle during the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 49th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 148th Machine Gun Company was formed in 148th (3rd West Riding) Brigade, 49th (West Riding) Division on the 6th of February 1916. They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were involved in the Operations on the Flanders Coast and the The Battle of Poelcapelle during the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 49th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 149th Machine Gun Company was formed in 149th (Northumbrian) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division on the 6th of February 1916. They fought on the Somme at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action at Arras during The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Wancourt Ridge and The Second Battle of the Scarpe before moving north for the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 50th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 14th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 14th (Light) Division. They were in action at Ypres and in the final advance in Flanders

   The 15th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 15th Brigade, 5th Division on the 27th of December 1915. In March 1916 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras. They moved south in July to reinforce The Somme and were in action at, High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In October they moved to Festubertand remained there until March 1917 when they moved in preparation for the Battles of Arras. On 7 September 1917 the 5th Division moved out of the line for a period of rest before, being sent to Flanders where they were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres. 5th Division was sent to Italy and took up positions in the line along the River Piave in late January 1918. They were recalled to France to assist with the German Advance in late March 1918 and were in action during the Battles of the Lys. On the 26th of April 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 5th Division to become the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 150th Machine Gun Company was formed in 150th (York & Durham) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division on the 1st of February 1916. They fought on the Somme at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action at Arras during The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Wancourt Ridge and The Second Battle of the Scarpe before moving north for the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 50th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 151st Machine Gun Company was formed in 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division on the 6th of February 1916. They fought on the Somme at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action at Arras during The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Wancourt Ridge and The Second Battle of the Scarpe before moving north for the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 50th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 152nd Machine Gun Company was formed in 152nd (1st Highland) Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division on the 16th of January 1916. They were in action in the The Battle of Festubert and The Second Action of Givenchy before moving south to The Somme taking over the line near Hamel. In 1916 they were in action in the Battles of the Somme, including the attacks on High Wood and The Battle of the Ancre, capturing Beaumont Hamel, taking more than 2000 prisoners. In 1917 They took part in the Arras Offensive, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge and the Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 51st Machine Gun Battalion on the 19th of February 1918.

   The 153rd Machine Gun Company was formed in 153rd (2nd Highland) Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division on the 15th of January 1916. They were in action in the The Battle of Festubert and The Second Action of Givenchy before moving south to The Somme taking over the line near Hamel. In 1916 they were in action in the Battles of the Somme, including the attacks on High Wood and The Battle of the Ancre, capturing Beaumont Hamel, taking more than 2000 prisoners. In 1917 They took part in the Arras Offensive, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge and the Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 51st Machine Gun Battalion on the 19th of February 1918.

   The 154th Machine Gun Company was formed in 154th (3rd Highland) Brigade, 51st (Highland) Division on the 14th of January 1916. They were in action in the The Battle of Festubert and The Second Action of Givenchy before moving south to The Somme taking over the line near Hamel. In 1916 they were in action in the Battles of the Somme, including the attacks on High Wood and The Battle of the Ancre, capturing Beaumont Hamel, taking more than 2000 prisoners. In 1917 They took part in the Arras Offensive, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge and the Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 51st Machine Gun Battalion on the 19th of February 1918.

   The 155th Machine Gun Company was formed in 155th (South Scottish) Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Division on the 23rd of March 1916. They were in action at Dueidar in April and The Battle of Romani in August. In 1917 they were in action during The First, Second and Third Battles of Gaza, at Wadi el Hesi, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil and The Battle of Jaffa including the passage of the Nahr-el-Auja. 52nd Division remained in the line near Arsuf until March 1918 when it was relieved by the 7th (Meerut) Division and proceedrd to France, sailing from Alexandria in early April, via Marseilles they concentrated near Abbeville. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 52nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of April 1918.

   The 156th Machine Gun Company was formed in 156th (Scottish Rifles) Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Division on the 16th of March 1916. They were in action at Dueidar in April and The Battle of Romani in August. In 1917 they were in action during The First, Second and Third Battles of Gaza, at Wadi el Hesi, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil and The Battle of Jaffa including the passage of the Nahr-el-Auja. 52nd Division remained in the line near Arsuf until March 1918 when it was relieved by the 7th (Meerut) Division and proceedrd to France, sailing from Alexandria in early April, via Marseilles they concentrated near Abbeville. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 52nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of April 1918.

   The 157th Machine Gun Company was formed in 157th (Highland Light Infantry) Brigade, 52nd (Lowland) Division on the 14th of March 1916. They were in action at Dueidar in April and The Battle of Romani in August. In 1917 they were in action during The First, Second and Third Battles of Gaza, at Wadi el Hesi, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil and The Battle of Jaffa including the passage of the Nahr-el-Auja. 52nd Division remained in the line near Arsuf until March 1918 when it was relieved by the 7th (Meerut) Division and proceedrd to France, sailing from Alexandria in early April, via Marseilles they concentrated near Abbeville. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 52nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of April 1918.

   The 15th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 17th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 15th (Scottish) Division. They were in action action at The Battle of the Soissonnais and the Ourcq taking part in the attack on Buzancy, and The Final Advance in Artois.

   The 16th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 16th Brigade, 6th Division in February 1916. In 1916 they were in action at Battle of Flers-Courcelette on The Somme, and again in The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy, in 1917 they were in action at Hill 70 and Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 6th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 16th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 9th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 16th (Irish) Division. They were in action on the Somme 1918 suffering very heavy casualties, the battalion was broken up at Camiers on the 8th of May 1918 with the troops transferring to infantry battalions. A new 16th Machine Gun Battalion was formed at Grantham on the 18th of June 1918 and joined the 16th (Irish) Division at Samer on the 2nd of August 1918 and fought in The Final Advance in Artois.

   The 176th Machine Gun Company joined 38th (Welsh) Division on the 28th of March 1917. They were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 38th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 178th Machine Gun Company joined 46th (North Midland) Division on the 28th of March 1917 in France. They were in action during the Operations on the Ancre, Occupation of the Gommecourt defences, The attack on Rettemoy Graben, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The attack on Lievin and The Battle of Hill 70. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 46th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918.

   The 17th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 24th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 17th (Northern) Division. they were in action in The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of Epehy and The Battle of Cambrai followed by The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle and The Battle of the Sambre. At the Armistice the Division was south east of Maubeuge and was quickly withdrawn to the area west of Le Cateau. On the 6th of December they moved back behind Amiens and went to billets around Hallencourt.

   The 18th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 18th Brigade, 6th Division in February 1916. Later that year they were in action at Battle of Flers-Courcelette on The Somme, and again in The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy, in 1917 they were in action at Hill 70 and Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other MG Companies of the Division to form the 6th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 18th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 20th of April 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 18th (Eastern) Division. They saw action during in The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Selle and The Battle of the Sambre. At the Armistice the Division was in XIII Corps Reserve near Le Cateau and demobilisation began on the 10th of December 1918.

   19th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 19th Brigade 33rd Division on the 24th of Feburary 1916. They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they took part in the Arras Offensive, The actions on the Hindenburg Line, the Operations on the Flanders coast and the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 19th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 33rd Division and became 33rd Battalion MGC.

   The 191st Machine Gun Company joined 24th Division on the 15th of December 1916. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Vimy Ridge in the Spring, The Battle of Messines in June and Third Battle of Ypres in October before moving south where they were in action during The Cambrai Operations when the Germans counter attacked. On the 5th of March 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 24th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 194th Machine Gun Company joined 23rd Division on the 16th of December 1916, near Vlamertinghe In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Messines, The Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood and the The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. In November 1917 the Division moved to Italy concentrating between Mantua and Marcaria before taking over the front line at the Montello on the 4th of December. On the 1st of April 1918 the Company joined with the other MGC's of the Division to become No 23 Battalion, MGC.

   The 195th Machine Gun Company joined 25th Division on the 16th of December 1916. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Messines attacking between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads. In the Third battle of Ypres were were in action during The Battle of Pilkem. On the 1st of April 1918 the Company joined with the other MGC's of the Division to become No 25 Battalion, Machine Gun Corps.

   The 197th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 9th (Scottish) Division on the 19th of December 1916 as the Divisional Machine Gun company under the direct Command of Divisional HQ. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, The First Battle of Passchendaele and The action of Welsh Ridge. They joined 9th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918

   The 199th Machine Gun Company joined 41st Division in October 1917. They were in action in the Operations on the Flanders coast. In November the Division was ordered to Italy, moving by train to Mantua. The Division took the front line near the River Piave, north west of Treviso. In February they were summoned back to France and departed from Campo San Piero, travelling by train to concentrate near Doullens and Mondicourt. They were in action during The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume and The Battle of Arras They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 41st Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 19th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 14th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 19th (Western) Division. They fought on The Somme during The Battle of St Quentin and The Battle of Bapaume and in the Battles of the Lys at Messines, Bailleul and The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge. They fought in The Battle of the Aisne and during the Final Advance in Picardly they were in action in The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre and the passage of the Grand Honelle. At the Armitice were were in billets near Bavay. Demobilisation began in December 1918 and the final cadres returned to England on the 27th of June 1919.

   The 2nd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 2nd Guards Brigade, 1st Division on the 26th of January 1916 They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they saw action in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Third Battle of Ypres. They moved into 1st MG Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 20th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 20th Brigade, 7th Division on the 10th February 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture Mametz, The Battle of Bazentin, the attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont and the Operations on the Ancre. In 1917 They fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the flanking operations round Bullecourt during The Arras Offensive, before moving to Flanders for the Third Battle of Ypres, seeing action in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In late 1917 the 7th Division was selected to move to Italy. They took up position in the line along the River Piave,in late January 1918. On the 1st of April 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 7th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 205th Machine Gun Company joined 5th Division on the 19th of March 1917 as the Division was preparing for the Battles of Arras. On 7 September 1917 the 5th Division moved out of the line for a period of rest before, being sent to Flanders where they were in action during the Third Battle of Ypres. 5th Division was sent to Italy and took up positions in the line along the River Piave in late January 1918. They were recalled to France to assist with the German Advance in late March 1918 and were in action during the Battles of the Lys. On the 26th of February 1918 they became the 5th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 20th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 15th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 20th (Light) Division. They fought in The Battle of St Quentin, The actions at the Somme crossings and The Battle of Rosieres engaging in heavy fighting in each battle, on the 20th of April they were withdrawn to the area south west of Amiensand received many new drafts of men during the summer. They returned to action at The Battle of the Selle and fought in The Battle of Valenciennes, The Battle of the Sambr and the passage of the Grand Honelle. At the Armitice the Division was in the area between Bavay and Maubeuge and later that month the units moved to the Toutencourt-Marieux area. Demobilistion of the Division began in January 1919 and was complete by the end of May.

   The 21st Machine Gun Company joined 21st Brigade, 30th Division on the 8th of March 1916. They were in action during the Battle of the Somme, in which the Division captured Montauban. In 1917 they took part in the pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras Offensive and The Battle of Pilkem Ridge. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 30th Battalion MGC on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 211th Machine Gun Company was formed in XXI Corps, they joined 52nd (Lowland) Division on the 1st of April 1918. They proceeded to France, sailing from Alexandria in early April, via Marseilles they concentrated near Abbeville. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 52nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of April 1918.

   The 216th Machine Gun Company joined 3rd Brigade, 1st Division on the 22nd of March 1917, they saw action in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Third Battle of Ypres. They moved into 1st MG Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 217th Machine Gun Company joined 20th (Light) Division in March 1917, they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Cambrai Operations. They moved into 20th Machine Gun Battalion on the 15th of March 1918

   The 218th Machine Gun Company joined 8th Division on the 23rd of March 1917. They were in action at the Battle of The Somme. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and then moved to Flanders and were in action in The Battle of Pilkem and The Battle of Langemarck. In 1918 they saw action during The Battle of St Quentin, The actions at the Somme crossings, The Battle of Rosieres, The actions of Villers-Bretonneux, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of the Scarpe and The Final Advance in Artois including the capture of Douai. On the 20th of January 1918 they became the 8th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 21st Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 24th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 21st Division. They were in action during the Battles of the Lys, the Battle of the Aisne, The Somme, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the Division were around Berlaimont, on the 12th they moved to Beaufort, then in mid December they moved west of Amiens and demobilisation began being completed by the 19th of May 1919.

   The 22nd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 22nd Brigade, 7th Division on the 24th of February 1916. In 1916 They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture Mametz, The Battle of Bazentin, the attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont and the Operations on the Ancre. In 1917 They fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the flanking operations round Bullecourt during The Arras Offensive, before moving to Flanders for the Third Battle of Ypres, seeing action in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In late 1917 the 7th Division was selected to move to Italy. They took up position in the line along the River Piave,in late January 1918. On the 1st of April 1918 they joined with the other MG Companies of the Division to form the 7th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 220th Machine Gun Company joined 7th Division on the 25th of March 1917. They fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the flanking operations round Bullecourt during The Arras Offensive, before moving to Flanders for the Third Battle of Ypres, seeing action in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In late 1917 the 7th Division was selected to move to Italy. They took up position in the line along the River Piave,in late January 1918. On the 1st of April 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to become the 7th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 225th Machine Gun Company joined 15th (Scottish) Division on the 19th of July 1917 and were in action during the The Battle of Pilckem and The Battle of Langemark. In 1918 they fought in The First Battle of Bapaume and The First Battle of Arras. On the 17th of March 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to become the 15th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 226th Machine Gun Company joined 30th Division on the 19th of July 1917. They took part in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 30th Battalion MGC on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 227th Machine Gun Company was formed in 228th Brigade, 28th Division on the 11th of September 1917 in Salonika, originally named 227th MGC. In 1918 they were in action at the Battle of Doiran and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. When Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased at the end of September the 28th Division was in the area of Trnovo. They moved in early November to Gallipoli and occupied the Dardanelles Forts.

   The 228th Machine Gun Company joined 39th Division on the 19th of July 1917. They fought in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 39th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of March 1918.

   The 23rd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 23rd Brigade, 8th Division on the 15th of January 1916. They were in action at the Battle of The Somme. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and then moved to Flanders and were in action in The Battle of Pilkem and The Battle of Langemarck. On the 20th January 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 8th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 232nd Machine Gun Company joined 51st (Highland) Division on the 20th of July 1917. They were in action in the The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge and the Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 51st Machine Gun Battalion on the 19th of February 1918.

   The 233rd Machine Gun Company joined 3rd Division on the 18 July 1917 and were in action during The Battle of the Menin Road and Battle of Polygon Wood during the Third Battle of Ypres. Then moved south and were in action at The Battle of Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 3rd Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 234th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 4th Division on the 16th of July 1917 as the Divisional Machine Gun company under the direct Command of Divisional HQ. They were in action in the Third Battle of Ypres, where they fought in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The First Battle of Passchendaele. On the 26th of February 1918 they amalgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of 4th Division to become the 4th Machine Gun Battalion who were in action on The Somme, then returned to Flanders fighting in the Defence of Hinges Ridge during The Battle of Hazebrouck and in The Battle of Bethune, The Advance in Flanders The Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy.

   The 235th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 12th (Eastern) Division on the 16th of July 1917. They were in action in The Battle of Pozieres on the 3rd of August with a successful attack capturing 4th Avenue Trench and were engaged in heavy fighting until they were withdrawn on the 9th. They moved north and in 1917 were in action at Arras in The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux and The Third Battle of the Scarpe. They remained in the Arras sector until the 30th of October when they moved to Hesdin for the Cambrai offensive in which the Division suffered heavy losses. They combined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 11th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 236th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 17th (Northern) Division on the 17th of July 1917 and fought in The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. They combined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 17th Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918

   The 237th Machine Gun Company joined 37th Division on the 17th of July 1917. They were in action in the Battles of The Somme. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras offensive, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 21st Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 238th Machine Gun Company joined 41st Division in July 1917. They were in action at The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges on the Somme. They left the Division in October 1917.

   The 239th Machine Gun Company joined 47th (2nd London) Division on the 17th of July 1917 in France and were in action in the last few days of The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres. They left the Division on the 1st of October 1917.

   The 23rd Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 23rd Division. They were in action during the fighting on the Asiago Plateau and the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, including the passage of the Piave and the Monticano. At the Italian Armistice at 3pm on the 4th of November, the 23rd were midway between the Rivers Livenza and Meduna, east of Sacile. They moved to billets west of Treviso and demobilisation took place in January and February 1919.

   The 24th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 24th Brigade, 8th Division on the 10th of January 1916. They were in action at the Battle of The Somme. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and then moved to Flanders and were in action in The Battle of Pilkem and The Battle of Langemarck. On the 20th January 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 8th Machine Gun Battalion.

   240th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 34th Division on the 18th of July 1917. In August they were involved in the fighting at Hargicourt and in October they took part in The Third Battles of Ypres at the Broenbeek. On the 26th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 34th Division and became 34th Battalion MGC.

   241st Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 35th Division on the 18th of July 1917. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were in action during The pursuit to the Hindenburg Line, at Houthulst Forest and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 35th Division and became 35th Battalion MGC.

   The 242nd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 2nd Division on the 18th of July 1917 as the Divisional Machine Gun company under the direct Command of Divisional HQ. They saw action at The Battle of Cambrai. They amalgamated with the other MG Coys of 2nd Division to become the 2nd MG Battalion on the 4th of March 1918 and then fought on the Somme, in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and The Battle of the Selle

   243rd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 31st Division on the 18th of July 1917. On the 21st of February 1918 they merged with other MGC of the Division to become 31st Bn MGC still with 31st Division. In early 1918 they were on the Somme before moving north to Flanders for the Battle of the Lys and the Final Advance in Flanders.

   The 244th Machine Gun Company joined 40th Division in July 19117. They they saw action during The Cambrai Operations, including the capture of Bourlon Wood in November. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 40th Machine Gun Battalion in March 1918.

   The 246th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 19th (Western) Division on the 19th of July 1917. They were in action in the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 19th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of February 1918.

   The 247th Machine Gun Company joined 37th Division on the 19th of July 1917. They were in action during the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 37th Machine Gun Battalion on the 4th of March 1918.

   248th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 33rd Division on the 21st of July 1917. They took part in the Operations on the Flanders coast and the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 19th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 33rd Division and became 33rd Battalion MGC.

   The 249th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 14th (Light) Division on the 21st of July 1917. They fought in The Battle of Langemark and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. They left the Division on the 1st of October 1917.

   The 24th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 5th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 24th Division. they were in action on the Somme and The Battle of Cambrai and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the Division were in the line 1.5 miles east of the Maubeuge-Mons road. They moved back to the area between Denain and Douai at the end of November moved to St Amand-Orchies, then on the 18th of December the Division moved to Tournai for demobilisation, which was completed by 26 March 1919.

   The 25th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 25th Brigade, 8th Division on the 10th of January 1916. They were in action at the Battle of The Somme. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and then moved to Flanders and were in action in The Battle of Pilkem and The Battle of Langemarck. On the 20th January 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 8th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 250th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 11th (Northern) Division on the 16th of November 1917 they combined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 11th Machine Gun Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 251st Machine Gun Company joined 48th (South Midland) Division on the 16th of November 1917. On the 21st of November 1917 they entrained for Italy. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 48th Machine Gun Battalion on the 22nd of March 1918.

   The 254th Machine Gun Company joined 49th (West Riding) Division on the 19th of December 1916. They were in action in the Operations on the Flanders Coast and the The Battle of Poelcapelle during the Third Battle of Ypres. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 49th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 255th Machine Gun Company joined 47th (2nd London) Division on the 19th of November 1917 in France. They were in action The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 47th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 25th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 25th Division. They briefly left the division between the 23rd of July and 19th of October 1918. They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Lys, The Battle of the Aisne, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy.

   The 26th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 26th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division on the 29th of January 1916. they were in action in the Battle of the Somme, including the capture of Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Le Transloy. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, The First Battle of Passchendaele and The action of Welsh Ridge. In 1918 they fought on the Somme and on the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 9th Machine Gun Battalion.

   266th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 36th Ulster Division on the 17th of January 1918. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 36th Division and became 36th Battalion MGC. They were in action on the Somme, in the Battles of the Lys and the Final Advance in Flanders. At the Armistice they were at Mouscron, north east of Tourcoing, where the Division remained throughout demobilization which was complete by June 1919.

   The 268th Machine Gun Company joined 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the 20th of January 1918. They joined with the other machine gun companies of the Division to form 42nd Machine Gun Battalion on the 23rd of February 1918.

   The 269th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 16th (Irish) Division on the 18th of January 1918, they combined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 16th Machine Gun Battalion on the 9th of March 1918

   The 27th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 27th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division on the 29th of January 1916. they were in action in the Battle of the Somme, including the capture of Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Le Transloy. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, The First Battle of Passchendaele and The action of Welsh Ridge. In 1918 they fought on the Somme and on the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 9th Machine Gun Battalion

   The 273rd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps was formed in 13th (Western) Division in October and November 1917. they were in action in the Second and Third Actions of Jabal Hamrin and fought at Tuz Khurmatli the following April. By the 28th of May 1918, Divisional HQ had moved to Dawalib and remained there until the end of the war, enduring extreme summer temperatures.

   The 28th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 28th Brigade, 9th (Scottish) Division on the 3rd of January 1916. On the 6th of May 1916 they transferred to the South African Brigade still with 9th (Scottish) Division. They were in action in the Battle of the Somme, including the capture of Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Le Transloy. In 1917 they fought in the The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, The First Battle of Passchendaele and The action of Welsh Ridge. In 1918 they fought on the Somme and on the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 9th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 29th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 29th Brigade, 10th (Irish) Division on the 10th May 1916 at Basingstoke. They departed from Liverpool on the 9th of July for Lemnos. The 29th Brigade landed at Anzac Cove and went into action on Sari Bair between the 6th and 10th of August then went on to attack Hill 60 later in the month. They were withdrawn from Gallipoli on the 29th of September 1915 to Mudros, moving to Salonika, landing between the 5th and 10th of October. On the 7th and 8th of December they were in action at Kosturino, in the retreat from Serbia. Some units of the Division were in action at the Karajakois and Yenikoi in late September and early October. They sailed from Salonika to Egypt in early September 1917, concentrating near Rafa to prepare for the Palestine Campaign. On the 7th of May 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 10th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 3rd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division on the 26th of January 1916 They were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they saw action in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Third Battle of Ypres. They moved into 1st MG Battalion on the 28th of February 1918

   The 30th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 30th Brigade, 10th (Irish) Division on the 10th May 1916 at Basingstoke. They departed from Liverpool on the 9th of July for Lemnos. The 30th Brigade landed at Sulva Bay on the 6th and 7th of August 1915 and made an attack on Chocolate Hill on the 7th and 8th. They were withdrawn from Gallipoli on the 30th of September 1915 to Mudros, moving to Salonika, landing between the 5th and 10th of October. On the 7th and 8th of December they were in action at Kosturino, in the retreat from Serbia. Some units of the Division were in action at the Karajakois and Yenikoi in late September and early October. They sailed from Salonika to Egypt in early September 1917, concentrating near Rafa to prepare for the Palestine Campaign. On the 7th of May 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 10th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 30th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 30th Division. They were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys, being reduced to a cadre on the 13th of May 1918 with 540 men transferring to 31st Battalion. On the 29th of June 1918 they were brought back to full strength by absorbing \"A\" Battalion MGC. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines. In January 1919 30th Division took up duty at the Base Ports of Dunkirk, Calais, Boulogne and Etaples and demobilisation began.

   The 31st Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 31st Brigade, 10th (Irish) Division on the 11th May 1916 at Basingstoke. They departed from Liverpool on the 9th of July for Lemnos. The 31st Brigade landed at Sulva Bay on the 6th and 7th of August 1915 and made an attack on Chocolate Hill on the 7th and 8th. They were withdrawn from Gallipoli on the 31st of September 1915 to Mudros, moving to Salonika, landing between the 5th and 10th of October. On the 7th and 8th of December they were in action at Kosturino, in the retreat from Serbia. Some units of the Division were in action at the Karajakois and Yenikoi in late September and early October. They sailed from Salonika to Egypt in early September 1917, concentrating near Rafa to prepare for the Palestine Campaign. On the 7th of May 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form the 10th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 31st Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 21st of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 31st Division. They saw action in The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, they moved north to Flanders and took part in The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Defence of Nieppe Forest and The attack at La Becque during the Battles of the Lys. During the Advance in Flanders they were involved in The capture of Vieux Berquin, and The action of Tieghem. They crossed the River Scheldt on the 9th of November and at the Armistice the forward units had reached Everbecque and the River Dender. They moved back to the Arques-Blendecques area and demobilisation began.

   The 33rd Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 19th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 33rd Division. They were in action in the Battles of the Lys, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the Division was in a peroid of rest in the Sambre valley near Leval Demobilisation took place throughout the first months of 1919 with Divisional HQ moving to Le Havre on the 28th of February.

   The 34th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 26th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 34th Division. They were in action in The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul and The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge during the Battles of the Lys, suffering heavy losses. The 34th Division was then withdrawn from fighting and on the 21st of April they moved to the area west of Poperinge for reorganisation and was engaged in digging a new defensive line between Abeele and Watou. On the 13th of May the infantry units moved to the area around Lumbres and reduced to a cadre which was then employed in the training of newly arrived American troops. By the 1st of July 1918 34th Division had been reconstituted and returned to action, at The Battles of the Soissonais, the Ourcq and the capture of Baigneux Ridge. They took part in the Final Advance in Flanders and at the Armistice was at rest in the area east of Courtrai. 34th Division was selected to join the Army of Occupation and began to move towards Germany on the 14th of November. On the 22nd of December a large number men with industrial and mining skills were demobilised. By the end of January 1919 the Division was occupying the Cologne bridgehead.

   The 35th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 35th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division on the 1st of February 1916. the Division moved back into the front line at Loos on the 12th of February 1916. In June they moved to Flesselles and carried out a training exercise. They moved to Baizieux on the 30th June and went into the reserve at Hencourt and Millencourt by mid morning on the 1st of July. They relieved the 8th Division at Ovillers-la-Boisselle that night and attacked at 3.15 the following morning with mixed success. On the 7th they attacked again and despite suffering heavy casualties in the area of Mash Valley, they succeeded in capturing and holding the first and second lines close to Ovillers. They were withdrawn to Contay on the 9th July. They were in action in The Battle of Pozieres on the 3rd of August with a successful attack capturing 4th Avenue Trench and were engaged in heavy fighting until they were withdrawn on the 9th. They moved north and in 1917 were in action at Arras in The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux and The Third Battle of the Scarpe. They remained in the Arras sector until the 30th of October when they moved to Hesdin for the Cambrai offensive in which the Division suffered heavy losses. They amalgamated with the other Machine Gun companies of the Division to form the 12th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 36th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 2nd of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 36th Division. They were in action on the Somme, in the Battles of the Lys and the Final Advance in Flanders. At the Armistice they were at Mouscron, north east of Tourcoing, where the Division remained throughout demobilization which was complete by June 1919.

   The 37th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 37th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division on the 4th of February 1916. the Division moved back into the front line at Loos on the 12th of February 1916. In June they moved to Flesselles and carried out a training exercise. They moved to Baizieux on the 30th June and went into the reserve at Hencourt and Millencourt by mid morning on the 1st of July. They relieved the 8th Division at Ovillers-la-Boisselle that night and attacked at 3.15 the following morning with mixed success. On the 7th they attacked again and despite suffering heavy casualties in the area of Mash Valley, they succeeded in capturing and holding the first and second lines close to Ovillers. They were withdrawn to Contay on the 9th July. They were in action in The Battle of Pozieres on the 3rd of August with a successful attack capturing 4th Avenue Trench and were engaged in heavy fighting until they were withdrawn on the 9th. They moved north and in 1917 were in action at Arras in The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux and The Third Battle of the Scarpe. They remained in the Arras sector until the 30th of October when they moved to Hesdin for the Cambrai offensive in which the Division suffered heavy losses. They amalgamated with the other Machine Gun companies of the Division to form the 12th Machine Gun Battalion on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 37th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 4th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 37th Division. They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the Division was in the area of Le Quesnoy. Demobilisation began on Boxing Day and was complete by 25 March 1919.

   The 38th Machine Gun Company joined 13th (Western) Division on the 24th of October 1916 as they pushed north across Iraq, fighting at Delli 'Abbas, Duqma, Nahr Kalis, crossing the 'Adhaim on the 18 April and fighting at Shatt al 'Adhaim. Later in the year they were in action in the Second and Third Actions of Jabal Hamrin and fought at Tuz Khurmatli the following April. By the 28th of May 1918, Divisional HQ had moved to Dawalib and remained there until the end of the war, enduring extreme summer temperatures.

   The 38th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 2nd of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 38th Division. They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy Demobilisation began in December 1918 and was complete by June 1919.

   The 39th Machine Gun Company joined 13th (Western) Division on the 26th of October 1916 as they pushed north across Iraq, fighting at Delli 'Abbas, Duqma, Nahr Kalis, crossing the 'Adhaim on the 18 April and fighting at Shatt al 'Adhaim. Later in the year they were in action in the Second and Third Actions of Jabal Hamrin and fought at Tuz Khurmatli the following April. By the 28th of May 1918, Divisional HQ had moved to Dawalib and remained there until the end of the war, enduring extreme summer temperatures. In July 1918, 39th Brigade was detached and joined the North Persia Force which was in Transcaspia by October 1918.

   The 39th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 14th of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 39th Division. They took part in The fighting on Wytschaete Ridge, The First and Second Battle of Kemmel and The Battle of the Scherpenberg. The Division had suffered heavy losses and they were reduced to a cadre by the 1st of June 1918 and took on a role supervising courses of instruction for newly arrived American troops, beginning with units of the 77th American Division at Wolphus. They moved to Varengeville on the 15th of August. By the Armistice the order had already been given to disband the training cadres and they took over the role of operating embarkation camps and reinforcement depots as demobilization began.

   The 3rd Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the MG companies of the 3rd Division. They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Lys, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Battle of the Selle. After the Armistice 3rd Division advanced into Germany as part of the Occupation Force.

   The 40th Machine Gun Battalion was formed in March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 40th Division. They were in action during The Battle of Estaires and The Battle of Hazebrouck in Flanders, suffering heavy losses and were disbanded in May.

   The 41st Machine Gun Company joined 14th (Light) Division on the 15th of February 1916. They were in action on the Somme seeing action in The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First and Third Battle of the Scarpe at Arras, The Battle of Langemark and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. In 1918 they returned to the Somme. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 14th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 41st Machine Gun Battalion was formed in March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 41st Division. They were in action during the Final Advance in Flanders, at Courtrai and Ooteghem. At the Armistice the advanced units were at Nederbrakel, Tenbosch and the River Dender. 41st Division was chosen to join the Army of Occupation, and on the 12th of January 1919, the Division took over the left section of the Cologne bridgehead. Demobilisation began in March and the Division was renamed the London Division.

   The 42nd Machine Gun Company joined 14th (Light) Division on the 24th of February 1916. They were in action on the Somme seeing action in The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First and Third Battle of the Scarpe at Arras, The Battle of Langemark and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. In 1918 they returned to the Somme. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 14th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 42nd Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 23rd of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 42nd Division. They saw action during The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Ancre, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The pursuit to the Selle and The Battle of the Selle. At the Armictice the advance units of the division had crossed the River Sambre at Hautmont. They were moved back to the Charleroi area in mid December where they were demobilised.

   The 43rd Machine Gun Company formed at Houtkerque on the 16th of February 1916 and joined 14th (Light) Division . They were in action on the Somme seeing action in The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Flers-Courcelette. In 1917 they fought in The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First and Third Battle of the Scarpe at Arras, The Battle of Langemark and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. In 1918 they returned to the Somme. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 14th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 44th Machine Gun Company joined 15th (Scottish) Division on the 12th of January 1916. In spring 1916, they were involved in the German gas attacks near Hulluch and the defence of the Kink position. They were in action duringthe Battles of the Somme, including The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and the capture of Martinpuich, The Battle of Le Transloy and the attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The First and Second Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Guemappe during the Arras Offensive. They then moved north to Flanders and were in action during the The Battle of Pilckem and The Battle of Langemark. In 1918 they fought in The First Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 15th MG Battalion on the 17th of March 1918.

   The 45th Machine Gun Company joined 15th (Scottish) Division on the 11th of February 1916. In spring 1916, they were involved in the German gas attacks near Hulluch and the defence of the Kink position. They were in action duringthe Battles of the Somme, including The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and the capture of Martinpuich, The Battle of Le Transloy and the attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The First and Second Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Guemappe during the Arras Offensive. They then moved north to Flanders and were in action during the The Battle of Pilckem and The Battle of Langemark. In 1918 they fought in The First Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 15th MG Battalion on the 17th of March 1918.

   The 46th Machine Gun Company joined 15th (Scottish) Division on the 11th of February 1916. In spring 1916, they were involved in the German gas attacks near Hulluch and the defence of the Kink position. They were in action duringthe Battles of the Somme, including The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette and the capture of Martinpuich, The Battle of Le Transloy and the attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The First and Second Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Guemappe during the Arras Offensive. They then moved north to Flanders and were in action during the The Battle of Pilckem and The Battle of Langemark. In 1918 they fought in The First Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 15th MG Battalion on the 17th of March 1918.

   The 46th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 28th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 46th (North Midland) Division. They saw action in The Battle of the St Quentin canal, including the passage of the canal at Bellenglise, The Battle of the Beaurevoir Line, The Battle of Cambrai, The Battle of the Selle and The Battle of Sambre. At the Armistice, the advance units of the Division were at Sains-du-Nord. The Division moved back to Landrecies on the 15th of November then to the Le Cateau area in early January 1919 where demobilisation began.

   The 47th Machine Gun Company joined 16th (Irish) Division on the 28th of April 1916 they were in action on the Somme during the The Battle of Guillemont in which the Division captured the village and The Battle of Ginchy. In 1917 they fought at the The Battle of Messines and The Battle of Langemark, during the Third Battles of Ypres. In 1918 they were in action on the Somme 1918 suffering very heavy casualties. On the 18th of June 1918 the Division returned England and was reconstituted loosing almost all of its remaining Irish units at this point. The reformed Division returned to France on the 1st of August 1918 and fought in The Final Advance in Artois. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 16th MG Battalion on the 9th of March 1918.

   The 47th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

   The 48th Machine Gun Company joined 16th (Irish) Division on the 28th of April 1916 they were in action on the Somme during the The Battle of Guillemont in which the Division captured the village and The Battle of Ginchy. In 1917 they fought at the The Battle of Messines and The Battle of Langemark, during the Third Battles of Ypres. In 1918 they were in action on the Somme 1918 suffering very heavy casualties. On the 18th of June 1918 the Division returned England and was reconstituted loosing almost all of its remaining Irish units at this point. The reformed Division returned to France on the 1st of August 1918 and fought in The Final Advance in Artois. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 16th MG Battalion on the 9th of March 1918.

   The 48th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 22nd of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 48th (South Midland) Division in Italy. They saw action in The fighting on the Asiago Plateau and The Battle of the Vittoria Veneto in the Val d'Assa area. At the Armistice the Division had withdrawn and was at Granezza. Demobilisation began in early 1919.

   The 49th Machine Gun Company joined 16th (Irish) Division on the 29th of April 1916 they were in action on the Somme during the The Battle of Guillemont in which the Division captured the village and The Battle of Ginchy. In 1917 they fought at the The Battle of Messines and The Battle of Langemark, during the Third Battles of Ypres. In 1918 they were in action on the Somme 1918 suffering very heavy casualties. On the 18th of June 1918 the Division returned England and was reconstituted loosing almost all of its remaining Irish units at this point. The reformed Division returned to France on the 1st of August 1918 and fought in The Final Advance in Artois. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 16th MG Battalion on the 9th of March 1918.

   The 49th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 49th (West Riding) Division. They were in action during the Battles of the Lys, The pursuit to the Selle and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice, The 49th Division was resting at Douai, demobilisation began in early 1919.

   The 4th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 26th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 4th Division when the army was reorganised. They were in action on The Somme, then returned to Flanders fighting in the Defence of Hinges Ridge during The Battle of Hazebrouck and in The Battle of Bethune, The Advance in Flanders The Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. The 4th Division was demobilised in Belgium in early 1919.

   The 50th Machine Gun Company joined 17th (Northern) Division on the 12th of February 1916. In the spring of 1916 they were in action at the Bluff, south east of Ypres on the Comines canal then moved south to The Somme seeing action during The Battle of Albert in which the Division captured Fricourt and The Battle of Delville Wood. In 1917 they moved to Arras and saw action in The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and The Capture of Roeux. In late summer they moved to Flanders and fought in The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 17th Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 50th Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 50th (Northumberland) Division. They were in action in the Battles of the Lys and The Battle of the Aisne, leaving the troops exhausted. The orginal infantry units were withdrawn and others arrived to take their place. The reformed Divison went back into action in October in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line, The pursuit to the Selle and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the 50th Division was resting at Solre le Chateau, demobilisation began December and the service of the Division was disbanded on 19th of March when the final troops left for England.

   The 51st Machine Gun Company joined 17th (Northern) Division on the 12th of February 1916. In the spring of 1916 they were in action at the Bluff, south east of Ypres on the Comines canal then moved south to The Somme seeing action during The Battle of Albert in which the Division captured Fricourt and The Battle of Delville Wood. In 1917 they moved to Arras and saw action in The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and The Capture of Roeux. In late summer they moved to Flanders and fought in The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 17th Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 51st Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 19th of February 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 51st (Highland) Division in the Cambrai area, where they remained until the 21st of March 1918, when the enemy launched an overwhelming attack and the Division were engaged in a fighting withdrawal back to Bapaume. In April they moved north and fought in The Battles of the Lys before a quiet spell at Oppy near Arras, from May to July. They were then in action at The Battle of the Tardenois, The Battle of the Scarpe, The pursuit to the Selle and the Final Advance in Picardy. They were resting the Cambrai-Iwuy area at the Armistice and demobilisation began December. The 6th Black Watch, 4th Seaforth Highlanders and 4th Gordon Highlanders were selected to join the Army of Occupation on the Rhine and left for Germany in February 1919.

   The 52nd Machine Gun Company joined 17th (Northern) Division on the 12th of February 1916. In the spring of 1916 they were in action at the Bluff, south east of Ypres on the Comines canal then moved south to The Somme seeing action during The Battle of Albert in which the Division captured Fricourt and The Battle of Delville Wood. In 1917 they moved to Arras and saw action in The First and Second Battles of the Scarpe and The Capture of Roeux. In late summer they moved to Flanders and fought in The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 17th Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 52nd Machine Gun Battalion was formed on the 28th of April 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 52nd (Highland) Division. The Division took over a sector of front line near Vimy on the 6th of May until the 23rd of July when they moved to take over the line north east of Arras. They were in action inThe Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord and The Final Advance in Artois. At the Armistice 52nd Division was north of the Mons canal engaged on clearing Herchies.

   The 53rd Machine Gun Company joined 18th (Eastern) Division on the 13th of February 1916. they were in action on The Somme in The Battle of Albert capturing their objectives near Montauban, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge including the capture of Trones Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights playing a part in the capture of the Schwaben Redoubt and Regina Trench and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they took part in the Operations on the Ancre including Miraumont and the capture of Irles, the fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and in The Third Battle of the Scarpe before moving to Flanders. They were in action in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 18th Machine Gun Battalion on the 16th of February 1918.

   The 54th Machine Gun Company joined 18th (Eastern) Division on the 13th of February 1916. They were in action on The Somme in The Battle of Albert capturing their objectives near Montauban, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge including the capture of Trones Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights playing a part in the capture of the Schwaben Redoubt and Regina Trench and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they took part in the Operations on the Ancre including Miraumont and the capture of Irles, the fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and in The Third Battle of the Scarpe before moving to Flanders. They were in action in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 18th Machine Gun Battalion on the 16th of February 1918.

   The 55th Machine Gun Company joined 18th (Eastern) Division on the 13th of February 1916. They were in action on The Somme in The Battle of Albert capturing their objectives near Montauban, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge including the capture of Trones Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights playing a part in the capture of the Schwaben Redoubt and Regina Trench and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they took part in the Operations on the Ancre including Miraumont and the capture of Irles, the fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and in The Third Battle of the Scarpe before moving to Flanders. They were in action in The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck and The First and Second Battle of Passchendaele. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 18th Machine Gun Battalion on the 16th of February 1918.

   The 56th Machine Gun Company joined 19th (Western) Division on the 14th of February 1916, though the machine gunners of the 56th Brigade had formed a provisional company the previous September. They were in action during the Battle of the Somme, capturing La Boisselle and being involved in The attacks on High Wood, The Battles of Pozieres Ridge, the Ancre Heights and the Ancre. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines and the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 19th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of February 1918.

   The 57th Machine Gun Company joined 19th (Western) Division on the 14th of February 1916. They were in action during the Battle of the Somme, capturing La Boisselle and being involved in The attacks on High Wood, The Battles of Pozieres Ridge, the Ancre Heights and the Ancre. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines and the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 19th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of February 1918.

   The 58th Machine Gun Company joined 19th (Western) Division on the 14th of February 1916. They were in action during the Battle of the Somme, capturing La Boisselle and being involved in The attacks on High Wood, The Battles of Pozieres Ridge, the Ancre Heights and the Ancre. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines and the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 19th Machine Gun Battalion on the 14th of February 1918.

   The 59th Machine Gun Company joined 20th (Light) Division on the 3rd of March 1916. They were in action on the Somme in The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 20th Machine Gun Battalion on the 15th of March 1918.

   The 5th Machine Gun Battalion was formed in Italy on the 26th of February 1918 from the 205th Machine Gun Company and continued to serve with 5th Division. The Division was recalled to France to assist with countering the German Advance in late March 1918 On the 26th of April 1918 they absorbed the 15th, 16th and 95th Machine Gun Companies and were in action during the Battles of the Lys. On the 14th of August 1918 the 5th Division was withdrawn for two weeks rest. Then moved to The Somme where they were more or less in continuous action over the old battlegrounds until late October 1918 and saw action in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice they were in the area of Le Quesnoy and moved to Belgium to the area around Namur and Wavre in December and demobilization began.

   The 60th Machine Gun Company joined 20th (Light) Division on the 3rd of March 1916. They were in action on the Somme in The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 20th Machine Gun Battalion on the 15th of March 1918.

   The 62nd Machine Gun Company joined 21st Division on the 4th of March 1916. They were in action in the Battles of The Somme, including The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Geudecourt. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras offensive, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 21st Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 63rd Machine Gun Company joined 21st Division on the 4th of March 1916. They were in action in the Battles of The Somme, on the 8th of July 1916 they moved with the Brigade to 37th Division. They went into action in The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 they fought in The First Battle of the Scarpe, including the capture of Monchy-le-Preux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They were in action during the Third Battles of Ypres. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 37th Machine Gun Battalion in February 1918.

   The 64th Machine Gun Company joined 21st Division on the 4th of March 1916. They were in action in the Battles of The Somme, including The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Geudecourt. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras offensive, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations. They joined with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to form 21st Machine Gun Battalion on the 24th of February 1918.

   The 65th Machine Gun Company joined 22nd Division on the 14th of July 1916 in Salonkia. The were in action at in the the Battle of Horseshoe Hill and Battle of Machukovo. In 1917 they were in action during the Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 a number of units transferred to France, the remainder fo the division again being in action at Doiran just before the Armistice with Bulgaria was signed at the end September 1918. By the 20th of October the Division was at Stavros and embarked on destroyers to attempt a landing at Dede Agach, but rough weather forced abandonment and the infantry finally landed on the 28th and reached Makri before the Armistice with Turkey. Demobilisation began at Chugunsi and was complete by the end of March 1919.

   The 66th Machine Gun Company joined 22nd Division on the 14th of July 1916 in Salonkia. The were in action at in the the Battle of Horseshoe Hill and Battle of Machukovo. In 1917 they were in action during the Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 a number of units transferred to France, the remainder fo the division again being in action at Doiran just before the Armistice with Bulgaria was signed at the end September 1918. By the 20th of October the Division was at Stavros and embarked on destroyers to attempt a landing at Dede Agach, but rough weather forced abandonment and the infantry finally landed on the 28th and reached Makri before the Armistice with Turkey. Demobilisation began at Chugunsi and was complete by the end of March 1919.

   The 67th Machine Gun Company joined 22nd Division on the 14th of July 1916 in Salonkia. The were in action at in the the Battle of Horseshoe Hill and Battle of Machukovo. In 1917 they were in action during the Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 a number of units transferred to France, the remainder fo the division again being in action at Doiran just before the Armistice with Bulgaria was signed at the end September 1918. By the 20th of October the Division was at Stavros and embarked on destroyers to attempt a landing at Dede Agach, but rough weather forced abandonment and the infantry finally landed on the 28th and reached Makri before the Armistice with Turkey. Demobilisation began at Chugunsi and was complete by the end of March 1919.

   The 68th Machine Gun Company was formed Grantham, Lincolnshire on the 4th of March 1916 and joined 68th Brigade, 23rd Division at Bullswater in September, as the winter set in, the Division moved to Aldershot. At the end of February 1915 they moved to Shorncliffe, Kent then to Bordon, Hampshire at the end of May for final training. They proceeded to France in the third week of August, landing at Boulogne and concentrating near Tilques. On the 5th of September 23rd Division became attached to III Corps, moving to the Merris-Vieux Berquin area, for trench familiarisation under the guidance of the 20th (Light) and 27th Divisions. They took over front line sector between Ferme Grande Flamengrie to the Armentieres-Wez Macquart road in their own right on the 14th. They fought alongside the 10th Btn. and 11th Btn. Northumberland Fusilers, the 12th and 13th battalions Durham Light Infantry and the 68th Trench Mortar Battery. During the Battle of Loos CIII and CV Brigades RFA were in action attached to 8th Division. With 23rd Division holding the front at Bois Grenier, they were relieved from that sector at the end of January 1916 and Divisional HQ was established at Blaringhem with the units concentrated around Bruay for a period of rest. On the 3rd of March they returned to the front line, taking over a sector between the Boyau de l'Ersatz and the Souchez River from the French 17th Division, with the Artillery taking over an exposed position between Carency and Bois de Bouvigny where it was subjected to heavy shelling. In early March a Tunnelling Company was established and men with a background in mining were transferred from the ranks to the Royal Engineers. In Mid April they returned to Bruay area for rest until mid May when they again took over the Souchez-Angres front, just before the German Attack on Vimy Ridge on the 21st. The brunt of the attack fell on 47th (London) Division, to the right of 23rd Division and the 23rd Divisional Artillery went into action in support of the 47th. On the 1st of June the Artillery supported 2nd Division as they undertook operations to recover lost ground. On the 11th of June the 23rd Division Infantry moved to Bomy and the artillery to Chamblain Chatelain and Therouanne to begin intensive training for the Battles of the Somme. They were in action in The Battle of Albert including the capture of Contalmaison, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge, Pozieres, Flers-Courcelette, Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy including the capture of Le Sars. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Messines, The Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood and the The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. In November 1917 the Division moved to Italy concentrating between Mantua and Marcaria before taking over the front line at the Montello on the 4th of December. On the 1st of April 1918 the Company joined with the other MGC's of the Division to become No 23 Battalion, MGC.

   The 69th Machine Gun Company was formed Grantham, Lincolnshire on the 4th of March 1916 and joined 69th Brigade, 23rd Division at Frensham in September, as the winter set in, the Division moved to Aldershot. At the end of February 1915 they moved to Shorncliffe, Kent then to Bordon, Hampshire at the end of May for final training. They proceeded to France in the third week of August, landing at Boulogne and concentrating near Tilques. On the 5th of September 23rd Division became attached to III Corps, moving to the Merris-Vieux Berquin area, for trench familiarisation under the guidance of the 20th (Light) and 27th Divisions. They took over front line sector between Ferme Grande Flamengrie to the Armentieres-Wez Macquart road in their own right on the 14th. They fought alongside the 10th Btn. and 11th Btn. Northumberland Fusilers, the 12th and 13th battalions Durham Light Infantry and the 69th Trench Mortar Battery. During the Battle of Loos CIII and CV Brigades RFA were in action attached to 8th Division. With 23rd Division holding the front at Bois Grenier, they were relieved from that sector at the end of January 1916 and Divisional HQ was established at Blaringhem with the units concentrated around Bruay for a period of rest. On the 3rd of March they returned to the front line, taking over a sector between the Boyau de l'Ersatz and the Souchez River from the French 17th Division, with the Artillery taking over an exposed position between Carency and Bois de Bouvigny where it was subjected to heavy shelling. In early March a Tunnelling Company was established and men with a background in mining were transferred from the ranks to the Royal Engineers. In Mid April they returned to Bruay area for rest until mid May when they again took over the Souchez-Angres front, just before the German Attack on Vimy Ridge on the 21st. The brunt of the attack fell on 47th (London) Division, to the right of 23rd Division and the 23rd Divisional Artillery went into action in support of the 47th. On the 1st of June the Artillery supported 2nd Division as they undertook operations to recover lost ground. On the 11th of June the 23rd Division Infantry moved to Bomy and the artillery to Chamblain Chatelain and Therouanne to begin intensive training for the Battles of the Somme. They were in action in The Battle of Albert including the capture of Contalmaison, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge, Pozieres, Flers-Courcelette, Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy including the capture of Le Sars. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Messines, The Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood and the The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. In November 1917 the Division moved to Italy concentrating between Mantua and Marcaria before taking over the front line at the Montello on the 4th of December. On the 1st of April 1918 the Company joined with the other MGC's of the Division to become No 23 Battalion, MGC.

   The 7th Machine Gun Company joined 7th Brigade, 25th Division in January 1916. They were in action in defence of the German attack on Vimy Ridge in May 1916. They then moved to The Somme and joined the Battle just after the main attack, with 75th Brigade making a costly attack near Thiepval on the 3rd of July. The Division was in action at The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres and The Battle of the Ancre Heights. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Messines attacking between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads. In the Third battle of Ypres were were in action during The Battle of Pilkem. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme. On the 1st of March they joined with other Machine Gun companies of the Division to become the 25th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 70th Machine Gun Company was formed on the 5th of March 1916, they joined 70th Brigade, 23rd Division in July 1916. They were in action in The Battle of Albert including the capture of Contalmaison, The Battles of Bazentin Ridge, Pozieres, Flers-Courcelette, Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy including the capture of Le Sars. In 1917 they fought in The Battle of Messines, The Battles of the Menin Road, Polygon Wood and the The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele. In November 1917 the Division moved to Italy concentrating between Mantua and Marcaria before taking over the front line at the Montello on the 4th of December. In 1918 they were in action during the fighting on the Asiago Plateau and the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, including the passage of the Piave and the Monticano. At the Italian Armistice at 3pm on the 4th of November, the 23rd were midway between the Rivers Livenza and Meduna, east of Sacile. They moved to billets west of Treviso and demobilisation took place in January and February 1919.

   The 71st Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 71st Brigade, 6th Division on the 14th of March 1916. Later that year they were in action at Battle of Flers-Courcelette on The Somme, and again in The Battle of Morval and The Battle of Le Transloy, in 1917 they were in action at Hill 70 and Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 6th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 72nd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 72nd Brigade, 24th Division on the 14th of March 1916. In 1916 they suffered in the German gas attack at Wulverghem and then moved to The Somme seeing action in The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Guillemont. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Vimy Ridge in the Spring, The Battle of Messines in June and Third Battle of Ypres in October before moving south where they were in action during The Cambrai Operations when the Germans counter attacked. On the 5th of March 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun companies of the Division to become the 24th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 73rd Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 73rd Brigade, 24th Division on the 14th of March 1916. In 1916 they suffered in the German gas attack at Wulverghem and then moved to The Somme seeing action in The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of Guillemont. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Vimy Ridge in the Spring, The Battle of Messines in June and Third Battle of Ypres in October before moving south where they were in action during The Cambrai Operations when the Germans counter attacked. On the 5th of March 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun companies of the Division to become the 24th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 74th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 74th Brigade, 25th Division on the 17th of March 1916. They were in action in defence of the German attack on Vimy Ridge in May 1916. They then moved to The Somme and joined the Battle just after the main attack, with 75th Brigade making a costly attack near Thiepval on the 3rd of July. The Division was in action at The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres and The Battle of the Ancre Heights. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Messines attacking between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads. In the Third battle of Ypres were were in action during The Battle of Pilkem. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun companies of the Division to become the 25th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 75th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 75th Brigade, 25th Division on the 15th of March 1916. They were in action in defence of the German attack on Vimy Ridge in May 1916. They then moved to The Somme and joined the Battle just after the main attack, with 75th Brigade making a costly attack near Thiepval on the 3rd of July. The Division was in action at The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres and The Battle of the Ancre Heights. In 1917 they were in action at The Battle of Messines attacking between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads. In the Third battle of Ypres were were in action during The Battle of Pilkem. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other Machine Gun companies of the Division to become the 25th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 76th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 76th Brigade, 3rd Division on the 13th of April 1916. In 1916 they took part in The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters then moved to The Somme for The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin helping to capture Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 They were at Arras, seeing action at Battles of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They moved north to the Flanders and were in action during The Battle of the Menin Road and Battle of Polygon Wood during the Third Battle of Ypres. Then moved south and were in action at The Battle of Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they joined with other MG companies of the Division to become the 6th Machine Gun Battalion.

   The 77th Machine Gun Company joined 77th Brigade, 26th Division on the 24th of July 1916. They were in action in the Battle of Horseshoe Hill in 1917 the fought in the First and Second Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 some units of the Division moved back to France and the remainer were in action in the Third Battle of Doiran and the Pursuit to the Strumica Valley. Advance units crossed the Serbian-Bulgarian boarder on the 25th of September but the Armitice with Bulgaria came just two days later. The Division advanced towards Adrianople in Turkey, but fighting was soon at an end and 26th Division became part of the Army of the Danube and later the Occupation of Bulgaria. Demobilisation began in February 1919, with Italian troops arriving to replace British units.

   The 78th Machine Gun Company joined 78th Brigade, 26th Division on the 22nd of July 1916. They were in action in the Battle of Horseshoe Hill in 1917 the fought in the First and Second Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 some units of the Division moved back to France and the remainer were in action in the Third Battle of Doiran and the Pursuit to the Strumica Valley. Advance units crossed the Serbian-Bulgarian boarder on the 25th of September but the Armitice with Bulgaria came just two days later. The Division advanced towards Adrianople in Turkey, but fighting was soon at an end and 26th Division became part of the Army of the Danube and later the Occupation of Bulgaria. Demobilisation began in February 1919, with Italian troops arriving to replace British units.

   The 79th Machine Gun Company joined 79th Brigade, 26th Division on the 15th of July 1916. They were in action in the Battle of Horseshoe Hill in 1917 the fought in the First and Second Battles of Doiran. In mid 1918 some units of the Division moved back to France and the remainer were in action in the Third Battle of Doiran and the Pursuit to the Strumica Valley. Advance units crossed the Serbian-Bulgarian boarder on the 25th of September but the Armitice with Bulgaria came just two days later. The Division advanced towards Adrianople in Turkey, but fighting was soon at an end and 26th Division became part of the Army of the Danube and later the Occupation of Bulgaria. Demobilisation began in February 1919, with Italian troops arriving to replace British units.

   The 7th Machine Gun Battalion was formed in Italy on the 1st of April 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 7th Division. The Division played a central role in crossing the Piave, in October and the Battle of Vittoria Veneto.

   The 8th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 8th Brigade, 3th Division on the 22 January 1916 they took part in The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters then moved to The Somme for The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin helping to capture Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 They were at Arras, seeing action at Battles of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They moved north to the Flanders and were in action during The Battle of the Menin Road and Battle of Polygon Wood during the Third Battle of Ypres. Then moved south and were in action at The Battle of Cambrai. They alamgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to become 3th MG Battalion on the 28th of February 1918 In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Lys, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Battle of the Selle. After the Armistice 3rd Division advanced into Germany as part of the Occupation Force.

   The 80th Machine Gun Company joined 80th Brigade, 27th Division on the 2nd of September 1916 in Salonika. Between the 30th of September and 2nd of October 1916 they were engaged in the capture of Karajakois, followed swiftly by the capture of Yenikoi and then the battle of Tumbitza Farm. In 1917 they were in action during the capture of Homondos. In mid 1918 a number of units returned to France and in September the remaining units of the 27th Division were in action in the final offensive in Salonika, including the capture of the Roche Noir Salient, the passage of the Vardar river and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased on the 30th of September, the 27th Division continued to advance and war wasordered to halt and turn about on the 2nd of November, being ordered to the Black Sea. The Division reached Constantinople on the 19th of December and set up a HQ at Tiflis in January 1919. The Division was finally disbanded on the 24th of September 1919 at Batum.

   The 81st Machine Gun Company joined 81st Brigade, 27th Division on the 16th of May 1916 in Salonika. Between the 30th of September and 2nd of October 1916 they were engaged in the capture of Karajakois, followed swiftly by the capture of Yenikoi and then the battle of Tumbitza Farm. In 1917 they were in action during the capture of Homondos. In mid 1918 a number of units of the Division returned to France and in September the remaining units of the 27th Division were in action in the final offensive in Salonika, including the capture of the Roche Noir Salient, the passage of the Vardar river and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased on the 30th of September, the 27th Division continued to advance and war wasordered to halt and turn about on the 2nd of November, being ordered to the Black Sea. The Division reached Constantinople on the 19th of December and set up a HQ at Tiflis in January 1919. The Division was finally disbanded on the 24th of September 1919 at Batum.

   The 82nd Machine Gun Company was formed in 82nd Brigade, 27th Division on the 16th of May 1916 in Salonika. Between the 30th of September and 2nd of October 1916 they were engaged in the capture of Karajakois, followed swiftly by the capture of Yenikoi and then the battle of Tumbitza Farm. In 1917 they were in action during the capture of Homondos. In mid 1918 a number of units of the Division returned to France and in September the remaining units of the 27th Division were in action in the final offensive in Salonika, including the capture of the Roche Noir Salient, the passage of the Vardar river and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased on the 30th of September, the 27th Division continued to advance and war wasordered to halt and turn about on the 2nd of November, being ordered to the Black Sea. The Division reached Constantinople on the 19th of December and set up a HQ at Tiflis in January 1919. The Division was finally disbanded on the 24th of September 1919 at Batum.

   The 83rd Machine Gun Company was formed in 83rd Brigade, 28th Division on the 21st of May 1916 in Salonika. Later in the year they were in action during the occupation of Mazirko and the capture of Barakli Jum'a. In 1917 they were involved in the capture of Ferdie and Essex Trenches (near Barakli Jum'a) and then the capture of Barakli and Kumli. In mid 1918 a number of units returned to France The remainer of the Division were later in actio at the Battle of Doiran and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. When Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased at the end of September the 28th Division was in the area of Trnovo. They moved in early November to Gallipoli and occupied the Dardanelles Forts.

   The 84th Machine Gun Company was formed in 84th Brigade, 28th Division on the 18th of May 1916 in Salonika. Later in the year they were in action during the occupation of Mazirko and the capture of Barakli Jum'a. In 1917 they were involved in the capture of Ferdie and Essex Trenches (near Barakli Jum'a) and then the capture of Barakli and Kumli. In mid 1918 a number of units returned to France The remainer of the Division were later in actio at the Battle of Doiran and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. When Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased at the end of September the 28th Division was in the area of Trnovo. They moved in early November to Gallipoli and occupied the Dardanelles Forts.

   The 85th Machine Gun Company was formed in 85th Brigade, 28th Division on the 18th of May 1916 in Salonika. Later in the year they were in action during the occupation of Mazirko and the capture of Barakli Jum'a. In 1917 they were involved in the capture of Ferdie and Essex Trenches (near Barakli Jum'a) and then the capture of Barakli and Kumli. In mid 1918 a number of units returned to France The remainer of the Division were later in actio at the Battle of Doiran and the pursuit to the Strumica valley. When Hostilities with Bulgaria ceased at the end of September the 28th Division was in the area of Trnovo. They moved in early November to Gallipoli and occupied the Dardanelles Forts.

   The 86th Machine Gun Company was formed in 86th Brigade, 29th Division on the 26th of February 1916. In July they went into action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were in action in the The First, Second and Third Battle of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, then moved to Flanders and fought in the The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Broodseinde and The Battle of Poelcapelle. Before moving south for The Battle of Cambrai. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 29th Battalion MGC on the 15th of February 1918.

   The 87th Machine Gun Company was formed in 87th Brigade, 29th Division on the 16th of February 1916. In July they went into action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were in action in the The First, Second and Third Battle of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, then moved to Flanders and fought in the The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Broodseinde and The Battle of Poelcapelle. Before moving south for The Battle of Cambrai. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 29th Battalion MGC on the 15th of February 1918.

   The 88th Machine Gun Company was formed in 88th Brigade, 29th Division on the 21st of February 1916. In July they went into action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they were in action in the The First, Second and Third Battle of the Scarpe during the Arras Offensive, then moved to Flanders and fought in the The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Broodseinde and The Battle of Poelcapelle. Before moving south for The Battle of Cambrai. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 29th Battalion MGC on the 15th of February 1918.

   The 89th Machine Gun Company joined 89th Brigade, 30th Division on the 13th of March 1916. they were in action during the Battle of the Somme, in which the Division captured Montauban. In 1917 they took part in the pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras Offensive and The Battle of Pilkem Ridge. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 30th Battalion MGC on the 1st of March 1918.

   The 8th Machine Gun Battalion was on the 20th of April 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 8th Division. They saw action during The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of the Scarpe and The Final Advance in Artois including the capture of Douai.

   The 9th Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of the 9th Brigade, 3th Division on the 8th February 1916 they took part in The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters then moved to The Somme for The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin helping to capture Longueval, The Battle of Delville Wood and The Battle of the Ancre. In 1917 They were at Arras, seeing action at Battles of the Scarpe and The Battle of Arleux. They moved north to the Flanders and were in action during The Battle of the Menin Road and Battle of Polygon Wood during the Third Battle of Ypres. Then moved south and were in action at The Battle of Cambrai. They alamgamated with the other Machine Gun Companies of the Division to become 3th MG Battalion on the 29th of February 1918 In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Battles of the Lys, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Battle of the Selle. After the Armistice 3rd Division advanced into Germany as part of the Occupation Force.

   The 90th Machine Gun Company joined 90th Brigade, 30th Division on the 13th of March 1916. They were in action during the Battle of the Somme, in which the Division captured Montauban. In 1917 they took part in the pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Arras Offensive and The Battle of Pilkem Ridge. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme and in the Battles of the Lys. They joined with the other Machine GunCompaies of the Division to form the 30th Battalion MGC on the 1st of March 1918.

   91st Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps was formed in 91st Brigade 7th Division on the 14th of March 1916. They were in action during the Battles of the Somme, including the capture Mametz, The Battle of Bazentin, the attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont and the Operations on the Ancre. In 1917 They fought during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the flanking operations round Bullecourt during The Arras Offensive, before moving to Flanders for the Third Battle of Ypres, seeing action in The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle and The Second Battle of Passchendaele. In late 1917 the 7th Division was selected to move to Italy. They took up position in the line along the River Piave,in late January 1918. On the 1st of April 1918 they merged with other Machine Gun Companies of 7th Division to become 7th Battalion Machine Gun Corps.

   92nd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps was joined 92nd Brigade 31st Division on the 20th of May 1916. Their first action being the attack on Serre in on the 1st of July during The Battle the Somme. They were also in action during The Battle of the Ancre and in 1917 the Operations on the Ancre before moving north to Arras for The Third Battle of the Scarpe and The Capture of Oppy Wood. On the 21st of February 1918 they merged with other Machine Gun Companies of 31st Division to become 31st Battalion Machine Gun Corps.

   93rd Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 93rd Brigade 31st Division on the 20th of May 1916. They saw action at Serre at Battle of the Somme in 1916 and were on the Ancre and in the Battles of Arras in 1917. On the 21st of February 1918 they merged with other MGC of the Division to become 31st Bn MGC still with 31st Division. In early 1918 they were on the Somme before moving north to Flanders for the Battle of the Lys and the Final Advance in Flanders.

   94th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 94th Brigade 31st Division on the 21st of May 1916. They saw action at Serre at Battle of the Somme in 1916 and were on the Ancre and in the Battles of Arras in 1917. On the 21st of February 1918 they became 31st Bn MGC with 31st Division. In early 1918 they were on the Somme before moving north to Flanders for the Battle of the Lys and the Final Advance in Flanders.

   96th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 96th Brigade 32nd Division on the 15th of March 1916. In 1916 they were in action during the Battles of the Somme 1916, In 1917 they were involved in Operations on the Ancre and the pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line. On the 21st of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 32nd Division and became 32nd Battalion MGC.

   98th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps joined 98th Brigade 33rd Division on the 28th of April 1916. they were in action in the Battles of the Somme. In 1917 they took part in the Arras Offensive, The actions on the Hindenburg Line, the Operations on the Flanders coast and the Third Battles of Ypres. On the 19th of February 1918 they joined with the other machine gun companies of 33rd Division and became 33rd Battalion MGC.

   The 99th Machine Gun Company, Machine Gun Corps was raised in Grantham and joined 33rd Brigade, 2nd Division in France on the 28th of April 1916. They fought in the Battles of the Somme, including the Battle of Deville Wood and the Operations on the Ancre. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, the Battles of Arras and The Battle of Cambrai. On the 4th of March 1918 they amalgamated with other units to form No 2 Bn, MGC, they fought on the Somme, in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and The Battle of the Selle.

   The 9th Machine Gun Battalion was on the 1st of March 1918 from the Machine Gun Companies of 9th (Scottish) Division. They saw action during in the Battles of the Lys and The Advance in Flanders, capturing the Outtersteene Ridge and seeing action in in the Battle of Courtrai and the action of Ooteghem. They were resting in billets at the Armistice.

   1st Guards Brigade Machine Gun Company served with 1st Guards Brigade, Guards Division, the company was formed in the first week of September 1915 from the Machine Gun Sections of the 2nd Btn, Grenadier Guards, 2nd Btn, Coldstream Guards, 3rd Btn, Coldstream Guards and 1st Btn, Irish Guards. They saw action at the Battle of Loos, the Battles of the Somme, the third Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Cambrai. On the 1st of March 1918 they amalgamated with the 2nd, 3rd and 4th MG Guards Coys to become 4th Battalion Machine Gun Guards Regiment.

16th Jul 1915 On the March

12th Nov 1915 In Comfortable Quarters

28th Nov 1915 With Old Pals

15th January 1916 Heavy Shelling  6th County of London Brigade RFA report there was quite a lot of retaliation during the day for enemy shelling our front and 2nd line trenches. The Germans shelled the Lens-Bethune road intermittently. Fire on the main road at N.7.a.3.0 caused the enemy to cease firing. Concentration of fire from 1400 to 1500 appeared successful and the fire of the field guns was accurate. Loos was heavily shelled from 1000 to 1100. The 140th Infantry Brigade took over from 141st Infantry Brigade on a slightly different front entailing the right outer H2 becoming the centre, the centre becoming the left and a new right. This caused some trouble with the guns but communications were satisfactorily maintained.

6th Feb 1916 Reorganisation

7th Feb 1916 Machine Gunners Transfer

24th February 1916 9th Lancers at HQ Enquin

25th February 1916 9th Lancers at HQ Enquin

26th February 1916 9th Lancers at HQ Enquin

Mar 1916 138th MGC in action.  In March 1916, 138 Machine Gun Coy are in action on Vimy Ridge at Doullet, Jericourt and Camblain L'Abbe, Villers au Bois: "Much shelling and mining. In action with machine gun covering craters blown up by our troops. Trenches in rear of us blown up by enemy. This happened in almost tropical rain: we were soaked through, but had a hot ration of tea and rum when we got back to our dug-out. Wall of another dug-out collapsed by rush of water. We had to fish out gun and ammunition; as much as possible before being engulfed."

 Siege of Kut al Amara

15th May 1916 Brigade Cross Country

16th May 1916 Parade

20th May 1916 Boxing Match

21st May 1916 New CO

23rd May 1916 Inspection

1st Jul 1916 12th MGC in action.  On the first of July 1916, 12th Machine Gun Company, 4th Division was in action between Beaumont Hamel and Serre.

1st Jul 1916 137 MGC in Action

1st Jul 1916 Over the Top

1st Jul 1916 Attack Made

1st Jul 1916 Attack Made

1st Jul 1916 In Action

2nd Jul 1916 Terrible Work

2nd Jul 1916 In Action

3rd Jul 1916 In Action

4th Jul 1916 In Action

5th Jul 1916 Reliefs

6th Jul 1916 Lines of Fire

7th Jul 1916 Relief

8th Jul 1916 On the Move

9th Jul 1916 In Camp

10th Jul 1916 In Camp

11th Jul 1916 Training

12th Jul 1916 Training

13th Jul 1916 Recce

14th Jul 1916 Into Support

15th Jul 1916 Reliefs

16th Jul 1916 Preparations for Attack

17th Jul 1916 Resting

18th Jul 1916 On the Move

19th Jul 1916 Hard Fighting

19th Jul 1916 In Action

20th Jul 1916 In Action

21st Jul 1916 Reliefs

22nd Jul 1916 On the Move

23rd Jul 1916 Resting

24th Jul 1916 On the Move

25th Jul 1916 At Rest

26th Jul 1916 Cleaning

27th Jul 1916 Drill

28th Jul 1916 Lecture

29th Jul 1916 On the Move

30th Jul 1916 In Billets

31st Jul 1916 Training

14th Aug 1916 145 MGC in Action

30th Aug 1916 Practice Attack

4th Sep 1916 59th MGC at Guillemont  59th Coy Machine Gun Corps are at Guillemont on the 4th of September 1916.

16th Sep 1916 150th MCG in action.  150th Machine Gun Corps are in action at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette

23rd Nov 1916 14 Brigade ordered to advance  An order is received from GOC 14 Brigade to capture point 88 and point 17, but mud and absence of artillery preparation makes the advance near impossible. 16th Btn Northumberland Fusilers suffer several casualties, most caused by "shorts" from British artillery.

30th Nov 1916 Advance by Tank

25th Dec 1916 15th MGC relieve 71st MGC  71st Machine Gun Company billeted at Noeux-les-Mines after being relieved by the 15th MGC on the 20th from the front line at Le Preol (east of Beuvry).

26th Dec 1916 71st MGC into the line  71st Machine Gun Company relieve 162nd MGC at Vernmelles.

5th Mar 1917 Reliefs

19th Mar 1917 Trench Raid

20th Mar 1917 Patrol

21st Mar 1917 Occasional Shells

22nd Mar 1917 Trench Raid

23rd Mar 1917 Trench Mortars

25th Mar 1917 Enemy Attack

26th Mar 1917 Trench Mortars

9th Apr 1917 145 MGC in Action

9th Apr 1917 Troops Move Up

9th Apr 1917 Assault Made

10th Apr 1917 Attack Made

11th Apr 1917 Village Taken

12th Apr 1917 Reliefs

24th Apr 1917 Gas Attack Ordered

15th July 1917 Move to France  245 Machine Gun Company

The Company left Grantham Machine Gun Training Base at 0225 and entrained for Southampton. At 1730 they embarked on HMT Australind and sailed for Le Havre. Company Strength 10 Officers 177 ORs.

16th July 1917 Arrival in France  245 Machine Gun Company

The Company disembarked at Le Havre at 0830 on the 16th July and marched to No.1 Rest Camp, Section A at Sanvic, where 1 ASC Driver joined the Company.

17th July 1917 refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

From the 17th to the 19th July the Company was engaged in making up deficiencies in equipment, clothing, transport and machine guns and generally sorting itself out for action.

20th July 1917 Rest and Refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

The Company was based at the Rest Camp from 20th to 28th July refitting and generally preparing itself for the move to its active service station.

23rd July 1917 Rest and Refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

Still at Rest Camp – one NCO sent to hospital – sick.

24th July 1917 Rest and Refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

Rest Camp – one OR sent to hospital – sick.

25th July 1917 Rest and Refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

Rest Camp – one OR sent to hospital – sick.

26th July 1917 Rest and Refitting  245 Machine Gun Company

Rest Camp – one NCO returned from hospital and two ORs were struck off previously reported Company strength.

28th July 1917 movements  At Le Havre, Movement order no.1 was received by 245 Machine Gun Company. The Company left camp at 2130. 1 Horse was cast.

"245 MG Coy. to entrain at Point 6 Le Havre midnight 28th/29th July and detrain at Boisleux-au-Mont 10 Officers 176 ORs 6 Riding Horses, 2 Heavy Draft Horses 47 Mules."

29th July 1917 Relocations  245 Machine Gun Company.

The Company entrained and departed Le Havre at 0320

Company Strength: 10 Officers, 176 ORs, 6 rider’s mounts, 2 heavy draft horses and 47 mules.

At 0530 the train arrived in Foucart-Alvimare Station. One Horse Truck was broken during shunting. It contained 6 mounts and 2 heavy draft horses. The Truck was left behind in a siding at Foucart-Alvimare station in charge of a transport sergeant and five men. Arrangements were made with the French authorities to have a replacement truck sent up from Le Havre.

The Company stopped for a meal and exercise in Romescamps at 1400 and continued on at 2145 by train via Amiens and Albert to Boisleux-au-Mont (near Arras).

30th July 1917 Arrival at Mercatel  245 Machine Gun Company

The Company arrived in Boisleux au Mont at 0430 on the 30th July and was met by the Divisional Machine Gun Officer (DMGO). They marched to a camp NW of Mercatel. Mercatel is south of Arras in the direction of Bapaume.

The OC 245 MG Company Reported to the GOC. 150th Infantry Brigade who informed the him that his Company is to be the Divisional Machine Gun Company of the 50th (Northumberland) Division and will be attached to Divisional Headquarters and not with 150th Brigade.

31st July 1917 245 MGC Setting up base camp  245 Machine Gun Company having arrived now at its base near Mercatel, commenced work erecting huts and tents and generally settling in. One man was sent to VII Corps Rest Station – sick.

1st August 1917 Inspections  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel. Received Operations Order No.115 but the Company is not affected by this Operations Order. GSO1 visited the Company and informed me that the Company would not take over trench positions until the 7th inst. (GSO General Staff Officer).

Copy of Operations Order GSO1 5oth Division. No.115 Copy 23. 150th Infantry Brigade to relieve 149th Brigade in the Vis and Guemappe sectors on night 4/5th Aug 17.

2nd August 1917 Movement Orders  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel

The Company received a Divisional letter GX4025/18. DGMO (Divisional Machine Gun Officer) is making arrangements for 8 guns to go into the line to relieve S2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and S9 in the intermediate line.

Copy of Divisional letter GX 4025/18 GSO1 50th Division. Divisional MG Coy (245?) take over following positions on 7th inst. S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8 and S9. Personnel of245 MG Coy. to be attached to detachments in the line for instruction. Officers, NCOs and men to learn the Divisional Sector as possible.

3rd August 1917 Movement Orders  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel

Saw the GOC 150th Brigade with DMGO, who arranged for 3 guns to relieve S5, 6 and 7 on the 3rd inst. Two teams from No.3 section and 1 team from No.1 section with Lt. AJ Barnes and 2/Lt Parsons respectively, relieved these positions at 2300.

Received Operations Order No.116 from Divisional HQ regarding transfer of 50th Division from VII Corps to VI Corps and consequent extension of the Divisional front to the right necessitating relieving of part of the line held by 21st Division in the night by 50th Division. This was the reason for the sudden order from DMGO to send 3 guns to relieve S5, 6 and 7.

Order received from DMGO to send up 2 guns in the night of 4th inst. to relieve positions S8 and S9.

Copy of Operations Order No.116. GSO1 50th Division. Copy No.21

  • 1. 50th Division transferred from VII Corps to VI Corps at noon 7th August 1917.
  • 2. Boundary between 50th Division and 21st Division (on right) altered.
  • 3. 150th Infantry Brigade extend to Otto Alley and 151st Infantry Brigade extend to Pug Lane.
Appx No 5. Letter on relief DMGO 50th Division.

245 MG Coy. to take over new positions S2, S3 and S4 on night 6/7th August 1917.

S.O directly responsible to GOC 151 Inf. Brigade (Right Sector) 5th August 1917.

4th August 1917 movements  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Sent up 2 gun teams under 2/Lt. Wheatley from No.3 Section to relieve S8 and S9 at 2300.

5th August 1917 Operational Orders  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Received orders from DMGO that S2,3 and S4 positions are to be taken over on the night of 6/7th August. Gave orders to 2/Lt. GE Barnes to take up remaining 3 guns of No.1 section on the night of 6th inst. (appendix No.5 letter – DMGO 50th Division.)

Copy of Appx No 5. Letter on relief DMGO 50th Division. 245 MG Coy. to take over new positions S2, S3 and S4 on night 6/7th August 1917.

S.O directly responsible to GOC 151 Inf. Brigade (Right Sector) 5th August 1917.

6th August 1917 movements 245MGC  

Disposition of troops and Company on 6/7th August

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

2/Lt Derbyshire took up the number 1’s of the three teams for instruction to positions S2, 3 and S4 and returned by himself at 1400. 2/Lt. GE Barnes took up the 3 guns at 2000. Lt. Parsons was warned that he would be in charge of S2, 3 and 4 positions in the Right Brigade Area. Lt AJ Barnes is to be in charge of S5, 6 and 7 on the right of River Coveul and 2/Lt. Wheatley in charge of S8 and S9 on the left of River Coveul, the latter 5 positions being in the Left Brigade Area. Map No.6 shows disposition of troops and Company on the night of 6/7th August.

7th August 1917 Movements 245MGC  

Disposition of troops and Company on 6/7th August

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Informed by DMGO that the Division on our left (12th Div.)is to mount a strong raid on enemy positions and that 2 guns from the Company would be required to place a barrage on the right of the enemy’s positions.

Lt JR Houghton took up 2 guns of No.2 section (in camp) to positions previously reconnoitred on the right of the River Coveul in Sunken Road at O.1g.a.20.50 (see Map No.6).

8th Aug 1917 Activity in Front Line  

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

At 1100 a practice barrage was commenced by all arms, during which fire was opened on the right of Lanyard Trench isolating that trench from St Romart’s factory. (see Map 6) The raid was postponed.

9th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

At 1100, the practice barrage of the previous day was repeated. Zero hour for the raid was at 0745 and rapid fire was maintained for 90 minutes. One NCO was wounded and sent to 20th Casualty Clearing Centre.

A suggestion was forwarded to the DMGO that relief of guns in the Right Sector should take place on the night of 13/14th August and in the Left Sector on the night of the 12/13th August.

One OR was wounded in Egret Trench.

10th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Received Operations Orde No.117 (50th Div.) warned that all officers in the trenches were considerably handicapped by not being in telephonic communication with Divisional Headquarters also with Right and Left Brigade Headquarters. This was reported to the DMGO.

Organization. The establishment laid down for a Machine Gun Company in the field does not seem sufficient. A Transport Officer is required during trench warfare.

The weather clear but unsettled. There was heavy rain during the week and storms on the 9th and 10th August.

Copy of Operations Order No.117 GSO1 50th Division. Copy No.20. 149th Inf. Brigade to relieve 151st Inf. Brigade in Cherisy sector on night of 12/13th Aug. 1917.

12th Aug 1917 Orders  245 Machine Gun Company report from Mercatel and trenches. "At 1600 orders were issued for relief on the night of 13th/14th of August (Order No.8)."

13th Aug 1917 Reliefs  245 Machine Gun Company report from Mercatel "The scheduled relief was completed at 23.00."

14th Aug 1917 Leave  245 Machine Gun Company report from Mercatel "Lt. AJ Barnes proceeded on special leave of absence for 10 days."

16th August 1917 Orders for Move  245th Machine Gun Company have their HQ at Mercatel and are in the trenches. Received Operations Order No.118 from 50th Division: "151st Inf. Brigade to relieve 150th Brigade in Vis and Guemappe Sectors on the night 20/21st August 1917."

17th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  

Layout of Machine Guns under new Divisional Defence

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Conference held at 245 Machine Gun Company Headquarters at 1200, attended by DMGO and OC’s 149, 150 and 151 Brigades together with the OC. 245 MGC. The new Divisional Machine Gun Defence Scheme, part of the VI Corps Defence Scheme, was discussed.

Received a letter from Divisional HQ, showing division of gun positions under the new Defence Scheme and indicating that all guns are to be in position by 0600 21st August.

Copy of Divisional Letter GX4025/34 GSO1 50th Division.

  • 1 Attached Map (Appx No.12) substituted for previous M.9 Maps.
  • 2 Right Brigade to occupy positions 1 to 7 inclusive and S1 and S2.
  • Left Brigade to occupy positions 8 to 15 inclusive and S8.
  • 245 MG Coy. to occupy positions S3 to S7 and S9 to S12 inclusive.
  • All guns to be in position by 0600 21st Aug 1917.
  • Remaining 7 guns per Bde MG Coy in the line to be at the disposal of GOC Brigade
17th August 1917.

18th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Attended VI Corps Horse Show at Bihucourt, with one entry in event 18, a pair of mules.

19th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches. Issued with Operations Order No. 1 for reliefs on the nights of the 19th, 20th and 21st August.

20th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  

Divisional Positions of all Machine Guns by Company

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Received orders from DMGO that post S3 need not be occupied. Posts occupied by the Company on the night of 20/21st were S4, 5 ,6, 7, 9, 10, 11 and S12.

All guns were in position by 0600 21st August, according to the Divisional Letter.

A map was issued showing the positions of all machine guns in the Divisional Sector and how they were divided amongst the Companies.

21st August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel and trenches.

Relief postponed as gas is expected to be released in the 50th Divisional area. Issued orders for reliefs to take place on the night of 22/23rd August.

22nd August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company at Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches

Section Reliefs.

  • 2/Lt. Parsons (No.1 Section) relieved 2/Lt. Derbyshire (No.4 Section) in S4 and S5.
  • 2/Lt. G Barnes (No.1 Section) relieved Lt. Houghton (No.2 Section) in S6 and S7.
  • 2/Lt. Wheatley (No.3 Section) relieved 2/Lt. Attwater (No.2 Section) in S8, 9, 10, 11 and S12.

Division of Positions:

  • S4, S5 and S6 – Right Brigade.
  • S7 – Right of River – Left Brigade.
  • S8, 9, 10 and S11 – Left of River – Left Brigade.


26th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches

Received Operations Order No.119 from Divisional HQ regarding Brigade reliefs.

Copy of Operational Order No.119 GSO1 50th Division. Copy 20.

150th Inf. Brigade to relieve 149th Inf. Brigade in Fontaine and Cherisy Sectors on the night 28/29th Aug. 17

Dated 26th Aug. 17

27th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches

The OC. 245 MGC, Capt WR Thomson proceeded on leave of absence to UK for 10 days. Lt. LW Rees assumed temporary command of the Company.

Weather during the night, very violent storm, strong wind and rain, several tents were blown down and sheets of (screens?) displaced. (Note: the war diary for last item very faint and difficult to read)

28th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches

Issued with Operations Order for reliefs on the nights of the 29th and 30th August 1917.

1 OR wounded in position 5.6

29th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches

Section Reliefs.

  • 2/Lt. Derbyshire (No.4 Section) relieved 2/Lt. Parsons (No.1 Section) in S4 and S5.
  • Sgt. Jenkins (No.4 Section) relieved 2/Lt. G Barnes (No.1 Section) in S6 and S7.
  • 2/Lt. Attwater (No.2 Section) relieved 2/Lt. Wheatley (No.3 Section) in S8, 9, 10, 11 and S12.


30th August 1917 Activity in Front Line  

Vickers Machine Gun which replaced Maxim MG.

245 Machine Gun Company

Mercatel – sheet 51B France 1/40,000 M.24.c.2.4 and trenches.

Lt RJ Houghton and 1 OR proceeded to Camiers to join Vickers Machine Gun Course at 47th Division GHQ Small Arms School.

Signed LW Rees Lieutenant. For Officer Commanding 245 Machine Gun Company.

Update This is the last entry in this extract from the war diaries of 245 MGC covering the months of July and August 1917.

25th Sep 1917 118th MCG in action  118th Machine Gun Company, 39th Division were in action under heavy shellfire during an operation on the 25th Sept 1917 near Cheluvelt.

 In Support

2nd Nov 1917 Training

5th Nov 1917 Medals Awarded

6th Nov 1917 Review

11th Nov 1917 On the March

12th Nov 1917 On the March

13th Nov 1917 On the March

15th Nov 1917 Kit and Stores

17th Nov 1917 On the March

18th Nov 1917 On the March

19th Nov 1917 On the March

20th Nov 1917 Ready to Move

21st Nov 1917 On the Move

23rd Nov 1917 On the March

24th Nov 1917 In Action

25th Nov 1917 Under Shellfire

26th Nov 1917 Reliefs

27th Nov 1917 Reliefs

28th Nov 1917 Into Billets

30th Nov 1917 Enemy Advance

1st Dec 1917 In Action

2nd Dec 1917 Reliefs Completed

3rd Dec 1917 Orders

4th Dec 1917 In the Trenches

5th Dec 1917 Reliefs Completed

6th Dec 1917 On the Move

8th Dec 1917 Training Difficult

8th Dec 1917 Training Difficult

28th Dec 1917 Range Practice and Football

29th Dec 1917 Posting

21st Mar 1918   The 21st Machine Gun Btn was in Epehy at the time of the Kaiserschlact. My Grandfather (originally in the 62nd Machine Gun company) was captured there on that date

21st Mar 1918 34th Division over run  On 21st March 1918, the great German spring offensive overran the positions of 34th Division at Croisilles on the River Sensee, causing many losses.

1st Apr 1918 Enemy Active

2nd Apr 1918 Enemy Active

3rd Apr 1918 Artillery Active

4th Apr 1918 Enemy Artillery Active

5th Apr 1918 Reliefs Completed

6th Apr 1918 Enemy Quiet

7th Apr 1918 Gas Shells

8th Apr 1918 Quiet

9th Apr 1918 Enemy Attack

9th Apr 1918 In Action

9th Apr 1918 Messages

10th Apr 1918 Messages

11th Apr 1918 Minnenwerfers in Action  During the early morning, the Bosche established his machine guns in the outskirts of Pont du Nieppe and became very active. Also his Minnenwerfer trench mortars opened up on us about 11am., assisted by field guns at close range.

At about 1pm., a party of enemy approached the trench of 6th West Riding Regt 'B' company, working up an old trench and sunken road. Owing to disgraceful behaviour on the part of some N.F.s, who ran out to meet him with their hands up, the enemy entered our trench. Captain Clough was wounded through the face and 2nd. Lieutenant Shaw was killed in attempting to turn out the Bosche. Two platoons of 'C' Company were despatched along the trench from left to right but, having no bench, were not able to dislodge the enemy, as it was impossible to get out of the trench owing to incessant machine gun fire. A block was established and a refused(?) right flank was made by a platoon of 'C' Company, who kept in touch with the 2nd. East Lancs. on the railway, some ground being given by them. Shelling and trench mortar on our line continued to be very intensive, especially in support and back areas. During morning and early afternoon, 2nd. Lieutenant Stewart was killed by rifle fire and Lieutenant Bain was wounded by a machine gun bullet.

At about 4pm., some No. 5 Grenades were secured and plans were made to drive the Bosche out of our trenches. While these plans were being, the enemy commenced to work his way further down our trench. He was therefore attacked across the open from the rear and finally ejected, leaving about 20 dead and 1 prisoner in our hands. 2nd. Lieutenant Baker was seriously wounded and Sergeant Burrows was killed in this enterprise. A machine gun team of the 34th. Division rendered valuable assistance and 71064 Private Womersley, 'B' Company, 34th. Machine Gun Battalion, behaved particularly well and, although wounded severely in the arm, remained at his gun and tried to continue firing. The C. O. rallied the men and went forward at the head of the attacking party. Captain Ogston, 2nd. Lieutenant Baker and 2nd. Lieutenant Whitehead led their men splendidly.

At 7pm., orders were received to withdraw platoons down the Bailleul road. By 11.30pm., the battalion was successfully withdrawn and bivouacked at crossroads just south of Bailleul (map reference S27 centre, sheet 28.) Groups(?) were pushed out.

Casualties on this day for 6th Battalion West Riding Regt were Captain S. H. Clough (Wounded), Lieutenant P. H. Bain (wounded), 2nd. Lt. H. F. Baker (Wounded), 2nd. Lt. C. R. Shaw (Killed in Action), 2nd. Lt. G. Stewart (Killed in Action), 2nd. Lt. A. M. Whitehead (Wounded at Duty), 300189 Sergeant J. W. Booth (Wounded), 266723 Sergeant G. W. Burrows (Killed in Action), 266083 Sergeant H. Smith (Killed in Action), 265298 Sergeant A. Stott (Killed in Action), 265924 Lance Sergeant H. Lowcock (Missing), 268049 Lance Sergeant L. Swallow (Wounded), 267558 Corporal J. Goldsborough (Wounded), 265092 Corporal H. Leach (Wounded), 242534 Corporal W. Nicholson (Missing), 265195 Corporal H. Swinden (Wounded), 267793 Corporal H. H. Whitehead (Wounded), 8673 Lance Corporal C. Bailey (Wounded), 265502 Lance Corporal D. Bamforth (Wounded), 24878 Lance Corporal G. Falconer (Wounded), 268276 Lance Corporal L. Hartley (Wounded), 268475 Lance Corporal W. Keeley (Wounded), 24408 Lance Corporal F. Metcalfe (Killed in Action), 267495 Lance Corporal E. Sayer (Killed in Action), 14911 Lance Corporal H. Whittaker (Missing), 16695 Private J. Adamthwaite (Killed in Action), 26487 Private G. F. Alfred (Missing), 18896 Private J. A. Bailey (Wounded), 266677 Private H. A. Barker (Wounded), 16986 Private H. Barraclough (Killed in Action), 11333 Private N. Bates (Wounded), 267901 Private J. F. Batley (Wounded), 268430 Private F. Battye (Wounded), 26502 Private S. H. Bell (Wounded), 267917 Private C. Bennett (Missing), 202424 Private J. H. Berry (Wounded), 23867 Private H. Bolton (Wounded), 242578 Private H. Booth (Missing), 306412 Private W. Boyle (Wounded), 266129 Private F. Bracewell (Wounded), 265680 Private W. G. Briggs (Killed in Action), 26677 Private W. Brittle (Killed in Action), 241458 Private N. Broadbent (Missing), 265143 Private A. W. Brooke (Wounded), 265977 Private J. W. Brown (Wounded),26666 Private P. Brown (Wounded), 200365 Private W. Bussey (Wounded),240023 Private F. Cartwright (Killed in Action), 267444 Private J. Caunt (Wounded), 242585 Private W. Chambers (Wounded), 23879 Private T. Charles (Wounded), 265299 Private F. Clarke (Wounded), 206325 Private Connelly (Killed in Action), 267899 Private H. Cook (Wounded), 267554 Private W. W. Cooper (Wounded at Duty), 26134 Private F. Cox (Killed in Action), 263012 Private J. Darby (Wounded), 201388 Private G. R. Dillon (Wounded), 267534 Private C. A. Emmott (Killed in Action), 267369 Private F. Evans (Missing), 10924 Private H. Foster (Wounded), 26668 Private E. Gamblen (Wounded), 242618 Private J. C. Garner (Missing), 267506 Private J. Gilfoyle (Wounded), 265775 Private H. Gooding (Killed in Action), 267335 Private E. Grazier (Wounded), 267860 Private W. S. Greasley (Missing), 267861 Private J. W. Greaves (Wounded), 267358 Private E. R. Green (Missing), 25504 Private W. Green (Wounded), 26556 Private J. Haley (Wounded), 26550 Private G. Hardcastle (Missing), 267420 Private S. Hardy (Killed in Action), 17077 Private G. Harper (Killed in Action), 242614 Private G. Harwood (Wounded), 265796 Private W. E. Haxby (Wounded), 306230 Private H. Hill (Killed in Action), 241325 Private F. Hinchliffe (Wounded), 265537 Private F. Hird (Missing), 267867 Private H. Holland (Killed in Action), 242915 Private G. E. Holliday (Killed in Action), 265054 Private J. Hollingdrake (Wounded), 266596 Private W. Horsman (Killed in Action), 242172 Private P. Howe (Killed in Action), 240079 Private P. Ingham (Killed in Action), 267422 Private H. R. Jackson (Wounded), 267469 Private N. Jackson (Missing), 41156 Private R. E. Johnson (Wounded), 41154 Private A. Jeffery (Wounded), 303005 Private A. Jowett (Missing), 41160 Private R. T. Lamb (Killed in Action), 26575 Private R. Lawson (Wounded), 242185 Private H. Lee (Wounded), 242387 Private F. Long (Missing), 26593 Private W. E. Maycock (Killed in Action), 267527 J. R. Merry (Wounded), 265176 Private F. Miller (Wounded), 17050 Private J. Milne (Wounded), 265014 Private J. Moore (Wounded and missing), 41185 Private T. C. Mudd (Wounded & died of wounds 13/04/1918), 241106 Private W. Naylor (Killed in Action), 266967 Private H. Newhouse (Wounded), 41190 Private F. Newton (Wounded), 26717 Private A. Nicholson (Missing), 266498 Private E. Oversby (Wounded),26604 Private J. R. Parker (Killed in Action), 17065 Private J. Patterson (Missing), 41193 Private F. Pemberton (Missing), 265056 Private C. R. Pinder (Missing), 265446 Private D. Powell (Wounded), 242934 Private J. Priestley (Wounded), 265010 Private T. Ralph (Wounded at Duty), 267733 Private H. Rawnsley (Killed in Action), 266409 Private L. Ream (Missing), 26141 Private C. Redshaw (Wounded & Missing), 267579 Private M. Riley (Wounded), 267584 Private H. Roebuck (Missing), 266136 Private M. Rogers (Missing), 41199 Private W. F. Rowe (Killed in Action), 267568 Private W. Rushworth (Killed in Action), 242856 Private J. H. Shields (Wounded), 24433 Private G. W. Simpson (Wounded), 266554 Private R. S. Smith (Wounded), 267723 Private G. Snowden (Wounded), 267834 Private G. Spencer (Wounded), 41208 Private W. R. Spencer (Wounded and missing), 26631 Private B. Steel (Killed in Action), 266669 Private P. Taylor (Wounded), 26665 Private W. Thomson (Killed in Action), 267897 Private F. Tomlinson (Wounded), 22934 Private G. Vowles (Wounded), 24419 Private J. J. Warren (Missing), 268324 Private L. Waterworth (Missing), 266934 Private J. E. Whittaker (Wounded), 267833 Private W. Wilcock (Wounded), 267551 Private I. Wilshaw (Wounded), 202959 Private J. A. Wilson (Wounded), 305454 Private J. W. Wilson (Wounded).

15th Apr 1918 Reliefs

29th May 1918 29th Btn MGC in Action

27th Jul 1918 Heavy Rain and Thunderstorms

28th Jul 1918 Preparations

28th Jul 1918 In Action

30th Jul 1918 In Action

25th Sep 1918 Medals Awarded

30th Sep 1918 33rd Machine Gun Btn at Villers-Guislain  The 33rd M.G.Battalion was under command of Lieutenant Colonel G.S.Hutchinson at Villers-Guislain at the end of September 1918

   T/2nd Lt William Andrew Stewart HILL ordered to support infantry who were attacking Hollow Corpse, near Frensnes, under heavy machine gun fire 2nd Lt Hill mounted his guns in advantageous positions and gave great support to infantry attack.

If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



Want to know more about Machine Gun Corps?


There are:58287 pages and articles tagged Machine Gun Corps available in our Library


Those known to have served with

Machine Gun Corps

during the Great War 1914-1918.

  • Alderton John Henry. Pte. 38th Btn. (d.18th September 1918)
  • Alexander David. Pte. 2nd Btn.
  • Allen Arthur Hewitt. Lt. 1st Btn. att 72nd MGC.
  • Allen Wellington L. Pte. 44th Coy. (d.22nd Aug 1917)
  • Allison William. Pte. 56th Coy. (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Anderson Henry McDonnell. Lt. D Coy, 5th Btn (d.30th May 1918)
  • Andrews Ernest William. L/Sgt.
  • Avison Arthur Thomas. Pte. (Cavalry) (d.15th Nov 1917)
  • Baker William Ingram. 70th Coy. (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Balls Daniel Methuen French. Pte. 10th Battalion
  • Barker John. Lt. 107th Coy.
  • Barnett Harry. Pte.
  • Barrell Arthur. Pte. 68th Coy (d.11th Jun 1917)
  • Beamer Ellis. Pte. 229th Coy. (d.18th Nov 1917)
  • Beamer Ellis. Pte. 229th Coy. (d.18th Nov 1917)
  • Beard Lewis Digby Mansell. 2nd Lt. (d.19th Oct 1916)
  • Beaton William James. 2nd Lt. 174th Coy (d.24th Sept 1917)
  • Bethune Douglas. Pte. Infantry (d.1st July 1916 )
  • Bethune Thomas.
  • Bible Geoffrey Roskell. 2nd Lt. 101st Company (d.1st Jul 1916)
  • Bloore Arthur Cyril. Pte
  • Blows E. J.. Pte. 11th Coy.
  • Bollands Walter. Pte. 5th Battalion
  • Boston . Lt. 31st MGC.
  • Botto Frank. Pte. 18 Coy. (d.14th Oct 1916)
  • Bower Joseph William. Pte 183rd Coy (d.3rd Dec 1917)
  • Bowler Edward. Pte. 1st Btn.
  • Boyle Thomas. Pte.
  • Bradley Alfred. Pte. 54th Company (d.6th June 1917)
  • Bradshaw William. Pte. (d.3rd Dec 1917)
  • Brennan John. Pte. (d.9th Apr1917)
  • Brewer Herbert Noton. Cpl. 43rd Coy.
  • Brian Reginald. Pte. Infantry (d.16th April 1917)
  • Brighton George. Pte. 25th Battalion (d.3rd Nov 1918)
  • Brophy Daniel. Pte. Infantry (d.4th Nov 1918)
  • Buckley Reginald. 2nd Lt. 217th Company
  • Butterworth Frank. Pte..
  • Caine Evan Idwal. Pte. 68th Coy (d.9th Jun 1917)
  • Campbell H.. Pte. 118th Coy.
  • Caulfield Frederick A.. Pte. 75th Coy. (d.29th Aug 1916)
  • Cavin Thomas. Pte. 117th Coy. (d.28th June 1917)
  • Chatfield Albert Edward. Sjt.
  • Chatt J. W.. Pte. 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion
  • Chatter John Howard. Pte. 140th Bde (d.1st May 1916)
  • Clark Archibald Ernest. Sgt. 90th Coy.
  • Clark Charles Alexander. 278 Coy.
  • Clark Fred. Sjt 29th Coy (d.9th Mar 1918)
  • Clarke William James Thomas. Pte.
  • Collins Joseph. Pte. 56th Btn. (d.18th Sep 1918)
  • Columbine Herbert George. Pte. 9th Sqdn (d.22nd March 1918)
  • Constable Thomas. Pte. 25th Coy.
  • Coombe N.. Pte. 109th Btn. (d.1st Jul 1916)
  • Crawford Hugh. L/Cpl. No.1 Squadron (d.4th April 1918)
  • Crawford William John. Pte.
  • Crumbley Philip. Pte. 7th Coy. (Infantry) (d.18th Jul 1917)
  • Currie George Francis. Pte.
  • Davies Daniel. L/Cpl. 74th Coy. (d.21st Sep 1918)
  • Davies M.. Sgt. 32nd Battalion
  • Deane Robert L.. Cpt. 28th Brigade
  • Dillon J.. Sgt. 21st Btn.
  • Dobson Bramley. Pte. 12th Btn (d.5th Apr 1918)
  • Donald George Moir. Pte.
  • Donald George Moir. Pte.
  • Dossett Walter. Pte. 1/4th Btn. (d.25th June 1918)
  • Ebbs George Edward. Pte. 109th Btn. (d.1st Jul 1916)
  • Edmondson Charles Edward. Pte. 42nd Btn. (d.2nd June 1918)
  • Edwards Thomas. Pte. 107th Coy.
  • Eggleton Henry. Lt. 56th MG Btn.
  • Ellis Harry. Pte.
  • Ellis Trevor Edgar. 2nd Lt. 40th Btn. (d.10th Apr 1918)
  • Evans Levi Henry. Sgt 95th Coy (d.11th Nov 1917)
  • Farrell Thomas. Sjt.
  • Flanagan Robert. Pte. 30th Coy (d.7th Oct 1916)
  • Foulkes Walter Joseph. Dvr. 8th Btn.
  • Fowler Frederick William. Pte. 68th Coy (d.9th Jun 1917)
  • Frith Willis Hirwen. Pte. 207th Coy. (d.8th Jun 1917)
  • Fulbrook Frederick George. Pte. 69th Coy (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Gamble Roland Cavendish. Sergeant
  • Gardner Charles Lyall. Pte. 57th Coy. (d.30th Sep 1918)
  • Gaskin Peter. Sgt (d.17 Sep 1918)
  • Gawthorpe William. Pte. 34th Btn. (d.21st Mar 1918)
  • Gaze George.
  • Geraghty John. Sgt. 21st Battalion (d.14th Dec 1919)
  • Gogarty Christopher. Pte. (d.30th March 1918)
  • Goldney A. L.Y.. 6th London Coy.
  • Goodman Arthur. Sgt.
  • Gourlay Benjamin. Sgt. 142nd Coy. (d.18th May 1917)
  • Graham Benjamin. Able Sea. Howe Btn.
  • Grant Robert William. Pte. 69th Coy (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Gray John. Pte. 68th Coy (d.9th Jun 1917)
  • Green Alfred. Pte. 57th Coy. (d.13th Dec 1917)
  • Griffiths George. Pte. 286th Coy. (d.25th Oct1918)
  • Griffiths George. Pte. 286th Btn. (d.6th Nov 1918)
  • Guest James. Private
  • Halsall Walter. 45th Coy (d.1st August 1917)
  • Hands Henry. Sgt
  • Harmer Charles. Pte.
  • Hart Andrew Chichester. Pte. 109th Btn. (d.1st Jul 1916)
  • Hartley Ernest Henry. Pte. 103 Coy. (d.10th Apr 1917)
  • Hartley James Henry. Pte. 46th MG Coy. (d.20th Apr 1918)
  • Hawkins Leslie William. 2nd Lt. 6th Battalion
  • Heanes Arthur. Sgt.
  • Heybyrne Henry Ivor. 33rd Coy.
  • Highcock Peter. Cpl. (d.14th Nov 1918)
  • Hitchen Richard James. 152 Coy. (d.16th May 1917)
  • Hodson William. Pte.
  • Holmes James Joesph. Pte. 33rd Coy. (d.12th Oct 1918)
  • Hopkins Francis John. L/Cpl 101st
  • Houghton Richard. Pte. 31st Battalion A Company
  • Howells Harry. A.Cpl. 56th Btn.
  • Hubbard Joseph Henry. 176 Coy
  • Hullah Joseph Llewellyn. L/Cpl. (d.20th Oct 1917)
  • Hutting William. Pte. 2nd Btn.
  • Jebbett E.. Pte. 149th Coy. (d.19th Oct 1917)
  • Jones W.. Pte. 51st Btn.
  • Kay F.. L/Cpl. 237 Coy.
  • Kenny Daniel. Cpl. 55th Coy. (d.11th Apr 1918)
  • Kent John Walter. Pte.
  • Kerr Andrew Smith. Sgt. 157 Coy. (d.19th Apr 1917)
  • King Thomas. Pte. (d.02 December 1917)
  • Lancaster Thomas. Sgt.
  • Langford V G. 119 MG Coy.
  • Large Frank. Private
  • Lathlan William John. Pte. 34th (d.11th Jan 1917)
  • Lathlane William John. Pte. 34th Coy (d.11th Jan 1917)
  • Lee Patrick. Pte.
  • Leitch Mathew Bryce. Pte.
  • Lewis David Thomas. Pte. 207th Coy.
  • Lewis Sydney G.. Ptr. 106th Machine Gun Company
  • Light Earl Eustace. Pte. 3rd Btn.
  • Lockley John Bright. CQMS (d.5th April 1918)
  • Mackay Angus. Cpl. 1/5th Btn.(Queens Edinburgh Rifles) (d.5th May 1917)
  • Mackay Angus. Cpl. 1st/5th Btn. (Queens Edinburgh Rifles) (d.5th May 1917)
  • Maggs Bertram. Spr.
  • Mallon Michael. Sjt. 207th Coy. (d.26th Sep 1917)
  • Mansfield Harry. Pte. 1st Coy (d.17th Apr 1918)
  • Mark William John. Sgt. 9th Battalion
  • Marshall Harvey William. Pte. 78th Company (d.11th Dec 1918)
  • Martin William. Pte. 62nd Btn. (d.12th Sep 1918)
  • McCarthy Laurence. Pte. 49th Btn. (d.16th Oct 1918)
  • McDonald James Francis. Sgt. 19th Btn. (d.9th Sep 1919)
  • McGregor David Stuart. Lt. 6th Btn. (d.22nd Oct 1918)
  • McGurk Bernard. Pte. 125th Coy. (d.6th Sep 1917)
  • McIlhone John. Pte.
  • McKenzie Hugh McDonald. Lt. (d.30th Oct 1917)
  • McLauchlan James Smith. Pte. 44th MGC (d.18th Aug 1916)
  • McNally Joseph Brunton. Pte. 149th MGC
  • McQueen Samuel Brown. 2nd Lt.
  • Measey Thomas. Pte. 101st Coy (d.20th Jan 1917)
  • Mickle Frederick William. Pte. 141st Coy. (d.14th Jul 1917)
  • Millett William H.. Cpl. 49th Coy. (d.29th Nov 1917)
  • Milton Edwin. Pte.
  • Mingham Joseph. Pte.
  • Mingham Joseph. Pte.
  • Mogg Samuel Henry Earnest. Pte (d.3rd July 1917)
  • Moritz Oscar Frank. 2nd Lt. 99th Btn (d.27th July 1916)
  • Murphy Patrick. Pte. 47th Btn. (d.12th Sep 1918)
  • Musgrove William. L/Cpl. 3rd Btn. (d.5th Jul 1918)
  • Newcombe J.. 32nd Coy. (d.9th Nov1918)
  • Newton J.. Pte. 69th Coy (d.8th Jun 1917)
  • Nicholson Cyril Howard. Pte. 25th Btn. (d.12th Oct 1918)
  • Oakley Frank. L/Cpl. 58th Coy. (d.2nd Aug 1917)
  • Orvis Henry William. Sgt. 29th Btn. (d.15th May 1918)
  • Owen James. Pte. 12th Coy.
  • Owers Frank. L/Cpl. 161st Coy. (d.5th Apr 1918)
  • Packham Edward. Pte. 220th MG Coy (d.25th October 1917)
  • Pain Major William. Pte. 69th Coy (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Parker G H. Sgt. 119th MC Coy
  • Parr Harry William Charles. Pte. 101st Coy
  • Petchell Arthur. Pte. 2nd Btn. (d.10th Mar 1915)
  • Pittman Arthur George. Pte. 25th Btn. (d.13th Oct 1918)
  • Plested Tom. Pte. 56th Company (d.5th July 1916)
  • Potts John William. L/Cpl. (d.26th September 1917)
  • Prince Henry George. Pte. 24th Btn.
  • Quincey George Henry. Cpl. 101st Machine Gun Company
  • Reeve Harry William. Pte. 149th Coy. (d.25th Oct 1917)
  • Roberts Charles. Sgt.
  • Roberts John Stephen. L/Cpl
  • Robinson George Ellis. Pte 18th Btn.
  • Robinson T.. Pte. 68th Coy (d.9th Jun 1917)
  • Robson John. Pte. 150th Company (d.19th Sep 1916)
  • Rosser George Archibald. Capt. 2nd Btn.
  • Rowell Thomas Richmond. 2nd Lt.
  • Ruddell George. Pte. 109th Btn.
  • Rymer Robert. Sjt. 150th Coy (d.10th Apr 1918)
  • Sampson Charlie George Melrose. Pte. 207th Coy. (d.11th Jul 1917)
  • Shepherd Thomas Bell. Pte. 3rd Btn.
  • Simpson Reginald. Cpl.
  • Slack Albert Edward. Sgt. 28th Coy. (d.19th Jul 1916)
  • Spear William. Cpl. 2nd Battalion
  • Stafford Benjamin Milburn. Pte. 149th Coy. (d.20th Apr 1917)
  • Starkey Harry Stephen. L/Cpl. 21st Bn (d.21st Feb 1919)
  • Stenson Thomas. Pte.
  • Stevenson John Henry. Pte. 70th Coy (d.1st Jul 1916)
  • Stewart Donald. Pte. 69th Coy (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Sword David Stevenson. Pte. 50th Coy (d.14th July 1917)
  • Symes George William. 2nd Lt. 69th Company
  • Taylor Harold Richard. Lt. attd. 77th Coy. Machine Gun Corps (d.17th March 1917)
  • Thomson W.. Pte. 142nd Coy. (d.7th Jun 1917)
  • Timms J. W.. Cpl. 119 MG Coy.
  • Toomath David. Pte.
  • Trivett Walter Thomas. Pte. 9th Sqdn (d.Oct. 27, 1918)
  • Trull James. Pte.
  • Unsworth John William. Pte.
  • Walker John. Pte. 33rd Coy. (d.10th Jun 1917)
  • Walker John. Pte. 33rd Coy. (d.20th June 1917)
  • Wall Hubert Henry. Pte. 53rd coy (d.22nd October 1917)
  • Wallace John. Cpl. 148 Company
  • Waring Samuel. CSM.
  • Watson James. 34th Coy.
  • Weeden Albert. Pte.
  • Whalley Ralph. (d.4th Apr 1918)
  • Wheadon Charles. Pte.
  • Wilkes C.. Pte. 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion
  • Williams George Shaw. L/Cpl. 32 Company (d.28th Sept 1916)
  • Williams Nathan. Pte. 58 Coy. (d.21st March 1918)
  • Willis Charles Richard. Pte
  • Willison Harry Cooper. Pte.
  • Willson John Bertram.
  • Wilson Charles Robert. 88th Coy. (d.24th May 1917)
  • Wilson James. Pte. 59th Coy (d.4th Sept 1916)
  • Winter George. Pte. 4th Coy. (d.4th Nov 1918)
  • Wood Ernest. Pte. 40th Company (d.21st March 1918)
  • Yallop Ronald Robert. Pte. B Coy (d.12th April 1917)
  • Yewdall David. Sgt.
  • Young W. B.. 119th Btn.

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1206577

Cpt. Robert L. Deane MID 28th Brigade Machine Gun Corps

Captain Robert L. Deane 28th Brigade Machine Gun Company, Mentioned in the Despatches, in March 1918 and later awarded the MBE I'm trying to establish my great uncle's WW1 service record. He served as a Captain with the Machine Gun Corps. He had the final rank of Lt Col. Died in SA around 1969.

Peter Deane




1206550

Pte. Charles Edward Edmondson 42nd Btn. Machine Gun Corps (d.2nd June 1918)

Charles Edmondson was killed in action 2th Jun 1918, aged 21 and buried in the Couin New British Cemetery, France. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Edmondson, 95 Leyland Rd., Burnley. Formerly 50 Milton Street, Burnley. A weaver at Emmott's, Burnley Lane

s flynn




1206469

Pte. John Howard Chatter 140th Bde Machine Gun Corps (d.1st May 1916)

My Great Uncle, John Howard Chatter, enlisted into the South Wales Borderer's in approximately August 1915 at the age of 17 years along with his brother and my Great uncle Charles E. Chatter aged 19 years. They both went on the end up in the Machine Gun Corps.

On 1st of May 1916 John Howard was killed at the age of 18 years and his grave stands in Caberet-Rouge British Cemetery in Souchez. Great Uncle Charles survived WW1 and returned to his family and friends back in Shifnal, Shropshire where he finally passed away and is buried in St Andrews church yard. I know John Howard was in 140th Bde., Machine Gun Corps. If anyone might have a picture or knows of any pictures of my Great Uncles during WW1 please could you get in touch with me.

Rob Chatter




1206463

Pte. William Hutting 2nd Btn. East Yorkshire Regiment

Private William Hutting served as N°9849, 2nd East Yorkshire Regiment, 83rd Brigade in 28th Division He changed units at the end of 1915 and went to the Machine Gun Corps with the n°176806. After he changed another time the unit for going to the South Lancashire with the n°8855.

It's the only information have find about this solder. I found his toothbrush near Arras Thanks if you have any another information about this soldier.

michel




1206289

Cpl. John Wallace DCM MID 148 Company Machine Gun Corps

Sheffield newspaper article reporting Cpl. J Wallace DCM award

My grandfather,John Wallace, served throughout the Great War. He was in 1/4 Battalion The Hallamshires of the Territorial Army before the war and was mobilised at the outbreak of war.

He sailed, with his battalion, for France on 13th April 1915 and served with his battalion (he was 2251 Pte J Wallace, York and Lancaster Regiment) as a machine gunner until transferred to 148 Company of the newly formed Machine Gun Corps on 31st January 1916. On 7th July 1917, during the Battle of The Somme, he was in a particularly fierce action near the small village of Thiepval, which was on, or near, the extreme left of the line, during which he remained in captured German positions to give covering fire to his retreating comrades during a German counter attack. During this action his cousin, who was part of his gun team, was killed and this left him to operate the gun alone for as long as he could. Eventually, he had to destroy the gun, which had become inoperable, with a grenade and make his way back after his comrades. The war diary for 148 Company records his action in its entry for 17th August 1916.

For his brave conduct throughout this particular action he was awarded the DCM. He had, previously, been Mentioned in Despatches at least twice. Strangely, his entry in the London Gazette, recording his DCM award, incorrectly identifies him as still belonging to York and Lancs Regiment and with his old number. He was eventually transferred to "Z" class reserve on 28th February 1919.

After the war, he married and had two children - a son and a daughter - and he died in 1947.

Cpl. J Wallace medal card

Lndon Gazette entry for  DCM Award for Pte J Wallace

Nigel Drake




1206267

Pte. John Henry Alderton 38th Btn. Machine Gun Corps. (Infantry) (d.18th September 1918)

Private John Henry Alderton

John Alderton died on 18th September 1918, aged 19 and is buried inthe St Sever Cemetery extension in France. He was the only son of Charles & Edith Annie Alderton (Nee Chittock) of Ilford, Essex, UK.

s flynn




1206247

Pte. Herbert George Columbine VC 9th Sqdn Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry) (d.22nd March 1918)

Herbert Columbine died on 22nd March 1918, aged 24 and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial in the Pozieres British Cemetery in France. He was the son of Mrs. Emma Columbine

s flynn




1206127

Pte. Walter Thomas Trivett 9th Sqdn Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry) (d.Oct. 27, 1918)

Walter Thomas Trivett is laid to rest in Saint Sever Cemetery Extension in Rouen, France. He was born in Market Bosworth, Leicestershire on 1st September 1894, which made him 24 years old when he died on the 27th October 1918.

Ian Spencer




1206098

Pte. Ronald Robert Yallop B Coy Machine Gun Corps (Heavy Branch) (d.12th April 1917)

On the 6th of April Ronald Yallop wrote to his uncle who was serving in Egypt. He commented that his winter quarters had been good and he had had a good rest with "beaucoup cafes etc". He then commented that they were having their share now and he had only had about 10 hours sleep in the past 72 hours.

This letter was probably never sent by Ron as we now have it in an envelope with a black border and a picture of his grave stuck to it. He died on 12th April 1917 of his wounds and is now buried in Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport. According to evidence I have sourced his Battalion was based in Pierremont, France at this time and the tanks he was training to use did not enter the action until after his death.

Clare Hensman




1206060

Lt. John Barker MC. 107th Coy. Machine Gun Corps

Lieutenant John Barker with his father Rev Thomas Barker probably taken before his departure for France in 1916.

My Dad, John Barker was born in 1895 at Barrowby, he grew up the youngest son of a country vicar and served 1 year each in the Officer Training Corps first at Brighton College and then Worksop College. Dad enlisted in the Territorial Force (no 2860) on 5th Feb 1915. I am not sure but think it was established he had been in the OTC so, on 23rd Feb 1915, he was appointed 2nd Lt in Worcestershire Regiment. Sometime later he was transferred to 107 MGC (he got in a bit of trouble during his initial training and am not sure if his reward was a transfer to the suicide club!).

He arrived in France in late June 1916 just missing the first days of the Somme. I have some information that he was awarded his MC from action on 3 March 1917 and have the citation from the London Gazette of 11 May 1917. Apart from that I know little about the circumstances that lead to his MC. The War Diary of 107th MGC for that day says it is quiet. I have also read that was the day a German Camouflet exploded at Spanbroekmolen near the 107th MGC. Was this the rescuing referred to in his citation?

Dad was taken prisoner on the 1st day of the German Spring Offensive. He never said much about his experiences but one day he told me that as POWs they were so hungry two of his fellow prisoners fought over a dead sparrow!

Dad also served as an Auxiliary Cadet with the infamous K Company in 1921-2 but was invalided out with a gun shot wound (barrack room incident). Like many families a great tragedy for Dad was that his eldest son (my half-brother) Thomas Roy lost his life over Belgium on 12 May 1940 trying to stop the German advance (Sgt Observer of 150 Sqn). Any additional info on Dad would be appreciated.

Extract from London Gazette 11 May 1917

John Barker




1205883

Pte. Joseph Collins 56th Btn. Machine Gun Corps. (d.18th Sep 1918)

Joseph Collins was killed in action on the 18th of September 1918, aged 25 and is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension in France. He was the son of Albert and Ada Collins of Bloxham, Oxfordshire, husband of Kathleen Collins and father of Rosina and Ada of Coventry

s flynn




1205764

Sgt. Arthur Heanes Machine Gun Corps

My great uncle, Sgt Arthur Heanes, ex Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry, is the goal keeper in this MGC Football team - location unknown - only clue, is the picture was produced in Grantham.

Clive Hardy




233357

Pte. C. Wilkes 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

C Wilks served with the Tyneside Irish and transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

Lynne




232336

Pte. J. W. Chatt 24th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

J Chatt was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps

Lynne




229909

Sgt. Arthur Goodman Machine Gun Corps

Arthur Goodman, my grandfather, was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire on 2 Aug 1892 to his parents William Goodman and Alice (nee Lea). He had two older brothers, Fred and Frank and two younger sisters Alma and Gladys. Presumably life was quiet for him and his family and he worked as an assistant boot salesman while the family lived at 16 Clifford Street. As far as I understand it at the outbreak of war he joined the King's Shropshire Light Infantry but them went on to join the Machine Gun Corps.

My father (William Edward Goodman) wrote of him: "Dad was a native of Shrewsbury, where he had commenced work as an assistant in that branch of boot and shoe retailers, G & W Morton, for whom he worked throughout the whole of his working life, except for Army service during the First World War. My father's army service was with the Machine Gun Corps, rising to the rank of Sergeant Major. The M.G.C. appears to have been something of a suicide squad in that they were to the fore in major actions, or bearing the brunt of spirited offensives against our lines. Whilst a Sergeant he received the congratulations of Major General C.E. Pereira, CB,CMG, Commanding 2nd Division on his "Splendid leadership and example to those under him.""

After the war he married my grandmother, Lavinia Barfoot, and had two boys my father and his younger brother, Ronald Clive. He died in Maidstone on in 1958.

Gill Chesney-Green




229710

L/Cpl. Joseph Llewellyn Hullah Machine Gun Corps (d.20th Oct 1917)

Joe Hullah was my great Grandmother's brother so I guess he would be my great great uncle. I understand he was initially with the DLI then joined the Machine Gun Corps. Joe was killed together with two pals who, I believe, were also from Consett on 20/10/1917 while setting up their machine gun prior to an advance. His body was never recovered and still remains over seas covered in mud. He is remembered on the Tyne cot memorial and Consett's memorial. I only know these limited facts due to reading letters sent home by his CO after his death.

In 1979 I left school and started work as an apprentice HGV fitter. A long time friend was also serving his time with me. One day during conversation I mentioned Uncle Joe and my mate realised he too was the same relation to Joe. What were the chances of that? Very big families in those days.

I do not have any photographs of Joe. As a result of my investigations I have found out that he too was a mechanic before the war and was married shortly before his death. My great grandmother often talked about him when I was a child. RIP Joe.

Arran Field




228294

Pte. George Moir Donald Machine Gun Corps

George Donald was my grandfather who served in WW1 in the Machine Guns Corps. In 1918 he was badly injured in action, and as a result he was put in an Iron Lung Machine, but he was not expected to live. But with the care of his wife over a long period of time, he survived. He was a jute overseer for most of his working life, he died in 1965.

M. Donald




227143

George Gaze Machine Gun Corps

George Gaze served with the MGC in 89th Brigade.

Michael Gaze




226846

W. B. Young 119th Btn. Machine Gun Corps

My parents' house in Northern France has a chimney place in the attic with lots of different names of people engraved into it. Several of the engravings come from men serving in the 119th Machine Gun Corp. It would be really good to find the relatives of these men.

Heidi Ward




226332

2nd Lt. William James Beaton 174th Coy Machine Gun Corps (d.24th Sept 1917)

William Beaton was the Assistant Librarian of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He was killed in action during 3rd Battle of Ypres on 24th of September 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the memorial at Tyne Cot, and also on the Roll Of Honour at the British Library.

Syd Maclain




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History of the 51st (Highland) Division 1914-1918

F.W. Bewsher


The Highland Division was one of the pre-war Territorial divisions. Its HQ was in Perth with brigade HQs in Aberdeen, Inverness and Stirling. On mobilization the division moved down to its war station in Bedford where it remained, carrying out training till embarking for France in May 1915. During this period six of its battalions were sent to France, three in November 1914 and three in the following March, replaced by two Highland battalions and a brigade of four Lancashire battalions; it is not clear whether the latter were required to wear kilts. They were transferred to the 55th (West Lancashire) Division when that division reformed in France in January 1916 and were replaced, appropriately, by Scottish battalions. It was in May 1915, just as the division arrived in France, that it was designated 51st and the brigades 152nd, 153rd and 154th; by the end of the war the 51st (Highland) Division had become one of the best known divisions in the BEF.
History of the 9th (Scottish) Division

John Ewing


The division’s record is graphically described in this history - what Field Marshal Lord Plumer in his foreword referred to as “a record of wonderful development of fighting efficiency.” There are useful appendices giving the Order of Battle, command and staff lists with the various changes; a table showing periods spent in the line, with locations; a table of battle casualties and the VC citations. The maps are good with adequate detail for actions to be followed.
Machine-Guns and the Great War

Paul Cornish


More information on:

Machine-Guns and the Great War


Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front.

Edward Rowbotham


It is 1915 and the Great War has been raging for a year, when Edward Rowbotham, a coal miner from the Midlands, volunteers for Kitchener's Army. Drafted into the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps, he is sent to fight in places whose names will forever be associated with mud and blood and sacrifice: Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele. He is one of the 'lucky' ones, winning the Military Medal for bravery and surviving more than two-and-a-half years of the terrible slaughter that left nearly a million British soldiers dead by 1918 and wiped out all but six of his original company. He wrote these memoirs fifty years later, but found his memories of life in the trenches had not diminished at all. The sights and sounds of battle, the excitement, the terror, the extraordinary comradeship, are all vividly described as if they had happened to him only yesterday. Likely to be one of the last first-hand accounts to come to light, Mud, Blood and Bullets offers a rare perspective of the First World W
With A Machine Gun To Cambrai

George Coppard


First World War memoir of George Coppard who served as a private soldier from 1914 until he was wounded at the end of 1917.
More information on:

With A Machine Gun To Cambrai


Mud, Blood and Bullets: Memoirs of a Machine Gunner on the Western Front

Edward Rowbotham


Mud, Blood and Bullets is a useful and still rare addition to the ordinary soldier's experience of the Machine Gun Corps in World War I. --War Books Review Likely to be one of the last first-hand accounts to come to light, this book offers an ordinary soldier's viewpoint of WWI. --Best of British Magazine Product Description It is 1915 and the Great War has been raging for a year, when Edward Rowbotham, a coal miner from the Midlands, volunteers for Kitchener's Army. Drafted into the newly-formed Machine Gun Corps, he is sent to fight in places whose names will forever be associated with mud and blood and sacrifice: Ypres, the Somme, and Passchendaele. He is one of the 'lucky' ones, winning the Military Medal for bravery and surviving more than two-and-a-half years of the terrible slaughter that left nearly a million British soldiers dead by 1918 and wiped out all but six of his original company. He wrote these memoirs fifty years later, but found his memories of life in the trenc
Somewhere in Blood Soaked France

Alasdair Sutherland


This book follows the life of a crofters son from the Highlands of Scotland to Edinburgh and beyond and is a very rare example of a Brave man who secretely kept a diary during his military service from the Campaigns in Dardenelles, Egypt, the Somme, Ypres and every other battle he fought in, most not as memorable and probably long forgotten but every bit as Bloody. Angus's diary gives a modest and unique version of events he lived through and also the horrific conditions which he had to face on a daily basis. The author Alasdair Sutherland paints a bigger picture of what really took place on those diary entry dates looking back in time to the battlefields filling in the detail and giving the diary more depth and perspective. This is a unique story brought to life by a very knowledgeable author who researched the subject in great detail.
Somewhere in Blood Soaked France

Alasdair Sutherland


From the heat and dust of the Dardanelles to the mud of the Western Front, Corporal Angus Mackay had one constant companion, his diary. He wrote of the battles and campaigns he fought in, names that would go down in history: Gallipoli, the Somme, Ypres and Arras. Serving in the the 1st/5th Battalion (Queens Edinburgh Rifles) Royal Scots and later the 88th Brigade Machine Gun Corps, he left a record of one man's extraordinary and tragic war. In Somewhere in Blood Soaked France, Alasdair Sutherland reveals this previously unpublished account of the First World War, complete with historical context, orders of battle and extracts from official war diaries. This rare source - it was an offence to keep a record in a case of capture - offers a stirring insight into the bravery of Mackay and his companions, who were not afraid to die for their country. 'If I go under it will be in a good cause, so roll on the adventure.'




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