You are not logged in.
London Regiment in the Great War - The Wartime Memories Project -

The Wartime Memories Project

- London Regiment during the Great War -


Great War>Allied Army
skip to content


This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to accept cookies.


If you enjoy this site please consider making a donation.



    Site Home

    Great War

    Search

    Add Stories & Photos

 Features

    Allied Army

    Day by Day

    War in the Air

    Prisoners of War

    War at Sea

    Training for War

    The Battles

    Those Who Served

    Hospitals

    Civilian Service

    Women at War

    Life on Home Front

    Central Powers Army

    Central Powers Navy

    Library

    World War Two

 Submissions

    Add Stories & Photos

    Time Capsule

 Information

    Help & FAQ's

    Our Facebook Page

    Volunteering

    News

    Events

    Contact us

    Great War Books

    About


Advertisements













World War 1 One ww1 wwII greatwar great

London Regiment

Territorial Force:

  • 10th (1st Hackney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 11th (1st Finsbury Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 12th (The Rangers) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 13th (Kensington) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 14th (1st London Scottish) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 15th (Prince of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment.
  • 16th (Queens Westminster Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 18th (London Irish Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 19th (St Pancras) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 1st Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/10th (2nd Hackney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/11th (2nd Finsbury Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/12th (2nd Rangers) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/13th (2nd Kensington) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/14th (2nd London Scottish) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/15th (2nd Civil Service Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/16th (Queens Own Westminster Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/17th (2nd Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/18th (London Irish Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/19th (2nd St. Pancras) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/1st Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/20th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/21st (2nd Surrey Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/22nd (2nd Queens) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/23rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/24th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/25th (2nd Cyclists) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/28th (2nd Artists Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/2nd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/3rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/4th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/5th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/7th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/8th (2nd Post Office Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2/9th (2nd Queen Victorias Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 20th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 21st (1st Surrey Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 22nd (The Queens) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 23rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 24th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 25th (Cyclist) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 26th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 27th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 28th (1st Artists Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 29th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/10th (3rd Hackney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/11th (3rd Finsbury Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/12th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/13th (3rd Kensington) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/14th (3rd London Scottish Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/15th (3rd Civil Service Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/16th (3rd Queens Westminster Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/17th (3rd Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/18th (3rd London Irish Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/19th (3rd St Pancras) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/1st Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/22nd (3rd Queens) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/23rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/24th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/25th (3rd Cyclist) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/28th (3rd Artists Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/2nd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/3rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/4th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/5th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/6th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/7th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/8th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3/9th (3rd Queen Victorias Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 30th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 31st Battalion, London Regiment
  • 32nd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 33rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 34th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 4/1st Battalion, London Regiment
  • 4/2nd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 4/3rd Battalion, London Regiment
  • 4th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 5th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 6th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 7th Battalion, London Regiment
  • 8th (Post Office Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • 9th (Queen Victorias Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment
  • London Regiment 3/20th (3rd Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment
  • London Regiment 3/21st (3rd Surrey Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment

       2/6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles)
  • Formed in London in August 1914.
  • Moved in October to Walton-on-Thames, then Burgess Hill in November where placed under orders of 2/1st London Brigade in 2/1st London Division.
  • Moved to Norwich in May 1915 and formation retitled as 174th Brigade in 58th (2/1st London) Division.
  • Moved on to Ipswich next month, then Stowmarket and Sudbury and then to Sutton Veny in July 1916.
  • 25 January 1917 : landed at Le Havre.
  • 31 January 1918 : absorbed by 1/6th Bn.

       The 7th Battalion The London Regiment was nicknamed the ‘Shiny Seventh’ was formed as part of the Territorial Force in April 1908, having previously been the 3rd City of London Rifle Volunteers. The Battalion landed in France in March 1915 as part of the 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. They first saw action at Festubert in May 1915, and later took part in major battles at Loos in September 1915, Vimy in May 1916, High Wood in September 1916, Butte de Warlencourt in October 1916 moving to Belguim in 1917 and seeing action in the battle of Passchendaele at Messines in June of that year before returning to France for the battles at and Cambrai in November 1917. In 1918 the 1/7th amaganated with the 2/7th to become the 7th Battalion, seeing action at Villiers Bretonneux, Mallard Wood, Epehy, Courrieres, Maulde.

       9th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment, The 1st Queen Victoria’s Rifles are the descendants of The Duke of Cumberland’s Corps of Sharpshooters which was inaugurated in September 1803. In 1908, when the Territorial Force was created, the 9th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (Queen Victoria’s Rifles) was allocated to the 3rd London Brigade, 1st London Division.

    In August 1914 they had their HQ at 56 Davies Street and were part of 3rd London Brigade, 1st London Division. They Moved on mobilisation to Bullswater, going on in September to Crowborough. Early in the Great War, the 1st London Division was broken up to provide reinforcements for the BEF and on 5th November 1914 the 9th Battalion landed at Havre and joined 13th Brigade, 5th Division. The battalion fought with 5th Division throughout 1915, at Hill 60, Second Ypres and St Julien. In February 1916 the 56th Division was formed in France and the 9th Battalion were allocated to the 169th Brigade. It fought with this division on the Somme, Arras, Third Ypres and Cambrai and transferred to the 58th Division in February 1918 where it amalgamated with the 2/9th to become the 9th Battalion.

       2/1st Battalion, London Regiment was a Territorial unit with HQ at Tufton Street in Westminster as part of 1st London Brigade, 1st London Division, when war was declared in August 1914. They were mobilised at once to guard the Amesbury-Southampton docks railway. On the 4th of September 1914 they sailed with the 1st London Brigade from Southampton to Malta, arriving in Valetta on the 14th of September to take over the garrison, allowing the regular units to return home for service in France. They left Malta on the 2nd of January 1915 landing at Marseilles on the 6th, the travelled north by train 17th Brigade, 6th Division on the 17th of February. On the 14th of October they transferred with 17th Brigade to 24th Division then on the 9th of February 1916 they transferred to 169th Brigade in the newly formed 56th (London) Division, which was concentrating in the Hallencourt area. They were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       3rd/9th (3rd Queen Victoria’s Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment, was formed in April 1915 and remained in Britain throughout the Great War in the role of training and providing reinforcements for the other two QVR battalions.

       2/3rd (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment was formed in London in September 1914. They trained at Epsom Downs and Tonbridge, joining 2/1st London Brigade, 2/1st London Division. On the 31st of December they left the Division and moved to Malta to replace the 1/3rd Londons at the garrison there. On the 27th of August 1915 they moved to Egypt, and went on to land at Cape Helles, Gallipoli on the 13th of October 1915, joining the 86th Brigade, 29th Division. They were involved in heavy fighting until the evacuation on the nights of the 7th and 8th of January 1916 when they returned to Egypt and transferred to 53rd (Welsh) Division. In April 1916 they left the Division and moved to France. In June 1916 the original 2/3rd Londons were disbanded at Rouen, with the 3/3rd Batalion then being renamed 2/3rd. When the army was reorganised in ealy 1918, the 2/3rd battalion was absorbed by 1/3rd Londons, on the 6th of February 1918.

       The 2/6th Battalion, London Regiment was formed at the end of August 1914 and became part of 2nd London Brigade, 1st London Division. The 2/6th arrived in France in January 1917 with 174th Brigade, 58th Division, and saw its first major action at Bullecourt. The Battalion also took part in the Third Battle of Ypres in late 1917. At the end of January 1918 the 1/6th and 2/6th were amalgamated and became known at the 6th Battalion, serving with the 58th Division until the end of the war.

       2nd/9th (2nd Queen Victoria’s Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment, was formed in August 1915. The 2/9th went to France in February 1917 with 58th Division and saw action at Bullecourt and Third Ypres before amalgamating with the 1st/9th Battalion.

       2/14th (2nd London Scottish) Battalion, London Regiment, was a second line Territorial unit formed in London in September 1914, from the troops of the 14th (1st London Scottish) Battalion who had not volunteered for serviceover seas. They joined 2/4th London Brigade, 2/2nd London Division at White City, later retitled 179th Brigade, 60th (2/2nd London) Division. They moved to Maidstone in January 1915 then to Watford in April, to Saffron Walden in June and to Sutton Veny in January 1916 to prepare for service overseas. Due to the Irish rebellion, plans to embark for France were with drawn and on the 28th of April the 2nd London Scottish landed at Cork for security duties in Ireland, based at Ballincollig and moving to Macroom. On the 14th of May they returned to England, sailing from Rosslare to Fishguard and returned to Sutton Veny to continue training. They proceeded to France on the 22nd of June, landing at Le Havre. In November they were ordered to Salonika. Travelling by train fom Longpre to Marseilles and sailing via Malta, they arrived in Salonika on 25 December 1916. In 1917 they were in action during the The Battles of Doiran in April and May. They moved to Egypt, concentrating at Moascar in the Southern Suez Canal Zone then advanced into Palestine. They were in action during The Third Battle of Gaza including the capture of Beersheba and the capture of the Sheria position and The capture and defence of Jerusalem. In 1918 they saw action in The capture of Jericho, The battle of Tell'Asur, The first Trans-Jordan raid (as part of Shea's Force) The attack on Amman (as part of Chaytor's Column) and The second Trans-Jordan raid. In the spring and summer the division was \"Indianised\" with British units leaving for France and units of the Indian Army taking their place. The 2nd London Scottish left the Division on the 30th of May and returned to France, joining 90th Brigade, 30th Division on the 2nd of July. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines. In January 1919 30th Division took up duty at the Base Ports of Dunkirk, Calais, Boulogne and Etaples and demobilisation began.

       2/15th (2nd Prince of Wales's Own Civil Service Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment, was a second line Territorial unit formed at Somerset House, London in September 1914, from the troops of the 15th (1st Civil Service Rifles) Battalion who had not volunteered for serviceover seas. They joined 2/4th London Brigade, 2/2nd London Division at White City, later retitled 179th Brigade, 60th (2/2nd London) Division. They moved to Maidstone in January 1915 then to Watford in April, to Saffron Walden in June and to Sutton Veny in January 1916 to prepare for service overseas. Due to the Irish rebellion, plans to embark for France were with drawn and on the 28th of April the 2nd London Scottish landed at Cork for security duties in Ireland, based at Ballincollig and moving to Macroom. On the 14th of May they returned to England, sailing from Rosslare to Fishguard and returned to Sutton Veny to continue training. They proceeded to France on the 22nd of June, landing at Le Havre. In November they were ordered to Salonika. Travelling by train fom Longpre to Marseilles and sailing via Malta, they arrived in Salonika on 25 December 1916. In 1917 they were in action during the The Battles of Doiran in April and May. They moved to Egypt, concentrating at Moascar in the Southern Suez Canal Zone then advanced into Palestine. They were in action during The Third Battle of Gaza including the capture of Beersheba and the capture of the Sheria position and The capture and defence of Jerusalem. In 1918 they saw action in The capture of Jericho, The battle of Tell'Asur, The first Trans-Jordan raid (as part of Shea's Force) The attack on Amman (as part of Chaytor's Column) and The second Trans-Jordan raid. In the spring and summer the division was \"Indianised\" with British units leaving for France and units of the Indian Army taking their place. The 2nd Civil Service Rifles left the Division on the 30th of May and returned to France, joining 90th Brigade, 30th Division on the 2nd of July. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines. In January 1919 30th Division took up duty at the Base Ports of Dunkirk, Calais, Boulogne and Etaples and demobilisation began.

       2/17th (2nd Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment were raised in London in August 1914. After training in the London area they joined 2/5th London Brigade, 2/2nd London Division at Reigate in January 1915. The division was later retitled 180th Brigade, 60th (2/2nd London) Division. They moved to St Albans in March 1915, then to Bishops Stortford in May 1915 and to Sutton Veny in January 1916 for final training. They proceeded to France on the 23rd of June, landing at Le Havre. In November 1916 they moved to Salonika. they were ordered to Salonika. Travelling by train fom Longpre to Marseilles and sailing via Malta, they arrived in Salonika on 25 December 1916. In 1917 they were in action during the The Battles of Doiran in April and May. They moved to Egypt, concentrating at Moascar in the Southern Suez Canal Zone then advanced into Palestine. They were in action during The Third Battle of Gaza including the capture of Beersheba and the capture of the Sheria position and The capture and defence of Jerusalem. In 1918 they saw action in The capture of Jericho, The battle of Tell'Asur, The first Trans-Jordan raid (as part of Shea's Force) The attack on Amman (as part of Chaytor's Column) and The second Trans-Jordan raid. In the spring and summer the division was Indianised with British units leaving for France and units of the Indian Army taking their place. On the 27th of May the 2/17th Londons left the Division and moved to France, joining 89th Brigade, 30th Division the 30th of June at Audruicq. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines. In January 1919 30th Division took up duty at the Base Ports of Dunkirk, Calais, Boulogne and Etaples and demobilisation began.

       2/23rd Battalion, London Regiment was raised at Clapham Junction, London in August 1914. After training in the London area they joined 2/6th London Brigade, 2/2nd London Division at Redhill, later named 181st Brigade, 60th (2/2nd London) Division. They moved to St Albans in March 1915, then to Braintree in May 1915 to and Sutton Veny in January 1916 for final training. They proceeded to France in June landing at Le Havre. In November they were ordered to Salonika. Travelling by train fom Longpre to Marseilles and sailing via Malta, they arrived in Salonika on 25 December 1916. In 1917 they were in action during the The Battles of Doiran in April and May. They moved to Egypt, concentrating at Moascar in the Southern Suez Canal Zone then advanced into Palestine. They were in action during The Third Battle of Gaza including the capture of Beersheba and the capture of the Sheria position and The capture and defence of Jerusalem. In 1918 they saw action in The capture of Jericho, The battle of Tell'Asur, The first Trans-Jordan raid (as part of Shea's Force) The attack on Amman (as part of Chaytor's Column) and The second Trans-Jordan raid. In the spring and summer the division was \"Indianised\" with British units leaving for France and units of the Indian Army taking their place. On the 26th of May the 2/23rd Londons left the Division and moved to France and joined 21st Brigade, 30th Division. They were in action during the Advance in Flanders and by the Armistice had crossed the River Scheldt with advanced units reaching the line between Ghoy and la Livarde, north west of Lessines. In January 1919 30th Division took up duty at the Base Ports of Dunkirk, Calais, Boulogne and Etaples and demobilisation began.

       33rd Battalion, London Regiment was formed at Clacton-on-Sea in early June 1918. On the 18th they moved to Pirbright and absorbed the cadre of the 7th Battalion Rifle Brigade, joining the reforming 41st Brigade, 14th (Light) Division. They proceeded to France on the 3rd of July 1918, landing at Boulogne. The Division joined Second Army and saw action at Ypres and in the final advance in Flanders.

       34th Battalion, London Regiment was formed at formed in Clacton-on-Sea in early June 1918. On the 27th of June, they moved to Aldershot, absorbing the cadre of the 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps and joining the reforming 49th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division. They proceeded to France on the 1st of August 1918, landing at Boulogne and fought in The Final Advance in Artois.

       1st (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers), The London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ in Handel Square, St Pancras. They were part of the 1st London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out in august 1914. They were at once mobilised for war, taking up position guarding the London to Newhaven railway line. On the 4th of September 1914 they were dispatched to Malta to relieve a unit of the regular army and 1st London Brigade sailed from Southampton to Malta, arriving in Valetta on the 14th. They were stationed in Malta until the 11th of February 1915 when they sailed for Avonmouth, arriving on the 21st. They proceeded to France, landing at le Havre on the 11th of March and joined the 25th Brigade, 8th Division. They were in action at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers and The action of Bois Grenier. On the 8th of February 1916 they transferred to 167th Brigade in the newly reformed 56th (1st London) Division. in the Hallencourt area in February. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. On the 6th of February 1918 when the army was reorgansised, they absorbed the disbanded 2/1st London Battalion. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       2nd (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 9 Tufton Street, Westminster, serving as part of 1st London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out in August 1914. The battalion was mobilised and allocated the task of guarding the Amesbury-Southampton docks railway. On the 4th of September 1914 they sailed with the Brigade from Southampton to Malta, arriving at Valetta on the 14th of September. They remained in Malta until the 2nd of January 1915 and arrived at Marseilles on the 6th of January heading for the Western Front by train. They joined the 17th Brigade, 6th Division on the 21st of February 1915 and on the 14th of October they transferred with the Brigade to 24th Division and on the 9th of February 1916 they were assigned to the 169th Brigade in 56th (London) Division, which was being reformed in France. The 56th Division concentrated in the Hallencourt area. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July also seeing action in The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       3rd (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 21 Edward Street, St Pancras. (Edward Street was renamed Varndell Street in 1938, the site is now occupied by a block of flats named Staveley.) They were serving with 1st London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out in 1914. They moved on mobilisation to guarding the Basingstoke-Eastleigh railway and soon began to prepare for service overseas. On the 4th of September 1914 they sailed with the Brigade from Southampton to Malta to man the garrison, allowing the regular army unit to return home for service in France. They left Malta on the 2nd of January 1915, sailing to Marseilles for service on the Western Front and joined Gharwal Brigade, 7th (Meerut) Division on the 10th of February. On the 17th they transferred to Dehra Dun Brigade in same Division. In November they transferred to 139th Brigade in 46th (North Midland) Division then moved again to 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. On the 9th of February 1916 they transferred to 167th Brigade, 56th (London) Division. They were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. On the 3rd of January 1918 they transferred to 173rd Brigade, 58th (2/1st London) Division, absorbing the disbanded 2/3rd Battalion and were renamed 3rd Battalion. They were in action on The Somme, during the Second Battles of Arras 1918, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy.

       4th (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers) The London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 112 Shaftsbury Street, Shoreditch. They were serving with 1st London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out in August 1914, they were mobilised at once and took up duties guarding the Basingstoke-Waterloo railway. The battalion soon began preparations for service overseas. On the 4th of September they sailed with the Brigade from Southampton to Malta, arriving at Valetta on the 14th of September to take over the garrison. They left Malta on the 2nd of January 1915 sailing to Marseilles for the Western Front. They joined Ferozepore Brigade, 3rd (Lahore) Division on the 10th of February 1915. On the 11th of November they transferred to 137th Brigade, 46th (North Midland) Division and on the 15th transferred again to 140th Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. On the 9th of February 1916 they transferred to 168th Brigade, 56th (London) Division. They were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 130 Bunhill Road, Finsbury. When war broke out in August 1914, they were part of 2nd London Brigade, 1st London Division and were at once mobilised, moving to Bisley. In September they moved to Crowborough for final training and on the 5th of November 1914 the Battalion left the London Division, proceeding to France, landing at Le Havre. On the 17th of November they joined 11th Brigade, 4th Division. They were in action at The Second Battle of Ypres and on the 19th of May 1915 the Battalion transferred to GHQ Troops, forming a composite unit with the 1/12th and 1/13th Battalions the London Regiment, whilst they recovered from lossed. The 1/5th resumed their own identity on the 11th of August. On the 25th of October 1915 they transferred to 8th Brigade, 3rd Division and on the 10th of February 1916 they transferred to 169th Brigade, in the newly reformed 56th (London) Division, in the Hallencourt area in February. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles), London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 57a Farringdon Road, Holborn. They were serving with the 2nd London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out. In November 1914 the battalion was transferred to 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division, later transferring to 140th Brigade, 47th Division with which it remained till January 1918. The 6th Battalion landed in France in March 1915 and saw its first major action at Loos in September. Teh Battalion fought on the Somme, and at Messines, in the Third Battle of Ypres and at Cambrai. At the end of January 1918 the battalion amalgamated with the 2/6th Battalion and joined the 174th Brigade, 58th Division.

       7th (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 24 Sun Street, Shoreditch.

       8th (Post Office Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 130 Bunhill Road, Finsbury.

       9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles), London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 56 Davies Street, Westminster.

       10th (County of London) Battalion (Hackney), London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 49 The Grove, Hackney.

       11th (County of London) Battalion (Finsbury Rifles), London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 17 Penton Street, Finsbury.

       12th (The Rangers) Battalion , London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at The Drill Hall, Chenies Street, Holborn. They were serving with 3rd London Brigade, 1st London Division when war broke out in August 1914. They moved on mobilisation to Bullswater, moving in September to Crowborough. In October, they were employed in guarding the Waterloo-North Camp railway at Aldershot railway. In December they moved to Roehampton to prepare for deployment overseas. On the 25th of December 1914 they left the Division and proceeded to France, landing at Le Havre. They joined 84th Brigade, 28th Division on the 8th of February 1915 who were concentrating in the area between Bailleul and Hazebrouck. In 1915 they were in action in The Second Battle of Ypres and on the 20th of May the battalion transferred to GHQ Troops and formed a composite unit with the 1/5th and 1/13th Londons, resuming identity on the 11th of August. On the 12th of February 1916 the 12th Londons transferred to the reforming 168th Brigade, 56th (London) Division who were concentrating in the Hallencourt area in February. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. On the 31st of January 1918 they transferred to 175th Brigade, 58th (2/1st London) Division and absorbed the disbanding 2/12th Londons. They were in action in The Battle of St Quentin and engaged in other actions on the Somme, The Battle of the Avre, The Battle of Villers-Bretonneux, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy and the Final Advance in Artois. At the Armistice the Division had crossed the River Scheldt with the advanced units being south of Ath. They remained in the Peruwelz area until demobilisation.

       13th (Kensington) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at Iverna Gardens, Kensington. They were serving with 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division when war broke out in August 1914. They were at once mobilised for war and moved to Abbotts Langley. They proceeded to France, landing at Le Havre on the 4th of November and joining 25th Brigade, 8th Division on the 13th. they were in action at The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers. On the 20th of May 1915 they transferred to GHQ Troops and formed a composite unit with 1/5th and 1/12th Londons, reuminhg their own identity on the 11th of August. On the 11th of February 1916 they transferred to 168th Brigade in the newly reformed 56th (London) Division in the Hallencourt area. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       14th (1st London Scottish) Battalion, London Regiment, a Terratorial unit had thier headquarters at 59 Buckingham Gate when war broke out in August 1914. They were attached to 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division and were quickly mobilised and moved to Abbotts Langley. They proceeded to France, landing at le Harve on the 16th of September 1914. They saw thier first action at Messines on the 31st of October 1914 under the command of the Cavalry Corps. On the 7th of November 1914 the battalion joined 1st Brigade, 1st Division and were in action during the Winter Operations of 1914-15. In 1915 they were in action during The Battle of Aubers and The Battle of Loos. On the 8th of February 1916 they transferred to the newly arrived 168th Brigade, 56th (London) Division who were assembling in the Hallencourt area. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       15th (Prince of Wales's Own Civil Service Rifles) Battalion, The London Regiment, a Terratorial unit and had thier headquarters at Somerset House, Westminster. When war broke out in August 1914, they were serving as part of 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training, with the 15th Battalion at Bedmond, and then moving to billets at Watford in November. They proceeded to France on the 18th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at Queen's Hall, 58 Buckingham Gate, Westminster. When war broke out in August 1914, they were part of the 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. They were mobilised and moved to the Hemel Hempstead area, being billetted in Leverstock Green in the late summer and early autumn of 1914, where they are commemorated with a stained glass window in the local church. They proceeded to France on the 3rd of November 1914, landing at Le Havre to join 18th Brigade, 6th Division. On the 10th of February 1916 they transferred to the newly reformed 169th Brigade, 56th (London) Division which concentrated in the Hallencourt area. In 1916 they were in action on The Somme taking part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the 1st of July. Also The Battle of Ginchy, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Combles and The Battle of the Transloy Ridges. In 1917 they were in action during The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Arras in April, then The Battle of Langemarck in August, then the Cambrai Operations in November. In 1918 They were in action on The Somme, in the Second Battles of Arras, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line and the Final Advance in Picardy. At the Armistice the infantry were in a rest period, whilst the artillery were in action. The Division received orders to join the British force to occupy the Rhine bridgeheads, but these orders were cancelled on the 21st of November, when they were in the area of Harveng undertaking road and railway repairs. Demobilisation was completed on the 18th of May 1919.

       17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment, a Terratorial unit and had thier headquarters at 66 Tredegar Road, Bow, when war broke out in August 1914, serving as part of 5th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training, with the 17th Battalion at St Albans. They proceeded to France on the 10th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. On the 1st of February 1918 they transferred to 140th Brigade still with 47th (2nd London) Division. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       18th (London Irish Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at The Duke of York's Headquarters, King's Road, Chelsea. When war broke out in August 1914, serving as part of 5th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 10th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 141st Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1918 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       19th (St Pancras) Battalion, London Regiment, a Terratorial unit and had thier headquarters at 76 High Street, Camden Town, serving as part of 5th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 10th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 141st Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1918 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       20th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at Holly Hedge House, Blackheath. (Holly Hedge House, was bombed in WW2 and most of the 20ths records held there destroyed in the resulting fire.) When war broke out in August 1914, they were serving with the 5th London Brigade, 2nd London Division and had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain, they were recalled home and were mobilised at once, moving to the St Albans area. They proceeded to France, landing at Le Havre of the 10th of March 1915. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel but rejoined the rest of tee Division at the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the 5th London Brigade was redesignated 141st Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1917 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       21st (First Surrey Rifles) Battalion, The London Regiment, a Terratorial unit and had thier headquarters at 4 Flodden Road, Camberwell, when war broke out in August 1914, serving as part of 6th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 16th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1921 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. On the 1st of February 1918 they transferred to 140th Brigade still with 47th (2nd London) Division. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       22nd (The Queen's) Battalion, The London Regiment, were a Terratorial unit with their headquarters at 2 Jamaica Road, Bermondsey, serving as part of 6th London Brigade, 2nd London Division in 1914. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 16th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1921 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. On the 1st of February 1918 they transferred to 140th Brigade still with 47th (2nd London) Division. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       23rd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 27 St John's Hill, Battersea. They were serving as part of 6th London Brigade, 2nd London Division in 1914. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 16th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1921 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. On the 1st of February 1918 they transferred to 140th Brigade still with 47th (2nd London) Division. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       24th Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at 71 New Street, Lambeth. They were serving as part of 6th London Brigade, 2nd London Division in 1914. The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war wasdeclared in August 1914, they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service. The Division concentrated in the St Albans area for training. They proceeded to France on the 16th of March 1915, landing at le Havre, being only the second TF Division to arrive in theatre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month. On the 11th of May 1915 the formation was renamed 142nd Brigade, 47th (2nd London) Division. They saw action in The Battle of Aubers Ridge, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos and The subsequent Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, In 1916 they fought during The German attack at Vimy Ridge, and on The Somme in The Battle of Flers-Courcelette capturing High Wood, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges in which the captured Eaucourt l'Abbaye and The attacks on the Butte de Warlencourt. In 1921 they were in action in The Battle of Messines, the Third Battles of Ypres and The Cambrai Operations where they captured Bourlon Wood and fought against the German counter attacks. On the 1st of February 1918 they transferred to 140th Brigade still with 47th (2nd London) Division. In 1918 they were in action on The Somme and the Final Advance in Artois including making the official entry into Lille. At the Armistice the the forward units of the Division had reached Franses-lez-Buissenal. They marched back to Tournai and on the 26th of November moved on to the Bethune area where demobilisation began with the first parties returning to England in the first week of January 1919.

       25th (County of London) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at Fulham House, Putney Bridge, Putney.

       28th (The Artists Rifles) Battalion, London Regiment were a unit of the Territorial Force with their HQ at Dukes Road, St Pancras diagonally opposite Euston Station. The Artists Rifles originated in May 1860 as a corps of rifle volunteers, formed by an art student, Edward Sterling, from members of the artistic professions. When the Territorial Force was created in 1908 it became the 28th Battalion, London Regiment. Shortly after the outbreak of the Great War second line and third line battalions were formed, the 2nd/28th an 3rd/28th.

    The Artists Rifles arrived in France at the end of October 1914 and became an Officers Training Corps (OTC) at Bailleul and in April 1915 it moved to St Omer. In November the 28th and 2nd/28th were merged and the battalion was sent to the front at the end of June 1917, allocated to the 190th Brigade, 63rd (RN) Division.

       2/28th (2nd Artists Rifles) Battalion London Regiment trained at Hare Hall Camp in Gidea Park in the London Borough of Havering.

    4th Aug 1914 Poplar and Stepney Rifles return from Salisbury Plain  17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, The London Regiment. It was a Terratorial unit and had its headquarters at 66 Tredegar Road, Bow, when war broke out in August 1914. It was part of 5th London Brigade, 2nd London Division (later the 47th Division). The Division had just arrived for their annual summer camp on Salisbury Plain when war was declared in August 1914 and they were at once recalled to their home base and mobilised for war service.

    6th Aug 1914 Colours Laid up

       The Queen's Westiminster Rifles trace their origin back to the Royal Westminster Volunteers raised in 1787, but it was not until the outbreak of this War that it consisted of more than one battalion. The second battalion was formed on September 1st, 1914, and consisted of men from all parts of the Metropolis. From September, 1914, to June, 1916, the battalion underwent training in England at Maidstone, Watford, Saffron Walden, Bishop’s Stortford and War- minster, sending out drafts, during the earlier part of the time, to the first battalion already on active service in France.

    It proceeded to France on June 22nd, 1916, and took over a portion of the line at Neuville St. Vaast, relieving, in conjunction with the rest of the 60th Divi- sion, the famous 51st (Highland) Division. With the exception of a successful raid into the enemy’s trenches in September, it was called upon for no offensive operations during this spell in France.

    On 24th October, 1916, on relief by a Canadian Division, the 60th marched into the Somme area, from which, however, it was diverted to Salonica, the 2/16th London embarking at Marseilles on 17th November and disembarking on the 30th. The 179th Brigade, of which it formed part, was despatched almost immediately on a special mission to Thessaly to guard the approaches from the South through the Petra and Kokinopolo passes. A landing was made at Skala Vromeris some miles down the Aegean sea and headquarters established at Katerini. . As events turned out, there was no fighting in this part, and all threat to the Salonican forces from this quarter having been removed by the end of February, the Brigade marched 97 miles in seven days and “ took over “ on the Vardar front on March 18th. Patrol work and various minor operations were carried out by the Brigade on this front, this battalion capturing Goldies Hill on 8th May, 1917, and holding it in spite of many counter attacks. In June, 1917, the 60th Division was transferred to the Egyptian Expedi- tionary Force, this battalion embarking on June 21st, and reaching Alexandria on the 25th. After refitting at Ismailia, it marched to Kantara, and proceeded thence by train to Deir El Belah. From there it marched to Shellal and took over a part of the line in the Wadi Ghuzze. For three months there were no active operations, and advantage was taken of this to give the division a strenuous training in the style of warfare likely to be encountered. Throughout the campaign, which opened at the end of October, 1917, the 60th Division held the right flank of the British line. After being in reserve at the taking of Beersheba, the battalion carried the Turkish position at Kauwaukah on November 6th. It is difficult to detach the doings of a single battalion from those of the Division to which it belonged, and, if for a bit we now talk of the 60th Division’s doings, it must not be assumed that the 2/16th London was invariably in front of the battle . . or invariably out of it. After the successful attack of the 179th Brigade at Kauwaukah, the 181st went through it, and, after a heavy fight, captured Sheria Station, and enabled the advance to be carried across the Wadi Sheria. On the same evening, the 179th drove back enemy rearguards from the ridge at Juathiny, and, continuing their progress on the following day, carried strong positions as far as Tor Dimreh near Huj. In all, between October 30th and November 8th, the infantry covered 60 miles, fighting a considerable part of the way. More marching, but not much fighting carried them on to December 7th, when the whole Brigade advanced in single file during the night over precipitous paths to attack at dawn near Am Karim. All objectives were taken, and, with other divisions equally successful, the enemy was forced to evacuate Jerusalem, which was entered two days later.

    The Division then held the line to the North of the city, and on December 27th the 2/16th London, with the 2/13th, bore the brunt of the determined Turk- ish counter attack and resisted every effort to break their lines. A gallant counter attack by the 2/ 15th London greatly helped them at a critical moment. The enemy was subsequently forced to retreat seven miles further northward to Bireh, where his position was carried by the 180th Brigade. The new line was held until the middle of February, when the division carried out successful operations against the Turkish positions at El Kuntar, Jebel Ekteif and Talat Ed Dumm, which resulted in our occupying Jericho and the enemy retiring to the Eastern side of the Jordan. Towards the end of Márch the whole division was called upon to make a colossal raid, in order to strike a blow at the Hedjaz railway communication.

    The Jordan was accordingly forced by the 180th Brigade on March 22nd, and two days later the 179th and 181st attacked the enemy on the foothills of the Eastern side of the plain After successful attacks, the division moved forward, and on the night of March 25th reached Es Salt. While the 181st held up the enemy near Amman, mounted troops carried out the desired destructive work, and on the night of April 1st the entire force was again withdrawn across the Jordan. At the end of the month a second and similar operation was commenced, but by this time the enemy had strongly fortified the hills at the edge of the plain, and the attempt had to be abandoned after repeated attacks spread over the period of four days.

    The Division was now dissolved from its original composition. The bulk of it, including the 2/16th London, came back to France and became part of the 30th Division. This battalion had its first experience of the front line at Locre on July 31st. Ordinary trench relief took place up to 20th August, when the line was advanced by about a thousand yards, and it was again advanced on the 30th by this battalion, which was afterwards withdrawn to divisional reserve. It took over the line again on September 25th and on the 28th it attacked, cap- tured Messines and advanced the line until it conformed with the Ypres-Commines Canal. The 90th Brigade, of which the battalion was now part, attacked again on October 14th, capturing Wervicq, and on the 17th the battalion forced ,the River Lys in the face of hostile machine-gun fire, and on the 18th again met with considerable resistance in the neighbourhood of Aelb eke. The advance was continued, with the 90th Brigade acting as advance guard to the 30th Division, but on the 21st the Brigade was withdrawn into divisional reserve. A short period of trench relief followed, and it had returned to divisional reserve when hostilities ceased.

    16th Sep 1914 First Territorials in France

    28th Sep 1914 Travel

    29th Sep 1914 Lord Kitchener inspects 2nd London Division  Lord Kitchener Secretary of State for War inspects the 2nd London Division at Gorhambury, Hertfordshire.

    28th Oct 1914 Artists Rifles Land

    29th Oct 1914 On the Move

    31st Oct 1914 London Scottish in Action

    1st Nov 1914 London Scottish in Action

    3rd Nov 1914 13th Londons proceed to France

    3rd Nov 1914 Nominal Roll of 13th London Regiment

    4th Nov 1914 To Rest Camp

    5th Nov 1914 13th Londons on the Move

    5th Nov 1914 Perfectly Hopeless

    6th Nov 1914 13th Londons on the Move

    7th Nov 1914 Training Parade

    7th Nov 1914 A Young Solider at the Front

    8th Nov 1914 Training

    8th Nov 1914 Artillery In Action

    9th Nov 1914 Training

    9th Nov 1914 Relief

    10th Nov 1914 Training

    11th Nov 1914 Training

    12th Nov 1914 13th Londons on the March

    13th November 1914 The Queens reorganise in Merris  At Merris. The following Officers, NCO's & Men from the Artists Rifles (London Regiment TF) were posted to the Battalion as Probationery 2nd Lieutenants: 2nd Lieutenant C.F. Austin - to 'A' company. 2nd Lieutenant H. Massom - to 'B' Company. 2nd Lieutenant Rought - to 'C' Company. 2nd Lieutenant Humphries - 'D' Company. Reorganising the Battalion continues. Close order drill. Total Strength - 12 Officers & 768 Other Ranks.

    War Diary


    13th Nov 1914 13th Londons on the March

    14th Nov 1914 13th Londons on the March

    15th Nov 1914 Inspection for 13th Londons

    16th Nov 1914 Training

    17th Nov 1914 Training

    18th Nov 1914 13th London Relieve 2nd Berkshires

    19th Nov 1914 First Casualties for 13th Londons

    20th Nov 1914 2nd Sportsmans Battalion raised  24th (Service) Battalion (2nd Sportsman's), better known as the Sportsmen's Battalions, were among the Pals battalions formed in the Great War. Rather than be taken from a small geographical area, these particular battalions were largely made up of men who had made their name in sports such as cricket, boxing and football or the media.

    24th (Service) Battalion (2nd Sportsman's) Formed in London on 20 November 1914 by Mrs E.Cunliffe-Owen. March 1915: moved to Hornchurch. June 1915 : came under command of 99th Brigade, 33rd Division. Landed at Boulogne in November 1915. 13 December 1915 : transferred to 5th Brigade in 2nd Division.

     Quiet Tonight

    20th Nov 1914 Snipers Pose Threat

    21st Nov 1914 Reliefs

    22nd Nov 1914 Snipers Active

    23rd Nov 1914 Weather Bad

    24th Nov 1914 Under Shellfire

    25th Nov 1914 Repairs

    25th Nov 1914 Funeral

    26th Nov 1914 Quiet Day

    27th Nov 1914 News from the Front

    27th Nov 1914 Reliefs

    28th Nov 1914 Prisoner in Germany

    28th Nov 1914 All Quiet

    28th Nov 1914 Entrenching

    29th Nov 1914 Under Shellfire

    30th Nov 1914 Heavy Rain

    30th Nov 1914 Admitted to Hospital

    1st Dec 1914 The King's Visit

    2nd Dec 1914 Very Wet Day

    3rd Dec 1914 Very Wet Day

    4th Dec 1914 Snipers Active

    4th Dec 1914 Snipers Active

    5th Dec 1914 Very Wet Day

    6th Dec 1914 Very Wet Day

    7th Dec 1914 Snipers Active

    8th Dec 1914 Snipers Active

    9th Dec 1914 Rain incessant

    10th Dec 1914 Occassional Sniping

    11th Dec 1914 Wet and Cold

    13th Dec 1914 Occassional Sniping

    14th Dec 1914 Changes in Trenches

    15th Dec 1914 Reliefs

    16th Dec 1914 Artillery Shelling

    17th Dec 1914 Under Shellfire

    18th Dec 1914 Adventures in Flanders

    18th Dec 1914 23rd Brigade make Attack

    19th Dec 1914 13th London Relieve Lincolns

    20th Dec 1914 Heavy Firing

    21st Dec 1914 Trenches Bad

    22nd Dec 1914 No Relief

    22nd Dec 1914 Reliefs

    23rd Dec 1914 All Quiet

    24th Dec 1914 Carol Singing

    25th Dec 1914 Merry Christmas

    26th Dec 1914 Much Work Done

    27th Dec 1914 Truce Continues

    28th Dec 1914 Completely Wrecked

    28th Dec 1914 Snipers Active

    29th Dec 1914 Very Wet Day

    30th Dec 1914 Fire Trench Abandoned

    31st Dec 1914 Slow Progress

    3rd Jan 1915 Box Drains

    12th Jan 1915 Trench Work

    13th Jan 1915 Tricky Work

    14th Jan 1915 Few Enemy

    23rd Jan 1915 On the Move

    25th Jan 1915 German Attack

    25th Jan 1915 In Action

    27th Jan 1915 Planned Birthday Present

    1st April 1915 1st Bn Herts marched into billets at Bethune  The Post Office H.Q. came up and another company took over our trenches. No.1 Company marched into billets at Bethune. Two machine guns relieved by the Post Office Rifles.

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    2nd Feb 1915 Prisoner Taken

    3rd Feb 1915 Shortage of Sandbags

    3rd Feb 1915 It Warms up Fine

    8th Feb 1915 Stormy

    18th Feb 1915 Sniping and Shelling

    18th Feb 1915 Well Cared For

    20th Feb 1915 Artillery Duel

    22nd Feb 1915 Sniping and Artillery Duel

    3rd Mar 1915 Physical Drill

    6th Mar 1915 In the Trenches

    7th Mar 1915 13th Londons on the March

    9th Mar 1915 13th Londons on the March

    9th Mar 1915 Nominal Roll of 13th London Regiment

    10th Mar 1915 Poplar and Stepney Rifles proceed to France  17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion, The London Regiment proceeded to France on the 10th of March 1915, landing at le Havre. The 5th London Brigade was ordered to Cassel, and the remainder of the Division concentrated near Bethune and were joined by 5th London Brigade near the end of the month.

    10th Mar 1915 13th Londons in Action

    10th Mar 1915 3rd Londons in Action

    10th Mar 1915 At the Ready

    11th Mar 1915 13th Londons in Action

    13th Mar 1915 Intense Bombardment

    15th Mar 1915 War Diary

    16th Mar 1915 

    16th Mar 1915 On the Move

    17th Mar 1915 On the Move

    18th Mar 1915 On the March

    23rd Mar 1915 Trenches Very Wet

    25th Mar 1915 13th Londons on the Move

    26th Mar 1915 Orders

    27th Mar 1915 Cleaning Up

    30th Mar 1915 Platoon Training

    31st March 1915 1st Bn Herts go to billets in Bethune  One Coy of the 8th City of London (Post Office Rifles) took over New Cut Trench, Givenchy. No.2 Coy marched into billets at School in Bethune.

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    31st Mar 1915 Training & Route March

    1st Apr 1915 Into the Trenches

    1st of April 1915 Training

    2nd April 1915 1st Bn Herts relieved by Post Office Rifles  H.Q., Nos. 3 & 4 Coys, 2 machine guns marched into Bethune on being relieved by 2 Companies of the Post Office Rifles.

    2 to 6-4-1915 Resting in Bethune

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    3rd Apr 1915 Very Wet Day

    4th Apr 1915 1st Londons relieve 13th Londons

    6th Apr 1915 Training

    7th Apr 1915 13th Londons relieve 1st Londons

    10th Apr 1915 Thunderstorms

    11th Apr 1915 Church Parade

    13th April 1915 1st Bn Herts billets at Le Quesnoy  Bn was relieved by the 15th Bn City of London (Civil Service Rifles) and went into billets at Le Quesnoy.

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    13th Apr 1915 Training

    14th Apr 1915 Training

    15th April 1915 1st Bn Herts takes over from Civil Service Rifles  Battalion took over from 15th Bn City of London Regt. (Civil Service Rifles).

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    15th Apr 1915 Training & Working Parties

    15th of April 1915 War Diary

    16th Apr 1915 Route March & Tactics

    17th Apr 1915 13th Londons Inspected

    19th Apr 1915 Alarm Signal

    19th of April 1915 On the March

    20th Apr 1915 13th Londons Giving Instruction

    21st Apr 1915 1st Londons relieve 13th Londons

    22nd April 1915  1st Bn Herts into billets at Le Preol  Relieved by the 15th County of London Regt. and went into billets at Le Preol.

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    22nd Apr 1915 Reconnaissance

    23rd April 1915 1st Bn Herts into billets at Givenchy  23 to 25-4-1915. Bn relieved by the 8th City of London Regt at B1 Givenchy.

    War Diary of the 1st Battalion Hertfordshire Regiment


    23rd Apr 1915 Training

    24th of April 1915 Reliefs

    25th Apr 1915 Enemy Shelling

    26th April 1915 Daily Battery Activity 6th London Brigade RFA   During the night of April 25th/26th, the 15th London Battery fired six rounds at the K works. After the second round shouting was heard from the enemy. Later the sound of hammering of posts was heard, and the sound ceased after the last two rounds were fired. 16th London Battery registered zone from A.3.d.2.2. to A.3.a.0.2. 36 rounds fired. 17th London Battery registered a communication trench leading along the north bank of the La Bassee canal. Range 3925-4200 yards.

    H A Barker and Pte P L G Winter (15th Battalion, London Regiment) gazetted as 2nd Lieutenants.

    War Diaries


    26th Apr 1915 Enemy Shelling

    28th of April 1915 Reliefs

    30th of April 1915 Patrols

    1st of May 1915 Stand To

    2nd May 1915 Daily Battery Activity 6th London Brigade RFA   Firing heard in the direction of Neuve Chapelle. 15th London Battery fired two rounds at J3 (A.2.d.8.3). 16th London Battery opened fire at 1530 to verify registration of that part of zone invisible from last observing station i.e. the Orchard. Fourteen rounds fired. At 2237 it fired two rounds into the Orchard at request of 18th London Battalion. One direct hit. 17th London Battery did not fire.

    War Diaries


    3rd May 1915 Gas Warnings  6th County of London Brigade RFA report information received from 1st Army of use by enemy of asphyxiating gas east and north of Ypres. Brigade conflagration just behind La Bassee Church. One of the guns of the 15th London battery was placed in a forward position at 2100 but was withdrawn by order at 2130. 16th London Battery fired two rounds at Cross Roads by P.4, at request of OC. ‘B’ Company, 18th London Regiment. Two Germans seen doubling from M.22 wearing light blue uniforms and flat round caps. All the men received masks and bicarbonate of soda for use against gases. At the suggestion of the OC. Brigade a certain portion of the enemy’s breastworks were bombarded by heavy guns. 17th London Battery fired four rounds to verify points on registered lines.

    War Diaries


    3rd May 1915 Very Hot

    4th of May 1915 Baths

    5th May 1915 13th Londons on the Move

    6th May 1915 Hot Day

    7th May 1915 Ready for Action

    7th of May 1915 Holding the Line

    8th May 1915 Battle of Aubers Ridge  Operation Orders for Battle of Aubers Ridge 9th May 1915

    Secret London Div Artillery Operation Orders No 2 8th May 1915

    Reference Maps 1/40000, 1/10000.

    Information.

    (a)1st Army will advance tomorrow with the objective of breaking through the enemy's line and gaining La Bassee-Lille Road between La Bassee and Fournes. It's further advance will be directed on the line Bauvin-Don

    (b) 1st Corps is to attack from Rue Du Bois and advance on Rue Du Marais -Illies, maintaining its right flank at Givenchy & Cuinchy.

    (c) The 1st Div, is to attack from it's breastworks in front of Rue Du Bois. It's first objectives are Hostile trenches P.8-P.10, the road junction P.15 and the road thence to La Tourelle. It's subsequent advance is to be directed on Rue Du Marais - Lorgies, a defensive flank being organised from the Orchard (P.4) by La Quinque Rue to Rue Du Marais. The artillery supporting the attack of the 1st Div. is to complete such registration as may be necessary by 0500 at which hour the preliminary bombardment is to commence and continue up to the time of the Infantry assault in accordance with the following time table. 0500 to 0510 wire cutting and bombardment of hostile strong points. 0510 to 0540 wire cutting and bombardment of the first objective. 0540 infantry assault. Artillery to increase their range.

    (d) The 2nd Div. (less 4th (Guards Bde) with motor machine battery attached is to be in Corps reserve in the area Loisne-Le Touret-Le Hamel in readiness to continue the advance.

    Intentions: The GOC. intends to hold the present defensive line Cuinchy-Chololai, Menier Corner (S.15) opening a vigorous fire attack along the entire front, until called upon to relieve the infantry of the 1st Div. at the Orchard (F.4.), La Quinque Rue and Rue Du Marais when these points have been secured and further to take advantage of any weakening of the enemy about the Rue D’Oovert to occupy that locality.

    Detail:

    (a) All troops are to be warned that the 1st Div. attack will come across their front lines left to right and that the right of their attack, as also any captured points, will be marked by a red flare with white vertical bar in centre. Troops in the 2nd Div. will carry a yellow flag. Troops of London Division will be marked by a round disc with a black cross (disc 2ft in diameter). Should our Infantry come under fire of our own artillery, they will make their identity known by raising their cups on the points of their bayonets.

    (b) Infantry. The 4th (Guards), 4th Lon Infantry (less 8th Battalion. Lon Regt), 6th Lon Infantry (less 23rd Battalion Lon Regt) Brigades will maintain their positions. The 6th Lon Infantry Brigade however, will be prepared on the receipt of orders to relieve the troops of the 1st Div. at the points mentioned in para 2 after these points have been occupied and made good by those troops.

    All assault troops will be in position by 0400. (c) At 0540 a vigorous fire attack with burst of rifle and machine gun fire, will be opened along the whole front, the object being to prevent the enemy being withdrawn from our front to operate against the 1st Div. and to inflict loses on reinforcements they may bring up to oppose the right of that Division. The heaviest possible fire will be brought to bear on any favourable target which may be offered.

    (d) Artillery fire will be directed as per time table already issued. NB. artillery in London Divisional area opens fire at 0445.

    (e) Engineers. The 1st East Anglian Field Coy. RE. is attached to the 4th (Guards) Brigade: 1 section 3rd London Field. Coy. RE. to the 4th London Infantry Brigade; 2 section of the 4th London Field Coy. RE. to the 8th London Infantry Brigade. Remains of the Royal Engineers are placed at the CREs disposal to carry out tasks already allotted. The 4th and 6th Inf Brigade will each be prepared to detail a company as working party when called for by the CRE.

    Wagon Lines and Ammunition Columns: Horses of the Wagon Lines and Amm Cols. not in reserve are to be harnessed and saddled from 0500 9th May but not hooked in.

    Reserve The Divional Reserve constituted as follows, will be in position by 0445 9th May.

    (a) Divisional Mounted troops (Squadron King Edwards Horse less two troops and London Cyclists less two platoons) under Major Herron will be under cover at Beuvry.

    (b) 8th Battalion London Reg at Annewuin under cover. Headquarters at Cross Roads (F.29.b) In case of sudden emergency this Battalion may be employed by GOC. 4th (Guards) Brigade to support the defense of the right flank.

    (c) 23rd Battalion the London Regiment under cover at Le Preop. Headquarters at Canal Bridge (F.10.c) Medical. Divisional Collecting Station will be at Beuvry (F.14.a.5.b). The existing dressing station will be maintained

    Supply. Every man to carry the currents day’s ration and iron ration. (d) Supply Sections of Train to rendezvous at Refilling Point by 0600 9th May

    Communication: From 0300 9th May all wires are reserved for operations purposes. All administrative messages will be sent by despatch rider, as opportunity offers. Reports to Div Hq Marche Au Paulets, Bethune

    Signed D.E. Sherlock Bde Major London Div Artillery

    War Diaries


    8th of May 1915 In the Trenches

    9th May 1915 The Battle of Aubers Ridge: The Northern pincer  2nd Battalion Queens (Royal West Surrey Regiment)

    2.30am: all units in the North report that they are in position, having assembled at night. 4.06am: sunrise and all very quiet on this front.

    5.00am: British bombardment opens with field guns firing shrapnel at the German wire and howitzers firing High Explosive shells onto front line. Many reports are received that British 4.7-inch shells are falling short, and even on and behind the British front line (Later it is agreed that this is due to faulty ammunition, as well as excessive wear to gun barrels). 5.30am: British bombardment intensifies, field guns switch to HE and also fire at breastworks. Two guns of 104th Battery, XXII Brigade RFA had been brought up into the 24th Brigade front and they now opened fire at point blank range against the enemy breastworks; they blow several gaps, although one of the guns is inaccurate due to the unstable ground on which it is located. The lead battalions of the two assaulting Brigades of 8th Division (24th Brigade has 2/Northants and 2/East Lancashire in front; 25th Brigade has 2/Rifle Brigade, 1/Royal Irish Rifles and 1/13 London Regiment (Kensingtons)) move out into the narrow No Man's Land (in this area it is only 100-200 yards across). German bayonets can be seen behind their parapet.

    5.40am: On the further advance the East Lancs are hit by heavy machine-gun and rifle fire by the time they had progressed thirty yards from their own trench; the Northants, coming up ten minutes later, were similarly hit, but a party got through one of the gaps blown by the field guns, and into the German front trench. The attack of 25th Brigade is much more successful: the wire on the left had been well-cut and the infantry poured through, crossing the almost-undamaged breastworks and into the German fire trenches. They moved onto the first objective (a bend in the Fromelles road), and the Rifle Brigade bombers extended the trench system they occupied to 250 yards broad. On the blowing of the two mines at 5.40am, the lead companies of the Kensingtons rushed to occupy the craters, moved forward to capture Delangre Farm, and then formed a defensive flank as ordered.

    6.10am: Br-Gen. Oxley (24th) orders the support battalion, 1/Notts & Derbys, to support the attack of the Lancashires, but they are also held up with high losses, at almost unbroken wire. The front and communication trenches are by now very crowded and chaotic; German shelling adds to confusion. By now, the fire across No Man's Land was so intense that forward movement was all but impossible. The support battalion of the 25th Brigade, the 2/Lincolns, was ordered forward, to cross by the craters; they did so, despite losing many men on the way. Men of the Brigade were at this time seen to be retiring to their front line, having apparently received a shouted order. German prisoners, making their way to the British lines, were mistaken for a counterattack and there was a great deal of confusion. Br-Gen Lowry Cole, CO 25th Brigade, was mortally wounded when standing on the British parapet in an attempt to restore order.

    8.30am: the attack had established three small lodgements in the enemy positions, but they were not in contact with each other and were under tremendous pressure. Otherwise the attack had come to a standstill and all movement into or out of the trench system had become impossible. The men in the German positions were cut off. 8.45am and again at 11.45am: Haig orders Rawlinson (CO, IV Corps) to vigorously press home the attack.

    1.30pm: A renewed attack (with 2/Queens of 22nd Brigade in support), did not take place as the troops were heavily shelled in the assembly areas and many casualties were suffered even before the original support lines had been reached. Major-General Gough (CO, 7th Division, whose 21st Brigade had now also been ordered forward by Haig) reported that after a personal reconnaissance he was certain that forward movement was at the present time impossible. 5.00pm: General Haig, hearing of the continued failure of the Southern attack and the hold-up after initial success of the Northern attack, orders a bayonet attack at dusk, 8.00pm.



    9th May 1915 The Battle of Aubers Ridge: Evening and Night  2nd Battalion Queens (Royal West Surrey Regiment)

    6.00pm: such chaos in the trench system and on the roads and tracks leading to it that it becomes clear that fresh units will not be ready for the 8pm attack. Haig cancels the attack and rides to Indian Corps HQ at Lestrem, to meet with all Corps commanders to consider the next moves. 7.30pm: the meeting breaks up having decided to renew the attack next day, taking advantage of night to reorganise. Efforts were made throughout the evening to reinforce the small garrisons of the lodgements in the enemy trenches. 26 men of the 2/Northants, of which 10 were wounded, returned to the British front. 2.30am 10 May: the 200 or so surviving Rifle Brigade and Royal Irish Rifles were withdrawn from their position, all efforts to reinforce them having been repulsed. 3.00am 10 May: the last few Kensingtons also returned from their position; all British troops were now out of the German lines. Around this time, First Army HQ, having by now got a good picture of the losses, failures and general conditions, called a Commanders conference for 9.00am, to take place at I Corps HQ on the Locon road, some 1.5 miles from Bethune. 9.00am 10 May: the Army and Corps commanders and staffs in attendance learned that there was insufficient artillery ammunition to continue two attacks. (The Secretary of State for War, Kitchener, had also just ordered a considerable portion of existing stocks to be sent to the Dardanelles); for example there were only some 3,000 18-lbr rounds left, and some of that was way behind the firing positions. They also heard that the 4.7-inch ammunition that had caused problems on IV Corps front was too defective for further use and that the fuzes on 15-inch heavy rounds were also defective and the shells simply did not burst on hitting the wet ground. All further orders for renewing the attack were cancelled at 1.20pm; the views of the conference were transmitted to GHQ. 7th Division was ordered to move from it's position north of Neuve Chapelle to the south of it, with a view to strengthening a future offensive there. British casualties from the 9 May attacks continued to move through the Field Ambulances for at least three days after the attack.

    More than 11,000 British casualties were sustained on 9 May 1915, the vast majority within yards of their own front-line trench. Mile for mile, Division for Division, this was one of the highest rates of loss during the entire war. There is no memorial to the attack at Aubers Ridge.

    9th May 1915 13th Londons in Action

    9th May 1915 Into Battle

    9th of May 1915 Under Fire

    11th May 1915 13th Londons in Billets

    12th of May 1915 Reliefs

    13th May 1915 Enemy attacks on British Ammunition Dump  The British ammunition dump at Wieltje is attacked by the enemy. L/Sgt Douglas Belcher of the 1/5th City of London Battalion, London Regiment was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions in breaking up enemy attacks under continuous fire to protect the supplies: "Early in morning, when in charge of a portion of an advanced breastwork south of the Wieltje-St Julien Road during a very fierce and continuous bombardment by the enemy, which frequently blew in the breastwork, Lance Sergeant Belcher with a mere handful of men elects to remain and endeavor to hold his position after the troops near him have been withdrawn. By his skill and great gallantry he maintains his position during the day, opening rapid fire on the enemy, who are only 150 to 200 yards distant, whenever he sees them collecting for an attack. There is little doubt that the bold front shown by this NCO prevents the enemy breaking through on the Wieltje Road and averts an attack on the flank of one of our divisions".

    Holts Battlefield Guide


    13th May 1915 13th Londons in Billets

    14th of May 1915 On the March

    16th of May 1915 Attack Made

    19th May 1915 13th Londons leave Division

    19th of May 1915 Fighting

    20th May 1915 13th Londons on the March

    21st May 1915 On the Move

    21st of May 1915 Reliefs

    21st of May 1915 Awards

    22nd May 1915 Composite to be formed

    23rd May 1915 7th Londons take prisoners

    23rd May 1915 Church Parade

    23rd of May 1915 War Diary

    24th May 1915 Inspection

    25th May 1915 Hold at any Cost

    25th May 1915 Inspection & Presparations

    25th of May 1915 Into the Front Line

    25th of May 1915 Ready to Attack

    25th of May 1915 Into the Attack

    25th of May 1915 Hold Up in the Advance

    25th of May 1915 Heavy Counterattacks

    25th of May 1915 Consolidating Captured Trench

    26th May 1915 Training & Presparations

    26th May 1915 Londons in Fierce Fighting

    26th of May 1915 Strengthening the Line

    26th of May 1915 Under Attack

    26th of May 1915 Situation Report 1

    26th of May 1915 Hard Fighting

    26th of May 1915 Digging in

    26th of May 1915 Situation Report 2

    26th of May 1915 Assistance Requested

    26th of May 1915 Situation Report 3

    26th May 1915 Under Heavy Fire

    26th of May 1915 Holding Captured Trench

    26th of May 1915 Relieved by 22nd Londons

    26th of May 1915 Situation Report 4

    26th of May 1915 Shelling Contiues

    26th of May 1915 Relief on the Way

    26th of May 1915 24th London Regiment Relieved

    29th May 1915 News from Prisoners

    30th May 1915 Detachments Entrain

    31st May 1915 Kensingtons Depart

    3rd Jun 1915 Behind the lines

    20th Aug 1915 Trenches Recaptured

    24th Aug 1915 Reliefs Completed

    3rd Sep 1915 Some Fine Work

    10th Sep 1915 Excitement Guaranteed

    25th Sep 1915 In Action

    25th Sep 1915 In Action

    25th Sep 1915 In Action

    25th Sep 1915 In Action

    28th Sep 1915 The Terriers Bite

    22nd Oct 1915 Happier than at Home

    1st November 1915 The Bluff

    2nd November 1915 Bluff Shelled

    3rd November 1915 Reinforcements

    4th November 1915 Sniper activity

    5th November 1915 Trench repairs

    6th November 1915 The Bluff

    7th November 1915 

    8th November 1915 Telescopic Rifle sucess

    9th November 1915 Trench cleaning

    10th November 1915 

    11th November 1915 Rest at Camp A

    12th November 1915 

    13th November 1915 Relief to Camp A

    14th November 1915 Bomb Slinger

    15th November 1915 

    16th November 1915 

    17th November 1915 Sniper activity

    18th November 1915 Mortar attack

    19th Nov 1914 

    19th November 1915 Trench repairs

    20th November 1915 Trench Inspection

    21st November 1915 Battalion relief

    22nd November 1915 Big move preparation

    23rd Nov 1915 Training

    24th November 1915 Route March

    26th November 1915 Brigade movement

    27th November 1915 Inspection

    28th November 1915 Companies Parades

    29th November 1915 CO Inspection

    30th Nov 1915 Blizzard

    30th November 1915 Training scheme

    1st December 1915 Bathing opportunity

    2nd December 1915 Gases Lectures

    3rd December 1915 Obstacle course training

    4th December 1915 Clothing Issue

    5th December 1915 Church Service

    6th December 1915 Divisional Lecture

    7th December 1915 Route March

    8th December 1915 

    9th December 1915 

    10th Dec 1914 Experiences in the Trenches

    10th December 1915 Route March

    11th December 1915 Live grenade training

    12th December 1915 Church Service

    13th December 1915 Restricted opening times

    14th December 1915 Smoke helmet demonstration

    15th December 1915 Preliminary practice

    16th December 1915 Assault practice

    19th December 1915 Intermittent Shelling  6th County of London Brigade RFA at Annequin report Major H. Bayley DSO, proceeded to Aire to attend a conference lasting 10 days on Gunnery. Enemy shelled our trenches intermittently all day. We retaliated each time which caused the enemy to cease firing. 17th Battery obtained several direct hits on the parapet of the Chord and Little Willie. At 2315, 2325 and 2330pm a big bombardment took place on the right lines, each battery fired two hundred rounds as some regiment was relieving another. The 23rd and 24th London regiments were in front of us.

    War Diaries


    22nd December 1915 6th London Bde Batteries in Action  6th County of London Brigade RFA at Annequin report from 0800 to 1400 the 16th London Battery fired eighty three Shrapnel and two hundred and forty nine H.E. on Cross Trench. From 1205 to 1335 the 15th London Battery fired on trench A.28.c.9.5 to G.4.b.2.5 in reply to enemy shelling Sticky trench and front line in A.28.c. From 1400 to 2000 the 19th London Battery fired two hundred and seventy two Shrapnel and ninety four H.E on Cross Trench and communication trenches in the vicinity. At 1450 the 17th London Battery fired fifteen rounds at am.9. emplacement and Observation Point on the Dump at G.5.a.6.7 There were several direct hits but loophole remained undamaged. At 2115 the 17th London Battery fired sixty one H.E. on Little Willie and Cross Trench as requested by Infantry. At 2150 the 16th London Battery fired eighteen Shrapnel on their right lines at the Hindenburgh trenches as requested by Infantry. At 2200 the 15th London Battery fired on right lines to the northern part of Little Willie on request from Infantry. The 19th London Battery fired on Cross Trench as requested by Infantry 18th London Battalion (London Irish) in front line, 2nd Division on our left and 1st Division on our right.

    War Diaries


    23rd Dec 1915 In the Trenches

    26th December 1915 Observation Posts Sighted  6th County of London Brigade RFA spend Boxing Day at Annequin. The 17th London Battery at 1000 fired sixteen H.E. on suspected Observation Point on the Dump, in reply to enemy shelling of railway in G.3. On first direct hit the enemy ceased firing. At 1030 16th London Battery fired eleven Shrapnel and five H.E. on Cross Trench in retaliation. They fired again at 1220 and 1352 (forty eight Shrapnel and 2 H.E.). At 1400 a single gun from 16th London Battery at G.2.b.7.7 registered ----- --. OC. the 17th London Battery observed two Germans walking along railway from A.28.b.1.5. to Auchy Alley and movement in roof of a large square red house about A.29.a.0.5. There are artificial observation holes in the roof where tiles have been removed in west front and from south gable. A tape stretched on stakes behind German front line probably marking a new trench from junction of Cross Trench and Little Willie to Hindenburgh trench. O.C. 19th Battery reports that there is a look out post on the left of the mound produced by the explosion of the crater. 19th London Battalion relieved the 18th.

    War Diaries


    27th Dec 1915 Sad Duty

    30th Dec 1915 Visiting Sailors in Action

    5th Feb 1915 Town under Shellfire

    20th Mar 1916 Difficult Conditions

    3rd July 1916 Wire cutting  236th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery at Aix-Noulette report Batteries wire cutting. B237 battery was shelled with 4.2s at about 0900 and one gun was damaged. The enemy shelled battery positions on the Aix-Noulette - Bully Grenay road all morning with 5.9 and 4.2 inch guns. Minewerfen (mortars) were active about 1600. At 2230 the enemy blew up a mine on Vimy Ridge but very little artillery fire followed. Another mine was exploded at 0030. At 0145 our artillery open a strong barrage in support of a raid by the 15th London Regiment on salient in Bois en Hache. The raid lasted twenty minutes with result at present not known. Enemy retaliation was much heavier than in the former raid. All was quiet again by 0230.

    War Diaries


    16th July 1916 Cutting Wire  236th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery report from Aix-Noulette: Trench Mortars wire cutting in afternoon from 1500 to 1730. At 0100 on the night of 16-17th July, the 20th London Regiment carried out a raid on enemy lines at a small salient north of Bois en Hache. The raid was supported by intense artillery fire with 2” Mortars and Stokes Mortars. Enemy retaliation was slight consisting of a few Light High Velocity shells & trench mortars. Infantry report that German front line trench was entered, dugs outs were bombed and a machine gun was destroyed. Our casualties were light. All was quiet again by 0145.

    War Diaries


    18th Aug 1916 On the March

    19th Aug 1916 Reliefs

    10th Sep 1916 In Action

    15th Sep 1916 1st Surrey Rifles at High Wood  The battle for High Wood was over by the time First Surrey Rifles were engaged later that day. The 47th (London) Division book 1922 states that they captured Starfish Redoubt. The entry was made by the then GSO1 Lt Col B L Montgomery. The mystery is that Starfish Redoubt is not recorded in the Official War Diary or the Regiment's book 1927. Starfish Redoubt is clearly marked on Official Trench Maps.

    26th Sep 1916 Combles Captured

       9th battalion the london regiment (queen victorias rifles) were fighting at les plouef thiepval on this date. cant find out much about les plouef but beleive it may have been a trench. my great uncle was in the regiment and got shot here. his body never recovered.information came from a letter from his commander to my great grandmother.

    Oct 1916 A Quieter Sector

    7th Oct 1916 Attack Made

    20th October 1916 3rd Canadian Tunnelling Coy War Diary

    29th October 1916 3rd Canadian Tunnelling Coy War Diary

    4th November 1916 3rd Canadian Tunnelling Coy War Diary

    22nd January 1917 Registration & Reliefs  236th London Brigade Royal Field Artillery report from Ypres: The Brigade checked zero lines and registrations. A test SOS. was received by the Batteries of the Brigade and the times averaged two minutes. Lt G Lyon Smith left for England on Jan 21st 1917 to continue his medical studies. 2/Lt M O Haskell RFA(SR) becomes acting Adjutant. On the night of 22/23 January the 6th Battalion (City of London Rifles) relieved 7th Battalion and 15th Battalion (Civil Service Rifles) relieved 8th Battalion, (all units in 47th Division).

    War Diaries


    7th Jun 1917 In Action

    7th of June 1917 In Action

    8th of June 1917 Holding Ground

    9th of June 1917 Shelling

    10th Jun 1917 Reliefs

    10th of June 1917 Shelling

    11th of June 1917 Stunt

    12th of June 1917 On the March

    13th of June 1917 Feeling Better

    14th of June 1917 A Little Light Relief

    15th of June 1917 On the Move

    16th of June 1917 On the March

    17th of June 1917 Relaxing

    18th of June 1917 An easy day

    19th of June 1917 Cooking Duty

    20th of June 1917 Happy Birthday

    21st of June 1917 Easy Duty

    22nd of June 1917 Routine Day

    23rd of June 1917 Latrine Duty

    24th of June 1917 Sunday Parade

    25th of June 1917 On Parade

    26th of June 1917 A Day Out

    27th of June 1917 Practice Attack

    28th of June 1917 Marching Again

    29th of June 1917 Arrive at Ridgewood

    30th of June 1917 Cold & Wet

    1st of July 1917 Working Party

    2nd of July 1917 More work to be done

    3rd of July 1917 Water Duty

    4th of July 1917 The King at the Front

    5th of July 1917 German Shelling

    6th of July 1917 Enjoying the weather

    7th of July 1917 Routine shelling

    8th of July 1917 Into the Front Line

    9th of July 1917 In No Man's Land

    10th Jul 1917 On the March

    10th of July 1917 After Effects

    11th of July 1917 Back with the Unit

    12th of July 1917 Treats in the trench

    13th of July 1917 Enjoying the rest

    14th of July 1917 Getting soaked

    15th of July 1917 The ruins of war

    16th of July 1917 Bomb Clearing

    17th of July 1917 Summer Sunshine

    18th of July 1917 A close call

    19th of July 1917 Working Party

    20th of July 1917 Will ever end?

    22ndt of July 1917 Further shelling

    23rd of July 1917 Not much sleep

    24th of July 1917 Working under fire

    25th of July 1917 Relieved at last

    26th of July 1917 Punishment duty

    27th of July 1917 Medal parade

    28th of July 1917 More awards

    29th of July 1917 Bomb throwing practice

    30th of July 1917 Meeting the locals

    31sth of July 1917 The Colonel's Parade

    1st of August 1917 March washed out

    2nd of August 1917 Marching in the mud

    3rd of August 1917 Marching in the wet

    4th of August 1917 Parade & March

    5th of August 1917 Wine tasting

    6th of August 1917 Out to tea

    7th of August 1917 Good grub

    8th of August 1917 Moving up the line

    9th of August 1917 German raid

    10th of August 1917 Cookery duty

    11th of August 1917 Night work

    12th Aug 1917 Diffilcult Conditions

    12th of August 1917 Forced to stop work

    13th of August 1917 Moving camp

    14th of August 1917 A quiet day

    15th of August 1917 To St. Omer

    16th of August 1917 Practice Day

    17th Aug 1917 Reliefs

    17th of August 1917 Shooting Practice

    18th Aug 1917 In Reserve

    18th of August 1917 Firing at the ranges

    19th of August 1917 Sunday Service

    20th of August 1917 Early morning run

    21st of August 1917 Health & Fitness

    22nd of August 1917 General's Inspection

    23rd of August 1917 Soaked in the rain again

    24th of August 1917 Return to the Front

    25th of August 1917 News from home

    26th of August 1917 A disturbed night

    27th of August 1917 Waiting to go in the line

    28th of August 1917 Going over the top

    29th of August 1917 New job

    30th of August 1917 Cooking for the troops

    31st of August 1917 More bacon

    1st of September 1917 Enjoying a lie in

    2nd of September 1917 Better than the Front Line

    3rd of September 1917 The High Life

    4th of September 1917 Cookhouse Duty

    5th of September 1917 Breakfast for the troops

    6th of September 1917 More frying

    7th of September 1917 Repeat the routine

    8th of September 1917 Working hard

    9th Sep 1917 Enemy Attack

    9th of September 1917 Cooking the Sunday Dinner

    10th of September 1917 Rabbit for a change

    11th of September 1917 Photo opportunity

    12th of September 1917 Cookhouse Routine

    13th of September 1917 Fire troubles in the Cookhouse

    14th of September 1917 Special Treat

    15th of September 1917 Early riser

    16th of September 1917 Apples & Custard

    17th of September 1917 Feeding the masses

    18th of September 1917 In to town

    19th of September 1917 A tall order

    20th of September 1917 On the move

    21st of September 1917 First bath in a month

    22nd of September 1917 Unloading trains

    24th of September 1917 Arrived Acq

    25th of September 1917 Wiring party

    26th Sep 1917 12th Londons in action  Following a heavy artillery barrage on the morning of the 26th September at 0530hrs ‘B’ Company of the 12th London’s advanced with the 2/9th London’s (Queen Victoria Rifles). The 2/9th found it difficult to maintain the correct direction due to heavy fog, boggy ground and taking heavy casualties through fire from a German trench and machine guns in a nearby pillbox. They pressed on, neutralising both positions, however they stopped a quarter of a mile short of their objective. ‘B’ Company of the 12th Londons took their objective but having failed to make contact with the 2/9th Battalion were forced to pull back to secure its flanks.

    C Company 12th Londons, led by Captain Hardy went over the top at 0611hrs and were tasked with attacking an enemy pillbox positioned on the ridge. After a sharp fight captured the German pillbox, together with numerous prisoners. The action of Rifleman Ratcliffe was noted as exceptional, having found himself in charge of the remnants of No 10 Platoon, being one of only four survivors, he collected a few men who had strayed from another Battalion (possibly 2/9ths), including a Company Sergeant Major and a Lewis Gun party and took up a position covering the flank of his Company. Together with the remaining No 10 Platoon men this disparate group held the flank with the aid of a captured German machine gun. Rifleman Ratcliffe was awarded the Military Medal for this action.

    26th of September 1917 Rumours of Ypres

    27th of September 1917 Guard duty

    28th of September 1917 Working on the range

    29th of September 1917 Digging dugouts

    30th of September 1917 Chance of a bath

    1st of October 1917 Digging in

    2nd of October 1917 Some shellfire

    3rd of October 1917 Out of Ypres for now

    4th of October 1917 Starting a new job

    5th of October 1917 Pay day

    6th of October 1917 Marching in the rain

    7th of October 1917 To church

    8th of October 1917 Duty runner

    9th of October 1917 Bath time again

    10th of October 1917 Back into the front line

    10th of November 1917 Rum and rain

    11th of October 1917 Accompanying the Captain

    12th of October 1917 Out in the rain

    13th of October 1917 Firing back

    14th of October 1917 More running

    Oct 1917 

    15th of October 1917 Fairly quiet at the front

    17th of October 1917 Quiet continues

    18th of October 1917 Quiet at the front

    19th of October 1917 An easy day

    20th of October 1917 Silent working

    21st of October 1917 A nice fine day at the front

    22nd of October 1917 High life at the front

    23rd of October 1917 Chief Cook

    24th of October 1917 Cooking continued

    25th of October 1917 How long will it last?

    26th of October 1917 Billet rest

    27th of October 1917 Promotion

    28th of October 1917 Sunday's rest

    29th of October 1917 Presented with a stripe

    30th of October 1917 Celebration

    31st of October 1917 Back to the line

    1st of November 1917 Carrying guns

    2nd of November 1917 Taking the ammo forward

    3rd of November 1917 Digging trenches

    4th of November 1917 Sunday again

    5th of November 1917 Building a duckwalk

    6th of November 1917 INspection & parade

    7th of November 1917 Raining

    8th of November 1917 Wet, wet, wet

    9th of November 1917 In the line in the mud

    11th of November 1917 Dugout collapsed

    12th of November 1917 Gone sick

    13th of Novtember 1917 Relieved

    14th of November 1917 Return to duty

    15th of November 1917 

    16th of November 1917 

    18th of November 1917 Enough is enough

    19th of November 1917 Still ill

    20th of November 1917 Route marching again

    28th Nov 1917 17th Londons in action  War Diary of 17th London Regiment records: "Bourlon Wood Sector Relief of 186th Infantry and 2nd Dismounts Cavalry Div. Hostile Artillery and Machine Gun Fire."

    29th Nov 1917 17th Londons in action

    30th Nov 1917 Enemy Attack  The German plan was simply to cut of the neck of the salient by attacking on each side, with the strongest blow to come on the southern side. The blow fell at 7.30am on the 30th November, and was devastatingly fast and effective. By 9am, the Germans had penetrated almost 3 miles towards Havrincourt Wood. Byng's Third Army faced disaster, with the real prospect of several divisions being cut off in the trap. The first attack fell on the 55th (West Lancashire) and 12th (Eastern) Division on the south-eastern side of the salient. The Germans climbed the slope to re-take Lateau Wood, pushed up the complex of shallow ravines south of Banteux, moved through Villers Guislain and past Gouzeaucourt. Amongst the troops defending the artillery positions at Gouzeaucourt were the 11th United States Engineer Company. The direction of the assault was across British divisional boundaries, and the command structure rapidly broke down as the troops became mixed up.

    Three German divisions attacked to the north, supported by an intense Phosgene barrage, intending to cut the Bapaume-Cambrai road near Anneux Chapel. They were repulsed by the machine gun barrage of the 47th (London), 2nd and 56th (London) Divisions, who had relieved the 36th and 40th. No Germans reached the road. Fierce fighting continued in the southern area for Gonnelieu, Les Rues Vertes and Masnieres

    1st Dec 1917 21st Londons relieve 15th Btn  at 9.30 a.m. Orders received for 21st Btn London Regiment to be ready to move at once to reinforce either 140 or 141 Inf. Bde. Reconnaissance made of possible supporting positions W & E of Anneux.

    3 p.m. Warning received of probable relief of 15th London Regt in Boulron Wood. 5 p.m. Orders received to reinforce 141 Inf Bde E of Anneux. Battalion prepares to move. C.O. reports to 140-141 Bde Hqrs for orders. 6 p.m. Orders cancelled & new orders received to proceed with the relief of 15th London Regiment already prepared for.

    War Diary


    2nd Dec 1917 21st Londons at Bourlon Wood  At 1 a.m. Relief of 15th Lon Regt by 21st Londons is complete. Dispositions. D& A Coys in Front line, opposite Bourlon. C Coy in immediate support. B Coy in reserve near Battn Hqrs at SW corner of Bourlon Wood.

    8.10 p.m. 7th & 8th Lon Regt attack to straighten out Front Line immediately W. of Bourlon Wood. Our L.G. cooperate on R. flank of the attack. Capt. A.L. Strickland sends one platoon from D Coy to assist in the consolidation of captured line. 8th Lon Regt wounded & prisoners wounded & unwounded, passed through Battalion Hqrs & R.A.P.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    3rd Dec 1917 21st Londons assist 8th Londons  1 a.m. on the 3rd December 21st London regiment supply Stretcher-bearers, SAA & tools to 8th London Battalion to help in evacuation of wounded & consolidation. 21st Londons C.O. issues orders for new dispositions to strengthen the left flank, at the request of O.C. 8th Battn.

    1.45 a.m. These orders cancelled on receipt of orders from 142 Inf Bde to take over more Front Line on the Right flank in relief of a Company of 22nd Battalion.

    Heavy enemy shelling, Gas & H.E. around Battn Hqrs in the evening. Rations obtained by limber during barrage fire.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    4th Dec 1917 21st Londons under fire  At 3 p.m. Orders received by 21st Londons from Brigade for C.O. to go to Battn Hqrs. He returns at 5.30 p.m. with orders for withdrawal from the Bourlon Salient.

    6. p.m. Operation Orders issued to O/C Coys in Conference at Battn Hqrs.

    4-10 p.m. Vicinity of Battn Hqrs intermittently and heavily bombarded with Gas shells & H.E. SAA.& tools removed by limber about 9 p.m.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    5th Dec 1917 21st Londons withdraw from Bourlon Wood   At just after 12 midnight on the morning of the 5th December, 21st Battalion, London Regiment withdraws from Bourlon Wood according to plan to Hindenburg Support Line – casualties Lieut. Hunt killed, 2 o.r. wounded.

    4 a.m. Outpost line (2 platoons from C Coy 21st Londons) under Lieut J Edmunds withdrew without casualty from Bourlon Wood.

    6.30 a.m. Outpost line reported back with the 21st London Battn. The Battalion extended in accordance with 142 Inf Bde: Operational Order 240. Dispositions being 4 Companies, each disposed in depth, 2 platoons in main line of resistance, 1 platoon in outpost line. Major R.H. Tolerton came forward to relieve Lt Col Dawes, & temporarily assumed command of the Battn. Battn HQ in 5.9’ gunpits in forward trench system.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    6th Dec 1917 21st Londons at Graincourt  11 a.m. Divisional Commander visited the line.

    4 p.m. Fighting patrol from the 21st Londons under 2/Lt J.O.B Hitch is sent Northwards along Hindenburg Support Line obtains touch with outposts of 2nd Divn – no signs of enemy patrols.

    5.30 p.m. The forward outpost line through Graincourt held by 140 Inf Bde is withdrawn.

    6 p.m. Post in K.11.A (Sheet 57c) held by RWF relieved by 2 platoons from D Coy, 21st Londons under Lieut C.H. Edmunds. Patrols & forward picquets are maintained during this & successive nights.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    7th Dec 1917 21st Londons at Graincourt  Work of consolidation of line continued for the 21st Londons. Enemy M.G. & snipers being active for Graincourt & neighbourhood. Much desultory shelling around Battn Hqrs. Patrols etc. maintained. 9 p.m. 21st London Battn Hqrs moved from forward system into George Str near Bde Hqrs. An advanced Hqrs is left in the old position under Capt Strickland. Lieut Col Dawes resumed command of the 21st Battalion, London Regiment.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    8th Dec 1917 Quieter day for 21st Londons  21st Battalion London Regiment are engaged in work of consolidation & improvement of wire and communications. Day quieter and enemy in general less active.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    9th Dec 1917 Londons Regiments in action  The War diary of the 21st London Regiment records: Considerable hostile shelling against our posts resulting in the evacuation of a post on our right garrisoned by the 23rd London Regt.

    1 p.m. A counter attack is made by the 21st Londons, consisting of 20 O.R’s with a platoon in support was conducted by 2nd/Lt Stoke. This operation resulted in driving the enemy to the N side of the sunken road in K.10.b but further progress was impossible owing to heavy machine gun fire down the road. Lt Richmond and 2 O.R’s killed. Sgt Alexander who had been shot through the thigh early in the morning, slipped away from the regimental aid post and returned to the line when the enemy were attacking. He left the trench and charged and dispersed a party of the enemy with the bayonet but was killed whilst performing this act of gallantry.

    About 12 midnight the Advance Post under Lt C H Edmunds withdraws.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    10th Dec 1917 Quieter day for 21st Londons  21st Battalion London Regiment record in their War Diary: Day considerably quieter. At dusk Lt H.A. Gilkes MC and 3 O.Rs went out to the old advanced post at K.11.a, evacuated previous night. A number of ‘P’ bombs were thrown into the dugouts and the entrances to the tunnels.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    11th Dec 1917 21st Londons consolidate  Consolidation work continued for 21st Londons continued. Situation fairly quiet except for some sniping from Graincourt.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    12th Dec 1917 21st Londons relieved  Consolidation continued for the 21st Londons, situation fairly quiet except for some sniping from Graincourt. At 6 p.m. Two companies are relieved by 23rd Bn Royal Fusiliers. Remaining Companies relieved about midnight by the 22nd Bn London Regiment.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    13th Dec 1917 21st Londons in reserve  By 4 a.m. on the 13th of December the 21st Londons report, relief complete. The Battalion bivouacked on a hill side.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    14th Dec 1917 21st Londons in reserve  The area occupied by the 21st Londons is cleaned up generally. Blankets are sent up and all efforts made to make things as comfortable as possible.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    15th Dec 1917 21st Londons return to billets  At 6 p.m. on the 15th December the 21st Londons are relieved by 7th Bn London Regt and withdraw to Bertincourt. By 9 p.m. the men of the 21st Battalion are in billets at Bertincourt.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    16th Dec 1917 21st Londons on the move  At 8 a.m. on the 16th December the 21st Battalion London Regiment paraded and then marched to Velu. They entrained there at 9 a.m. and proceeded to Aveluym detraining there about midday. They ate dinner in half an hour and the Battalion then marched to Lavieville which was reached at 4.30 p.m.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    17th Dec 1917 21st Londons at Lavieville  The 21st Londons record in their war diary: Day spent in cleaning up generally and in intensive economy at Lavieville where the Battalion are to remain in billets resting until the end of the month. Light training is carried out according to the daily programme, tactical scheme by Brigades under supervision of the Divisional Commander. Work is done as material available, an improvement of accommodation in billets.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    28th Dec 1917 21st Londons prepare to depart Lavieville  The 21st Londons record in their war diary for the 28th of December 1917: Brigade put under orders to move at 4 hours notice.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    30th Dec 1917 21st Londons depart Lavieville  At 4 p.m. Orders received for the 21st Londons to be ready to move about 6 p.m.

    At 6.15 p.m. a Brigade Operational Order is received to march to Albert & entrain for Étricourt.

    At 9 p.m. 21st London Battalion entrained at Albert.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    30th Dec 1917 Counter Attack

    31st Dec 1917 21st Londons under canvas  By 6.30 a.m. on the 31st of December 1916 the 21st Battalion, London Regiment are under canvas in camp near Étricourt. But at 12 midnight an Operational Order is received for the Brigade to move into Camp in the Lechelle area.

    War Diary 21 Londons


    8th May 1918 13th Londons near Arras  The 13th Battalion London Regiment are around Neuville Vitasse, outside Arras.

    6th Aug 1918 Patrol Work

    8th Aug 1918 Mustard Gas

    1st Sep 1918 Advance Made

    7th Oct 1918 On the March

    28th Oct 1918   The drums of the 24th Btn London Regiment took part in the formal entry into entry into Lille.

    17th December 1915 Maxim gun training

    If you can provide any additional information, please add it here.



  • Want to know more about London Regiment?


    There are:49150 pages and articles tagged London Regiment available in our Library


    Those known to have served with

    London Regiment

    during the Great War 1914-1918.

    • Abbott William Frederick. Pte. 1st/22nd Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Acworth Gordon William. 2nd Lt. 15th Btn (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Adams Herbert John. Pte. 1st/7th Btn. (d.2nd December 1917)
    • Ainsworth Albert. Cpl. 7th (City of London) Btn. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Aird A P.M.. Pte. 15th Btn
    • Aldridge Frederick William. L/Cpl. 12th Btn. (d.27th Sep 1917)
    • Allcroft Frank Charles. Cpl. 13th (Kensington) Btn. (d.6th Nov 1918)
    • Allen Henry Furner. Cpl. 1st/7th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Allen Henry James Olaf. Cpl. 1st/6th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Allen Henry James Olaf. Cpl. 1/6th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Allibone John. Dmr. 19th (St Pancras) Btn.
    • Amos Harry. Rfm. 1st/21st Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Ancell Horace. L/Cpl. 28th Btn (1st Artists Rifles) (d.27 Mar 1918)
    • Anderson Charles Patrick. 11th Btn.
    • Anderson Donald. Pte. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn.
    • Anderson Henry Campbell. Pte. 28th (County of London) Battalion (Artists Rifles) (d.30th Oct 1917)
    • Anderson John. L/Sgt. 19th (St Pancras) Btn.
    • Anderson William Charles. Pte. 1st/22nd Btn. D Coy. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Andress W.. Rfm. 8th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Andrews William Horace. L/Cpl. 1/21st Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Appleby John. Rfn. 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers) (d.2nd Dec 1917)
    • Archer Frank McDonald. Rflmn. 8th (Post Office Rifles) Battalion (d.24th May 1915)
    • Armstrong Edmund Robert. Pte. 1st/21st Btn (d.3rdJune 1918)
    • Aronow Harry. Rfm. 1/8th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Ashby George William. Capt. 6th (City of London) Battalion (d.25th Sep 1915)
    • Ashford H. W.. Pte. 24th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Aston William. Sjt. 1/8th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Atkins William Frederick. L/Sgt. D Coy (d.26th May 1915)
    • Atkins William Frederick. L/Sgt. 1/23rd Battalion, D Coy. (d.26th May 1915)
    • Attkins Leslie. Rflmn. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Battalion (d.1st July 1916)
    • Ayling Cecil Wallace. Pte. 7th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Bacon Harry William. Pte. 9th (Queen Victorias Rifles) Btn.
    • Bacon J. J.. Pte. 1/7th Btn.
    • Bailey Reginald. Sgt. 17th Btn. (d.15th Oct 1916)
    • Baillie R.S.. 14th (London Scottish) Btn.
    • Baird James Frederick. Pte. 1st Btn. (d.16th Jun 1917)
    • Baker H.. Sig. 2/2nd Btn.
    • Baker Louis Harley. Rflmn. 6th Btn (d.9th Jan 1918)
    • Balcon Joseph. Pte.
    • Ball William Henry. Pte. (d.27th Aug 1918)
    • Barker Robert Loveless. Rflm. 1/6th Btn. (d.4th Nov 1916)
    • Barlow Knightley Trevor. Cpl. 1/6th Btn.
    • Barrett Albert James. Cpl. 2/12th Btn The Rangers (d.9th August 1918)
    • Barrett Edward John. Rflmn. 1/17th Btn. (d.1st Oct 1916)
    • Barrett Henry Charles. Pte 10th Btn.
    • Barrow Charles George. L/Cpl. 20th (Blackheath and Woolwich) Btn. (d.18th Sep 1916)
    • Barrs William A.. Pte. 1/22nd Btn.
    • Bartley Harry Nelson. Pte. 15th Btn. (Prince of Wales' Own Civil Service Rifl (d.29th Jan 1916)
    • Bartram George Leopold. Pte. 29th Btn.
    • Baskeyfield Harold. Pte. 24th Battalion
    • Bateman Harold. Pte. 1st/13th Btn. (Kensington) (d.1st Sep 1918)
    • Batte Sidney. 2nd Lt. 19th Btn. (d.20th Jan 1918)
    • Batterbee Charles. Pte. 9th Battalion (d.9th Jun 1917)
    • Beale Joseph Daniel. L/Cpl. 7th Btn.
    • Beamont Fredrick. Pte. 18th Btn. (d.2nd May 1918)
    • Beaumot-Edmonds William George. 2nd Lt. 1/22nd (County of London) Btn. (d.17th Sep 1916)
    • Benns Herbert Edward. Pte. 12th Btn.
    • Berry Dennis Henry. Pte. 24th Btn.
    • Betson James William. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Bettles Fredick Edward. Pte. 22nd Btn.
    • Bezley William George. Pte. 1/7th Btn. (d.10th Apr 1917)
    • Bidewell John. Pte. 1/8th Btn. (d.19th April 1918)
    • Billings Albert Edward. Pte. (St Pancras) (d.29 September 1916)
    • Birt Daniel Francis. Pte. 8th Battalion
    • Bish Harold. Pte. 1/19th Btn. (d.22nd Aug 1917)
    • Bolger William John. Pte. 15th (County of London) Battalion (d.10th Oct 1916)
    • Bonham Herbert George. L/Cpl. 23rd (County of London) Battalion (d.2nd Oct 1916)
    • Boss Thomas Harry. Capt. 1/8th Btn.
    • Boughton E.. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Bourner Herbert Frederick. Pte. 15th Battalion
    • Boyer Herbert James. Private 22nd Battalion (d.3rd Sept 1918)
    • Brady John. Rflm. 2nd/18th Btn. (d.7th Nov 1917)
    • Branch Spencer Osborne. 2nd Lt. 2/5th (City of London) Btn.
    • Brannigan James Desmond. L/Cpl. 14th (London Scottish) Battalion (d.1st Aug 1918)
    • Branton Joseph. Pte 1st/6th Bn. (d.15th September 1916)
    • Brayden Kevin. 2nd Lt. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Battalion (d.23rd Dec 1917)
    • Breeden Henry Charles. Pte. 13th (Kensington) Battalion (d.19th Jan 1917)
    • Brill Walter Arthur. Rflmn. 12th (The Rangers) Btn. (d.22nd Sep 1916)
    • Brindley Thomas. Pte. 7th Btn.
    • Brooks Frederick Francis. Pte. 19th Btn.
    • Brown Alfred. L/Cpl. 22nd Btn. (d.26th Jul 1917)
    • Brown Frederick William. Rfn. 12th Btn.
    • Brown George Thomas. Rfm. 18th Battalion (d.7th Aug 1918)
    • Brown George Thomas. Pte. 18th Battalion (d.7th Aug 1918)
    • Bull Walter John. L/Cpl. 14th (1st London Scottish) Battalion (d.28th Mar 1917)
    • Burford Horace Arthur. Rflmn. 1st/16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Btn. (d.30th Nov 1917)
    • Burnett Edward. Rflmn. 17th Btn. (d.28th Sept 1919)
    • Butler Herbert Ormonde. Pte. 1st btn. 3rd btn.
    • Butt Frederick Claude. Rflmn. 5th Btn. (d.6th July 1916)
    • Cable Charles Ernest. Rfmn. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion (d.22nd Apr 1917)
    • Campling Thomas. Pte. 17th Btn.
    • Carberry William . Pte. 18th Btn. (Irish Rifles) (d.24th Nov 1917)
    • Carpenter Sidney. Rflmn. 1st Btn (d.1st October 1917)
    • Carter Alfred Henry. Pte. 24th Battalion, B Company
    • Chambers Edwin. Rflmn. 33rd Btn. D Coy. (d.5th Oct 1918)
    • Chapman Charles Henry. Rfm. 18th Btn (d.20th Jan 1917)
    • Chapman George Henry. Pte. 19th Btn. (d.5th Dec 1917)
    • Chennells Reuben James. Pte. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn.
    • Child Arthur Leslie Roland. Pte. 19th (Post Office Rifles) Btn.
    • Chipperfield Edward. Pte. 1st (City of London) Btn. (d.3rd May 1917)
    • Clack Phillip. Rifleman 12th (The Rangers) Btn. (d.8th Nov 1917)
    • Clark Henry Cecil. Pte. 3rd (City of London) Btn.
    • Clark John William. Sgt. The Queen's
    • Clark William Wallace Edmund Messenger. Pte. 14th (London Scottish) Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Clarke . Pte. 16th (Queens Westministers) Btn.
    • Clarke Frederick Boulton. Rfm. 1st/5th Battalion (d.12th Apr 1917)
    • Clement Frank Malcolm Louis. Pte. 1/23rd Btn. (d.16th Sep 1916)
    • Cliffe Kenneth. Pte. 1/7th (City of London) Battalion (d.11th Jun 1917)
    • Coit E. D.C.. Pte. 15th Btn. (d.24th Dec 1916)
    • Cole George Albert. Pte. 17th Btn.
    • Coles Cecil Frederick Gottlieb. Sgt. Bandmaster 9th Btn. 1QVR (d.26th Apr 1918)
    • Coles William Price Vivian. 2nd Lt. 7th Btn. C Coy. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Collins Percy John. Pte. 2nd/20th Battalion (d.28th Nov 1917 )
    • Collins William Charles. 3rd/15th (Civil Service Rifles) Btn.
    • Connolly William Joseph. Pte. 1/7th Btn. (d.7th June 1917)
    • Connolly William Joseph. Pte. 1/7th Btn. A Coy. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Cook Herbert. Pte. 12th Battalion, D Coy. (d.9th Apr 1917)
    • Cook William Alfred. Sgt. 8th Btn. (d.16th June 1917)
    • Cooke Frederic Arthur. Pte. 5th Btn (d.9th Sept 1916)
    • Cooke William. Rfmn. 1/17th Battalion (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) (d.3rd June 1917)
    • Coombes Herbert Victor. 2nd Lt 21st Btn (d.28th Mar 1918)
    • Cooper Thomas William. Pte. 20th Battalion
    • Cornwell H. W.. Rfm. 1/17th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Cornwell Harry Walter. Rfmn. 1/17th Btn. (d.7th June 1917)
    • Cottingham Edward Albert. Sgt. 4th Btn (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Cox J. T.. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.5th Jul 1917)
    • Craig Gordon. Pte. 3rd Battalion (d.30th May 1918)
    • Crane William. 6th Btn. (d.26th Sep 1916)
    • Crawford Frederick Thomas Edward. Rfm. 16th Btn. (d.15th Apr 1917)
    • Craymer Horace Leonard. 23rd Btn.
    • Creek Stanley Alistair. Act Co. Sjt Mjr. (d.16th Sep 1916)
    • Crockett Edgar George. Rflmn. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Btn. (d.3rd Jan 1916)
    • Croucher Robert Gort. Pte. 1/19th Btn. (d.5th Jun 1917)
    • Crush John Henry. Pte. 2nd Battalion (d.3rd Jan 1918)
    • Crush John Henry. Pte. 2nd/21st (First Surrey Rifles) Btn. (d.1st Mar 1918)
    • Cumming John Douglas Skeoch. L/Cpl 2/14th (2nd London Scottish) Battalion
    • Cutts John Haiden. Pte. 2nd/10th Btn. (d.22nd Sep 1917)
    • Dady Joseph Alfred. Rfn. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Battalion (d.14th Aug 1917)
    • Dainty Edward Joseph Patten. CSM. 2nd Btn. (d.8th Nov 1917)
    • Davison Aylmer Allsworth. Pte. 1/28th (Artists Rifles) Btn. (d.25th June 1918)
    • Day Albert Frederick George. Sgt. 24th Battalion (d.9th May 1915)
    • Daykin Henry John. 1/7th Btn.
    • Daykin Thomas. Rfmn. 1/11th (Finsbury Rifles) Btn.
    • Dean William Leonard. Pte. 7th City of London Battalion
    • Denman H. F. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Densham Stephen Hugh. Rifleman (d.10 Dec 1917)
    • Densham Stephen Hugh. Rflmn. 5th Btn. (d.2nd Dec 1917)
    • Dicker Roland Richard. Cpl. 1/8th Btn.
    • Dickson William James. Cpl. 13th Btn.
    • Dickson William James. Cpl.
    • Dowsett William David. L/Sgt. 6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles) (d.6th April 1918)
    • Drew Alfred Stephen. Pte. 19th Btn.
    • Driscoll Sidney. L/Cpl. 1st/22nd Btn. A Coy (d.7th June 1917)
    • Duhig John Francis. Pte. 17th Btn.
    • Dunn Sydney. 23rd Btn.
    • Dunn William. Pte. 1/24th Btn.
    • Dyball Frank H.. 2/24th Btn.
    • Dyer Frederick Ewart. Pte. 15th Btn. (d.15th Sep 1918)
    • Easey Henry George. Sgt. 10th (Hackney) Btn.
    • Edgeworth Charles Frederick. L/Cpl. 2/4th Btn. (d.26th Oct 1917)
    • Edgington Alfred. A/Sgt 1/22nd Btn.
    • Edmondson Allan. Pte.
    • Edmondson George Allen. Pte. 1/7th Btn. (d.9th Aug 1918 )
    • Elder David. Pte. 1/13th Btn.
    • Elliott Cyril Charles. Rfm. 6th Btn. (d.28th June 1915)
    • Elliott Timothy Goddard. Rfmn. 19th Btn.
    • Ellis Guy S.. 2nd Lt. (d.12th Jul 1917)
    • Elmes King. Capt. att. 2/16th London Regiment (d.30th Sep 1918)
    • Evans Thomas Young. Pte. 3rd Btn. (d.13th Sep 1916)
    • Eve William Francis. Rflmn. 1/16th Btn.
    • Fathers Kenneth George. Pte. 1/21st London (1st Surrey Rifles)
    • Fenton William Norman. Pte. 16th Btn.
    • Ferrell Jack. Pte. 1/6th Btn.
    • Field Leslie George. Rflmn 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. (d.8th Sep 1918)
    • Findlay Malcolm. Pte. 14th (Scottish) Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Finn Daniel Patrick. Rflmn. 1/8th Btn. (d.30th April 1918)
    • Fisher Charles. Cpl. 2nd/24th Btn. (d.29th May 1918)
    • Fisher Charles. Cpl. 2/24th Btn. (d.29th May 1918)
    • Ford Jack. Rflmn. 17th Battalion (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Francis William James Baden.
    • Franklin Cyril George. Rflmn. 5th Battalion (d.21st August 1918)
    • Fraser Aubrey. Rflmn. 5th Btn. (d.9th July 1916)
    • French William Henry. L/Sgt. 2nd Battalion (d.28th Feb 1918)
    • Fresco Moses. Rfmn. (d.7th April 1917 )
    • Frey Emile. 2nd Lt. 1/15th Btn. (d.26th Aug 1918)
    • Frost Sydney Ernest. Pte. 19th Btn.
    • Fry J.. Rfm. (d.12th Nov 1918)
    • Fuller Frank Irwin. Pte. 2nd/14th (London Scottish) Btn.
    • Gammidge Leonard Norton. Pte. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Btn. (d.25th Sept 1915)
    • Garlick Harry. Pte. 1/7th Btn.
    • Garner Frederick. Pte. 17th Btn. (d.1st Sep 1918)
    • Garnet Reginald. A/Cpl. 16th Btn.
    • Garrett W.. Rfm. 1/18th Btn. (d.12th Jul 1917)
    • Gatland Edward. Dvr. 8th Btn.
    • Gay Ernest Frederick. Pte 1/10th (Hackney) Btn.
    • Gaydon Charles Frederick. Pte. 4th (City of London) Btn. (d.11th Aug 1918)
    • Geerts Walter Philibert. CSM. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Btn.
    • George Alfred Frank. Dvr. 47th Divisional Ammuntion Column (d.3rd Jan 1918)
    • Gibbs Leslie Stephen. Pte. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn.
    • Gissing Walter Leonard. Pte. 16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Gissing Walter Leonard. Rflmn. 1st/16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Btn. (d.1st Jul 1916)
    • Glasby Charles Samuel. L/Sgt. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. (d.23rd May 1916)
    • Glenton Frederick. 7th Btn.
    • Goldstein Leopold Harris. Pte. 2nd Btn
    • Goodall Stanley Percival. Pte. 1st/2nd Btn. (d.26th Oct 1917)
    • Goode Joseph Edward . Sgt. 6th Battalion
    • Green Charles Frederick William. Pte. 21st (1st Surrey Rifles) Btn.
    • Green George R.. Pte. 7th Btn.
    • Green Henry W.. Sgt. 1/8th (Post Office Rifles) Btn. F Coy. (d.21st May 1916)
    • Gregory William J. Rfm. 1/8th Btn. (d.7th Jul 1917)
    • Gridley Arthur James. PTE Rifleman 6th Btn
    • Grieves Alfred Henry. L/Cpl. 24th Btn.
    • Griffith William Key. 2nd Lt. 1/12th (The Rangers) battalion (d.26th Sep 1917)
    • Grubb Edward Albert. Pte.
    • Gutberlet John Thomas. Rfmn. 25th Btn.
    • Hadley Charles Ernest. Pte. 19th Btn. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Hains Thomas Noel. 12th Btn.
    • Haizelden Benjamin. 2nd Lt. 2nd/10th Btn. (d.30th Aug 1918)
    • Halms Alfred. Rfm. 6th Battalion
    • Hamilton William. Pte. 22nd Battalion (d.8th Oct 1916)
    • Hanley William. Pte. 1/16th QWR Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Harding Harold Charles. Pte. 4th (City of London) Battalion
    • Harman Frederick. Cpl. 17th Btn.
    • Harrington Arthur George. RSM. 5th (City of London) Battalion (d.28th April 1915)
    • Harris Albert John. Pte. 1/19th Btn. (d.11th Jul 1917)
    • Harris John. Pte. 1/6th Btn. (d.11th Jul 1917)
    • Harris John. Pte. 19th Btn. (d.11th Jul 1917)
    • Harris John. Pte. 13th Btn. (d.11th Jul 1917)
    • Harrison C. E.. Rfm. 1/18th Btn. (d.12th Jul 1917)
    • Hart Henry George Rueben. Pte. Att. 1/20th Bn. London Regiment (d.1st Sep 1918)
    • Hart Woolf. Rfmn. 1/17th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Harvey H.. Cpl. 1/19th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Harvey Harold. Pte. 4th Btn.
    • Harwood Ralph Edwin Charles. Pte. 20th Battalion (d.21st May 1916)
    • Haseldean Albert Charles George. Sgt. 21st (1st Surrey Rifles) Btn (d.16th Jul 1917)
    • Havinden George Smith. Pte. Queen's Westminster Rifles 1/16 Btn.
    • Headland William. Pte. 23rd (Service) Battalion (First Sportsman)
    • Heal Walter. Rfmn. 2nd/21st Bn. (d.17th Jul 1916)
    • Hearnden Cecil. Act Cpl
    • Hedges Frederick William. 2nd Lt. 6th Btn.
    • Hendry Henry Oscar. L/Cpl. 1/7th Btn. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Hennessy Herbert William. Sgt 22nd Btn (d.17 Feb 1917)
    • Herbert John. Supply Sgt 17th Btn.
    • Hester Charles William James. Rflmn. 1/17th Battalion
    • Hewett William Walter. Rflmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn., C Coy. (d.5th April 1918)
    • Hewins James Henry. Pte. 7th Battalion (d.9th Aug 1918)
    • Hicks Albert Victor. Pte. 22nd (Bermondsey) Btn.
    • Hill Hugh Henry. L/Cpl. 14th (London Scottish) Btn. (d.3rd Jul 1917)
    • Hills George Charles. 3/10th Btn.
    • Hilton Ernest. Pte. 95th Coy.
    • Hinds Harold Manning. Pte. 12th (County of London Rangers) Btn.
    • Hipwell Charles Alfred Edward. Rfm. 17th Poplar & Stepney Rifles Btn. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Hirst Alexander E R. Rifleman 1st/6th Bn. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Hobbs Herbert John. Sgt. 19th Btn. (d.22nd March 1918)
    • Holder A. S.. Pte. 12th Btn.
    • Holder Arthur Stanley. Pte. 12th (The Rangers) Battalion (d.26th Aug 1918)
    • Hollington Joseph John. Pte. 2/1st Battalion (d.21st Sep 1917)
    • Hollst Benjamin. Pte. 2/23rd Btn. (d.30th Aug 1916)
    • Holm John Bennett. L/Cpl. 7th Btn. (d.2nd Dec 1917)
    • Holmes Ernest George. Sgt. 13th Kensington Btn. (d.4th August 1916)
    • Hopkins Emsley. L/Cpl. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Horrill Edwin John. Rfmn. 16th (Queens Westminster Rifles) Battalion (d.19th Sep 1916)
    • Horwood A. J.. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Horwood Ernest Bentall. 28th Btn.
    • Hotchkiss O. E.. Rfm. 1/18th Btn. (d.13th Jul 1917)
    • Houghton John Reginald. Cpt. 1st Battalion (d.21st March 1918)
    • Howard James. Pte. 1/20th Btn.
    • Howkins Francis Edward. 2nd Lt. 28th Btn.
    • Hoyle William. Rfmn. 12th Btn. (d.26th Sep 1917)
    • Hull John Allingham. L/Sgt. (d.22nd Feb 1918)
    • Hull Reginald Louis. L/Cpl. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Hurford Charles Horace. Pte. 9th (Queen Victoria Rifles) Btn.
    • Hurford Walter. L/Cpl. 5th Btn.
    • Isbister Leonard Stanley. 2nd.Lt.
    • Ives James. Pte. 17th Btn.
    • Jackson Robert. Pte. 2/23rd Btn.
    • Jacobs Thomas Daniel. Pte. 24th Battalion (d.18th Sep 1918)
    • Joel Harold Walter. Capt. 1/21st Btn. (d.7th. June 1917)
    • Johnson Arthur Leon. Rfmn. 21st btn.
    • Johnson Norris Riddley. Cpl. 24th Btn. (2nd Sportsman's) (d.13th Nov 1916)
    • Jones Stephen James. Rflmn. 1/9th (Queen Victoria Rifles) Btn. (d.29th Sep 1916)
    • Jones William . L/Cpl 2nd Btn.
    • Joy George Henry. Rflmn. 17th (Poplar & Stepney Rifles) Btn., B Company (d.9th Jan 1917)
    • Joyce Alfred. 5th Btn.
    • Kay John Brayshaw. Pte. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Btn.
    • Kearns Thomas. Pte. 18th Btn.
    • Keeble William Arthur. Pte. 1/24th Btn. (d.8th Jun 1917)
    • Keeble William Arthur. 1/24th Btn. (d.8th Jun 1917)
    • Kemp George William. L/Cpl. 22nd Btn. (d.23rd Mar 1918)
    • Keyworth Leonard James. L/Cpl. 24th (The Queens) Btn. (d.19th Oct 1915)
    • Kindell Percival Kinghorn. Pte. 14th (London Scottish) Btn.
    • King Charles. Cpl. 1/22nd Btn.
    • King Francis Baker. Pte. 20th (Blackheath & Woolwich) Btn. (d.26th May 1918)
    • King Francis Baker. Pte. 20th Btn Att. 141st TM Bty. (d.26th May 1918)
    • King Hamilton Boyd. 2nd Lt. 1/22nd Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • King Harold Vincent. Cpl. 12th (The Rangers) Btn. (d.9th April 1917)
    • King James William. L/Cpl. 2/10th Btn.
    • Kinsela William Matthew. Rfn. 1/28th (Artists' Rifles) Btn (d.26th Aug 1918)
    • Kirkland William Ernest. Pte. att. 1st/23rd Bn. London Regiment (d.2nd Sep 1918)
    • Kirkum Bertie. 13th Btn.
    • Kirkwood Matthew. Pte. 14th (London Scottish) Battalion, G Coy. (d.25th Jan 1915)
    • Knight James Albert Edward. Pte. 21st (First Surrey Rifles) Btn.
    • Knox George. Sgt. 7th Btn
    • Lacey Frederick Victor. Pte. 19th (St Pancras) Battalion (d.14th Oct 1918)
    • Lack Lovell William. Rfmn. 1st/21st Battalion (d.25th May 1915)
    • Lander Val Penruddock Oram . L/Cpl. 1/13th Btn. (d.9th May 1915)
    • Lathan Arthur Herbert. Rfmn. 9th Btn. (d.9th Oct 1916)
    • Lawrence William. Rflmn. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Btn.
    • Lazenby William John. L/Cpl 2/16 (Queens Westminster Rifles) Btn.
    • Lefever Arthur George . Pte. 5th (City of London) Btn.
    • Leonard William Henry. Pte. 2/16th Btn. (d.6th Dec 1917)
    • Lester Albert Edward. 2nd Lt. 13th Btn. (d.8th May 1918)
    • Lester Reuben. Pte. 2/18th London Irish Battalion (d.22nd Aug 1916)
    • Lewis Wilfred Henry. Pte. 1/23rd Btn. (d.26th May 1915)
    • Lewis Wilfred Henry . Pte. 1/23rd Btn. B Company. (d.27th May 1915 )
    • Libby Frank Thomas. Sgt. 5th Btn. (d.19th April 1918)
    • Lidgley John Charles. Pte. 1st/21st (Surrey Rifles) Btn. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Loader Frederick. Pte. 1/22nd Btn. (d.19th Aug 1917)
    • Lucas Ernest Henry Austin. 2nd Lt 8th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Lutjen John. Cpl. 2/7th Battalion (d.8th Sep 1918)
    • Lyons Leo Daniel. L/Cpl. 6th Btn.
    • Lyus Richard Sadler. Rflmn. 6th Btn. (d.25th May 1915)
    • Machin Ernest Arthur. Sjt. 4th Battalion
    • Magee Leslie Horace. Pte. 2/22nd Battalion
    • Mantle Alfred Lewis. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.7th July 1917)
    • Marriage Andrew. Rfmn. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn (d.28th Aug 1915)
    • Marriott Arthur. L/Cpl. 7th Btn.
    • Marriott Arthur. Cpl. 1/7th Btn.
    • Marriott Stanley. Sgt. 2nd Btn.
    • Marsh W.. Sgt. 13th Btn.
    • Martin John G. Rfmn. 1st/16th Btn. London Regiment (d.1st July 1916)
    • Martin Percival John. Sgt. 20th Btn.
    • Mason A J. Cpl. 1/15th Btn.
    • Mason Reginald John. Sgt. 12th (Rangers) Btn.
    • Mason Stanley. Sgt. 12th (Rangers) Btn.
    • Mathers John George. Rfmn. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Btn. (d.24th Aug 1918)
    • Matthews Arthur Henry. Pte. 7th City of London Btn.
    • Maunder Richard. Pte. 18th Btn.
    • May Ernest George. Rfn. 5th (London Rifle Brigade) Btn. (d.16th or 19th Aug 1917)
    • Maynard Thomas Walter. Pte. 1st Btn. (d.3rd May 1917)
    • McAuliffe Patrick Francis. 23rd Btn. C Company.
    • McCombie Herbert James. Pte. 10th Btn. (d.29th May 1918)
    • McEntee Henry Daniel. Pte. 13th Btn. (d.9th May 1915)
    • McEvoy Robert McEvoy. Pte.
    • McKone Charles Alfred. Pte. 1st/8th Btn. (d.2nd Dec 1917)
    • Mcleod Frederick William. Rfmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn.
    • McVitie William Johnston. L/Sgt. 9th Btn (d.25th Sep 1915)
    • Merryweather William John Edward. Pte. (d.11th Dec 1918)
    • Messervy Ernest Dyce. Capt. (d.20th Jul 1917)
    • Metcalfe Digby. Pte. 2/20th Btn. (d.31st Aug 1918)
    • Miles A. London Regiment (d.1st Jul 1916)
    • Miles Albert John. Rflmn. 16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Millen Arthur. Pte. 22nd Btn. (d.8th Jul 1915)
    • Mills Charles Clarence. Rflmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. (d.2nd Sep 1918)
    • Mills William Charles . Cpl. 1/6th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Moore Reginald Francis. Pte. 1st Btn. (d.10th Oct 1917)
    • More Charles John. Pte. 6th Btn. (d.29th Sep 1916)
    • Morris Thomas G . Rflmn. 17th Btn. (d.1 Oct 1916)
    • Morrison Charles Henry. Rfn. 17th Btn.
    • Morrisson Charles Henry. Rfn. 17th Btn.
    • Moulder Frederick Benjamin. Pte. 9th Btn.
    • Moulton Ernest. Pte. 8th Btn.
    • Munton John Edward. Rifleman 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Btn. (d.28th Nov 1917)
    • Murphy Henry William. L/Cpl. 1/23rd Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Murray George. Pte. 7th Btn.
    • Newman Arthur James. Pte. 2nd Battalion
    • Newman Joseph Charles. Pte. 10th Btn. (d.19th March 1917)
    • Nix Henry Richard. Pte. 24th Battalion (d.26th May 1915)
    • Norton James. Pte. 13th Battalion (d.17th Nov 1916)
    • Nugent Francis Joseph. Cpl. 7th (City of London) Battalion (d.2nd Dec 1917)
    • Nunns Norman. 2nd Lt. 1/21st Btn.
    • O'Brien James. 1/7th Btn.
    • O'Brien Thomas William. Pte. 1/7th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • O'Brien William James. Pte. 24th (The Queens) Battalion (d.26th May 1915)
    • O'Leary Francis. Sgt. 1/6th Btn. (d.15th Sept 1916)
    • O'Neill Joseph. Rflmn. (d.6th Sep 1918)
    • Oliver Albert George. Rfmn. 20th Btn.
    • Oliver Francis Henry. Rfm. 1/17th Btn.
    • Olley Gordon Percy. Sjt.
    • Oram Sidney Abraham. Pte. 1/17 (Stepney & Poplar) Btn. (d.25th March 1918)
    • Palmer Charles Stanley Banks. L/Cpl. 7th Btn. (d.26th Sep 1915)
    • Pamphlett Charles. Pte.
    • Pantling George. Sgt. 3rd Btn.
    • Pardew Frank Arundel. Cpl. 12th (The Rangers) Btn. (d.9th Sep1918)
    • Parfait Edward. Pte. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Btn.
    • Parker George William. L/Cpl. 2/23rd Battalion
    • Parker John. Pte 9th Btn.
    • Parry Arthur Ernest. Pte. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion
    • Parslow Albert Jack. 2nd Lt. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. (d.10th Oct 1916)
    • Peach Richard Murray. Rflmn.
    • Peake George. Pte. 1/19th Btn.
    • Pearce Ernest Edmund. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Pearcy John. Pte 6th Btn.
    • Pelotto H.. Rfm. 1/18th Btn. (d.9th Jul 1917)
    • Perry Frederick Charles. Pte. 2/20th Btn.
    • Phillips William. Rfm. 6th Btn.
    • Phippen Francis J.. Pte. 12th Btn. (d.21st Jul 1916)
    • Pike John Sidney. Rflmn. 18th Btn. (d.9th Jul 1917)
    • Pitcher Charles Robert. Pte. 9th (Queen Victoria Rifles) Btn.
    • Pitt Christian William. Rfm. 1/21st Btn. (d.20th Oct 1917)
    • Planck Charles Digby. Pte. 1/7th Btn.
    • Polston James. Rfmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. (d.8th Dec 1916)
    • Polston James. Rfmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. (d.8th Dec 1916)
    • Pond Frederick. Pte. 2/15th Btn. and 3rd Btn.
    • Pool Leonard Rossiter. Pte. 12th Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Pooley John Edmund Noel. 2nd Lt 9th Battalion (Queen Victoria's Rifles)
    • Porter Ralph. Rfmn. 2/6th Btn. (d.8th Oct 1918)
    • Powell William John. Pte. 2/28th (Artists Rifles) Btn.
    • Preston J. F.. Lt. 1/7th Btn.
    • Price Richard James. Pte. 2nd Battalion (d.21st Aug 1917)
    • Prince Henry George. Pte. 24th Btn.
    • Privett Henry. Pte. 22nd Btn.
    • Probets William Frederick. Rfmn. 15th Bn. (d.1st Sep 1918)
    • Proud Charles Percival H. Rflmn. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Battalion (d.1st Dec 1917)
    • Pugh Edward David. Pte. 20th Battalion (Blackheath and Woolwich) (d.28th Jan 1917)
    • Pulleyn Edward Henry. 2nd Lt. 1/20th Btn. att.1/2nd Btn. (d.25th Nov 1917)
    • Rainsforth William. Pte. 5th Btn.
    • Ramsey Arthur. 1/8th Btn.
    • Read Harold John. L/Cpl. 3rd Battalion (d.24th July 1916)
    • Reedman Oliver Victor. Pte. 2/22nd Btn. (d.8th Oct 1916)
    • Reid Ernest Robert . Rifleman. 8th (Post Office Rifles) Btn. (d.7th Nov 1916)
    • Richardson Frederick William. Pte. 18th Btn.
    • Richmond Matthew Wilson. 2nd Lt. 19th Bn
    • Richmond Matthew Wilson. A/Capt. 19th Btn.
    • Rickman S. J.. Cpl. 1/22nd Btn. (d.6th Jun 1917)
    • Riddiford Wallis Bristow. Pte. 1/8th Btn. (d.26th Aug 1917)
    • Riddle Wilfred Hedley. Pte. 1/9th (QVR) Btn. (d.28th Aug 1917)
    • Ridout Hedley. Rflmn. 12th (The Rangers) Btn.
    • Ringguth Theodore James Henry. Pte. (d.22nd May 1916)
    • Ritson James Bede. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.27th Sep 1915)
    • Roberts Joseph. Pte. 1/24th Btn. (d.8th Jun 1917)
    • Robinson Robert Beeley. Rfm. 1/7 Btn, C Coy. (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Rodgers Henry. Pte. 8th (Post Office Rifles) Btn. (d.27th June 1915)
    • Rooney D.. 2nd Lt. 37th Btn.
    • Ross Francis George. Pte. 34th Btn.
    • Ross Francis George. Pte.
    • Ross Peter Joseph. Cpl. 20th Btn.
    • Roughley Edward. Col.Sgt. 14th (London Scottish) Btn.
    • Rowen Charles Victor. Pte. 1/22nd Battalion (d.21st Dec 1920)
    • Rowen James Edmond. Pte. 24th Battalion (The Queens)
    • Rowen John George. Rfm. 2nd/6th Battalion (d.28th Oct 1917)
    • Rowen Walter . Rfm. 2nd/6th (City of London Rifles) Battalion (d.28th Oct 1917)
    • Rowson Walter William Tombleson. Pte. 7th Btn. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Russ William Percy. Rifleman 1/9th.London Regiment
    • Russ William Percy. Rfmn. 1/9btn (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn
    • Russell Henry Friend. Pte. 24th Btn. (d.23rd May 1918)
    • Salt Herbert William. Rifleman
    • Sandell Albert Edward. Pte. 19th (County of London) Batallion (St. Pancras) (d.7th December 1917)
    • Sanger Henry Keith. 2nd Lt. 10th Btn. (d.13th April 1918)
    • Saunders Archibald Sidney. Rfn. 1/21st (Surrey Rifles) Btn. (d.22nd Mar 1918)
    • Savory Ernest. Pte. 19th London
    • Sculthorpe W. V.. 2nd Lt. 1/22nd Btn. (d.8th Jun 1917)
    • Seaborne John Stanley. L/Cpl 12th Battalion (The Rangers) (d.24 Aug 1918)
    • Shephard Herbert W.. Pte. 12th (The Rangers) Battalion
    • Short Albert. 20th Btn. (d.8th April 1917)
    • Siddalls George Henry. Pte. 7th Btn. (d.28th Aug 1918)
    • Simpson William John Sydney. Lt. 8th Btn.
    • Singyard Thomas. Pte. 22nd Btn. (d.9th July 1916)
    • Skingle Mark Leonard. 9th Btn.
    • Skinner A. H.. Rfm. 1/18th Btn. (d.13th Jul 1917)
    • Slade F. N.. Rflm. 2/6th Btn. (d.14th Dec 1917)
    • Smith Albert. Rflmn. 1st/5th Battalion (d.9th October 1916)
    • Smith Arthur George. Pte. (d.3rd May 1917)
    • Smith Arthur Leonard. 7th Btn.
    • Smith Arthur Douglas. Pte. 9th Btn.
    • Smith Charles.
    • Smith Frank James. Rflmn.
    • Smith John. Pte. 20th (Blackheath & Woolwich) Btn. (d.21st Aug 1917)
    • Smith Leonard. L/Cpl. 24th Queens Battalion
    • Smith Thomas Edward. 2nd Lt. 8th Btn. (Post Office Rifles) (d.5th September 1918)
    • Solomons Henry. Rfmn. 17th (Popular and Stepney) Btn.
    • Southgate Albert Edward. Rflmn. 6th Battalion (d.19th Apr 1918)
    • Spencer George William. L/Cpl. 2/9th (QVR) Btn.
    • Spong Alfred Henry. Rfm. 8th (Post Office Rifles) Battaion (d.19th Nov 1916)
    • Staff W.. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.8th Jul 1917)
    • Standcumbe John Frank. Rfm. 9th Battalion (Queen Victoria Rifles) (d.10th Apr 1917)
    • Stanley Montague William. Rfmn. 15th Btn.
    • Starling Nathan. Pte. 2nd Btn. (d.3rd July 1916)
    • Stephenson Robert Harold. L/Cpl. 1/22nd Btn.
    • Stinton Kennedy. Rfm. 1/21st Btn. (First Surrey Rifles) (d.7th June 1917)
    • Stone H.. 2nd Lt. 1/23rd Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Story Goronwy. Rflmn. 2nd/9th Btn. (d.27th September 1917)
    • Stratton William Gerald. Rflmn. 6th Battalion. "D"Coy. (d.24th July 1918)
    • Sturt John Edward. L/Cpl. 1st/20th Battalion (d.24th Mar 1918)
    • Swan Sidney Victor . Pte. 2/16th Btn.
    • Tardif Valentine Sullock Aveline. L/Cpl. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Battalion (d.15th Sep 1916)
    • Tatham Thomas Septimus. Pte. 24th Battalion (d.26th May 1915)
    • Taylor Robert. Rflmn. 1st/9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. (d.30th Nov 1917)
    • Taylor William. Rfm. 1/6th Btn. (d.23rd Nov 1916)
    • Terry Walter. L/Cpl. 5th (City of London) Battalion (d.1st July 1916)
    • Thelwell Harry Rowland. Lt 3rd Btn. (d.8th July 1916)
    • Thomas Francis Albert. Pte. 15th Btn. (Civil Service Rifles)
    • Thomas Walter. Pte. 17th (Poplar and Stepney Rifles) Battalion
    • Titcomb Ernest James. Rflmn. 12th Btn. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Toms Arthur. L/Cpl. 1st Battalion (d.3rd Nov 1914)
    • Toomey Jeremiah. Pte. 1st Btn.
    • Toomey William. Pte. (d.14th Aug 1917)
    • Tovey William. Rflmn. 17th Btn.
    • Turner Arthur. Pte. 2nd Battalion (d.3rd May 1917)
    • Turrell William Edward. Private 2/3d Btn (d.16th June 1917)
    • Turville Ralph Reginald. 15th Btn.
    • Twining Arthur. Pte. 30th Btn. (d.8th Aug 1918)
    • Twining Arthur. Pte. 30th (d.8th January 1918)
    • Twinning Arthur. Pte. 3rd Btn. (d.8th Aug 1918)
    • Unknown . 16th Btn.
    • Varney Alfred John. Sgt. 29th Btn.
    • Vizard Thomas. Rflmn. 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. (d.1st July 1916)
    • Walpole James. Pte. 20th Battalion (d.19th April 1917)
    • Walters Ernest Charles. Rflmn. 8th Btn. (Post Office Rifles) (d.15th September 1916)
    • Ward Charles Heber. Pte. 14th (London Scottish) Btn. (d.16th Aug 1917)
    • Warlow William. 12th Btn. (The Rangers)
    • Warman John. Pte. (d.21st May 1917)
    • Warner John Verney. Pte. 13th (Kensington) Btn. (d.11th Mar 1915)
    • Warren Percival Discombe. Cpl. 1/7th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Watts G. H. W.. Rfm. 1/17th Btn. (d.7th Jul 1917)
    • Weare Frank Morton. Pte. 1/24th Btn. (d.7th Jun 1917)
    • Weatherhead Henry Kenneth. Rflmn. 16th Btn. C Company. (d.10th Sept 1916)
    • Weatherston George Lumsden. Pte. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Battalion (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Webb Charles William. Rflmn. 2nd/8th (Post Office Rifles) Btn. (d.7th Oct 1916)
    • Webb Cyril. Pte. 2nd/2nd Bn (d.5 November 1917)
    • Webb John. Pte. 2/16th (Westminster Rifles) Btn.
    • Webb Leonard James. Pte. 23rd Btn. C Coy (d.16th Sep 1916)
    • Webb Musgrave Maitland. Lt. 16th (Queens Westminster Rifles) Battalion (d.18th Sep 1916)
    • Webster William. Pte. 1st Battalion (d.31st July 1917)
    • Wells Edwin. Pte. 22nd Btn. (d.10th Jan 1916)
    • Wells Frederick George. Pte. 1/15th Btn.
    • Whelan Frank Edward. Pte. 1st Btn
    • Whelan Frank Edward. Pte. 1/20th Btn.
    • White Charles Cecil. L/Cpl. 12th Btn. (d.8th May 1915)
    • Whittington Henry Charles. Sgt. 15th (Civil Service Rifles) Btn.
    • Wightwick Oswald. Pte. 18th (London Irish Rifles) Btn. (d.9th Oct 1915)
    • Wilde George Richard. Rflmn. 9th (Queen Victoria Rifles) Battalion (d.29th Nov 1917)
    • Wiles Frederick Walter. Sgt. 14th (London Scottish) Btn. (d.21st Aug 1918)
    • Willis Alfred Frederick. 2/18th (Irish Rifles) Btn.
    • Willis Reginald Grant. Pte. 1/6th (City of London Rifles) Battalion
    • Wilson Gavin Arthur. L/Cpl. 1st/14th Btn. (d.31st Aug 1918)
    • Winckles Alfred Charles. Pte. 22nd(The Queens) Btn. (d.12th Jul 1916)
    • Withers Robert John. Pte. 1/8th Btn.
    • Wogan Charles Henry. Sgt. (d.3rd Dec 1918)
    • Wood Granville Barton. Pte. 17th (Poplar & Stepney Rifles) Btn. (d.8th Nov 1916)
    • Wood R.. Pte. 1/20th Btn. (d.10th Jul 1917)
    • Woodbridge William Ernest. Pte. 23rd Btn.
    • Woods Horace. Sjt. 24th Btn.
    • Wootton Donald Herbert. Cptn. 20th Btn. (d.25th August 1918)
    • Woplin Frederick Harvey. Sgt. 12th Bn (The Rangers) (d.12th April 1915)
    • Worz Alfred Jacob. Rfm. 1/8th Battalion (Post Office Rifles) (d.1st Nov 1915)
    • Wright Howard Caldwell. Capt. 17th (Stepney & Poplar) Battalion (d.2nd Sep 1917)
    • Yardley Robert John Henry. Rfm. 1/8th Btn.
    • Yarwood Alfred. Pte. 2nd/22nd Btn. (d.31st Oct 1916)
    • Yarwood Alfred. Pte. 22nd Btn. (d.31st Oct 1916)
    • Yeats Percy H.. Pte. 1/15th Btn.
    • Yetton William Valentine. Rflmn. 1/9th Battalion (d.28th March 1918)
    • Young William Ewart. Pte. 2/5th Btn. (d.16th Aug 1917)
    • Zimmer James William. Pte. 1/7th Btn.

    All names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List



    The 1st of September 2017 is The Wartime Memories Project's 18th Birthday. If you would like to send us a present, a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web.



    Looking for help with Family History Research?   

    Please see Family History FAQ's

    We are unable to provide individual research free of charge, but do offer a paid service at competitive rates, the small profit from these services will be put towards the costs of keeping this website running. For more information please see our Research Services Leaflet

    Can you help?

    The Wartime Memories Project is run by volunteers and this website is funded by donations from our visitors.

    If the information here has been helpful or you have enjoyed reaching the stories please conside making a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web. In these difficult times current donations are falling far short of this target.

    If you enjoy this site please consider making a donation.


    Announcements

    • The Wartime Memories Project is the original WW1 and WW2 commemoration website

      This website has been running for 18 years and receives in excess of a million hits per month. The website and our group will continue long after the 2014-18 events are over. We hope that people will continue to support us by submitting material and stories in addition to submitting to the new websites set up for the anniversary.

    • We are looking for volunteers to help with researching the activities of units of the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers, Territorial Force, Regular Army, Pals Battalions, Kitchener's New Armies, Voluntary Organisations and the Ships of the Royal Navy. We currently have a huge backlog of stories and historical documents which need to be edited or transcribed for display online, if you have a good standard of written English, an interest in the two World Wars and a little time to spare online we would appreciate your help. For more information please see our page on Volunteering.

    Wanted: Digital copies of Group photographs, Scrapbooks, Autograph books, photo albums, newspaper clippings, letters, postcards and ephemera relating to the Great War. If you have any unwanted photographs, documents or items from the First or Second World War, please do not destroy them. The Wartime Memories Project will give them a good home and ensure that they are used for educational purposes. Please get in touch for the postal address, do not sent them to our PO Box as packages are not accepted.





    We are now on Facebook. Like this page to receive our updates, add a comment or ask a question.

    If you have a general question please post it on our Facebook page.


    Sep 2017

        Please note we currently have a backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 235634 your submission is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

    World War 1 One ww1 wwII greatwar great
    Did you know? We also have a section on World War Two. and a Timecapsule to preserve stories from other conflicts for future generations.






    1206626

    Pte. Dennis Henry Berry 24th Btn. London Regiment

    My Uncle Harry Berry was a furrier at Debenham & Peabody's store in Wigmore Street London when he enlisted in the 24th London Territorial Army on the 10th of June 1914. He embarked for France on the 15th of March 1915 and fought at Battle of Festubert. His regiment fought with great distinction standing firm when the regular army retreated and winning the day. On the 25th of March 1915 he was wounded in his left arm and left leg. He was hospitalized at Rouen nd afterwards given home leave. He returned to active service on the 9th of October 1915 and fought at the Battle of Loos and the second Battle of the Somme. He was blown up and gassed but he survived the war and was Honorably discharged on the 3rd of January 1919.

    They Were All Heroes and deserve to be remembered.

    Eric Foster




    1206624

    Cpl. Percival Discombe Warren MM. 1/7th Btn. London Regiment (d.7th Jun 1917)

    Sadly Percival Discombe Warren was killed in action on the 7th June 1917 at age 23. After his death, my gran inherited a framed certificate and a military medal which was awarded to Percival for bravery and gallantry on the field. My gran recently passed it on to me and she didn't know a great lot about Percival as she would have been too young to remember much about him. I told my gran I would try to find out as much as I possibly could. Just a couple of days ago I knew nothing about him and today I know what unit he was with and where he was sent. It's been a great experience to learn about all the challenges and the bravery of all who were involved during the First World War. Percival's body was never found. His name is written on a plaque at Ypres memorial

    Ash Woodstock




    1206566

    Rfmn. Edwin John Horrill 16th (Queens Westminster Rifles) Battalion London Regiment (d.19th Sep 1916)

    Edwin John Horrill was my mother's half brother. His mother was Annie Snell. When my grandparents died we found the items relating to Edwin which I have photographed. He was born on 13th October 1896 in Menheniot, Cornwall, England and died on the 19th of September 1916 in France. He is buried in Combles Communal Cemetery and Extension, Guards´ Cemetery, in Combles.

    Marilyn Garrity




    1206522

    2nd Lt. Thomas Edward Smith 8th Btn. (Post Office Rifles) London Regiment (d.5th September 1918)

    Thomas Edward Smith was killed in action on 5th September 1918, aged 21 and is buried in the Peronne Communal Cemetery Extension in France. He was the son of William Henry and Judith Ellen Smith, of 290, Lizzie St., Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    From the Winnipeg Tribune:

    On First Anniversary Brings Details of Son’s Death a Letter from Batman Tells How Winnipeg Officer Met Hero’s End

    While giving one of his boy’s who was badly wounded a drink Lieut. T. E. Smith, son of William Smith 290 Montifiore Str., was killed by a German sniper, at Peronne Sept 5, 1918 - two months before the armistice ended the war. A week ago on the first anniversary of his son’s death. Mr. Smith received a letter from Lieut. F. C. Gozette giving details in connection with his death. Lieut. Gozette was with Lieut. Smith when the latter was shot.

    Lieut. Smith had visited shell hole after shell hole to see that his boy’s were comfortable. While uncorking his bottle to give a wounded man a drink, he was shot through the neck by a sniper.

    "I suppose you had official notice as to how you son died, but I think it would lessen your grief to learn the death of a man, a hero, such as if had he been giving the choice, possibly he would have wished. I was your son’s batman from the time he joined the Imperial unit until his death. He was absolutely loved by his platoon and he was like an older brother to me than a officer. It was during the Somme advance that he was hit. We attacked the last day of August Canal du Nord in front of Moislain near Peronne, and Mr. Smith was in command of our company, all of our other officers having been killed or wounded the day before. While lying in the shell hole after our objective he decided to go around our position to see if all 'his boys' were comfortable. Making our way from shell hole to shell hole cheering the lads as we went, he came across one of his platoon badly wounded. It was while giving the poor lad a drink that a German sniper shot him through the neck. His death was mercifully instantaneous. Two or three of us got the sniper, but unfortunately that did not give us back our officer and pal. His death caused a lot of casualties to the Germans as it made the platoon mad for revenge. I hope you got his bible as he asked me to send it to you if anything happened to him. With the deepest sympathy in your loss of your son by one who regarded as a dear pal." I am sincerely, Lieut. F. C. Gozzet.

    s flynn




    1206511

    Pte. William Webster 1st Battalion London Regiment (d.31st July 1917)

    Private William Webster

    My uncle, Billy Webster, was killed on the first day of the Battle of Passchaendale, we know very little about him other that his name is on the Menin Gate as he has no known grave. He did once joke with his sisters (prior to him enlisting, possibly even before 1914) that after he was dead his name would be inscribed in "letters of gold". Sadly, I'm sure none of them realised how true that would become.

    Hetty Garlick




    1206466

    Sgt. Frank Thomas Libby MM. 5th Btn. London Regiment (d.19th April 1918)

    Frank Libby was posted to 1st/28th Bn. Artists' Rifles, he died of wounds on the 19th of April 1918, received at Mailly-Maillet on 2nd of April. He is buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery in France. The Military Medal was awarded for conspicuous Bravery at Passchendaele, on the 20th of September 1917. He was the son of John and Emily Harriet Libby, of Croydon, Surrey.

    s flynn




    1206451

    L/Cpl. John Bennett Holm 7th Btn. London Regiment (d.2nd Dec 1917)

    John's parents William and Mary Cameron Holm, from Fife, migrated to Ilford where John Bennett Holm was born. He married Theodosia Eliza Radley and had two daughters, Winifred and Doris May.

    John was killed at the 2nd Battle of Cambrai on the 2nd of December 1917, he is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial at Louverval, France. One of the thousands with no known grave.





    1206446

    Rflmn Leslie George Field 9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. London Regiment (d.8th Sep 1918)

    Leslie Field was killed in action on the 8th of September 1918 and is buried in Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

    s flynn




    1206438

    Rflmn. Robert Taylor 1st/9th (Queen Victoria's Rifles) Btn. London Regiment (d.30th Nov 1917)

    Robert Taylor was killed in action on the 30th of November 1917 and is commemorated on The Cambrai Memorial in France.

    s flynn




    1206437

    Rflmn. Horace Arthur Burford 1st/16th (Queen's Westminster Rifles) Btn. London Regiment (d.30th Nov 1917)

    Horace Burford was killed in action on the 30th of November 1917 and is commemorated on The Cambrai Memorial in France.

    s flynn




    1206364

    2nd Lt. William George Beaumot-Edmonds 1/22nd (County of London) Btn. London Regiment (d.17th Sep 1916)

    The Sphere 18th Nov

    William Beaumont-Edmonds was born at Stockwell, June 2, 1883. He was educated at Merchant Taylors School from 1896-1900 and Gray's Inn, Inns of Court and was admitted to the Bar in 1909. Edmonds served in the 16th London Regiment (Westminster Rifles) as a Lance Corporal for seven years prior to the Great War. He was promoted to 2nd Lt and joined 1/22nd London Regiment in 1915 and served 10 months in France prior to his death.

    2nd Lt. Beaumont-Edmonds was killed in action on the 17th of September 1916 in a trench about 1/4 mile northeast of High Wood by an artillery shell. His identity disc was recovered and he was buried close to the trench. However, due to the fortunes of war his grave location was lost and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing.

    Ralph Bennett




    1206334

    Capt. Ernest Dyce Messervy 56 Sqd. (d.20th Jul 1917)

    Ernest Messervy of the London Regiment and R.F.C. is one of 30 soldiers commemorated on a Memorial Plaque in the Moray Golf Club, Lossiemouth, Morayshire - To the honoured memory of the members of the Moray Golf Club who gave their lives in the Great War 1914 - 1919.

    Captain Ernest Dyce Messervy served with the 21st Battalion (First Surrey Rifles), the London Regiment and the 56th Squadron, Royal Flying Corps during WW1 and died on the 20th July 1917. He is commemorated at the above Golf Club and at the Arras Flying Services Memorial.

    On the 4th April 1918, Flight & The Aircraft Engineer published the following obituary: Captain Ernest Dyce Messervy, London Regt, attached RFC, who was missing on July 20th 1917, and is now believed to have been killed that day, was the youngest son of the late Ernest and Margaret Dyce Messervy, Telawakelle, Ceylon, and nephew of Mrs Thorne, Highfield Park, Heckfield. His age was 23. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds the additional information that he was serving with 56th Squadron at the time of his death. He is commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial.

    A 28-year-old Major Gerald Messervy MC of the RFA also died during the First World War (8th October 1918). The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds that he was the "Son of Ernest Francis and Margaret Dyce Messervy" and this being the case it looks likely that he was Captain Ernest Dyce's older brother.

    John Ellwood




    1206282

    Sgt. Frederick Harvey Woplin 12th Bn (The Rangers) London Regt (d.12th April 1915)

    A young Frederick Woplin

    Frederick Woplin was born in 1877 and joined up early in 1914. He must have had some earlier military training because he appears to have been inducted as a sergeant and there is a photo of him as a young man in an unidentified uniform. He and one of his 5 brothers each married sisters. Frederick and his wife had one child by the time Frederick arrived in France just one day before Christmas 1914.

    By April of 1915 The Rangers (12th Bn London Regt) were attached to the Canadian Division defending the area around St Julien close to Ypres. It was here that he was killed, probably by shell-fire as his body was not found. He is commemorated on the Menin gate.

    Peter Barsby




    1206232

    L/Cpl John Douglas Skeoch Cumming 2/14th (2nd London Scottish) Battalion London Regiment

    JDSCumming

    John Douglas Skeoch Cumming served in the Territorial Army with the 2nd Battalion London Scottish. A notation on the back of a photo postcard says "Dumped on the Right bank of the Jordan April 30/18 about sunset", as well as a list of places visited, transited or saw action: France, Salonika, Palestine. Port Said, Ismailia, Marsailles, Cairo, Alexandria. There is one other place Mount Olympus (this is a guess)

    The photograph of C Coy, 10 Platoon, 2/14 London Regiment, 2nd Battalion London Scottish was taken in June 1916, at Sandhill Camp, Wiltshire.

    Cumming2ndfromright

    Sandhill Camp Wiltshire

    TravelnotesJDSCumming

    Susan J Cumming




    1206161

    Pte. Francis Albert Thomas 15th Btn. (Civil Service Rifles) London Regiment

    My Grandfather, Francis Thomas enlisted on 29 November 1915 at Somerset House. He was wounded by shrapnel I believe, although I do not know at which battle as I have only just started researching, and had probably revolutionary surgery for the time. A Canadian surgeon saved the use of his hand by swapping tendons to enable him to close his fist. He rarely talked about his service, but did suffer from nightmares. My father recalls, I suspect a fairly standard tale, of him jumping into a hole during a night bombardment and waking up next to a dead German soldier. I have seen at least one photo of him in uniform which I hope to post in due course.

    Lynn Frost




    1206153

    Pte. Edwin Wells 22nd Btn. London Regiment (d.10th Jan 1916)

    Edwin Wells served with the A Company, 22nd Battalion, London Regiment during WW1 and died on the 10th January 1916, aged 24. He is buried in the Maroc British Cemetery, Grenay, near Bethune in France. He was the husband of Annie E. Wells, of 27, Perseverance St., Bermondsey, London.

    Ann West




    1206063

    L/Cpl. Charles Frederick Edgeworth 2/4th Btn. London Regiment (d.26th Oct 1917)

    Charles Edgeworth enlisted with the 23rd Btn London Regiment, he was killed on the 26th of October 1917 whilst serving with the 2/4th Londons.

    Alan Edgeworth




    1206059

    Pte. Harold Bish 1/19th Btn. London Regiment (d.22nd Aug 1917)

    Harold Bish is my great uncle, son of Sophia Bish nee Taylor, first wife of my Great Grandad. Sophia moved from Nottingham (after separating from grt grandad) to Shepherds Bush before the war, where Harold worked as an accountants clerk.

    He joined the Middlesex Regiment later served with the 1/19th Battalion London Regiment. Unfortunately he never returned from war and Sophia suffered the death of a second son. I would love to trace his medals - Victory and British.

    Jayne Wilkinson




    1206049

    Pte. George Henry Chapman 19th Btn. London Regiment (d.5th Dec 1917)

    George Henry Chapman died of wounds on the 5th of December 1917, aged 29 and is buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery in France. He was the son of Mr and Mrs S Chapman, of Carlisle, husband of Ethel Jane Chapman, of 87, Suffolk St., Poplar, London.

    s flynn




    1206036

    Unknown 16th Btn. London Regiment

    This picture was found behind a painting when taking it to be reframed. The badge looks like the queens westminsters and the painting is of a scene near conwy north wales. The home of the soldier may be similar but is unknown.

    Anthony Nixon




    Want to know more about London Regiment?


    There are:49150 pages and articles tagged London Regiment available in our Library
      These include information on officers, regimental histories, letters, diaries, personal accounts and information about actions during the Great War.




    Recomended Reading.

    Available at discounted prices.



    History of the Shiny Seventh

    C Digby Planck


    Written in the 1920's and recently reprinted. This history tells the story from those early beginnings to the end of WWII including the period between wars when, in 1936, the the regiment's role changed from infantry to searchlight and the title to 32nd (7th City of London) AA Battalion, RE.,TA. Most of the book, some 200 pages, is concerned with the Great War and the record of the two active battalions, 1/7th and 2/7th. The narrative includes extracts from letters, diaries and articles written by officers and men, casualty details are given as they occur and gallantry awards and other incidents. The inter-war years and WWII are only briefly covered and the Roll of Honour for The Great War has one list, officers and men of both battalions, in alphabetical order but without identifying the battalion; Honours and Awards are shown under 1/7th and the combined 2/7th and 7th.
    More information on:

    History of the Shiny Seventh


    History of the London Rifle Brigade 1859-1919


    A Detailed & readable history with num. anecdotes . Appendices inc. officers’ services, awards. The first 60 or so pages deal with the pre-war history,. The rest of book is devoted to the Great War in which three battalions served, the 1st and 2nd Battalions on the Western Front, the 3rd was a training battalion. Each battalion is covered separately concluding, in the case of the active service battalions, with a detailed itinerary. This is a very good history with many informative appendices including casualty lists by battalions, nominal roll of all officers who served between 1859 and 1919 with service, and in a number of cases biographical details, honours and awards including mentions
    Artists Rifles: Regimental Roll of Honour and War Record 1914-1919

    S.Stagoll Higham


    This remarkable book contains a complete record of all whose names have been inscribed in the regiment’s Muster Roll since August 1914, showing commissions obtained, when and in which corps/regiments; honours and decorations awarded with citations where published; and a list of all casualties. There is a total of 15,022 names, that is everyone who at one time or another served in the Regiment in any capacity. 10,256 received commissions, eight VCs were awarded, and the casualties suffered throughout the war numbered 6,071 of whom 2,003 were killed. There are summary tables of awards and of casualties
    History and Records of Queen Victoria's Rifles 1792-1922

    C.A.Cuthbert Keeson


    This is a good history with plenty of detail and with many names, covering the period from the earliest days up to the Great War in an appendix (185 pages) at the end of the book. It covers each battalion in turn - 1/9th, 2/9th, the amalgamated 9th and finally 3/9th. There is the Roll of Honour and a list of Honours and Awards, including Mentions in Despatches.
    Cast-iron Sixth: A History of the Sixth Battalion, London Regiment (City of London Rifles)

    E.G. Godfrey


    This history begins with the names of divisional and brigade commanders under whom the battalion served, followed by the Honours list where all recipients are named, except for Mention in Despatches where totals are given. The early history of the battalion is briefly narrated before the Great War, which takes up the bulk of the book. In addition to details of actions fought, in each chapter attention is given to some particular aspect of military training or operations, such as communications between front and rear, transport difficulties, individual exploits and so on, while to facilitate reading, at the head of each page appears the number of the battalion being discussed. The book ends with the Roll of Honour (1050 dead) and an index.
    Beneath Hill 60 [DVD]


    BENEATH HILL 60 tells the extraordinary true story of Oliver Woodward, the legendary Australian metal scientist. In 1916, Woodward faced the most difficult decision, ultimately having to separate from his new young love for the deadly carnage of the Western Front. On treacherous territory, behind the German enemy lines, Woodward and his secret platoon of Australian tunnelers face a suicidal battle to defend a leaking, tunnel system. A tunnel packed with enough high explosives to change the course of the War.
    More information on:

    Beneath Hill 60 [DVD]


    Hill 60: Ypres (Battleground Europe)

    Nigel Cave


    The shell-ravaged landscape of Hill 60, some three miles south east of Ypres, conceals a labyrinth of tu nnels and underground workings. This book offers a guide to the memorials, cemeteries and museums at the site '
    Beneath Hill 60 [Paperback]

    Will Davies


    'Ten seconds, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one - fire! Down goes the firing switch. At first, nothing. Then from deep down there comes a low rumble, and it as if the world is spliting apart...' On 7th June 1917, nineteen massive mines exploded beneath Messines Ridge near Ypres. The largest man-made explosion in history up until that point shattered the landscape and smashed open the German lines. Ten thousand German soldiers died. Two of the mines - at Hill 60 and the Caterpillar - were fired by men of the 1st Australian Tunnelling Company, comprising miners and engineers rather than parade-ground soldiers. Drawing on the diaries of one of the key combatants, "Benealth Hill 60" tells the little-known, devastatingly brutal true story of this subterranean war waged beneath the Western Front - a stygian battle-ground where men drowned in viscous chalk, suffocated in the blue gray clay, choked on poisonous air or died in the darkness, caught up up in vicious hand-to-han
    More information on:

    Beneath Hill 60 [Paperback]


    Tim's Wars

    Robin Gregory


    This book highlights a remarkable legacy and is surely unique in chronicling a continuous record spanning not just the whole of the Great War but also the inter-war years. The editor / author has done a fantastic job bringing to life the terse entries Tim scribbled in the trenches while the mortars fell around him and placing them into context with the bigger picture. This little book is a compelling Pandora's box showing at once the growth of an impetuous youth into a mature family man, of a society from imperial to modern and of the reality of life in both war and peace 100 years ago. The diary entries themselves start off being somewhat terse and I was grateful for Robin Gregory's witty and very personal narrative to knit it all together. Later on, starting around 1917, the diary entries are much longer (apparently Tim had a bigger notebook!) wise, and absolutely fascinating. Here is a man fresh from the trenches predicting that the treaty of Versailles will cause World War II.
    More information on:

    Tim's Wars






    Links


    Suggest a link

















    The Wartime Memories Project is a non profit organisation run by volunteers.

    This website is paid for out of our own pockets, library subscriptions and from donations made by visitors. The popularity of the site means that it is far exceeding available resources.

    If you are enjoying the site, please consider making a donation, however small to help with the costs of keeping the site running.


    Hosted by:

    The Wartime Memories Project Website

    is archived for preservation by the British Library





    Website © Copyright MCMXCIX - MMXVII
    - All Rights Reserved